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Full text of "The Duluth Herald"

mi 



THE DULUTH 



VOLUME XXX— NO. 131. 



MONDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 9, 1912. 



SmiAnON ON THE 
MEXICAN BORDER IS 
GEHING MORE TENSE 



Caogress May Be Reconvened 

(0 Authorize American 

Intervention. 

Gea Salazar Believed to Plan 

New Raids Over 

Border. 



Arms Meant for Americans 

Are Held Lest Rebels 

Get Them. 



W«»hln|fton, Sept. 9. — The tensity of 
tho •ituatioii along; the Mexican border 
wa« rellected hert> today hy the con- 
tinuation o( preparations for any 
emergency; prlnctpally the posaibUlty 
of President Taft*» callini? a special 
sesslc'ij of congress to pass upon the 
Question of intervention. 

With the border patrols. streiiKth- 
ened l-y additicnal cavalry and other 
troops, "f ;y upon their arms at 

posta thi -t the West, ready to 

move at uu iifur's notice to supple- 
ment the forces in Arizona and on 
th» " M :. :in frontier, war de- 

pa; In felt they had the 

nit wtji i:< r '. for the present 

but ai'pr. ■■ <»f the next 

mi ' of tht- i^r-.'^-l ^vnertxl. Sahi- 

za: 'B encamped within ."^Ight of 

Iht • ' '^' itea troops. protestlnR 

hr m, but is believed to 

l»© i„. ...uiher raid into Ameri- 

can tt; : 




Kep< 
•rn Ml .- 
interest. 



BCO'Ut!= 

whll*^ 
at ' 

cr> 



\> i.ovn Pntriil Itnrder. 

.t in South- 
riand much 
..,v». ^c. it was pointed out that the 
situation in which the United States 
la concerned ' alonp the border. 

Armed cowl tlnjf as volunteer 

ug the boundary, 

. s are concentrated 

.vhtre Mexican rebels miirht 

;eal cattle or pillage ranches. 

j.i ......cipaiion of a raid by Salazar, 

Mil J. liite with three troops of cavalry 
Is encamped near the rebel leader. Out- 
posts have been established by both 
tilde» Maj. Riee is concentratins his 
command. 

DAHlit SmlmiMr'm Promise. 
Gen. Steever reported that Lieuten- 
antf' T,,i n.son. Boone and Warner, in 
chj. (»atroliinK parties, had talked 

■wit:- ; -. i/ar near Langs ranch and 
that Salazar protested he meant no 
harm to Americans and was not with 
his men on the raid on Culberson's 
ranch. Gen. Steever s dispatch added 

tContinued on page 4, third columii. 

S-YEARlSirRL 
MURDER VICTIM 

Gary, Ind., Child Attacked 

and Killed — Missing 

Since Aug. 10. 

Gary. Ind., Sept. 9. — Another mur- 
der mystery was revealed today by the 
discovery of the body of B-year-old 
Mary Gruba In a swamp on the out- 
skirts of this city. 

Mo»t of the clothing had been torn 
from the body. The police b«!lieve the 
g^irl wan attacked and then mur- 
dered. 

Iv apparently had been in the 

.ee Aug. 10. when the child 

• d from her parents' home. 

■lie it was believed the girl 

kidnaped. 

•■ of the Gruba girl recalls 
of Elsie Schroeder, 7 years 
old, who waw attacked and murdered 
In New York in 1907. William Dagle 
Is now serving a term in state prison 
for the crime. 



T 

BW: 

di.- 
At 

ha<! 

']■ 

the 



DEADLY HORSE 
DISEASE SPREADS 

Northern Nebraska Invaded 

and Farms Are Being 

Stripped of Animals. 

Norfolk. Neb., Sept. 9. — Cerebro-spln- 
al meningitis, which is alleged to have 
been killing horsrea in Southern Ne- 
braska and Kansas for some time, has 
appeared in the northern part of the 
■tate, several deaths having occurred. 



Uturiiatljie at Fort Riley. 

Junction City, Kan., Sept. £>. — A quar- 
antine intended to prevent the horse 
plau'iu rit.w prevalent in Kansas from 
tak. il of the horses at Fort Riley. 

ha.s ' ordered by Col. Charles Hat- 

field commandant of the fort. No horses 
of civilians will be allowed on the fort 
grt unds and no army horses will ba 
taken ujlside except on special order. 



JOHN WALKER POWELL, D. D., 

WTio Has Decided to Resign as Pastor 
of Endion M. E. Church, Duluth, to 
Take up Work Among the Students 
of the University of Minnesota at 
Minneapolis. 



KNOX HRST 
TOJRRIVE 

Special Envoy to Funeral of 

Emperor Mutsuhito Is 

at Tokio. 

Prince Henry of Prussia Will 

Be Second to Reach 

Capital. 



Tokio, Sept. 9. — The American secre- 
tary of state, Philander C. Knox, the 
first special envoy to the funeral of 
the late Emperor Mutsuhito to reach 
Japan, arrived at Tokio this evening. 
Mr. Knox was accompanied by Mrs. 
Knox and a suite, including Ransford 
Miller, chief of the Far Eastern divi- 
sion of the state department. At the 
station at Tokio Mr. Knox was met by 
F'rince Tokugawa. representing Emper- 
or Yoshihto; Foreign Minister Viscount 
Uchida. formerly ambassador to the 
United States; Seigo Nagasaki, master 
of ceremonies of the Imperial house- 
hold, and the entire staff of the Amer- 
ican embassy. 

Prince Henry of Prussia, the repre- 
sentative of Emperor William, will ar- 
rive here tomorrow. 

Garter for Eaiperor. 

Prince Arthur of Connaught, the eld- 
est son of the governor-general of Can- 



WANT TO HEAR 
WILSON TALK 

III III ■■ 

People of Middle West May 

Compel Second Trip 

By Governor. 

New Jersey Executive De- 
clares War on Smith as 
Senatorial Candidate. 



New York, Sept. 9. — Oovemor "Wood- 
row Wilson spent this forenoon at 
Democratic national headquarters. 

Representative Burleson of Texas, 

chairman of the speakers' bureau, and 

Senator Gore of Oklahoma, chairman 

of committee on organization, arrived 

from Maine, where they have been 
stumping, and discussed with the gov- 
ernor further plans for speaking. 

From the number of requests which 
have been coming from the Middle 
West asking the presidential candi- 
date's presence at various meetings. It 
is apparent that Governor Wilson 
probably will do much more speaking 
than he" originally intended. 

After the first Western trip, which 
will begin Sept. 16 and end Sept. 21, 
the governor will have two days' rest at 
his home in Sea Girt, N. J., but present 
plans are that he will start out" al- 
most Immediately for another Western 
Invasion. 

iteeond Weatern Trip. 

It Is likely that on his second West- 
ern trip he will go to Missouri, Ne- 
braska and Illinois. The governor 
probably will meet William J. Bryan 
the latter part of the month in Ne- 

The governor planned today to open 
(Continued on page 4, second column.) 



COMES MCK 
WITH WEALTH 

Michigan Man, Who Deserted 

Family Ten Tears Ago, 

Has $100,000. 

Barney ttcEnanj Returns to 

Uurontoiu- and Makes 

Up. 



Houghton, Bfflch., Sept. 9. — After an 
absence of ten years, during which 
time his wife and lamily of seven or 
eight children were left to their own 
resources, Barney U' iinany has just re- 
turned to his old home in Hurontown, 
near here, bringing with him a fortune 
estimated at |100,000. In consequence 
the family is holding a Joyous reunion 
and all is forgiven. McEnany is doing 
everything possible to make up for 
the years of privation his family has 
suffered. He became prosperous 

through a mining venture In Canada. 

Sixteen years ago McEnany brought 
his wife and several children to Hu- 
rontown. He failed to prosper and be- 
came shiftless. Hia family increased 
as the years went by, and finally he 
left for parts unkt.own. During all of 
his absence his family got no trace of 
him. 

A short time ago a friend of the 
family, who happened to be In Canada, 
ran across McEnany and immediately 
informed his wife of the man's ad- 
dress. Communicattone followed and 
McEnany showed every desire to 
make retribution, which he was well 
able to do. He sent for his two oldest 
daughters, who were employed in a 
Houghton laundry, paid all their ex- 

fienses to Canada, and entertained them 
avishly. returning with them to 
Hurontown. 



SUBSCRffTIONS TO WILSON 
FUND AGGREGATE $175,000 



(Continued on page 4, third column. 

TRAIN RUNS OYER 
DYNAMITE "PLANF 



Treasurer Wells Says Amount 

Thus Far Is Totally 

Inadequate. 



New York, Sept. i" -Twelve thou- 
sand persons have ,c^tilbuted thus 
far to the Wilson and Marshall cam- 
paign fund, which at present totals 
1175,000. 

This was stated at Demi)cratlc na- 
tional headquarters, which at the same 
time made public a list of contribu- 
tors, containing, it was paid, the 
names of all who had contributed the 
sum of flOO or more. 

W. G. McAdoo, acting chairman of 
the Democratic national committee, 
declared that a new political standard 
has been set by this action. 

Rolla Wells, treasurer of the com- 
mittee, declared that while the sum 
received was encouraging, It was "to- 
tally Inadequate to conduct the cam- 
paign properly," but he believed that 
contributions would continue. 
Two of f 1 0,000 Eaek. 

The largest contributions thus far 
have been made by Henry Morgen- 
thau, chairman of the national ex- 
ecutive committee, a wealthy citizen 
of Germantown, Pa., and Henry Gold- 




STREET RAHWAYIAEN STRIKE ON 



HOUR'S NOTICE DR RECOGNITION 
OF UNION AND^ SHORTER HOURS 



IDEAL DAY 
DOIAINE 

Voters Are Favored By 

Weather for the State 

Election. 



Four Candidates for Govern- 
or Are to Be Passed 
Upon. 



Portland, Me., Sept. 9. — With several 
well-defined state issues to be decided 
and a few questions of national im- 
portance to be passed upon, the voters 
uf Maine went to the polls today to 
elect a governor, four congressmen, 
county officers and a state legislature. 
The legislature selected today will 
choose a United States senator next 
winter. 

The polls will close in moet places at 
5 p. m. It is many years since Maine 
voters have had such ideal weather on 
election day. The country roads are 
In good condition, after recent rains, 
for travel to the voting places. 

The candidates for governor are: 
Governor Frederick W. Plalsted. Dem- 
ocrat; William T. Haines. Republican; 
William T. Sterling, Prohibition; 
George Allen England, Socialist. 



FATHER OF INJURED 
GIRL IS ARRESTED 

Held for Lynching of Negro 

Who Attacked His 

Daughter. 



Bluefield, 



ADMIRAL BADGER 
WILL HEAD FLEET 

Is to Succeed Osterhaus in 

Atlantic Service on 

First of Year. 

"Washington. Sept. 9. — When Rear 
Admiral Charles J. Badger takes com- 
mand of the Atlantic fleet next Janu- 
ary In succession to Rear Admiral 
Hugo Osterhaus, nine changes among 
the fleet captains will become effec- 
tive. 

Admiral Osterhaus, relinquishing the 
command of the fleet to become a mem- 
ber of the general board, has served 
about eighteen months as commander- 
in-chief and will have about six months 
more of active service in Washington 
aftttr his relief, before he retires next 
June. 

The dreadnaught Wyoming, a new 
ship, will fly Admiral Badger's flag 
in place of the Connecticut, which has 
been the flagship of several fleet com- 
manders. "The change In commands, 
which will take place after the sailors 
have had their holiday ashore, will 
precede the departure of the big ships 
for the Southern cruise and the be- 
ginning of the mld-wlnter drills in the 
Caribbean. (Continued on page 4, second column.) 

I REGISTER TOMORROW | 



^^^f^^^f^^^^^f^^^^^^^t^^^^^^^*^^^*^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 




„.„...v.^. W. Va.. Sept. 9.— Gordon „_-„__-,„ 
White, father of Nita Wliite, aged 14. l^'J^^.^l 
was arrested Saturday in connection 
with the lynching of "Walter Johnson, 
negro, last Thursday night at Prince- 
ton, "W. Va., and today was released on 
$10,000 bond. White was brought to 
Bluefield early today from Charles- 
ton, where he had been taken to pre- 
vent his rescue by friends. He is 
charged with first degree murder, it 
being alleged he fired several shots 
Into the negro. He was met by hun- 
dreds of sympathizers at the railroad 
station here. Johnson was identified 
as Nita White's assailant, and was 
lynched. 



ADMIRAL CHARLES J. BADGER, 

Former Superintendent of the Naval 
Academy, Who Is to Succeed Ad- 
miral Hugo Osterhaus Next January 

mmTof 
rates on wires 

New York Firm Takes West- 
ern Union Before Com- 
merce Commission. 

Washington, Sept. 9. — Reasonable- 
ness of telegraph and cable rates was 
attacked today by William N. White 
& Co.. New York, in a complaint 
against the Western Union Telegraph 
company to the interstate commerce 
commission. 

The complaining concern contends, 
rates are fixed arbitrarily; that the 
handling of the press dispatches ar 
one-fourth the rate charged coHfimer- 
clal business subjects the general pub- 
lic to "undue prejudice and disadvan- 
tages," and that the Western Union 



Strikers Claim Discharged 

Employes Were Their 

Union Leaders. 



of 



Tell Tale of Invasion 
Union Meeting By Com- 
pany Officials. 



Manager Asked to Attend 
4:30 A. M. Meeting and 

Promptly Refuses. 

. 1 

Between 60 and 130 men (the com- 
pany giving the former figure and 
the men the latter) employed as 
condictors and motormen of tlSe 
Duluth Street Railway company went 
out on strike this morning with only 
an hour's notice, and the result was 
that a good many school teachers and 
pupils were late for school, office em- 
ployes all over the city were late for 
work, and a few people missed trains.^ 

So far, that is the most serious re- 
sult of the strike and HerWeri Warren, 
general superintendent of the street 
railway company, says that that wilt 
be the most serious result. The ad- 
mitted cause of the strike is that nin» 
men, old employes of the company, were 
discharged on Sunday night. These, 
the strikers demand, must be rein- 
stated or a good cause given for let- 
ting them out. The strikers assert 
that the men were let out because they 
were leaders in the recent movement 
which resulted in the formation of a 
union; and for no other cause. This 
discharge of men not only precipitated 
a strike but also brings up the matter 
of having the street railway company- 
recognize the union, which the strikers 
claim will now be made a part of any 
settlement which may be arrived at or 
attempted. 

Supt. Warren says that he is ignorant 
ol the situation as he has just re- 
turned after a considerable absence, 
but he understands that the discharge 
of some men and the matter of rec- 
ognizing the union precipitated the af- 
. — ~- — . . 

(Continued on i>age 4, first column.) 



has bought up smaller companies and 
eliminated competition in violation of 
interstate commerce laws. 

The New York concern asks repara- 
tibn in the sum of |5,000, which It 
claims the telgraph company has col- 
lected in overcharges on cablegrams 
and telegrams. 



NOTED WASHINGTON WOMAN 
IS DEAD AT BAR HARBOR, ME. 



Fnrin Work Halted. 

T' n., Sept. D. — Farm work is 

goii • in Western Kansas for 

Jack tA luirtjes killed by the i)lagur>. 
Crops remain ungathered and fall 
plowing is weeks behind. On manv 
farms all the horses have died. Until 
expert*? >< • rtain positively a remedy 
for tht u!>u»e, the farmers are un- 
willing to parcbase more horses. 

The disease is rapidly spreading 
eastward, 'ig to leports received 

by J. H. S: state livestock sani- 

tary ( ommissioiier. Mr. Mercer has 
sent out warning that horses all over 
the state should be kept off pastures 
and given no water except from wells. 
The streams and ponds are said by ex- 
perts to swarm with diplocci, which 
cauB« meningitis. 

The Atchison. Topeka & Santa Fe 
railroad officials have sent two trained 
veterinarians to the plague-stricken 
district. 



Oregon & California Express 
Fails to Set Off Ex- 
plosive. 

Portland, Or.. Sept. 9. — The Oregon A 

California Express of the Southern 

Pacific railroad ran over a "plant" o£ 

twenty-seven sticks of dynamite near 
Gervais, forty miles south of here. Sun- 
day, but failed to explode any of the 
fulminating caps attached to the fusea 
A track walker, following the train, 
discovered the explosive. 

QUIZ GAYNOR 

ABOUT VICE 



New York Aldermen 
Pot the Mayor on the 
Grill. 

New York, Sept. 9. — According to 
plans announced today, unless changed. 
Mayor Gaynor will be the first witness 
this afternoon when the aldermanlc 
committee appointed to Investigate al- 
leged police graft holds Us flr»t ses- 
sion. It will be optional with his 
honor whether he is sworn or not. Ho 
has not been subpotnaed, simply invited 
to testify. 

The committee la determined, it is 
said, to get from the mayor his views 
in detail of the vice and gambling sit- 
uation, and his Ideas of the duties of 
the police department in suppressing 
the evils. 

The police trial of Cornelius G. 
Hayes, deposed Inspector, is to be re- 
sumed tomorrow and the trial of Lieut. 
Becker, charged with the murder of 
Gambler Rosenthal, is set to begin oa 
Thursday mornins. ' 




Mrs. John R. McLean Battles 

One Week With 

Pneumonia. 



Bar Harbor, Me.. Sept. 9.— Mrs. John 
R. McLean of Washington, D. C, died 
at her summer home today after being 
ill a week with pneumonia. 

Mrs. McLean survived eleven hours 
after the arrival of Dr. L. D. Barker 
of Johns Hopkins hospital, who was 
brought from the North Carolina 
mountains In a special train with rec- 
ord-breaking speed. 

Mrs. McLean's husband, publisher of 
the Washington Post and Cincinnati 
Enquirer, was at the bedside when the 
end came. Her son, Edward McLean, 
and his wife also were present, to- 
gether with her brother, Truxton 
Beale, and her sister, Mme. Bakhme- 
tleff, wife of the Russian ambassador 
to the United States. 

Mrs. McLean was very weak last 
evening and except for a slight rally 
about midnight she steadily lost 
strength. Shortly before sunrise she 
became unconscious and remained so 
until her death. 

It is planned to hold the funeral 
services here. The body then will be 
taken either to Cincinnati or to W ash- 
Ington lor burial. 



Widely Known Hostess. 

Washington, Sept. 9. — Mrs. John R. 
McLean was one of the capital'.s most 
widely known hostesses. Her enter- 
tainments for the last twenty-five 
years have been looked upon as mile- 
stones in a Washington social season, 
and attracted wide attention for their 
splendor. She was the daughter of the 
late Gen. and Mrs. Beale. Her only 
sister is Mme. Bakhmatieff. wife of the 
ambassador from Russia, and her only 
brother is Truxton Beale of this city. 

W ALSH GETS \VORK ON 

DEMOCRATIC COMMIHEE 



COMMIHEES OF 
BANKERS MEET 

Prepare for Sessions of Na 

tional Association at 

Detroit, Mich. 

Detroit, Mich., Sept. 9. — Members of 
committees of the American Bankers' 
association and the various national 
organizations affiliated with it, today, 
faced a large amount of routine busi- 
ness, which they hoped practically to 
dispose of by tonight. This, they ex- 
pected, would clear the decks for tha 
association's national convention* 
which starts tomorrow and which will 
probably end Friday. 

The National Association of Super- 
visors of State Banks expected to hold 
their first annual meeting this after- 
noon. 

Considerable Interest has been 
shown as to the probable fate of a. 
number of proposed constitutional 
amendments. One offered by Andrei 
J. Frame of Waukesha. Wis., has as 
its principal purpose a plan whereby 
more members will be able to hold 
important association offices. His 
amendment charges that under the 
present constitution "certain officials 
and committeemen have continued in 
various positions to the extent that 
ten men have held 150 of those honor* 
in the past ten years, and that most of 
the members cf the executive council 
have been absolutely excluded frona 
participating therein." , 

One section of the Frame amendment 
prohibits a delegate holding more tha 
one committee appointment at the sa 
time. 



Kansas City, Mo., Sept. 9. — Frank P. 
Walsh of Kansas City will take charge 
of the work of Establishing a social 
center department of the National 
Democratic committee. He has re- 
ceived notice of his appointment from 
W. C. McAdoo, vice chairman of the 
committee, and will leave for New 
York Thursday. Mr. Walsh is presi- 
dent of the board of civil service of 
Kansas City. 



Racine HeaTrrreight Dies. 

Racine. Wis.. Sept. 9. — Ernest Bartell, 
aged 48. the heaviest man in Racine, 
who weighed 360 pounds, was found 
dead In his bed Saturday. Death was 
due to natural causes. Bartell was a 

(prominent member of the Modern 
Woodmen of America and of the Order 
of Eagles. 



EXHUME BODY OF 
LAWYER'S CUEN 



New York Authorities Will 

Probe Death of Mrs. 

Szabo. 

New York. Sept. 9. — To determine. It 
possible, whether death was due to tiny 
agency other than drowning. District 
Attorney Rogers of Orange count.v, N. 
Y., will cause to be exhumed today the- 
body of Mrs. Rosa Szabo, an Austrian 
woman, who met death in Greenwood: 

lake while In a rowboat with Burtoa 
W. Gibson, a New York lawyer, now 
executor of her 110,000 estate. The pro- 
posed autopsy will embrace not only" 
an examination for wounds, but &■ 
chemical analysis of the contents of the- 
stomach. 

Gibson had the body buried under the; 
name of "Mrs. Rltter" In a cemetery 
near Jersey City, but he has expressed 
his entire willingness to have it ex- 
humed. 

••Mether** Claim False? 

According to the Austro-Hungarian 
consulate, detectives have found the- 
woman who posed as Mrs. Rose Men- 
schlk. mother of Mrs. Szabo, and. 
beneficiary under the will. The con- 
tention of the consulate is that th©^ 
victim's mother was dead at the time 
the will was drawn and that, there^ 
fore, the waiver of citation purported: 
to have been signed by Mrs. Menschik, 
is a forgery. 

This phase of the case will b» 
threshed out before the surrogate court 
on Sept. 17, when a brother of Mrs^ 
Szabo, now on his way from Austria^ 
will testify as to his mother's deatk. 



I 





mtitmimmimmiiiiiti 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 



IIIIIIH^^^^^^^^^^^ 







THE DULUTHiHERALP 



September 9, 1912. 



WEATHER' — Gen^^niUy fair weath- 
er tonight and Tuesday. 



ALWAYS RELIABLE 




Superior SL at Second Ave. West 



YOU'LL LIKE A 
SOFT HAT 
TO WEAR 

THROUGH THE 
FALL 



•My <*' this fall for 
."id colorings are 
...tractive and be- 



pa: 

€V 



w 

III '., t V, H ill > '- 

can pinch 

tilt them 
any angle 
fa 



ire showing many rough 

' ' .ts that are to be 

....red this season— you 

them, hollow them, 

tlicm, give them 

tiiat pleases your 

nl tliey are right. 

. -. . .'s a great variety of c*)l- 

oriii,- aiui many of the most 

faslii-niable one- are a mixture 

three colors, beauti- 

liiii) luiMnied. 

A !<'<>k through our line will 
convmce you that we look well 
to the quality - >f the hats we 
sen-->t' >ck in every one is fine 
and clear and rightly worked 
to make the perfect hat. 

S,. .lire are we of their good- 
ness that we guarantee every 
one of them to give absolute 
satisfaction and it's a rare thmg 
for an Oak Hall Hat to go 
wrong. 
$2. $2.50. $3.00, $3.50. $4, $5. 




(GLEANED 
LOJVGTHE 

«iia 



umuM 






FallStyles 

Every department ready 
with attractive 

Hats Caps 
Shirts Cravats 



A.B.Siewert&Co. 

304 West Superior St. 



"Some of you feUows get a few 
drinks under your belt and you think 
I you can do anything you pleane. 
Tta^ro'a too much of that tn this town 
and this court has no sympathy tov 
anybody brou8;ht in uuder Buch clrcum- 
iitances." 

So said Judge W. I* Wlndom this 
morning when John Morgan waa ar- 
raigned before him ihia morning on a 
charge of disorderly conduct. Morgan 
pleaded guilty and got $15 and costd 
or fifteen days in the county Jail. 

The police reported that Morgan 
walked up to a stranger on the street 
Saturday night and slapped him in the 
face. As far as could be learned the 
man had not as much as looked at 
Morgan. But a boozy inspiration seems 
to have induced Morgan to assault 
him. The man told tl»e police that he 
would appear in court this morning, 
but did not show up. 

Another man was in Saturday on ex- 
actly the same charge. The court de- 
clared liiat it was most reprehensible 
and that any one arrested under such 
circumstances would be substantially 
punished. The judge said that peo- 
ple are entitled to protection and that 
they will get It as far as the court is 
able to give it. 

e • • • 

Bennie Vail was arrested at 8 o'clock 
last night on a charge of keeping his 
saloon open on Sunday. Patrolman Nela 
Perry walked into the place when sev- 
eral persons with a big Sabbath thirst 
were admitted. Vail forfeited $100 ball 
when his case was called in police 
court this morning. The police reported 
that this was not his first offense and 
the court directed that he be brought 
In to make a plea. 

e • • • 

Although he has but one leg of his 
own. Erick Lundberg declares that his 
iTUtches will support him if he has 
had only one drink. Erick asserts that 
his wooden pegs are a most reliable 
proposition. 

Erick waa arrested yesterday on a 
charge of having become voluntarily 
intoxicated. WJien he was brought into 
court today he entered a plea of guilty 



and put up such a strong front that the 
court gave him a suspended .sentence. 

•I only hud one drink, judge, said 
Erick. 

"You were loaded to the eyebrows, 
said the policeman. "You were «o 
pickled that you had to bo lifted oft 
the pavement into the patrol wagon. 

••How about it. Erick?'" asked tho 
court. "Will one drink leave you in 
that condition? It certainly must have 
been some big drink." , , j „„„ 

••That .s right. Judge. I only had one 
drink. Some fellow came along and 
pu.siied me over. I hit my head on the 
pavement and was dazed when the po- 
liceman came to get me. All I dranK 
waM one scuttle of suds and that was 
mostly all white."" 

F^rlck was so sincere about It mat 
the court thought despite his many 
pa.st sins of the .same kind ho might 
be given an opportunity to go to 
work or get out of town. Every time 
Erick is jugged lie .says tho same 
thing, but he appears In the grist reg- 
ularly Just the same. 

• • • 

John Ryan tried to run away from 
a policeman last night and this morn- 
ing the Judge let him go. 

The cop was not so lenient, however. 
Patrolman Nell Mooney saw him as he 
was trying to tack down the street 
H© was one too many sails in the wind 
and the officer concluded that he ought 
to be guided to port. Whereupon he 
took the reeling sailor in tow. The 
only haven of which he knew was the 
police station. _ 

But when Ryan got his bearings suf- 
ficiently to realize what was happen- 
ing to him he objected. Without sound- 
ing any blasts he broke away. A stran- 
ger may have thought he was adrift 
but not the policeman. He had too 
much steam up. The race did not last 
long enough to make It interesting. 
Ryan hadn't gone 100 feet before he 
was back in the guiding" arms of the 
copper. 

The court concluded that he really 
did not want to go to Jail or pay any 
fine, having given evidence In the man- 
a word of advice the Judge told him 
a wor dof advice the Judge told him 

that he could go. 

• • • 

The police raided an alleged disor- 
derly house at Third alley and Mesaba 
avenue la.st night. John Wardin and 
Mike McKay were arrested on disor- 
derly charges. Nellie Peterson was 
charged with residing In a house of 
ill fame and Mllma De Flora was 
booked for selling liquor without a li- 
cense The men pleaded guilty but the 
women denied the allegation against 
them. Their cases were set for hear- 
ing this afternoon. 

• • • 

Emma SUr will not get drunk for 
a couple of months, at least. She 
pleaded guUty to third offense drunk- 
enness this morning and got a straight 
sentence of sixty days. Emma has 
been one of the regular callers in tho 
morning grist for several years. 



WEST DULUTH 

I J* 4I UKB-iLD BRANCH OPPICESi 

' A. J«ii»eB. 8»0 North STth Av«. W. J. J. Moran. 31CH North Central Av« 

CAND$MES 
Heii POW WOW 



West Duiuth Republicans 
Hear Speeches From Seek- 
ers for Office. 

Every political office from county 
commissioner to the presidency of the 
United States was discussed at the 
weekly meeting of the West Duiuth 
Republican club Saturday evening. The 
meeting was held at the Commercial 
club and waa att<wded by a largo fol- 
lowing of the piu.ty throughout the 
city. 

The following candidates were pres- 
ent and addressed the audience during 
the evening: Lyndon A. Smith and 
Thomas Fraxer, candidates for attor- 
ney general on the Republican ticket; 
John A. Healy of Hlbblng and S. S. 
Dahl of Virginia, candidates for ropro- 
sentatlvea from the Forty-ninth dis- 
trict; Roy Hood, who spoke on behalf 
of E. T. Young for governor; Andrew 
Horngren. who sp«ke on behalf of Gov- 
ernor Eberhart's candidacy; Dr. J. C. 
Anderson, candidate for county coron- 
er; J. W. Gumming and Walter Swan- 
strom, candidates for county commis- 
sioner In the Fifth district; Cliarles 
Calligan, candidate for register of 
deeds; William A. Anderson and Joseph 
Burdaah. 



ment, after which refreshments were 
served to th<j following guests; Mes- 
damea John Qelstman, Joseph Thomas, 
Moss, and the Misses Mary AJlen. Mar- 
garet Cunneen, Etta Bijold. Kthel 
Brotherton, Molly Doyle, Delia Felix, 
May Larrive, Jennie Boden, Maud Ar- 
teau, Cyl Schulte, Mary Schulte, Uladya 
Nickolson and Janet Cfampbell. 

AFRICAN MISSIONARY 

AT ASBURY CHURCH 



Rev. W. H. Farrell of the Asbury M. 
E. ciiurch. Sixtieth avenue west and 
Raleigh street, took part In the dedi- 
cation of the new Hill City M. E. 
church yesterday afternoon. Rev. W. 
B. Williams, a recently returned mis- 
sionary from Africa, conducted the 
services at the Asbury church yes- 
terday. Rev. Farrell is expected home 
this %fternoon. 



Bundle Shower. 



DIXONDtSGRANGES. 



Former West Diiluth Girl Is Mar- 
ried on the Coast. 

Miss Essie Dixon of Tekoa. Wash., 
and Harvey Deagranges, a farmer of 
the Rockford. Wash., district, were 
married at Spokane, Wash., Aug. 31 at 
the Hotel Halliday by the Rev. S 



Wil- 



lis McFadden, paator of the First Pres- 
byterian church. After a brief wed- 
ding trip to the coast they will make 
their home on the groom's farm. Miss 
Essie Dixon waa formerly a Duiuth 
girl. 

LIHLE BOY HAS 

A NARROW ESCAPE 



DOCTORS SAY 
IT'S NATURE'S 
GREATEST CURE 



SHOOT TELEGRAMS UNDER 
THE STREETS OF DUIUTH 



and who hav© cured cases 
ive been pronounced to be in- 



If you have ever been told that your 
atseaae is Incurable, or that it will 
take you an unreasonably long time 
to get cured, don't believe it! The 
doctor who says that, is either wrong 
in his diagnosis, or he la not up to 
date In the equipment of his office. 
or he has not the knowledge of treat- 
ing disease."!! electro medically. Just 
so you will And some street cars 
pulled by horaes in some towns, in- 
stead of operating them by electricity, 
you will ttnd some doctors who will 
fltlck to their old method and give 
«lope for all troubles, acute as well as 
chronic, or operate and call that 
"radical cure." 

The doctors who have been eminent- 
ly successful In the cure of chronic 
tr 

Wi:. 

curab!'-. are the Electro Medical Doc- 
tors!, who are located at No. 26 West 
Superior street. They are the ploneer.s 
In the Northwest of this new method 
of treatment. Scarcely has any doc- 
tor ever been more successful than the 
Electro Medical Dortor.s. 

You must try Eleotro Medical heal- 
ing your.«lf. you must find out for 
yourself, if you want to know what 
It will do for you. Don't believe you 
are incurable. Electro Medicine has a 
remedy for every disease. If you take 
it. you will forget that you have ever 
l>t?en sick. This wonderful discovery 
of itealing disease with the aid of elec- 
tricity, and to draw out the poisons 
and n«;utralize them, that indeed has 
begun to revolutionize the art of medi- 
cine. All .ictentiats agree that, if the 
organs of circulation, secretion and 
»<xcretion are in perfect condition, per- 
fect health is attained. The wonder- 
ful power the scientific machines have 
on the sick body Is marvelous. The 
proper remediea are driven into the 
diseas'Nl parts, where they at once 
begin f . work on the poisons. If tRey 
ar© insoluble, they will be broken up 
by that tremendou.s force. If tliey are 
germs, which secrete their poison and 
infect the organs and blood, they will 
be exterminated by that power, while 
the aiclt tissues are healed and the 
nerves restored with new power. 

This great method curoa weak man- 
hood, debilitation In both sexes, indi- 
gestion, dyspepsia, stomach trouble, 
female weakiiesa; in fact every disease 
known to man or woman. This won- 
derful treatment cures all classes of 
oeople. The present generation should 
^e Indeed thankful for this great 
method of Electro 
which bids 



For the purpose of shooting tele- 
graph message* under the streets 
through pneumatic tubes, the Western 
Union company la at work to put its 
Duiuth branch In the metropolitan 
class, on a scale enjoyed by only a 
very few centers of the country. The 
company has a crew of men at work 
In Third avenue west at the present 
time laying a double-pneumatic tube 
system from the company's head of- 
fices In the First National Bank build- 
ing to the eiglith floor of the Board 
of Trade building where It has an of- 
fice in the trading room, and between 
the two places messages will soon bo 
shot back and forth as need be. The 
click of the instruments on the West- 
ern Union aide of the telegraph alcovo 
on the floor will soon be heard no 
longer, giving place to the whirr and 
chuck of the message cartridges aa 
they arrive and depart through the 
tubes. ,,, ^ , , ^^„ 

This new departure will be In keep- 
ing with the arrangements made two 
years ago by the company to make the 
Duiuth office one of the model ones ot 
*u.. ,..»ii»trv Tmnrovement after im- 



the country. Improvement after 

THIRD STREET 
PAVING PROBLEM 

CoQDcil Will CoDsider Con- 
tract Awarded Two 
Weeks Ago. 

The Third street paving matter wMl 
be thrashed out at the council meeting 
this evening. It was laid over for two 
weeks when it came up for approval. . 

The board of public works awarded 
the contract to the General Contracting 
Company of Mlnneapolsj. When it 
reached the council a warm discussion 
t^nsued. Some of the aldermen said 
that th>»y were opposed to the material 
and others stated that they wished to 
investigate the matter. 

Tho improvement of Twenty-seventh 
avenue west from Michigan street to 
Fltth street will probably be re-adver- 
tised. The property owners wish a 
combined cement curb and gutter, 
which waa not Included In the previous 
speclflcationii. The proposed condem- 
I nation for the western extension of the 
boulevard Is also expected to come 
up for acton. 

•- 

OBITUARY I 



provement has been Introduced and U 
Is believed that this tube system la 
only the initiation of one more vaat 
than given out now. However con- 
cerning any future plans, E. F. Kelley. 
local manager, and to whom credit is 
due for the progressive plans of the 
company here, will not talk juat now. 
He says that the tube ayatem of the 
board of trade will give a much more 
satisfactory aervice than now and that 
the company feels that Duluth'a busi- 
ness has warranted every improvement 
made. This is the only place In the 
Northwest, not excluding tlie Twin 
Cities, where this tube ayatem will be 

In operation. 

Rumor has it that before long th*e 
West Duiuth office will be taken under 
the charge of the central office and a 
tube system put In between the two. 
Other tube systems, auch as would give 
better aervice to The Herald and other 
places where a great deal of telegraph 
buaineas is done are rumored, but Mr. 
Kelley would say nothing about such 
pruK<ls. Many business blocks may 
liso i.f so favored. In such case. It 
will mean a network of pneumatic 
tubes under the city streets and light- 
ning service which will do away with 
quite a number of messenger boj-a. 



Clement Boydj 6 years old. son of 
Mr. and Mra. Allan Boyd, of Ironton. 
narrowly escaped oeing killed Satur- 
day afternoon, when some loose boards 
on the Eighty-third avenue west 
bridge fell and struck him on the leg. 
Toung Boyd waa watching aome work- 
men underneath the bridge, when he 
waa atruck by the wood. 

According to one of the workmen re- 
pairing the bridge, an automobile 
fiassed over, knocking off some of the 
ooae boards at one end. Luckily 
none of the workmen were underneath 
tijiat point of the bridge, and Clement 
was too far away to receive any seri- 
ous injury. He was seated on a mound 
and one of the boards bounding away 
fell on hfh-vAeel. allghUy crushing it. 
He will reCtJrer wlthlYi a few weeks, 
according to one of the attendants at 
.St. Luke's bospital. n^here he waa taken 
fgllowlng the accident. 

Work on th« bridge Is being pushed 
rapidly and l^l*,J;>eUeved will be fin- 
ished by the latter part of this month. 
Although very little traffic goes over 
the bridge, an occasional wagon or 
automobile take's this road to New 
Duiuth. _ 

'POOR RICH MAN" 

IS PASTOR'S THEME 



Miss Ethel Brotherton and Miss Cyl 
Schulte entertained at a bundle shower 
last week at the home of the former, 
305 South Sixtieth avenue west, in 
honor of Miss MIna Smeryage, who will 
be married next week to Sivert Berg- 
um. The guests were: Misses Liza 
Burton. Bessie McCormlck. Nellie Dun- 
leavy. Maye Shannon. Etla Bijold, Delia 
Felix, Rena Sennett. Blanche Ryan, 
Tlllle .Scohea. Nicholson. Stella Harvey. 
Martha Onsgard. Phoebe Brassard. Olga 
Sande, Edna Rosa, Gladys Smeryage, 
Sarah Clark. Catherine McCormlck. 
Kate Dunleavy. Myrtle Putman, Delia 
Scoshea, Ruby Blanchard. Mollie Doyle, 
Louise Bergum, Clara Bloedle, Mary 
Schulte. Ella Brassard, Louise Sands 
and Mildred Brotherton. 



Store Opens at 8:00 a. m., Closes 6:00 p. m.; Saturdays 10 p. m. 





*^ Correct J?re9$/Qr Women 




GIDDING FASHIONS appeal 

to discerning women, because they 
are corred, authentic and tasteful ; 
and because the prices are sensible 
and qualities desirable. ^ 



Surprise Party. 



Fond du Lac young people enter- 
tained at a surprise party Saturday 
evening In honor of Arvln Shipley at 
his home. The evening was spent in 
games and music, after which refresh- 
ments were served to the following 
guests: Misses Lillian Westgaard. Ma- 
bel Brazeau, Jessie Russell, Emma Ol- 
sen, Lucile Runqulst, Florence John- 
son, Edith Johnson, Alice Nelson, 
Myrtle Nelson, Johanna Nelson, Helen 
Shipley, Muriel Johnson, Constance 
Johnson. Alice Westgaard, Leonard 
Beckman. Robert Russell. Philip Ship- 
ley. Henry Beckman, Williard Run- 
qulst, Roy Nelson, Martin Nelson and 
Arvin Shipley. 

♦ 

Lawii Social. 

The Adelpha Society of the Bethel 
Lutheran church. Fifty-third avenue 
west and Wadena street, entertained at 
a lawn social Saturday evening. Jap- 
anese lanterns decorated the church 
lawn. The program Included musical 
numbers and recitations, after which 
refreshments were served. The follow- 
ing committee was in charge of the 
affair: Misses Vivian Lybeck. Mary 
Forsman and Edith Rennell and Ralph 
Qranqulat. 



Birthday Party. 



Mrs. H. C. Brown of 603 South Sev- 
enty-first avenue west entertained at a 
birthday party Saturday afternoon in 
honor of her daughter. Gladys. The 
guests were: Misses Agnes Dunn. Stella 
Summers, Gladys Brown. Bessie StriveL 
Vivian Landry, Maud McDonald, Kath- 
ryn Hunt, Violet Hunt. Ruth Miller. 
Adell La Fortune. Madeline Cress and 
Eunice Cress. 



The Limousine Coat 

This garment is original and 
exclusive with this house. 
Worked up in Corduroy, Vel- 
our, the neV Mole Plush, Vi- 
cuna, diagonal Boucle, as well 
as nobby Chinchilla, English 
Nub materials and the newest 
winter Eponge. The new Au- 
tumn shades as well as white 
are the colors. Priced from $15 
to $65. 

The "Princess Pat" Suit 

A new suit creation. The smart- 
est kind of a tailor made. Natty belt 
effect with loops that have a Frenchy 
touch. A pleat down the back 
graced with three buttons. New 
gored skirt with pleats front and 
back, trimmed with buttons — $35.00. 

Channeuse Dresses 

Fashion calls for charmeuse 
dresses this season. Many afternoon 
and street frocks arrived last week. 
Some were trimmed with uncut vel- 
vet and hatters' plush. Others with 
dainty lace or net. Some new shades 
of taupe, walnut, Benjais blue and 
Faille are in this first shipment. $25 
to $59.50. Dainty Chiffon Dancing 
Frocks at $25.00. 



Tomorrow 

We Sell About 

40 Dresses 

Lingerie, Eponge and 
other wash materials, 
actually worth $9.75 
to $15.00, at 




ALSO 

45 

Tailormade 
Suits 

actually worth $25.00 
to $45.00 at— 




Millinery 



some- 
Every 



PAID POLITICAL 
ADVERTISEMENT. 

Inserted by the St. Louis County 
Ilepublican committee. Amount to 
be paid. $10.00. 



CITIZENS 

OF DULUTH 

IF YOU WANT TO VOTE 

AT THE PRIMARY 

ELECTION, 

nU MOST lECISTER 

TOMORROW 

TUESDAY, SEPT. 10th 



Rev. H. A. Stoughton of the West 
Duiuth Baptist church. Fifty-ninth 
avenue west and Grand, spoke last 
evening on 'That Poor Rich Man," tak- 
ing his text from Mark x. 21: "One 
thing though lackest." 

In speaking of the young ruler, R»v. 
Mr. Stoughton said: 

"He was not lacking in some of the 
things often thought, rightly or wrong- 
ly, to be favorable to destiny. He was 
young when reformation could more 
readily be made. He was interested 
enough In religion to be a 'ruler' in 
the synagogue. He was rich enough 
to escape the temptations of poverty. 
He was moral. He was an earnest in- 
quirer, but asking the price of meat 
Is not eating. Jesus loved him. But 
none of these things was enough to 
save htm without the one thing lack- 
ing. This 'one thing" was putting God 
first In life, the point where rich and 
poor alike so often fail. You cannot 
serve God and mammon. The lack of 
one thing Is often fatal. The key- 
stone, the middle bolt, the straight 
track. God. And no life is a failure 
that has this one thing. 

"He would not pay the price of peace 
and right, but went away sorrowful. 
Did he definitely refuse to meet the 
conditions? Did he hope to do so after 
he considered It well? Did he try to 
evade the issue? At any rate so far 
as we know ha never came back." 



Olson FuneraL 

The funeral of Florence, the 2-year. 
old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Louis 
Olson. 4609 Magellan street, who died 
.Saturday morning aft«r a short Illness. 
was held at 3 o'clock this afternoon 
from the St. James" Catholic church. 
Fifty-seventh avenue west and Kin- 
near place. Rev. D. W. Lynch, pastor 
of the church, officiated and interment 
was at Calvary cemetery. 

Cote FuneraL 

The funeral of Isaac Cote, 50 years 
old. 5101 Main street, who died Friday 
evening after a two months' illness, 
will be held at 9 o'clock Wednesday 
morning from the St. Jean Baptist 
church. Twenty-fifth avenue west and 
Third street. Interment will be at 
Calvary cemetery. 

< 

"Inspiration Meetings.'' 

Rev. H. A. Stoughton of the West 
Duiuth Baptist church. Fifty-ninth 
avenue west and Grand, will begin a 
series of Inspiration meetings this 
evening. The meetings will be held 
each evening this week and will con- 
tinue until Saturday. A splendid pro- 
gram will be featured at each meeting. 



The Millinery Salon has 
thing new to ofter each day. 
express brings the latest creations 
from Paris and New York. Con- 
Btantly are our own designers 
creating new things here. 

Smart small hats for early au< 
tumn wear. Satin, moire, velvet. 
!elt with plush trimmings and plush 
are used mostly. 

Oidding Millinery is distinguished 
by the fine quality of materials used 
and uncommon models. 



The early autumn styles 
moderate in price. $6 to $15. 



are 



The Autumn Blouse 

This season the waists are pret- 
tier than ever. New chiffons for 

Fall — some are made with tucked 
sleeves, shoulders, front and back 
and dainty lace yokes and cuffs. In 
a variety of colors. Priced, $6.73, 
$8.75 and up. * 

New taffetas in plaids and 

stripes. Some with Robespierre 

collars, others with Directoire ef- 
fects. 

Beautiful silks in plain colors and 
stripes, with the newest collar ef- 
fects in contrasting colors. But- 
tons made of amber are used in 
quite a few instances. 



MOTOR BOAT RACES 

ARE ARRANGED 




Medical healing, 
the afflicted not only to 
hoDP but positively tells them that 
their affliction can be cured. From 
the urpss and the pulpit come words 
of gratitude voicing the sentiment of 
fllousands who have »— ""—» *^^ 



been cured by 



th 3 w*"nderful scientific method 

All ihose who desire to find out the 
truth about their condition and who 
««rloualy wish to be cured are cordially 
Invited to free consultation and advice. 
2< West superior street. 



t-nnon Harmon B. Harffla. the oldest 
Protestant Episcopal clergyman. In 
point of service. In the diocese of Ne- 
braska, died at his home in ,Platta- 
moulh. Sept. 7. aged 78 years. He had 
been rector of the Plattsmouth church 
thirty-eight years. 

Mlw Mary DoKaldMoa. member of 
one of Minneapolis* most prominent 
and wealthy families. Is deaa at the 
English hospital, on the Island of 
Lyde. near Venice. Italy. Her brother. 
George Donaldson, sailed last Saturday 
and probably will reach Venice Tues- 
day. 

Bernhard Zlekn. said to be one of 
th" foremost authorities of the century 
on musical theory, died at h»« home in 
Chlcajco Sept. 8. after a long Illness. 
He wa^bor^n In Erfurt. Th^rlngen Jan^ 
20 1845. and came to this country in 

18 es. 



SHARP SHOOTERS 
KEPT AT PRISON 

All Other Troops With- 
drawn From Michigan 
Penitentiary. 

Jackson. Mich.. .Sept. 9. — Seventy-one 
sharpshooters, picked from five na- 
tional guard companies, still were 
guarding Jackson prison today. All of 
the other troops on duty since Tues- 
tlay's riot have been wlthflrawn. Kvery- 
thing Is quiet at tho penitentiary to- 
day. 



With sixteen motor boats already en- 
tered, the Western Boat club will hold 
its second motor boat race next Sun- 
day afternoon on the St. Lou's river. 

•The main event of the day will be a 
race between the d'Autremont and 
the Jean du Luth, both 40-horse power 
boat.s. which will travel over a fifteen 
mile course, starting at the foot of 
Sixty-first avenue west. The races will 
start at 2:30 o'clock an<l are to be run 
past Fairmont park, so that the crowd 
will be able to watch the events. Com- 
plete plans for the afternoon will be 
made at a meeting of the club to be 
held Thursday evening at the West 
Uuluth Commercial club. 

The entries in the class "B," which 
includes boats ranging from 10 to 30- 
horse power, are as follows; "Call." 
.lO-horse power, Fayllng and Paree; 
••.*?emego." 27-horse power, Jacoby; 
"Dixie," 27-hor8e power, Lasalle; "Du- 
pont " ZS-horse power, Olson Bros.; 
■Splttrock." 15-horse power, Murray; 
"Clipper." 20-horse power. Capt. Holm- 
berg, "Ona," 18-horse power. Odell; 
"Gee XNTIi'z." 10-horse power, Swan- 
strom Bro.s. ; a 20-horse power boat 
by Jennings and a 24-horse power boat 
by RandalL 

The entries in class "C" to date are: 
"Script." 10-horse power, Andrew John- 
son" "Capitol,*' 6-horse power. Frank 
Wade; "Spike." lO-horse power. Cros- 
by; "Fritz," 9-hor8e power, Maleskl. 

Sunday School Meeting. 

The West Duiuth division of the Sun- 
day school union of Duiuth will meet 
tomorrow evening at the West Duiuth 
Baptist church. Fifty-ninth avenue 
west and Grand. B. N. Wheeler, super. 
Intendent of the division, will preside 
at the meeting. The subject to be dis- 
cussed during the evening will be "How 
to Begin a Youth of the Graded Les- 
sons." Mrs. Ruth Merrltt Is secretary 
of the division. 



EnteiHaiis for Bride. 

Miss .StelU ifarvey of 311 South 
Fifty-seventh avenue west entertained 
the members of the Blessed Virgin So- 
dality of St. James' Catholic church ai 
her home Saturday evening in honor of 
Miss Marie Nicholson, who will be mar. 
ried to Vincent Burdash next Monday 
evening. The rooms were decorated In 
hearts and cupId bells. Games anO 
music featured the evening's entertain. 



For Ladies' Aid. 

Mrs. C. G. Futter of 623 North Fifty- 
seventh avenue west will entertain the 
Ladies' Aid society of the Westminster 
Presbyterian church at the home 
Wednesday afternoon. A musical pro- 
gram win be rendered during the aft- 
ernoon, with Miss Annabelle Munson 
and Rev. W. L. Staub. pastor of the 
church, taking part. 

.. -^ 

Socialist Meeting. 

David M. Robertson, Socialist candi- 
date for lieutenant governor, and Mor- 
ris Kaplan, candidate for congress 
from the Eighth district, will speak at 
a Socialist mass meeting to be held 
this 'evening in front of the Proctor 
Y. M. C. A. Other local candidates will 
speak during t he evenin g. 

. West Duliith Briefs. 

Thomas J Lee of 5809 Tacony street 
returned this morning from a short 
business visit at Virginia. 

Rev. J. A. Krantz of the Elim Swed- 
ish Lutheran church. Fifty-sixth ave- 
nue west and Elinor street, is in Min- 
neapolis for several days. 

Rev H. Nelson of Minneapolis, for- 
mer pastor of the West end Mission 
church, win preach Wednesday even- 
ing at the West Duiuth church. Fifty- 
ninth avenue west and Greene street. 

Mesdames Josephine Hodlund and 
Julia Mollne of 634 North Fifty-sixth 
avenue west returned this morning 
from a weeks visit in the Twin Cities. 

The official board of the Merrltt Me- 
morial M. E. church. Forty-sixth ave- 
nue west and Halifax street, will meet 
In the church parlors this evening. 

The Ladles' Aid Society of the Mer- 
rltt church will be entertained Wed- 
nesday afternoon at the home of Mrs. 
E Ward. .1901 West .Sixth street. 

The congregation of the Swedish Mis- 
sion church will entertain at a social 
In the church parlors Thursday even- 

'"walter Evered and D. C. Wakeman 
left Saturday for a short hunting trip 
in Western Minnesota. 

The Ladies*' Aid Society of the St. 
James' Catholic church will meet Wed- 
nesday afternoon at the home of Mrs. 
James Gallagher. 525 North Fortieth 

^''mI-s*' A^ R Rockwell of 405 Central 
avenue will entertain the Women's 
Home and Foreign Missionary Society 
of the Asbury M. B. church at her home 
Friday afternoon. 

The Ladles' Aid Society of the West 
Duiuth Baptist church will meet Wed- 
nesday afternoon at the home of Mrs. 
Fanny Erickson, 929 East Superior 

The Queen Esther Circle of the As- 
bury M. E. church will meet this even. 
Inif at the home of the Misses Grace 
and Nellie Anderson. 120 North Sixty- 
third avenue west. 

Miss Bonnie Freedson of Brainerd is 
a guest for several days at the home of 
Mrs P. Gilley. 322 Central avenue. 

Watch repairing. Hurst. West Duiuth. 



NEWLY OPENED-"?™ ««««» 



AftCERICAN OR EUROPELANT PL.A.IW. 



Ctfitrally locatsd between tht NEW STEEL 
PLANT and the CITY OF OULUTH. 



Forty *ew. DlMly fumithad. •team haatad rvMBi, 
witli bath and elaetrie light*. 



FIRST CLASS TABLE BOARD 

Lowatt ratal can now ba obtained for the winter month*. Our catering to Wedding*. Banquet*. So- 
cletie* and Private Partle* will be our Specialty. An invitatio* i* oxteaded the travelling and general 
public to make the QRANO HOTEL their headquarter*. 



COLORADO UHADY TO 

VOTK AT PRIMARIES 



Denver. Colo., Sept 9.— Today will 



mark the close of Colorado's first pri- 
mary campaign. Balloting will begin 
tomorrow for the nomination of presi- 
dential electors, two United States 
senators, four congressmen and com- 
plete state and county tickets. 

Among the Republicans the fight In- 
volves the attempt of the Progressive 
Republicans to name the state ticket. 
Including Roosevelt electors, over the 
recognized Taft electors and state can- 
didates. The Progressive party leaders 
In Colorado have instructed their sup- 
porters not to participate in tomor- 
row's primaries. 

IS DROWNED IN 
TURTLE UKE 

Vinton Ellis of Bemidji Meets 

Death While Hunting 

Ducks. 

Bemidji. Minn.. Sept. 9. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Vinton L. Ellis, a well 
known young real estate and insurance 
man of this city, was drowned this 
morning In Turtle lake, north of here, 
while hunting for ducks. He had gone 
out In his automobile with his wife 
and two small children to hunt ducks. 
He left his family at a farmhouse and 
no one was with him at the time of 
the accident. . 

It Is believed that he shot a duck 
and started to swim after It and was 
taken with cramps. His clothes and 
gun were found on the bank. His body 
has not been recovered. 

A few years ago he was one of the 
publishers of the Daily Pioneer here. 

CONSIDER A GRAIN OF WHEAT. 

By the Narrator: M. PhlUiparl. pro- 
fessor of botany. In 1842. cultivated at 
Versailles near Paris. France, success- 
fully 372 varieties, from combinations 
of the following standards: Five main 
kinds. one Egyptian, iwo 8P«lter 
wheat, three Polish wheat, 'our single 
grain wheat, five common bearded 
wheat, three general kinds, hard, soft 
and Polish ordinary. 

M. Deslongchamps reported that he 
coa?ited four hundred and fifty grains 
f?om one seed, and that he also saw 
one hundred and fifty-two stalks com- 
ln«r from one grain. 

Mr Shaw of St. Louis rece ved once 
from' a governor of an Algerian prov- 
ince^a plant of eighty stalks, and men- 
tions one of one hundred and twenty 
stalks in possession of a pasha of 

^%^r Humphrey Davis, mentions one 
of one hundred and thirty stalks. 
Duharned speaks of two 8««d8 each 



that produced one hundred and forty 
stalks and six thousand grains. 

At Kerinon. near Brest. France, in 
1817, one hundred and fifty-five ears 
from one root were reported. 

D' Albert, chief gardener of Louis 
Philippe (1830-1848) reports of a plant 
near Maules of fifty-two ears, with two 
thousand two hundred and forty 
grains. 

The Chinese, by planting .Mngle 
seeds, frequently obtain twenty to thir- 
ty ears from one seed. 

Charles Miller of the Botanical Gar- 
dens at Cambridge, England, in June. 
1776. selected a grain ready to branch 
out, pulled It up and Aug. 8 divided it 
Into eighteen parts. Each was care- 
fully replanted, which sprouted again, 
and In September were divided and re- 
planted, making seventy-six separ- 
ate i>Iants, which went through the 
winter and were redivided during 
March and April and gave in all five 
hundred plants, from which came 71,- 
109 ears, producing forty-seven pounds 
and a half of grain, or, just think of 
It. 4,768,040 seeds! 

Sir William Symonds of Hampshire, 
England, brought a few grains from 
Thebes, Egypt, which must have been 
about three thousand five hundred 
years with the mummy from which they 
were taken In his presence. One seed 
only was planted and it produced fif- 
teen stems, with more than one thous- 
and six hundred grains. 

The people your property would ap- 
peal to are. almost surely, readers of 
Herald real estate advertising. 



HAVE YOU TflE NECESSARY TRAVEL- 
ING EQUIPMENT FOR YOUR TRIP? 

You Will find ju.st what you need 
among our complete stock of Qual- 
ity" Trunks. Suit Cases. Bags, etc. 

"Complete line of .Small Leather 
Goods. In new styles and leathers. 

DULUTH TRUNK CO., 

Blanafaetnrers, Established 1888 

MORITK, L'AMIB Jt MOKITZ. 

220 l*'e«t Sapertor Street. 



THE PALM ROOM 

At tlie SPA LDING 

MOST DELIGKTFU L AN D LUXURIOUS 
REiTAUR.^NT IN DULUTH. 






1 



^ u 



i 




DULUTH ^HERALD 




September 9, 1912. 





Duluth, Minn. Chicago, 111. Quincy, III. Lima, Ohio. 





Women's and Misses' Outer Garments. 
24 West Superior Street— Near First Avenue West. 

2nd Week xL Anniversary Sale 
With Greater Values Than Ever S 

Our %2S Suits at $17.50 ^ 

Will Surprise You 

There is morf than the intrinsic value in them. Styles 
that art- It.uters in favor, and a choice selection of new- 
fsi materials. Every one smart and dressy. Colors are 
navy blue, brown, gray or black. 

Sizes fi«r women or misses. 



Also Showing an Attractive Line ol Suits at 

$25 $27.50 $35.00 to $45 



The FaU Coats 

are very smart and different I.eiser's prices will tempt you 

to buy. $10.75 $15.00 $17.50 to $25.00 

Btg Display of FaH Waists— 

every new fall model is here. 

Pretty Lingerie Waists, special at— 98c 
Beautiful Lingerie Blouses, special at — $1.05 

Chic Sillc Waists-- 

at $1.98, $2.98, $3.98 and $5.00, others tip to $15.00. 





BUY NOW AT OUR 

Autumn Furniture Sale 

The saving you will make will be worth 
while. Ask your friends and neighbors 

about it. 

The King Edward 
Electric Lamp 

Measures 18 inches high, satin brass, with an 
— • r'ment of olive green, red and yellow col- 
rhf.«e are the most handsome lamps of 
in IS style — sell ordmarily at $6.00 to 18.00 — at 
our Autumn 8ale they go C9 9^ 

at only 9v«mV 

Colonial Style Brass Bed in 
the Autumn Sale tor $7.97 




Two- inch Colonial posts, reinforced 
fillers: finished with fine lacquer 
— in this sale at 



by five 

$7.97 




We cannot begin to enumerate all the articles we have on sale, but 
if tJikci* in every department in our entire store. Some wonderful values In 
tlie Crockery Dept. — Nauliful dinner seta for nearly one-balf their value. 



I'ciar 
Credit 



2(KS aad 204 E:«Mt {»a»erlor St.. Dwiutk 



Complete 
Uuuae 
Purnlakcrs. 



DENIES GUILT OF 
MURDER CHARGE 

Emil KymalaiDeo Pleads Not 

Guilty to Slaying Tom 

Kallio. 

Emll Kymalalrien, alias Emil Lind- 
holm. pleaded not guilty to the charge 
of murder, second degree, wiien ar- 
raigned Saturday afternoon before 
Judge Cant of the district court on an 
imlictment returned by the September 
grand' Jury. 

aged 2i*. Is accused of 
fa - Tom Kallio, 28, a res- 

Id. . ix avenue and a labor- 

er . V 5 in the saloon under 

the Htlrnoiu nutel, 705 West Superior 
strtet. Both men had been quarreling 
and <: ■ < heavily. 

.111.. t will appoint an attorney 



EUROPEAN 
HOT SPRINGS 
AT HOME 

"Why spend time and money to go 
away from home to a iiealth resort? 

You can have all the healing ad- 
vantages of Carlsbaa, Baden. French 
Lick. Mount Clemens Hot Springs or 
any rolntral or othtr bath treatments 
right here at home — in Duluth — at the 
European Mineral Vapor Bath and 
Massage F'arlors. We have all the 
latest and best electrical and other 
apparatus, and the care and skill of 
thortiughly competent and experienced 
operators.'with private rooms for ladits 
and experienced lady attendant. 

UK Dtl HOT CLAIM TO BE IMIR- 
ACLE WORKER.S, but we can and do 
give you in this institution the treat- 
ments tiiat will put you in sound 
physical condition, just as quickly and 
just as effectively as you would get 
at any of the world famed health re- 
sorts. 

If you are ni"S DOW.V. 

If thf-re is STIFFNESS or SORE- 
NESS i;i anv of your muucles — 

If yoj have RHEl'MATISM — 

If you have IXDIGESTIOW. COWSTl- 
PATIOiW or any such troubles these 

EUROPEAN MINERAL 
BATH TREATMENTS 

will restore you to perfect health. 

The rates are moderate — bashed en- 
tirely on the service rendered. 

We do not publish any testimonials 
but we can refer you to hundreds of 

f>eople in Duluth and surrounding 
owns who have been greatly benefited 
and CCRED BV Ol'R TREAT.ME.\TS, 
A visit to our institution is request- 
ed — no charge for consultation. 

EUROPEAH MIIERAl VAPOR 
BATH t MASSAGE PARLORS 

17 and 19 EAST SI'PERIOR STREET 
(Second FiowrK 
Phone, Melrose, S1S3. Dulath, Bllaa. 



to defend Kymalainen. The man will 
probably be brought to trial some time 
next week. 

Three other prisoners, under indict- 
ment by the September grand jury, 
were arraigned Saturday before Judge 
Cant, all entering pleas of not guilty. 
They were: Mike Divjak, robbery, first 
degree; Victor Makl, grand larceny, 
second degree, and Nora Whitehatch, 
grand larceny, second degree. 

Divjak, the state claims, was one of 
four men who held up Joseph Subat 
near the steel plant on June 5 last, se- 
curing a watch and chain worth |25 
and 12.35 in cash. Divjak was armed 
with a revolver when he was arrested 
shortly afterwards. He was recently 
convicted for the Illegal sale of liquor 
at New Duluth and paid a fine of $100. 

Victor Maki will be expected to an- 
swer for the bold daylight robbery 
which he is credited with having pulled 
off about 8 o'clock on the morning of 
July 17 under the Lake avenue viaduct. 
It was claimed that he tackled two 
men. relieving one of them, George 
Jarvinen. of |6.50. He was arrested 
the same day. The police say that 
Maki has a record and has served time 
in the St. Louis county jail on more 
than one occasion. 

Nora Whitehatch, colored, will stand 
trial on the charge of having stolen 
$150 in bills from Ed Gustafson, a rail- 
road laborer, on the morning of Aug. 8 
last. 

The court issued bench warrants for 
indicted persons who are not in cus- 
tody. 



nVE ESTATES IN 
PROBATE COURT 

E. G. Church Appointed Ad- 

fflinistrator of Estate of 

His Mother. 

Several estates were opened to 
probate this morning in probate court. 

E. G. .Church of this city was ap- 
pointed administrator of the estate of 
iiJs mother, Mary C. Church, who died, 
aged 71, at her home in Duluth on 
May 5, last. She left real estate of a 
small valuation. The estate will be 
divided between three sons, E. Q. 
Church, Duluth; B. C. Church, Wren- 
shall, and R. D. Church. Springfield. 
111. 

George C. Morey, who died Jan. 29, 
1908, aged 47, left properly valued at 
J2.100. His widow, Isabella Morey, 731 
East Fifth street, was appointed ad- 
ministrator. The money will he di- 
vided between the widow and three 
daughters, Liilian, Georgie and Nina, 
all of Duluth. 

EUas Balich was named ag adminis- 
trator for the estate of John Trdak, 
who was killed in a mine accident near 
Chlsnolm, May 18. last. Trdak left a 
wife and two children; The main asset 
of his estate Is a claim for wrongtul 
death against his former employer. 

The will of Marlon N. Upham, who 
died, aged 59, at Los Angeles. Cal.. on 
July 21. last, leaving property in St. 
Loiiis county valued at |7,000, was ad- 
mitted to probate by Judge Gilpin. 
The heirs are William E. Upham. a 
son, residing in California: Grace Up- 
ham Spar, a daughter, living In Duluth. 
and Bessie Upham Stewart, a daughter, 
Los Angeles. 

Sarah J. Simpson, who died March 
5. last, in Los Angeles. Cal.. owned 
lands in section 3. 61-15. this county, 
valued at $10,000. The heirs named in 
her will live in the West. 



ST. LOUIS COUNTY'S POTATO AND CLOVER EXHIBIT. 





■5»<tS( 













HOMECROFT EXHIBIT AT STATE FAIR. 



St. Louis county triumphed again at 
the Minnesota state fair. 

Seven first, four second and three 
third prizes were won by the St. Louis 
county exhibit. 

St. Louis county producers almost 
swept the board In potatoes. They 
scored four firsts, two seconds and two 
thirds, the first prizes including that 
for the best collection, the most covet- 
ed potato prize at the fair. 

A first prize on clover, a first on 
timothy hay, third on alfalfa and a 
first and two seconds on celery showed 
that potatoes are not the only St. Louis 
county product. 

Competition for the potato prizes 
was keener this year than ever before, 
but St. Louis county was again suc- 
cessful in scoring highest on the col- 
lective exhibit of potatoes. Anoka 
county was second, and the Red river 
valley was strongly represented. 

The prizes won by St. Louis county 
exhibitors were: 

First — Highest score, 90 points, on 
collection of potatoes, fifteen of the 
varieties grown on the county farm. 

First — Peck of Burbank potatoes 
grown on county farm. 

First — Late white potatoes, long 



type, 
farm. 



White Star, grown on county 



RAILROADS 

AGENTS ARE 
ENTERTAINED 

Nioely Railroad Men Guests 
of City for the 
; Day. 



President of Association Pre- 
dicts Great Growth for 
Dulnth. 



Great things are predicted by W. H. 
Mills, president of the National Associ- 
ation of Railway Agents, who was in 
the city yesterday with ninety other 
members of the association who are 
on their way to Vancouver, B, C, where 
the sixteenth annual convention of the 
association will be held Sept. 17 and 
18. 

"Nothing but an earthquake can stop 
Duluth from soon being a city of the 
100,000 class," he said. "I honestly be- 
lieve that it will be a great city in a 



First — Late white potatoes, oblong 
type. McKihley, grown on Jean du 
Luth farm. 

First — Medium white clover. 

First — Timothy hay. 

First — White Plume celery, grown by 
Benjamin Decker. Hermantown. 

Second — Any early variety of pota- 
toes, peck of Early Rose, grown by Au- 
gust Velander. 

Second — Late white potatoes, round 
type, Rurals. grown on county farm. 

Second — White Plume, celery, grown 
by G. G. Hartley, Annajidale. 

Second — White King ceJei"y, grown 
by Peter Hansen, Hermantown. 

Third — Peck Triumph potatoes, 
grown on county farm. 

Third — Any early variety of potatoes-. 
Beauty of Hebron, grown by S. Gfun- 
land, Hermantown. 

Third— Alfalfa. 

A. B. Hostetter, superintendent of 
agriculture of the Duluth Commercial 
club, who was in charge of the St. 
Louis county exhibit. Is delighted with 
the results. The exhibit was not en- 
tered for competition with the other 
county exhibits, but the specimens 
shown were in competition with the 
whole state and the number of prizes 
captured indicates St. Louis county's 
supremacy over the other counties of 



few short years. It has an advantage- 
ous location as it is the natural gate- 
way to the Northwest. 

"It is true that Duluth has competi- 
tion from St. Paul and Minneapolis. 
These cities are the only ones that can 
possibly hinder her rapid growth. To 
my mind, however, your geographical 
location will offset any competition 
that the Twin Cities may offer. It is 
both a rail and boat center while the 
Twin Cities can ship only by rail. If 
they ship by boat most of the goods 
will have to come to Duluth and then 
instead of competing with your city, 
they will be aiding it. 

■'Duluthlans, I have found, have pro- 
gressive ideas. Everything in your 
city is modern and up-to-date. You 
work with the railroads and not 
against them. In some cities, railroad 
men are con.''idered somewhat of a 
necessary evil — not so here. 

"We have been royally entertained 
by tiie members of the Commercial club 
and have not had one Idle moment 
since we arrived. Everything we did 
wa.s interesting and was thoroughly 
enjoyed and appreciated. In the Com- 
mercial club, you surely have a won- 
derful organization." 

The members of the association and 
their wives came to Duluth yesterday 
morning from Chicago over the Soo 
Line. They were met at the station 
by tiie entertainment committee of the 
Commercial club and escorted to the 
club rooms after which the>' were en- 
tertained by a trip upf the St. Louis 
and amund the boulevard. 

A special train durihi^ the afternoon 
took the visitors through the terminals 
at the Head of the Lakes. ," They left 
last evening for Winnliieg. 



Northern Minnesota in the production 
of certain products. 

According to Mr. Hostetter. who re- 
turned home this morning, the exhibit 
was highly commended. People who 
have been to every fair in late years 
declared the exhibit was the best ever 
shown by St. Louis county, and St. 
Louis county has had some great ex- 
hibits In the past. The building was 
crowded almost every minute of the 
fair, Mr. Hostetter says, and nothing 
but favorable comment was heard. The 
moving pictures, showing St. Louis 
county farm scents and open pit min- 
ing operations, were v^y popular, and 
the machine was kept in constant oper- 
ation to satisfy the crowds. 

The exhibit of the Duluth Home- 
croft society, which was shown at the 
St. Louis county building, attracted 
great attention. It was in charge of 
C E. Roe. executive secretary of the 
Homecroft -society, and he always had 
a crowd around him whUe he explained 
the methods of putting up products of 
the homecroft gardens. 

After the fair Mr. Hostetter turned 
part of the exhibit over to the Immi- 
gration bureau of the Northern Min- 
nesota Development association for 
display In the association's quarters at 
Minneapolis. The prize winning grasses 
and many other products were given to 
H. J. Maxfield, the state immigration 
commission, for use in Minnesota dis- 
plays at other state fairs. 



details of the work on this end of the 
line. Mr. Anderson will go back from 
here to the Canadian end of the con- 
struction. 

Just now he is handling the work 
on the last link of the trans-con- 
tinental system of the road, which is 
being built between Port Arthur and 
Sudbury, Ont., on the north shore ^f 
Georgian bay. That will complete the 
line across the continent, and will be 
finished in about sixteen months. About 
8,500 men are employed in the work. 




jJte Ne^v^ Silks ana Dress Goods 

Are Reaay 
New Fall Dress Goods— 

Our showing of new Fall Dress Goods gathered front 
only the best foreign and domestic mills we feel should 
interest you. Very extensive line of weaves and colors 
for every dress purpose. Among them plain, striped 
and illuminated Zibelines, plain and two-toned Whip- 
cords and Diagonals, French, Storm, Clay and Men's 
Wear Serges, Prunella, plain and Boucle; Henriettas^ 
Poplins, Crepes, Ratines, striped, monotoned and Noy-» 
city Suitings and Cloakings. 

New Velvets and Velveteens Just Arrived— 

Ideal for Suits, Dresses and Coats. They are of the finest 
quality and guaranteed fast pile, also chiffon velvets in plain and 
monotone stripes, are entirely new and very fashionable. Pricey 
ranging from $1.00 to $6.00. 

New Fall Sflb— 

Charmeuse, Satin, Crepe Meteor, Panne Satin, Crepe de Chine, 
plain and brocaded weaves ; Boucles, Chiffon, Printed Radium, 
Voiles, Satin Pekin, Waisting and Suiting Silks, Embroidered 
Voiles and Chiffons, etc. Black Silk of quality in weaves of 
Faille, Bengaline, Duchess, Chiffon and wool-back Satin to 54 
inches wide, all Silk Voile, Surah, Peau de Cygne, Messaline, 
double-faced Satin, Grenadine and Moire. 

Bengaline Radiant — A new and very handsome Radiant Cord 
— for coats and suits, 45 inches wide — ^4,50 the yard. 



draft of cars as soon as the latter can 
be placed where they will obstruct 
the main tracks. Yardmasters and 
train directors give necessary orders 
to provide a clear track to the scene 
of the fire. Almost before the locomo- 
tives are uncoupled, signals are set 
indicating the routes by which to 
reach the fire, and by the time they 
arrive their crews have pumps un- 
limbered ready to work and hose ready 
to unreel. In the fire organization the 
assistant yardmaster acts as chief, and 
gives general directions both in fire, 
fighting and in drills. The conductor 
of eacli train crew acts as foreman of 
that crew, the flagman looks after 
unreeling and connecting the hose, and 
the two brakemen act as nozzlemen, 
and direct the stream. 

At a fire which occurred near the 

gas tank under a passenger car, the 

first engine was coupled up ready to 

I act within two minutes after the alarm 

: was sounded, while within seven min- 

; utes nine engines were on the scene. 

TICKET Agents 

T O THE COAST 

Duluth Railroad Man Joins 

the Party Bound for 

Seattle. 

J. R Hanson, general passenger 
agent for the Duluth, Missabe & North- 
ern Railroad company, left yesterday 
with Mrs. Hanson for St. Paul, where 
they boarded a special train over the 
Northern Pacific for Seattle. Wash., 
where Mr. Hanson will attend the ses- 
sions of the American Association of 
Passenger and Ticket Agents. 

The fifty-seventh annual convention 
will begin Sept 12 and last through 
Sept 13. This is the first convention 
to be held in the Pacific Northwest 
Last year the convention was held at 
St Paul. 

There were two special trains need- 
ed to carry the railroad officials from 
the East and Middle West to the scene 
of the convention. 

On the Northern Pacific, the welfare 
of the party is being looked after by J. 
G Woodworth. traffic manager, and A. 



M. Cleland, general passenger agent, 
assisted by C. A. Matthews and John C 
Poore, assistant general passengej^ 
agents, and H. J. Titus, superintendent 
of dining cars. 

En route over the Northern Pacific, 
stops for local entertainment will bd 
made at Butte, Missoula and Spokane. 
More stops would be made could thd 
party devote the time to it, but time is 
precious to the men in charge of the 
soliciting of passenger traffic and th© 
multitude of details incident thereto* 
and while some of the members com- 
bine their vacations with the trip to 
the convention, others made it as a 
business proposition and figure to con- 
sume only the necessary amount of 
time. All, however, make the occason 
one of considerable enjoyment and be- 
sides the elaborate entertainment ar- 
ranged in Seattle, the entire member- 
ship in attendance at the convention 
will proceed from there to Victoria, 
Vancouver and Taccma by steamer, 
where some 'doings' are scheduled 
for each city, and from Tacoma they 
will proceed on Sept. 15 to Seaside, 
Or., for an outing on the Pacific coast, 
thence going to Portland, arriving 
there Sept. 16 to receive the hospital- 
ity for which Portland Is famous. The 
party will disband at Portland, tha 
:nembers returning to their homes vi» 
various routes. 



* I 



ORDER RECEIVED 

FROM IRELAM 



* A inoiiey order from DabilB, 
4^ Ireland, fcr 2». 6d has been re- 
4t celved by ■ local rubber beei 

S manufacturer for a trial pair of 
ruhltcr heel". 
^ The money vmm sent to E. J. 
^ Flllatraulf. president of the Du- 
^ lath Rotary club, who In turn 
^ turned It over the heel company. 
4l( S. J. Rtordan !■ the i»ender. Me 
^ irantH to try a pair of mbher 
^ heeN and says that If they are 
$ KatiHfactory he will try to gr*t 

S others to vrear them. ^fk 

Mr. RIordan la an enthualastle 
^ Rotarian. 

YEGGMEN ROB PERLEY 

BANK OF SOME STAMPS 

Fargo, N. D., Sept. 9. — (Special t<* 
The Herald.) — The bank at Perley, 
Minn., was entered by yeggmen last 
night. They took a few stamps in a 
desk and were evidently frightened 
away before blowing the safe. 



Trusses Like These Are A Crime' 





COMPLETING 



>i; 



:« 



MISS1N6 LINK 



) 



Prank Anderson, who has had charge 
of the construction work on the Ca- 
nadian Northern road for the con- 
tractors, Foley Bros.,'.'& Stewart, is 
in the city today cleinine^ up some 



LOCOMOTIVES 
AS FIRE FIGHTERS 

Pennsylvania System Is Equip- 
ping Engines and Train- 
ing Its Employes. 

steam railway locomotives as Aire 
fighters have proved so efficacious on 
the Pennsylvania railroad that the 
company has equipped 612 engines 
with special apparatus for use in case 
of fire. This fact was announced today 
in a notice issued by the company. 

The special fire fighting apparatus 
consists of pumps and hose attached 
to switching engines regularly used 
In switching cars. The crews of these 
engines are systematically trained as 
fire fighters to put out promptly any 
fires that might occur in the hundreds 
of cars out of reach of city fire de- 
partments. 

The yards are divided Into districts, 
numbered as are fire alarm boxes in 
cities. When a fire Is discovered, the 
nearest switch tower is notified and 
alarm whistles are blown throughout 
the yard limits. By a code of signals, 
engineers of locomotives within the 
yard can tell from the whistles just 
where the fire is. 

Each engine Is uncoupled from its 



Get Rid of Elastic Rands, Springs and 

Leg-Straps. Snch Harness Has 

Forced ThouHanda to Undergo 

Dangerona Operations. 

Trusses like those shown above — the 
belt and leg-strap, elastic and spring 
contraptions sold by drugstores, surg- 
ical supply houses and many self- 
styled "Hernia Specialists" — make life 
miserable for everybody who wears 
them. 

And — even when drawn so tight you 
can scarcely stand to keep them on — 
they do no good whatever. 

Instead, they often do immense harm 
— they squeeze the rupture, often caus- 
ing strangulation — dig into the pelvic 
bone in front — press against the sensi- 
tive spinal column at the back. 
The Plain Truth !■ This. 

Rupture — as explained in our free 
book — can't be relieved or cured — can't 
even be kept from growing worse — un- 
less constantly held in place. Just as 
a broken bone can't "knif unless the 
parts are held securely together. 

And — just as a bandage or splint is 
the only way a brolcen bone can be 
held — the right Itlud of trasa is the only 
thing in the world that can keep a 
ruptnrc from coming out. 

\%'hat a difference it will make when 
you get that kind of truss. 

And you can get exactly that kind 
of truss — without risking a cent of 
your money. 

It's the famous Clothe Truss or 
Clot he Aotomatic Massager. 

Far more tlian a truss — far more 
than merely a device for holding, the 
rupture in place. 

So different from ererytUlng else for rupture th«t 
It hM recelTed 18 Migrate patent*. 

ThouMiiKia say it 1« m comforuble m Uielr olcth- 

No helt. elastic belt or Bpiines around j-our waist, 
and no lec-slrapa. Seif-reFulattng, self-adjufiting. It 
to held In i>o»itlon by auction — can't ghlft or slip — 
tlie only truae in ixi5trjiro that is honestly guar- 
anteed to hold your rupture every minute of Uie day. 

Sent oB 60 Day"' Trial to Prove It. 

We IjaTB BO much faith in the Cluthe Truss — we 
hate seen It work wonders for so many others — Uiat 
we want to make one especially for your caa« and let 
you try It at our rlak. 



We'll give you 60 days trial to proril 
that this truss will keep your rupture 
I from coming out, when you are work- 
ing and at all other times — that it will 
put an end to the trouble vou've here- 
tofore had with your rupture — that it 
will improve your condition. If the 
trial we allow you doesn't prove it, 
then the truss won't cost you a cent. 

How It StrenKthcns and Heala. 

In addition to holdfna ilv- rupture, the Clutbe 
Tru.« or Cluthe Automat ic Massncer is constantly 
glTlnc a strsnvthMiIng massage tu tbe «<ak rup- 
tured parts. 

All avtomaUcallj-— the massairo foes on all day 
lonr. all nithout any att«titlon wh^teirer fn'm you. 

This m&sMge — wl.lch ttrrngtliens j\:st as ejieniac 
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dlat« relief — after tiyicg this truss. 

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It explains tbe d&ufers of operations and why they 
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Esttlalns wliy belt, spring and elastic trusses caa 
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pUanc«i," "plasters." "systems." etc. 

And tells all about tbe Cluthe Truss— just bow II 
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water-prxKif — how it ends constant expense — how yoo 
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t^eallng powers — and gives names and aildresses of 
over .".000 people who have uled It and want you to 
know about it 

Write for Jt today — don't put it off— this book may 
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give our box number as below — 



Box 7»-CLUTHC COMPANY 



125 Cast 23rd St, 



New York City. 



Send me your Free Book on Tbe Cure of Rup- 
ture. 



Name. 
Street. 
Town. 



jiiiiiiir 
BBI' 



i 



< 






V * ■» 



mmmmAi^riii 




tm 



Monday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



September 9; 1912. 



REV. POWELL 
WILLRESIGN 

Eodiofl M. I Pastor Will 

Take Position at MiDD^ 

seta University. 

Has Built Up Large Congr^ 

gation Daring His 

Service Here. 






('.; :. r Powell, D. D.. for 

I : M i>iiator of Endion 

\ • nth avemu- ea»t 

I. i.> ixptifted to teiuler 

to ibe board tonight. 

kMVjntf to take vhiirwc 

work at the University 

If,. •■■ ;s N^---- --"laider- 

- 1 aftiT 

, H with 

iiiitversity 

I tu c.'nrtrrn the re- 
hf' \vi-«h<*>l to confer 



I ■ 



ii-.i 



in 

Ml 



: he 



very hi»h in 
thtti part of 
Vi,. his built 
of 
■ < in 
stuio — and a 



tlon who 

intentions. 

'tisa In his 

; _ During? 

:unh he hi!* miide many 

■,>s and has g:»ined no 

!i as a lecturer and an 



STREET RAILWAY MEN 

STIUKE m HOUR'S NOTICE 



tuned f' 



v?e 1.) 



»t 



i! 
ri": 



■iiiirf.if - ^;ivs fhat tile 

- wlien 

! > telt»- 

k this morning 

..)Ti htm to meet 

:■■ ;; \t 4:30 at the 

■ •. -e. Mr. War- 

■.V of no rea- 

jUI b<? called 

: -;. hung up 

-.• :;t ;. .• I- t.» bed. The 

'1 \Vj.rren declared 

that ho would not 

tucui then or at any other 

C'lira Wrre iMte. 

- ar*! to start out on the line 
lie. Fewer than 
lie, however, and 

Ml iir.tu riiueh later in the 
tii.it a .sufficient numtwr of 



U.S.,...,,. 

people l:i 



l.vri. 

not n- 

a strikv 



1 to operate 

: ite the walt- 

-*re waa much 

) much as Is 

, 'dared. Many 



rl- 



ev 
In 



(.,1(..£.r, f 

t! 

Ill 

o,r 

Al'On,s 

lime* 

gesition 



8 ■• 
1 

t; 



C 
t: 
tr 
\ 

SM II. 

.An 



I' 
II 
T 

er 

V 

11 ; 



agent, ' 

v: 1 'J r 1 1, 

\', 

V. 

tV' 

c 

V. 

■\\ 



J 

I. 

1'" 



j\ „ 

efilurt tu 
day. but 

Mr,, W 
-p- ■ 

r 
'ii, 

t 
ri 
II 
i- 



king cars — In fact, almost all 
ose who are accustomed to 
in the early hours to get to 
.■^ rtf work or business — are 
nt of the condition 
: . ir or so would come 
ery little while, and .somo- 
bunches. and relieve the con- 
it street corners. 
Btitli !4I«I«H uf C'SfW. 

-I of the cauise of the strike 

'he two sides are identical, 

Uspute aa to the number 

•<I The strikers claim 

out and only sixty 

:. Mr. Warren laugh.? 

r.^ out that If sixty 

■ if only thirty car-* 

••. lares that many more 

m operation. He a&y^ t 

number of men in- 

, the reverse of the 

: ■ ■.Jii.etit is f' ~ ■■■■■^•-». 

tory tn wl r.- is di.s- 

:i the strikv:.-, u:.d Mr. War- 
) the entrance by officers 
pany in a house at West 
' Monday evenlns where a 
the union was being held. 
< that of Axel Peterson, an 
''"» company. A meeting 
-.-J last Monday evening. 
:.... r» claim that forcible 
.1 made by David Wright, line 
iri.r R. H. WelUnston, claim 
light to And out who 
>rt in the me^eting. Mr. 
lis morning that there 
;-• enfrv. but jthat the 
looking for a 
-n an accident 
' time ago, and 
Man they wanted 
• ij at the Peterson 
i'd th'^re to find him; 
they had acquired the 
ntfd. they left, and that 
w-ia to th nt. 

.-.- .llscharge p it- 

are: Motormeu Max 
of the local union; carl 
'. ..'ft .\:,>!erson and Pfter 
• <"•.,[-., ).!.-r,>rs Victor Wlok- 
".: ; ■- '1. .1. A. Kelsuu. J. 

^ .. >:n Smith. 

appointed to wait 

superintendent, and 

i iii:r. up thl.s mornlni,'. • •«- 

! .Tohnson. .\lfred Jeri;'"' iv. 

ince and Geors<' 

• may make an 

•■i-e Mr. Warren later in the 

of this the strikers are not 

arren waid thii* morning that 
thing at first hand 
:-«e of the strike, he 

-i tiiat, ihe <r -■- -^ - -r — - ■■•-■- ■> 
he direct 

I to dlacu.sa the 

^■■'- ^''T he ex- 

f their 

.: .;. V. .;,.^ ,:.':^','; ■.•ed. as 

it it was, they will stay 

! h.' intimated that t';*^ 

; tran> 

■T lii.s 

•^nce. Fur- 
would not 



ANNIVERSARY 



"J lines from a man who 

owe^ nee to yv>u. This wrlt- 

In:,' IS a hiippy anniversary aa It is 
0uw one year that I have not lost a 
day du»* to my old trouble. I am 
f •■'■■' fine and the teat Is normal. 1 
( . xpreaa or utter an apprecla- 

liim .s ;ir ibie. Wishing you unlimited 
•uccess." 

F. CHANDLER. 
35a Main Street. 

Middletown. Mass." 

Two years ago on Chrl.itmas Day. 
Chandler wa.«i given up in Clay, X. Y.. 
by his home physiciana. He had 
dropsy to the bursting, nearly 50 per 
cent albumen and early death waa 
looked upon as certain. The family 
waM tn despair. They heard of a re- 
covt-ry in an adjoining town and one 
of them went to ^im,> about it. They 
learned that the r. every was effected 
by FuIton*a Renal Compound, and 
Chandler waa put on it on that day. 
It wa.s a v»'ry hard case and recovery 
•^ru^ ,! . V but about a year thereafter 
h •' to return to employment. 

The iiuMv« anniversary tells the reat. 

Wonder what physicians think of all 
this, who are wedded to nitro glycer- 
ine, digitalis and Bashum's Mixture, 
under which failure Is certain. 

.Druggist* supplied by JLelthhead 
Drug C«. 



say anything, and would not dlacuas 
the union. 

No violence uas yet been offered. A 
group of strikers stands mo.st of the 
time clo.se to the street car barns and 
call "scab, scab" at the men who are 
running the cars, as they pans, but 
that is the extent of the demonstra- 
tion. 

Superior la little affected by the 
strike, the organization of the men 
there being nominal. 

The men prepared a statement of 
their side of the case this morning. It 
follows: 

Tke Mra'a StateowBt. 

The statement of the men follows: 

"Wo exceedingly regret that it haa 
become nec&saary to call a strike of the 
street railway employe.^ and thus In- 
convenience the people of this city. 
who have been more than kind to ua 
and who have in the past shown muclk 
sympathy for our po.sitlon as employes 
of the Duluth Street Railway company. 
The strike Is the culmination of a long 
aeries of grievances, with most of 
"hlrh the public is familiar. 

Some months ago we requested of 
the management of the Duluth Street 
Railway company that we be given an 
increase in wages, a different regula- 
tion of our working hours, a correc- 
tion of the merit and demerit system 
and a right to be represented by com- 
mittees In presenting our grievances 
to the management of the company. 

"Considerable putillclty was given to 
our aide of the ca.-ie. The city council 
passed ."Strong resolutions urging Gen- 
eral Manager Warren to meet and 
treat witii a committee of hla employes. 
This he reluctantly agreed to do. A 
committee wa» appointed, the employes 
were canvassed and our grievances and 
demand.s were put In shape and pre- 
sented to Mr Warren. 

"The committee held a half-hour con- 
ference with Mr Warren at whic* he 
turned down everv request we made, 
except the change in the waiting room. 
Later, however, an announcement waa 
made that an increase In wages would 
be granted to the men. This increase, 
while a disappointment to us be- 
cause It waa much less than we had 
expected, was accepted and we had 
hopeil for a time, at least, there would 
be no trouble. 

WurklBB Hon ra. 

"The matter of wages was not our 
main grievance. We had expected and 
hoiK'd to be able to co-operate with 
the management to .secure a change in 
our working hour«. so that we could 
get a ten-hour day within a twelve- 
hour spread. As it is now. many of the 
men are working fifteen and slxteen- 
hour spreads, and some of them even 
more than this. The day is spilt up so 
that we have little time to spend with 
our families, and it is with us a steady 
grind of work, eat and sleep, with 
preclouji little time for the latter. 

"Disappointed because the manage- 
ment Ignored our request for a change 
In our working time, we set out to 
quietly and secretly organize a street 
railway employes" union. We would 
have liked to have done this in the 
open, but it would have been unwise 
because of the known opposition of the 
management to any kind of a union 
among its employes. We obtained a 
charter from the Amalgamated Street 
Railway Employes' and held our meet- 
ings at ti'.e homes of certain of the 
members. We liave been organized 
about three months and have a paid up 
membership compriaing 75 per cent of 
the employes, 

Meetlnar lavaded. 

"On last Monday evening, while we 
were holding a meeting of our union 
at the home of Axel Peterson. 4113 
Magellan street, and while we were 
in the act of admitting some new mem- 
bers, two petty officials of the rail- 
way company forcibly entered the 
house and made their way to the room 
In which we were meeting. These 
officials were Ralph H. Wellington of 
the claim department and David 
Wright a line foreman. 

"Mr. Peterson. In whose home we 
were meeting, told these officials that 
they must not enter his home, but they 
brushed him aside and rushed Into our 
meeting room. They attempted to 
make excuses about their presence, 
claiming that they were looking for 
Mr. Peterson, whom thei.' had brushed 
aside, for the purpose of asking him 
about an accident. They remained in 
the meeting room long enough to 
ascertain who were there and then 
passed out into the kitchen, where 
the secretary of our union was exam- 
ining three applicants for membership. 
They then left the house. 

"«>n Sunday evening. Sept 8. every 
member present in the meeting was 
discharged from the service of the 
company, excepting Mr. Peterson In 
whose home the meeting was held. The 
situation was critical. A meeting of 
the employes was held during the 
night until 3 o'clock this morning and 
a committee was appointed to waif 
upon Mr. Warren and demand the rein- 
statement of the men discharged. 

Shortly after 3 o'clock we reached 
Mr. Warren by telephone and asked for 
a hearing. He informed us that he 
would not meet a committee now or 
later on. There was nothing left to do 
but to refuse to return to work this 
morning- 

"This Is our statement frankly and 
plainly made. There will be fewer 
cars running tomorrow morning than 
there are today. We do not ask for 
anything unreasonable, but we shall 
insist upon the reinstatement of the 
men who were discharged for no other 
reason than they were In attendance 
at a meeting of the employes, and we 
will further demand that a schedule be 
made with the employes through their 
organization and that a committee 
from such shall always be received by 
the management. 

"We submit our case to an honest 
and sympathetic public. We promise 
that we shall conduct an orderly and 
peaceful contest. No Injury will be 
done to life or property If we can pre- 
vent it. and we shall endeavor to keep 
strictly within the provisions of the 
law. 

"Our men will remain loyal and we 
ask the public to help us by refusing 
to ride on street cars until the man- 
agement agrees to treat its employes 
like men. "This statement is made hvfr- 
rledly. A more complete one will be 
made later. Respectfully submitted, 
MAX HALL. President 
W. J. MilRRIS. Vice President 
VICTOR WICKLUND. Secretary. 
CARL STABERG. Treasurer. 

Local Union, No. 593." 



the return of Mr. Smith to power 
would mean a "rastoratlon of machine 
rule." 

Two years ago Governor Wilson op- 
posed Mr. Smith's candidacy for United 
States senator, but on the Issue that 
Jamea E. Martlne was the legal chtilue 
of the Democratic primaries. The gov- 
ernor was sustained by the legisla- 
ture. Now the governor goes a step 
further in his opposition to Mr. Smith 
by charging lilm wUh "utterly de- 
feating" the program of the Demo- 
cratic party once before when the tar- 
iff issue waa pre-eminent. 

-Uadlral Step Backward.** 

The governor's statement In part 
follows: 

"Mr. Snxith'a selection as the Demo- 
cratic candidate for the senate would 
be the most radical atap t>ackward that 
the Democrats of the state could pos- 
sibly take. It would mean his restora- 
tion to political leadership In New Jer- 
sey the moment my services as gov- 
ernor ended, and with his restoration, 
a return to the machine rule which so 
long kept every active Democrat in the 
state In subordination to him. and pre- 
vented every progressive program con- 
ceived in the Interests of the people 
from being put Into effect. 

"It ia of particular sinister Import 
that Mr. Smith should seek to return 
to the senate of the United States at 
this time. He was senr to the s^enate 
ones before when the tariff had been 
the chief issue of the national cam- 
paign, and when the Democrats had 
for once In a generation an opportuni- 
ty to relieve the people of intolerable 
burdens and the Industry of the nation 
waa in a straight-Jacket. If the tariff 
could have been wisely revised then, 
we might have been spared some part, 
at least, of the crop of trusts and com- 
binations' which now rule and circum- 
scribe our market.^. 

Defeated Party Program. 

"Mr. Smith was one of a small group 
of senators calling themselves Demo- 
crats, who. at that crucial and hopeful 
juncture in our poiitlca, utterly defeat- 
ed the program of the party. This 
election now may bring the party face 
to face with a similar disaster and dis- 
grace, and would Ainquestlonably ren- 
der the satisfactory performances of 
the federal functions In New Jersey al- 
most impossible for a Democratic pres- 
ident" 



SITUATION ON THE 

MEXICAN RORDER IS 
GEHING MORE TENSE 



(Continued from page 1.) 



that "Johnson does not believe the 
statement" One of the Mexican's 
troopers, captured in a skirmish, haa 
told American soldiers that raids upon 
American ranches were upon personal 
orders of Salazar, who wanted beef 
for his men. 

Brig. -Gen. Murray, commanding the 
Western division, has instructed Brig.. 
Gen. Schuyler to utilize all the troops 
at Fort Huachuca, Ariz., and has dis- 
patched two troops of cavalry to 
Apache to strengthen the patrol. 
Wants More Treoiw. 

Gen. Murray reports more troops are 
needed, and suggests that part of the 
Ninth cavalry, on the way from Fort 
D. A. Russell, Wyo.. be assigned to his 
command. 

The rebels are reported threatening 
the city of Torrecn. The reported vic- 
tory of the federal troops at Nacozarl is 
discredited In a dispatch to the war de- 
partment from Gen. Schuyler, who 
telegraphed that it generally was ac- 
cepted that the rebels had been paid 
by the Nacozarl Railroad company to 
leave the vicinity. 

Arms and ammunition which Presi- 
dent Taft authorized exported to 
Mexico for use of Americans in danger 
from rebels in Cananea, have been 
ordered held up at Douglas, Ariz., un- 
til there are assurances that they 
will not fall into the hands of the reb- 
els. 

HoM Arms at Doufflaa. 

The arms will be held at Douglas 
until the railway south, as far as 
Nacozarl, is clear of rebels or until the 
Mexican government Is able to furnish 
a guard to inaure the safety of the 
arms. 

It is expected here that the Imme- 
diate effect of rebel interference with 
the railroad will be to haaten the extra 
session of the Mexican senate to au- 
thorize the sending of troops out of 
Mexico and across New Mexico and 
Arizona to Chihuahua and S.jnora. 

Oen. Steever. in command of the 
American border patrol, reports his 
forces now sufficient to repel any 
raiders. 

KNOX FIRST TO ARRIVE 



(Continued from page 1.) 



SI BS( RlPTiONS TO WILSON 
FUND AGOREOATE $175,000, 

(Continued from page 1.) 
man. a New York banker. Each gave 

llO.iilVO. 

Fi.»> $'.000 contributions were re- 
ceive.!. The givers are Charles R. 
Crane of Chicago, who la vice chair- 
man of the national finance commit- 
tee: Rolla Wells, former mayor of St. 
Louis, the national treasurer: #.eve- 
land H. Dodge and Jacob H. Schlff, 
New York bankers, and Hugh Wallace 
of Tacoma. national committeeman 
from Washington. 

BrysB Oave f1,MI0. 

Among othor contributors are Will- 
iam J. Bryan; Norman E. Mack of Buf- 
falo. N. Y., national committeeman: 
John B. Stanchfleld of New York, for- 
mer Democratic candid.ate for gover- 
nor of New York; and Perry Belmont, 
ll.oot) each. 

The list Includes the following con- 
tributions in the Northwest aent di- 
rect to the national committee: Ber- 
nard Stein & Co., Milwaukee; P. W. 
Paine, Duluth; W. A. Bahkle. Alma. 
Mich.; W. L. West, St Paul. flOO each. 



WANT TO HEAR WILSON TALK 



(Continued from page 1.) 



a tariff exhibit conducted by the Dem- 
ocratic headquarters and was to visit 
National Chairman William F. Mc- 
Combs at his home in Flushing, L. I.. 
returning for a speech In the evening 
at the New York Press club. 



1%'ar t*n ilmltll. 

Sea Olrt. N. J.. Sept 9.— Governor 
Woodrow Wilson, Democratic presi- 
dential nominee, has declared war on 
James Smith, Jr., a Democratic can- 
didate for United States senator from 
New Jersey, an office which he held 
during President Clevelaad'a adminis- 
tration. 

Governor Wilson expressed himself 
in a statement addressed to the voters 
of New Jersey. He pointed out that 



ada, who will represent King George 
at the funeral ceremony and who later 
will pre.sent to Emperor Yoshihlto the 
Order of the Garter, bestowed on the 
new Japanese ruler by King George, 
win reach Toklo Sept. 11. 

Prince Henry and Prince Arthur will 
be met personally by the emperor at 
the railroad station. 

Arthur Bailey-Blanchard, the new 
secretary of the American embassy at 
Toklo. arrived at the Japanese capital 
tonight from Paris. 

The special American ambassador ar- 
rived at Yokohama aboard the United 
.States armored cruiser Maryland, 
which was conveyed into the harbor by 
the Japanese battleship Fuji and the 
armored cruisers Iwate and Tokiwa. 
Met by .<laiibasiiadoT. 

Charles Page Bryan, the American 
ambassador to Japan, waa the first 
person to go aboard the Maryland, 
where he spent half an hour In confer- 
ence with Mr. Knox. 

Shortly afterwards Baron Shinitchlro 
Kurino, the Japanese ambas.sador to 
France, accompanied by representatives 
of the imperial household of the foreign 
office and of the army and the navy, 
went on board the American cruiser 
and greeted the American special am- 

On landing from the cruiser. Mr. Knox 
was given a reception by a committee 
of Yokohama residents headed by H. 
E Cole, following which the American 
party entrained for Toklo. 

MAKES MONEY 
WITH HIS BRUSH 



Artist Is Arrested on Charge 

of Painting $10 

Notes. 

Chicago, Sept 9. — Louis Raymore. 
also known as Gagmore. an artist, was 
arrested by Capt Thomas I. Porter of 
the federal secret service bureau today 
charged with having circulated numer- 
ous hand-painted |10 note.i. Gagmore 
is said by attaches of the secret serv- 
ice bureau to have confessed that he 
painted the notes. 

Many of these bogus notes have been 
circulated In a score of the larger 
cities. They were not easy of detec- 
tion because of the deftness and talent 
of the artist who made them. Raymore 
has a wife and daughter. 

WOMEN CAN BE OPERATORS. 



Governmfnt Does Not Object to 
Them in Wireless Service. 

Washington. Sept 9. — Navigation 
bureau officials were surprised to learn 
that a woman wireless operator had 
been discharged from the steamer 
Mariposa, on a trans-Paclflc line, on the 
ground that the government was op- 
posed to such employment of women. 

"On the contrary." said Commission- 
er Chamberlain, "the new code of reg- 
ulations provides precisely the same 
treatment of men and women appli- 
cants for these places. Some wom- 
en make splendid operators, and they 
are Just as eligible a« the men." 



SETTLERS 
INTERESTED 

Dr. Park Talks Dra« With 

Evmers on Road to 

Sl PaoL 

State Highway Engineer to 

Look Over Roads Near 

Duietk 



Dr. J. D. Park, president of the Du- 
luth Automobile club, and party re- 
turned today from their good roads 
missionary trip from this city to Min- 
neapolis. Dr. Park states that be met 
with a most welcome reception wher- 
ever he stopped. He declared that he 
found all the settlers heartily In favor 
of improving their highways. He ex- 
plained the operation of the road drag 
to them and they became enthusiastic 
over it. 

Dr. Park used the drag on the road 
running out of Lester park to the 
pumping station, a distance of about 
three miles. It cost about >50 to make 
it smootlier than many city streets 
and the demonstration proved that 
practically any dirt road can be kept 
in first-class shape by the use of the 
drag at a cost not to exceed $25 per 
mile. 

While in St. Paul Dr. Park conferred 
with State Hi^fhway Engineer George 
W. Cooleyv«iihd Interested him in the 
work which the local auto club is do- 
ing in this p^ t of the state. Mr. Cooley 
came to- Duluth today and he will look 
over the. ground with Dr. Park. To- 
gether Ui»y Will make a careful Inspec- 
tion ofu tl»» .principal roads running 
into th0 city. Dr. Park is hopeful that 
he can ahow the highway commission- 
er the oenefits which can be derived 
from the use of a drag. If he can do 
that he aavs that there will be no 
queatioa but that the highway commis- 
sioner 1^111 Jb all in his power to in- 
duce t\ii sMte to place a number of 
them uponfthfe roads in this part of 
Minneseta. 

SAYS THAT WOMAN 
KlUED THE MAN 



Coroner Makes Statement Re- 
garding Two West Ham- 
mond Resort Murderers. 

Chicago, Sept. 9. — Coroner Peter Hoff- 
man today Issued a statement In which 
he declared he had secured evidence 
showing that a certain woman habitue 
of one 'of the West Hammond road 
houses had killed John Messmaker. and 
also had killed Miss Esther Harrison, 
who died at the place operated by 
Henry Foas. The coroner said his evi- 
dence in the case would be submitted 
to the September grand jury. 

Detectives from Coroner Hoffman s 
office, aided by Miss Virginia Brooks, 
reformer, and Mrs. John F. Bass, suf- 
fragette leader and settlement worker, 
today continued investigation of vice 
conditions at West Hammond, 111., 
where several men are said to have 
been killed by "doped" drinks served at 
roadhouses. The detectives went to 
Gary. Ind., In search of several women 
who are wanted as witnesses. 

J. B. McNAMARA 
OPERATED ON 

■I II »' 

Dynamiter Has Appendix Re- 
moved in Prison 
Hospital 

San Quentln, Cal.. Sept 9. — James B. 
McNamtttra, 'serving a life sentence in 
San Quentln prison here for murder in 
connection with the dynamiting of the 
Los Ailgelei Times building, was op- 
erated pn "Oiursday at the prison hos- 
pital fdr 8pt)endiciti.s. This became 
known with the announcement that he 
would recover. 

"McNamarfi is in no danger." said 
Warden Hoyle, "and will be out of the 
hospital In ^ few days." 

WOMAlmiRDER 
TRIAL POSTPONED 

Chicago's "Queen of Little 

Italy" Will Face Court 

Oct. 10. 

Chicago. Sept 9. — The trial of Mrs. 
Lena Musso on a charge of murdering 
her husband. Peter Musso. was post- 
poned today In <Judge Richard B, 
Burke's division of the criminal coiirt 
Oct 10 was set as the new date for 
the opening of the trial. Mrs. Musso 
was known as the "Queen of Little 
Italy." The state charged Mrs. Musso 
with shooting her husband because he 
objected to the attentions she is said 
to have received from other men. 

NO SALUf e¥eR 
MACARTHUR'S GRAVE 

Smple Religions Ceremony 
Held hx Late Wiscon- 
^ sin General. 

Milwaukee. Wis., Sept 9.— Simplicity 
marked, the funeral rites today of 
Lieut Gen. Arthur MacArthur, who died 
of apoplexy last Thursday night while 
addressing the survivors of the Twen- 
ty-fourth Wisconsin volunteers at the 
semi-centennial reunion. 

The services, conducted by Rev. Dr. 
Paul B. Jenkins of Immanuel Presby- 
terian church, consisted only of scrip- 
tural rending and prayer, followed by 
the reading of Wordworth's p<oem. "The 
Happy jyartlof.' 

At the crave in Forest Home cem«> 



tery. only the committal service of the 
Presbyterian church was used. There 
was no military salute. 

The active pall bearers were chosen 
from the ranks of the younger mem- 
bers of the Loyal Legion and the hon- 
onary pallebearers Included Governor 
F'rancls EJ. McGovern. Gen. Frederick 
C. Winkler, Gen. Charles King. Maj. 
Jamea Sawyer, Maj. T. E. Balding and 
a few others. 



t»j>»> i t»«»»»»»«oK»i i i)H») i m(»»»»») 

FORM WALKING CLUBS. i 



Mr. B. MciB«r«a aays that aa 
aooB ■• tke news off th« mtr^et -^ 
railway atrike gat abrnad thia ^ 
moratas four or Ave baalaeaa 
aad yrofesBloBal aarB from dlffrr- 
eat parts of the city called him 
np aad savgeated the (armatloa 
off M-alklDK cluba, the object bc> 
lair, off cuume, to boycott the ^ 
mtr^Kt cars. Mr. McKwea aays $ 
that mt hla auKVcattoit Mcveral off ^ 
« thoHC who called him coaaeated # 
» to Biakc aa effort to orsaalxe * 
W Much claba la their rcveetlve £ 
^ comaiualtica. £ 

* « 

STATIONARY MGINEERS 

MEET AT KANSAS CITY 

Kansas City, Mo., .Sept. 9.— More than 
500 delega.tes representing nearly every 
state in the Union are attending the 
opening: session today of the thirtieth 
annual convention of the Internation- 
al Association of Stationary Engineers. 
Governor W. R. Stubbs of Kan.sas and 
Governor Herbert S. Hadley of Missouri 
were scheduled to address today's gath- 
ering. The convention will be in ses- 
sion five days. 



Red Mca Hear Bleaac. 

Charleston, S. C, Sept. 9. — Members 
of the Improved Order of Red Men from 
all sections of the United States, were 
in attendance when the national coun- 
cil of the order opened here today. 
Governor Cole Blease delivered the ad. 
dress of welcome to the visitors. George 
M. Hanson of Calais, Me., supreme 
chancellor of the Knights of Pythias, 
wae formally introduced to the council 
Sessions will be held for five days at 
the Isle of Palms. 



HRST CASES 

ARE DBISSED 

Two Actions Called for Trial 

in District Cowl and 

Dropped. 

No civil cases went to trial this 

morning in district court, although two 

were called and a jury was Impaneled 

In one. In both Instances the cases 

were dismissed on motion of the plain- 
tiff. 

One of the actions was a personal 
Injury action brought against the city 
by Edith Ethel Blackwood for 13,000 
damages for a fall on a defective side- 
walk. One oC the principal witnesses 
was out of the city and the case had 
to be dropped from tlils term 

The other action which was called 
for trial was that of Mathews Kresch. 
administrator of the estate of Charles 
J. Jentsch against Frank Morgan. The 
action ia one brought to enforce the 
collection of a debt of |1,952.72 which 
the administrator claims is owed to 
the estate by the defendant. In this 
action, the attorneys for the plaintiff 
put In no appearance and the court 
dismissed the case. 

This afternoon it Is expected that 
the jurors will be given tlieir first 
case on the large September calendar. 

WOMAN WHoTtTEMPTED 

SUICIDE IS SET FREE 



Chicago, Sept. 9. — Mrs. Pauline Cody 
of Marinette, Wis., who attempted to 
end her life by throwing herself Into 
Lake Michigan Saturday night, was 
discharged by Municipal Judge Will- 
iams today when she promised to re- 
turn to the home of relatives at Marin- 
ette. 

Mrs. Cody, who Is 20 years old. said 
she became despondent when she was 
forced to leave her young husband a 
few months ago. 



CAST MADE FROM MASK 
OF BISHOP GRAFTON'S FACE 



Fond du Lac, Wis., Sept. 9. — A cast 
has been successfully made of the 

deathmask taken of Bishop C. C. Graf- 
ton. While the bishop's face appears 
thinner than In health, the strong lines 
of hla countenance and his impressive 
forehead clearly are revealed. The 
cast. It Is expected, will be used as a 
model for a recumbent statue to be 
placed In a crypt In St Paul's ca- 
thedral. 



t>^ i 



Taft mt Biddeffordpool. 

Blddefordpool, Me., Sept. 9. — 'Presl- 
dent Taft, who eame here yesterday, 
planned to end his brief visit at the 
sunfmer home of his brother, Charles 
P. Taft, and return to Beverly this aft- 
ernoon. The president arranged to 
leave Blddefordpool by automobile, 
stopping at York Harbor for Mrs. Taft. 

• 

Killed by Stray Bnllct. 

Beaudette. Minn.. Sept 9. — John 
Youngberg of Grassy River. Ont, wa.1 
accidentally shot while he and his com- 
rade was out in a canoe at Gull Bay 
In Lake of the Woods. The bullet was 
fired by some one on shore who was 
hunting. He was taken seventy-five 
miles by water In an open boat to 
Spooner hospital, where he died. 

Ask yourself this question: "Can I 
afford NOT to advertise?" 



4 

I 



SPECIAL THIS WEEK $0-25 



40-lncli Sclioul Trunk — 



9 



- I 



THE TRUNK FACTORY 



OF OULUTH 



NORTHERN TRUNK CO. 

228 West First St. 



TRUIKS, BAGS AMD CASES 

Prices Most Reasonable. 






About Some Women's Suits $ 

In Plain Tailored and 
Dressy Styles, at 





Today we unpacked some fifty of the smartest Fall Suits 
to sell at $25 that we've ever offered. Made of the most fash- 
ionable materials, such as Diagonals, Cheviots, Whipcords, 
Men's Wear Serges and Mannish Mixtures, in blue, black, 
brown, taupe, smoke, etc. 

In handsome plain tailored styles, as well as smart 
dressy models ; coats are in the fashionable 30-inch 
length, lined with guaranteed Skinner satin — suits 
that will meet the requirements of most any woman 
and a price that is within reach of all; suits that 
are easily worth $32.50, our special leader at $25.00. 






I 



TO THE 



I 



I 



ST PAUL 8r 
MINNEAPOLIS 
DULUTh S SUPERIOR 







SEPT. 25 TO OCT. 10, 19 12 

' ^-ee 4Ae ' — 



Cutumn Jf4fUi- 



CALL ON SOO LINE ACENT: 

OULUTH 

WESTERN CANADA 




.»''■''-':■ 



f;^--ri 



■ ■ ii immn ii—pip— I 



: r 






Monday, 



THE DULUTHjHERALD 



September 9, 1912. 



MINNESOTA POLITICS 

Tuesday Is Last Day for Registration Before Pri- 
mary Election -Governor Eherhart's Newspa- 
per Supplement Loses Impressivness on Analy- 
sis-Candidates Concentrate on Twin Cities. 



\'at*m Hkonld Rraclitter. 

Tomorrow 1« the last day of reglntra. 

tlon tn n I'litii fiefore the primiii-y t-ltv- 
1 te held one week fruiu 



lion, wh 

t' --■■■ 

u ... 

ilt t : 

IT, 



ho fail to repistiT tomorrow 

• ., I,. .1.,,,. ,, ,..; .f tlifir vt>U'» 



t.fforf the IT. 



r \he fir?l 



twvilti II f 
hv th» 



' i iikuth iiA'Ul if 

A One regit'tra- 

:y I he voter for tlit- prl- 

ind the Ktneriil fcltclion 

onful.le of Miuri. apotiit, 

ni. the thi*e iiiitB of 

primary eitction day 

. V..L.V ut registraticin. as 



Tli<r iiovernor'n Miipplement. 

liKn ntivs- 
,ii t<l. Thf 
-!i juitl the 



id an Kt'erhttrt 

► e. Ti.f -MciKUiKa Jouinal is 

y the most coriSisient istaudi>al 

!i(l will stand lor 

lar" as iiu'atjured 

^ :. .! lA- the two 

i-, i;.,iu .itf tttat it 

:it. so t>rf fuuiii 1 iy 

..c ... ii it fre«-, Ml. Kit :». 

of his own .toil ;irid t! e 

• .il in uratUllOUS SUVport 



■■^^ists of four 
[ ;thertd 

, trillion. 

csisivf. but on 
ss falls from 
I- ,1^ ir\iaifd as a pretty 

t. 

. :;t consists of 214 clip- 
f h 114 newspapeis are 

I, i :ci-tiJtt:U. mere are about 700 news- 
oHpers in the state. 

: ted Include puch ar- 

1 consistent support- 

<.r H8 the North fit Id 

tu Mascot, the Hib- 

^i« and the Duluth 



many prominent Democrats from all 
parts of thf «tate will attend. 

(jeoiigb: d. Mocarthy. 



The {.,. 
ilerit a<i: 
t-rs of tti>' 

Herald. 

.Many of t''-- 

reports of 

lii.ti I'.f Ml' 



lipnitii-R are Laudatory 

the consolida- 

- :;d other Issues 

- ■ s. 

ijiiigs were broiisht 

: nor's promise to the 

:a Dewl'ipnunt asso- 

d that he would tall 



WILL HIKE 
OVER^ROAD 

Party Leaves to Inspect 
Proposed Carlton High- 
way. 



George W. Coolev. engineer for the 
state liiKhway . <:i:r: i.-s;. n ; .). H. Mul- 
len, assii.-tant fngi!iter .Judiro AV A 
Cant of the distrii l court und H. V. 
Eva of the Commercial club left thirf 
morning for Thomson. They were 
join, d there by several Carlton county 
people for a hike over the right-of-way 
of the old .<t. Paul & Duluth road. 

A plan has been suggested for con- 
vrifif.v- the right-of-way into a state 
(i;- Lclwefn (.'aritiii and Imluth, 

t;.. . . nlng a more direct route be- 
tween liulutii and the Twin Cities. 

The road runs through a rich unde- 
veloped fanning country and those in- 
terested in the highway believe it 
would be a valuable development fac- 
tor. Very little expense would be nec- 
essary to put the road in good condi- 
tion, it is believed, and Carlton and 
l>uluth people are anxious to have the 
work done. The trip of inspection to- 
dav is intended to determine Just what 
will be necessary to put the road in 
good condition. 

It is a most picturesque route and 
would be a beautiful automobile high- 
way. 

CLOQUET HOMES 
HIT BY LIGHTNING 



T h e I 

support II. « 



pat to the last degree. 
Tl 



of 



i 



.orti^::nh?^f^li:^M''^h^ Lifts Top Off of Sideboard 

n He failed to make '^ 

and Breaks the 
Mirror. 



.oted are nearly all 
:iii and are mostly stand- 



go v*;r nor 



'3 Tribune leads In number 
■ lis, with seven, and the 
: -lal 1.'* seeoiid, with six. 
'.V the supplement is not 
idable as it looks. Three 
rit scrutiny of the news- 
....■ slate have given the 
mighty poor results. 
• • « 



YVindnii of C'aBiiiniKii. 

Ctrulii' : or nomination for state 

yfi-jies icentralfc their forces on 

thf TwJi. ' iits this week. Some of 
them have one or two outside speaking 
dales, but they will give the bulk of 
their time to Minneapolis and St. Paul. 



CloQuet. Minn., tept. 9.— (Special 

to The Herald.) — Ciocjuet had a severe 

electrical storm Saturday night and 

the home of Louis Erickson on Eighth 

street was struck by lightning. The 

chimney and the walls of one bedroom 
were damaged, while the bolt played 
queer pranks in the dining room, lift- 
ing off the top of a large sideboard 
and breaking the mirror. A few nights 
previous the home of George Ho'.m- 
Btrand was struck and a hole made 
through the roof and one through the 




^„ ""•'• .--^r- .-"--" ':£.;■» t« ««n«.<-tPd 'night a good many telepho 
continue in that course. U is expected. », commission, a hor»e be- 

E. Lee, L. C fepooner and E^ J- Jonglng to the GasklU livery barn was 



William 

Young 
Stat 

Twi .-- 

,. i whirlwind campaign of i 

, s and St. Paul, and James A. \ 
rcierson and James A. Manaharu will 
make several speeches 



oung have al'out ^^"JP|^J^^ .^'IV^t knocked down and the shingles ripped 
tale campaigns and will work in the _ RoKcrs' house In 

win Cities. Governor Eberhart »» ■ VittiV^ r'/nnL sogers noujse in 



Little Canada. 



fa 

er, 



WATER LEVELS IN 
LAKE OF THE WOODS 



The campaign has been featureless as 

r as Duluth is concerned. LC. Spoon- , 

■, James A. Peterson and W illlam E. 
Lee are the only candidates who have 
have made hall speeches here and the, 
biggest crowd numbered about twenty- 
five Jame.u A. Manahan made two 
open-air speeches Saturday night and __ • i • t% . 

?i^-eTe L^been'mtie vrs^bL%wden"e:of | hf croationd Joinl Commis- 

sion to Meet at Border 



interest in the campaign. The regis- 
tration of about 3,600 last Tuesday was 
the only Indication that the voters In- 
tend to get out at the primary. What 
they will dQ there cannot be* forecast- 
ed. No predictions as to St. Lou1.h 
county's attitude on candidates for 
8tat© offices is worth consideration. 
• • « 
Democratic €;o««rover*y. 
The charges of H. W. Striekler of St. 
Paul and J. J. Reiter of Rochester, can- 
didates for the Democratic nomination 
for railroad and warehouse commis- 



Towns. 



Washington, Sept. 9. — James A. Taw- 
ney, chairman of the international Joint 
commission, has called a meeting of the 
commission at International Falls for 
Tuesday, Sept. 17, for public hearings 
on complaint regarding water levels 



sioners. tliat Fred B. Lynch and D. D. jn the Lake of the Woods. This ques- 
Dsly dictated some of the filings on Uion was formally submitted to the 
the Democratic ticket have occasioned commission by Joint action of the gov- 



Bome ta; 
Mr L- 



v> iUidrau 

as a cHndMate. 
drew F' 



h t m F« 1 



Ml-. 

Fiei.c 



<. I ernments of the United States and of 

h admits that he urged Mr. Uhe Dominion of Canada. The question 

file for railroad and ware- i» as follows: 

tnlssioner when Mr. Striekler First — In order to secure the most ad- 

him about it, and also ad- vantageous use of the water of the 

he urged Mr. Striekler to | Lake of the Woods and of the waters 

when Mr. Gaynor appeared flowing into and from the lake on each 

side of the boundary, for domestic ana 
sanitary purposes for navigation and 
transportation purposes, and also in 
order to secure the most advantageous 
use of the shores and harbors of the 
lake and of the waters flowing into and 
from the lake, is It practicable and de- 



He says neither An- 

Mr. Gaynor consulted 

and his activity was 

\ iiy a desire to get n 

ratic ticket in the field. 

declares that Andrew 

sured him that he would 



tiled after Mr Reiter had I sirable to maintain the surface of the 
' ' lake during the different seasons of the 

year at a certain stated level, and, if 
so. at what level? 

Second — If a certain stated level is 
recommended in answer to Question No. 
1 and if such level Is higher than the 
normal or natural level of the lake, to 
what extent, If at all, would the lake 
when maintained at such level overflow 
the low lands upon its southern border 
or elsewhere on its border and what is 
the value of the lands which would be 
submerged? 

Third — In what way or manner, In- 
cluding the construction and operation 
of dams or other works at the outlets 
and Inlets of the land or In the water 
which are directly or indirectly tribu- 
tary to the lake or otherwise is it 
possible and advisable to regulate the 
volume use and outflow of the waters 
of the lake so as to maintain the level 
recommended in answer to No 1, and 
by what means or arrangement'can the 
proper construction and operation of 
regulating works or a system or meth- 
od of regulation be beat secured and 
maintained In order to Insure the ade- 
quate protection and development of 
all the Interests involved on both sides 
ot the boundarjr with the least possible 
damage to all rights and Interests, both 
public and private, which may be af- 
fected by maintaining the proposed 
level? 

The commission will also hold a hear, 
ing at Kenora, Ont., on Thursday, Sept. 
19. "All parties Interested in this" will 
be heard by the commission at these 
two places. 



.1 He suspects Mr. Lynch of 
ii,!..n^ ■''■'-z to do with it. 

M.-. LOW comes forw-'srd 

with .1 li'-t ■ 'Uon that he and Mr. 
Gaynor withdraw from the contest for 
the nomination for the six-year term, 
leaving the field clear to F. M. Currier 
of Mankato, who has ali<o filed. 

In view of the tact that every citi- 
zen has a right to run for office under 
the primary law, and all involved in 
the controversy have filed, it would 
seem the voters have the final say and 
the Democrats in the state will decido 
*• whom they want to make up their 

/ ticket. 

• ♦ • 

MaBahan Talka. 

The Initiative, the referendum and 
the recall were warmly advocated, and 
the railroads, the courts and big busi- 
ness were subjected to a vigorous 
panning Saturday evening by James A. 
Manahan. candidate for the Republic- 
an nomination for congres.9man-at- 
large. 

Mr Manahan made two open-air 

pp^e-'hes. At Twentieth avenue west 

— - iperior street, he had a crowd of 

i50 people. At Second avenue 

we.si and Superior street about 400 

heard him. ... 

Mr. Manahan declared that the peo- 
ple must have the Initiative, the refer- 
endum and the recall to drive big busi- 
ness out of politics and restore the 
., government to the people. He advo- 

cated the dirett election of senators 
and of the president of the United 
States. He said no corrupt court should 
be shielded from attack by the people, 
and no conditions which would allow 
railroads and other business interests 
to lontrol legislatures and courts 
should exist. 

« « f 
Baaqnct to JohB IJad. 

Congressman W. S. Hammond. Na- 
tional Committeeman Fred B. Lynch 
and -Andrew Nelson of Duluth will be 
speakers at a testimonial banquet to 
be given In honor of Former Governor 
John Llnd by the Hennepin county 
Wilson organization Wednesday night. 
Harry Lund of Minneapolis will be 
toastmaster. Mr. Lind will make the 
principal address. The banquet has 
been planned as a state afEalr and 



NEW CATHOLIC SCHOOL 

AT CLOQIET OPENED 

Cloquet, Minn., Sept. 9. — (Special to 
The Herald.)— The Catholic school of 
Our Lady of the Sacred Heart opened 
In the Catholic church building re- 
cently completed. 

There are accommodations for about 
400 children. Seven grades will be 
taught this year, beginning with the 
first primary and continuing through 
the seventh. It is intended to put in 
eighth grade work next year. Seven 
sisters of the Benedictine order are 
iQ charge. 



$ 25 in Prizes Given Away 

— Six different prize events to which all 
babies up to 18 months are invited to 
enter. Six handsome prizes aggregating 
$25. will be awarded. Prizes on display 
in windows. 



n 



m &m Block Store 



"The Shopping Center of Duluth 



>ff 



B aby's Weight Free 

—Every baby brought to the store this 
week will be accurately weighed on a 
pair of Toledo electric scales, and given 
a dainty weight slip, together with hand- 
some souvenir. 



This Week Is ^^Bafty Week"— A Notable Event for Infants! 



— This week the third floor is reigned over by ''Her Ladyship' and 
**His Lordship'' THE BABY. 

— For a long time this store, in the perfection of its vast public 
service, has specialized in things for that most important member 
of the household — THE BABY. Year by year we have added dif- 
ferent lines until today we have the most complete stocks of baby 
wearables in the Northwest. 

— To begin the Fall season in a fitting manner, and to show all 

H and Made Dresses 

— Exquisite little garments fruni finest materials, 
expertly made and embroidered by hand. 

— Long and short dresses and slips of nain- 
sook and fine batiste, hand embroidered, 
sizes to 1 year, $2.25 to $7.50. 

— Long or short skirts, hand made, $1.49 
to $9.98. 

B aby Dresses 

— Long white dresses, lawn and nainsook, 
lace and embroidery trimmed, 98c to $5.95 

— Long white slips of lawn and nainsook, 
50c to $1.25. 

— Short white dresses, lawn and nainsook, 
lace and embroidery trimmed, sizes 6 
months to 4 years, 95c to $4.98. 

— Long and short petticoats of nainsook, 

59c to $3.25. {tab)/ ahop, TiiirU Floor, 

S hoes for Toddlers 

— We have the exclusive agency for the famoog 
"Klingfast" shoes. These are made with the non- 
slip soles and shown in various styles. 

— Vici kid, black and tan, 1 to 2 years, $1.25. 

— Patent kid. with mat or cloth top, sizes 
1 to 2 years. $1.25. 

— Patent kid, with white, pink or 
blue tops, $1.50. 

(Shoe Annex) 



mothers our supremacy in babywear things, this big six-day carni- 
val— BABY WEEK— has been planned. 

—The Baby Shop is in gala attire, and a week of interesting enter- 
tainment for the little tots has been planned. 

—Useful souvenirs are provided for every baby 
:; that enters its name in our Register, and six valu- 

able prizes are to be given in three weight contests. 

We cordially invite every baby and mother to this first BABY, 

WEEK, today or any day this week. 

R ath Robes and Kimonos 

— Bath robes of figured flannelette, 1 to 16 

years, 59c to 98c. 

—"Beacon" bath robes, figured patterns, 
pink and blue, ages 2 to 5, $1.75 to $2.75. 

— Kimonos of figured flannelette, 49c 

to 98c. 

— Cashmere kimonos, $1.25 to $3.50. 

— Cashmere nightingales, plain and em- 
broidered, 59c to $3.50. 






y/iu\vf 



R aby's Notion Needs 



^m^ 



— Velvet Grip hose supporters, lisle 
web, pair, 15c. 
— Clinton safety pins, brass and highly nickel 
plated ; will not rust, all sizes, 8c. 
— Baby pearl buttons, dozen to card, 10c. 

{Xution Section, Main Floor) 



Wire stock- 
1 n g and 
shirt stret- 
chers, each 
19c. 

— Pin n 1 n ff 
B 1 a n k e ts 
89c to T9e. 



— Qu lilted 
crib pad- 
ding the 
yard, 85c. 



R aby Flannels 

excellent quality. 



— Plain white, of 
yard, 25c to $1.25. 
—Pink and light blue "Finette ' flannel, 

yard, 89c. 
—Scalloped and hemstitched flannel, yard, 

^c to $5. u -J 1 • • u 

—Saxony flannels, white, embroidered in pink 

and blue, yard, $1.50. ,„,,•, ok 

—White silk warp flannels, 27, 32 and 36-inch, 80c 

to Si 25 vard {Flannel Section, Alain Floor j 

I nfants^ Sleeping Garments 

—Dr. Denton sleeping garments, 60c to 00c 
—Beacon sleeping bags, blue or pink, $2.75. 



R aby Bibs 

— Omo rubber bibs — 
each, 25c. 

— Padded cloth bibs, 
10c to 98c 



K nit Garments 

— Knit sacques, white 
with pink or blue trim- 
ming, 50c to $1.25. 
— Knit sweaters, boys' 
and girls', 89c to $2. 

(Baby Shop, Third Floor) 



B aby's Underwear 

— Ruben's infant shirts, silk, wool, and 

mixed, 50c to $1.50. 

— "M" shirts, cotton, 25c. 

— "M" bands, 25c. 

— "Vanta" all wool binders. 35c. 

— "Vanta" vests, 50c to $1.50. 

I nfant's Coats 

— Clever new styles, designed with a view to 

looks, comfort and wear. 

— Long coats of corduroy, cashmere and wool 

crepe, plain and embroidered, $2 to $4.95. 

— Hood capes, wool crepe, hand embroidered, 

$3.95 to $4.£6. 

— Short coats, velvet, corduroy, wool crepe, 

cashmere, $2 to $5.95. 

—White bearskin coats, $2.25 to $4.75. 

fi ifty Trinkets 

— Half a hundred dainty and interesting kinds 
of novelties that are ideal as gifts to babies. A 
partial listing includes rattles, comb and brush 
sets, water bottles, trinket boxes, arm gar- 
ters, puff boxes, powder puffs, soap cases, 
baby records and pin boxes. 

B aby Bonnets 

— Well selected lines of beautiful new bon- 
nets for the babies. Various styles are 
made from corded silk, velvet and cot- 
ton, all well lined, ribbon trimmed and 
embroidered, colors white, red and 
brown, 35c to $1.98. 

{baby Shop, Third Floor) 



\. 



^Flannel skirts, em- 
broidered, 98c to $1.25. 



— Omo rubber 
sheeting, 36 In. 
tvide, yard, 91. 

— Ptocklngette lap 
shtets. two sizes, 
S5c and fl.75. 



I nfants' 
Hosiery 

— Cashmere hose, black, 

tan, pink, blue and white, 

25c. 

— Mercerized cotton hose, 

black, pink, blue and white, 

25c. 

— Silk and wool hose, white, 
black and tan, 35c. 
—Silk hose, colors blue and 
white, 50c. _^ ^, ^ .-, 

(Baby Shop, Third floor) 



R abv's Toilet Articles 

— Cuticura soap, the cake, 21c. 
— Pure castile soap, Yz pound cakes, 7c 
— Colgate's talcum powder, 15c. 
— Squibb's baby talcum powder, 15c. 
— Baby hair brushes, 25c, 35c and 50c. 



S tork Goods 



R aby Cups and Sets ^ 

—Baby silver sets, knife, fork and 
spoon, nicely boxed, 69c to $3.50. 

—Baby spoon and fork set, sterling, 
$2.50. 

—Baby cups, quadruple plated, 
plain and fancy, 69c to $3. 
— Baby cups, sterling silver, 
plain, $5.25 and $5.98. 

(Jevee'ry Section, Main Floor) 

D olls for Baby 



e.^^/. 

"*--^> 



'We 






— A complete line of char- 
acter babies, rag and 
other dolls is always 
carried. 

.T-jy Dept., Basement) 




Baby Foods& Remedies ^i^^i,^,^ Mu^ 



— Stork diapers, three sizes, 25c, 
29c and 50c. 

— Stork sheeting, 36-inch width, 
light and heavy weights, yard, $1. 
— Stork rubber sheeting, 36, 45 

and 54 inches wide, 75c to $1.25 
yard. 

— Stork pants, medium and large ^izes, 50c. 



T he Baby's Jewelry 

— Baby rings, solid gold, band, set 
and signet styles, 69c to $1.50. 
—-Baby bracelets, plain and em- 
bossed, 89c to $1.26. 
— Baby neck chains and lockets, 
$1.50 to $3.25. 

— Baby pins, gold plated, 25c to 
69c. 

— Baby pins, solid gold, plain and 
fancy, 69c to $2.26. 

^Jewelry Section, Main Floor) 



— Mellin's baby food, 69c. 

— Merck's sugar of milk, 31c. 

—Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup, 22c. 

— Fletcher's Castoria, 31c 

— California Syrup of Figs. 43c. 

— Baby Pacifiers, 2 styles, 10c. 

—Nursery bottles, 5c to 15c. Nipples, 

6c to 16c. 

il>ruff Section, Main Floor) 



— Baby china plates, decorated, two 
styles, 34c and 48c. 

— Bread and milk sets, decorated ; com- 
prising pitcher, bowl and plate, $1.25. 
— Baby china sets of cup, saucer and plate, 
decorated, '75c and $1.48. 
- — Baby china mugs, decorated, 26c. 

{China Stort, Third Floory 



.S hoes for Infants 



— Baby's soft sole shoes, button styles; colors pink, 
blue, white, tan and patent leather, 50c, 75c, 
and 86c. 

— Felt moccasins, hand made, plain or em- 
broidered, 50c and $1. Baby Shop, Third Floor) 



— Crib spreads, 
marseilles, satin 
and crochet, $1 
and $4. 




i^W^^4 



-OF- 




Monday, 



THE DULUTH HERAL 



Ladies' 
Fall Outerwear 

Tailored Suits at $15, $17.50, $19.50, 
$22.50 and up. 

Highly Tailored Coats, in all the leading materials, 
from'$7.50 to $45. 



MARINE NEWS 

ORE DOCK LABORERS 
REFUSE COMPANY OFFER 



ySE Yum mEMl 



iVs entirely free to our patrons. Our prices are 
right and our garments guaranteed. 



Na Cfiarg* 
for 

Alkratiam 




wum— aiPEUNh-TiiwiU 



m Charge 

for. 
Alterations 



Allonez Docks Are Idle and 

Boats Are Bunching 

in Harbor. 

Great Northern Officials Are 

Making Every Effort to 

Settle Strike. 



Berwind. Ia Belle, coal; 8 J. Murphy. 
Uell. Clarke. Mills. Meacham, A. B. 
Wolvln. L C. Smith. M. Andrews. U 
C. Hanna. Nettleton. light «or ore^ 

Departures— Zlllah. coal for Knire 
River; Northern Lake. merchandise. 
Hutchinson, grain; Renown, t-ret«' 
light: Riddle. Sahara. Nye. Tuscarora. 
McDougall. Heckee. Squire, Sonora. 
Manola? Schoonmaker. Holley. Goulder. 



ore. 



BURIED MEN 
NOT YET FOUND 

Yiclims of Biwabik Mine 

Disaster Are Undoubtedly 

Dead. 

ili. Ui uiiuc are undoubted- 



for that position hy tlie Bull Moos- 

"^'T, . 1, 1^ b.>.Mi the head of Fargo col- 

M.l , I - .U*nt of the state only 

. .*n ttiree and It.ur years. Five 

affo he was a resident of >^w 

. • K It id presumed that tlie com- 

ti-.tttee will name another man. 

Dr. Creesan'8 nomination had arous- 
e'd protestiiis friends In Fargo college. 
^",, r- - hia candidacy would injure the 
ir a. and unofficially many of 
til. .,. ... iaanded his withdrawal or his 
resignation. Thf - institutional provi- 
sion eliminates luru^ 

pureIoodmen 
are for wilson 



I' 

of t 

aii«i. 
dr*;tl 
none 
fuuii 



i-:!it tliat they wen* In 

when workmen 

• Uiy, the men were 

,1. ..M a Btlll lower 

.,,imht that they are 

V ,.i <.•!>; hi feet of 

• ; • ;,.-n ■!!■.• un- 

Oo- 
The 

.I'c and seven 

; . ,1 by a cloud- 

, = :■ last week. Tlie 

u. r cjiisod a cave-in. 

are sui>i>i.>.'«ed to *">> 

■ I the warning c.i:: i 

!Men when tii^y 

hired they had 

I >.■:■:■-• liiey could leave 

iperhuman efforts 
in the rescue work 

itif svai.-r puiui-s turning out hun- 
.s of ftallons of water per minute. 
. of the men have aa yet been 
d. 



BULL MOOSE MAN 
BARRED BY LAW 

Creegan Has Not Lived in 

North Dakota Long Enough 

to Be Nominee. 

Fargo. N. D.. Sept. 9. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — A ron.stltutlonal provi- 
sion reciuiring that a candidate for 
grntiM'.r f>i be a resident of the state 
for I s barred the candidacy of 

Dr. C. V t. (cegan. who was nominated 



Leaders Plan to Organize to 

Help Him m His 

Campaign. 

New York, Si- pi. :• — A conference of 
advocates of pure food legislation, at- 
tended by Governor Wilson, resulted 
today In a plan to organize workers 
lor pure food law.s throughout the 
country in an a.H.sociati..u to w-.rk for 
l»emocratic sue --.s next November. 

Governor Wili^on did.-ua.sed his atti- 
tude on this subject and the Demo- 
cratic platform insofar as it related 
to pure food legislation, with Pr.>f. Irv- 
ing Fisher of Vale. Dr. Woods Hutch- 
inson. Dr. J.,, M. McCormack Drs. 
Thomas Darlington and Wll iam A. 
Evans, former health commissioner of 
New York and Chicago, respectively; 
Dr J. B. Murphy of Chicago, president 
of the American Medical society, and 
other leaders In the movement 

At the con.-lu8ion of the conference. 
Governor Wilson dictated the following 
interview: , , . 

•The Democratic platform is much 
the strongest, most direct and exp'»'-'" 
on the question of public heaith and 
pure food. The conference which I at- 
tended was to organize and develop 
that side of the campaign. I expect to 
make the question of the proper legis- 
lation of the public health and pure 
food one of the principal feature.-* of 
my campaign." ■ 

After tliis meeting Governor Wilson 
went to Democratic headquarters and 
spread out a big map of the Lnlteci 
States, and with the party leaders 
sought to plan a new speaking tour. 
The governor's advisers at this con- 
ference included William G. McAdoo. 
acting national chairman; Charles R. 
Crane. Senator O Corman, Josephus 
Daniels, Homer Cummins. William 
Saulal>urv. Representative Burleson, 
Senator Gore and RoUa Wells, treas- 
urer of the national committee. 



The striking laborers on the Great 
Northern ore docks at Alloueie have re. 
fused the offers made by the company 
and strike breakers will take their 
places as soon as the railroad company 
can bring them in from Chicago and 
Milwaukee. 

The Great Northern offered the men 
an advance of 20 cents and time and a 
half for Sunday work. The men wanted 
an advance of 25 cents and double time 
fur Sunday labor. . , „r x- 

The men had been receiving $2.25 for 
day work and 12.50 for night work. 

The offer was made by railroad of- 
ficials at a meeting held with the strik- 
ers at Woodmen hall, Allouez, yester- 
day afternoon. The cottipany required 
them to I- at work tliis morning as 
usual it t i.^v accepted the terms. 

The men did not wliow up this morn- 
ing and the railroad company an- 
nounced that it would at once go t) 
Chicago and Milwaukee for laborers 
Nearly 400 men are on strike and 
the 400 comprise practically all of the 
men employed on tlie docks. The docks 
are for the present completely tied up. 
BuatM at Anehor. 
Boats ar»- continually arriving light 
for orti and as fast as they come into 
the harbor, they are ordered to go to 
anchor opposite the boat club. Early 
this morning the steamers ralmer, 
Nettleton, L C .Smith. A. B. Wolvln. 
Murphy. B.>lle arid G. A. Tomllnson 
were at anchor and the number was 
Increased as the boats arrived during 
the day. 



1 ADDITIONAL 
I SPORTS 

EFFECT OF 
NEWRULES 

Football Men Believe They 

Will Give Big Colleges 

Advantage. 

May Mean a Return to 

Old Line Plunging 

Tactics. 



New Yot-k. Sept. 9. — College football 

will encroach more upon professional 

baseball this season than In a good 

many years, writes E. R. Bushnell. Be- 

Gtva^t' Northern officials at Allouez cause the intercollegiate football rtales 



claimed to^havr'somt^merrwTirking t^ at its annual meeting ^last 

dav. but admitted that th»?y haven't spring, saw fit t 



o make so many radical 
nekrly enJuVh^to"^ go-ahead" with the i changes qi the rules every college 
work of loading boats. | which expects to make a cred table 

D. M. Philbin. at the head of the ore showing on the gridii;on this fall w ill 
shipping department of th.- road, spent j;et in as much preliminary t«;ainlng as 
the'^grelter part of the day at Allouez the time and its f^'^^t^-^Mll permit 
trying to K>>t the strike settled and Last year there was vet y little ot \vnai 
the men l).aek at work. I might be called preliminary football 

If th»> strike continues any length of training, but this year nearly every 
time, the boats will be badly bunched college will be forced to j^'v^''" ^J' 
at this end of the lakes. There are I early. Indeed calls have al'^ady been 
several Ivlng Idle at the Allouez docks issued at a number ot universities lor 
In addition to those at anchor in the , the candidates to be ready to w-oik d> 
lower bay. the middle of September. In a few in- 

Some of the boats are being trans- stances the players have been worKing 
ferred to the Duluth. Missabe & North- 1 during the summer, though. o}_2^^^^^^ 



«rn docks, where they are being loaded. 
It is understood that Industrial 
Workers of the World have been try- 
ing for some time to get the men em- 
ployed on the Missabe docks to go out 
on strike, but the men have refused 
to do so up to this time. 



Saiilt Passages. 



JimiA,-jiatm&€f» 



Make This Shop Your Downtown Stop. 



no college has conducted organized 
nr3.ctic6 

it need not be supposed that prelim- 
inary practice indicates a return to the 
unhealthy football situation so much 
criticised a few years ago. No college. 
under ordinary circumstances, sees any 
necessity for . extended preliminary, 
work. But this year the rules com- 
mittee forced upon the college world 
a number of radical changes which it 
will take the college world considerable 
time to assimilate. Any institution 
which waits until the last week in 
September to unravel the mysteries of 
the game is bound to suffer early sea- 
son reverses. 

Will Help Big Teamii. 

The most important conclusions 

which football men have drawn from 

the new rules Is that they give the big 

teams a decided advantage over their 

smaller opponents, which they have not 

had since the introduction of the for- 

t.ov. ward pass This, of course, was not 

Walker. 6: Marl- ,the original purpose of the rule makers. 

7; Saturn, German. What they set out to accomplish was 

to equalize the offense and the defense. 

For the last four or five years the de- 
fense has been so much stronger than 
the offense that a great many 0-0 or 
otherwise unsatisfactory scores re- 
sulted. Three important games last 
year demonstrated the truth of this 
.-,:30: Calder. 1 assertion. They were the Harvard- 
.Schuck. 7:30; [Princeton. Princeton-Yale and Harvard- 
" " Yale games. Princeton won the first 
two but not on what might be termed 
offensive football. Had it not been for 
the manner in which \Mn\te of Pr nce- 
ton took advantage of a loose ball the 
Tigers would never have beaten Har- 
vard and would have lost to Yale. 
«j.-iuitt..i, There was no question that In both In- 
Hubbard. stances the Tigers' opponents had the 
8 Vail, I better offense. *)ut the Tigers had been 




lar than the forward passing and run- 



ning type. 



Sault Ste. Marie, Mich.. Sept. 9. — 
(Special to The Herald J—Cp: Jay 
Gould 12:30 a m Monday; McKlnstry. 
1 Peck. Randolph. Warner. Thomp- 
son Yosemite. 2::50; Tomllnson. 3:30; 
Empress Midland. Ream. Lagonda. 
Dunham, &; Colby. Townsend. 6; 
Truesdale. 7; Holden. 7:30; Castalia. 
Snyler. 8; Hartwell. 8:30; Van Vleck. 
Foster. Mitchell. Sullivan. 10; Socopa. 
10:30: Hamonic. Captain Wilson. 11:20; 
Weston, Asslsiboia. 12:30 p. m.; Saun- 
ders. St. Clair. 1:20; House 2; He- 
bard 2:30; Amasa Stone. 3; Munro. 5; 

Buffington. 3:3<K Wickwire. Jr.. 4:30; 

Shaughnessy. 5::V); 

tana. 6:30; .Sonoma. .. -"-----. -,---..-;, 

S; L. C. Smith. Kerr. 9: Boland. 9.30; 

superior City, 10; Hanna. Jr.. 10:30; 

Hoover, 11; Black, midnight; Robert 

Wallace. Blxby. 12:30 am Monday; 

Princeton. 1; James Wallace. 1:30; 

Major. 2: Mcintosh. Viking. McGean. 

Helen C. 3; Adams. 4; Sherwln, 4:30; 

Corey. 5; Harvey. Troy 

Congdon, l>akewood. t>. - .. „ , 

Ralph. Connelly Bros.. Harold Hurl- 
but Smith. 9; Bessemer. Marsla. Gon 

don, Wotan. 10:30; Dickson. lJ>nkey 

11:30; Hill, Byer.'*, noon; Gary. 12:30 

"^Down: Taylor. la. m. Sunday; 
(steel) Bradley, 2; Mataafa. 3; Ish- 
peming. Cornelius. 4; Adams, Octorara 
7, .',0: Buffalo. 6; Charles "..'-v.-.^-i 
6::10; Lakeland. 7: Ashley. 

V! -tn- ^tpwart Yuma. 9; Dan xaamiii, i wi:»cijf .-._,«»-•.-... ... ----.jj-, .„»,i.,/^a 

tw' Stadacona. 10:30; Plummer. noon:|and the Harvard and Yale machines 
Pondennis Whlie. 12:40 p. m.; Centur- were powerless ^^o 
ion 2; Odanah. 2: JO; Manitoba, Pent- 
land 4; rioper. 4:30; Utley. 5: Slnaloa. 
Western Star. 7; Angellne. 8; Cham- 
plain 8:30; Crescent City. 9; Dunn. 



TERRIFIC SPEED 
FOR MONOPLANE 



Yuma 9: Dan 'Hanna'. 1 wisely coached In defensive tactics 



I 



Smart Styles 
In Women's Suits 

Fashions which are as distinct from 
the**ordinary"as the artistic genius 
of the very foremost tailors and 
modistes can make them. These 
smart made-up outer garments will 
at once appeal to the tastes of dis- 
cerning women. 

An unusual variety to select from at 
$15, $19,50, $25, $35, $39,50, 
$45.00, $52.50, $57.50 and up. 

New Autumn Coats 

At $15, $17.50, $20.00, $22.00. 
$25.00 and up. 

Beautiful New Blouses 

At $3.95, $5, $7.50, $8.75, $10. 



„^.^ ..v,^., carry the ball across 

by straight football. ,.,.»». 

Had the 1911 games been played with 

just one ot the 1912 alterations — that of 

permitting four downs to take ten 

Morgan._7; Conemaugh Pre.sQue Isle. f^Jf^^^nfA® JjJIpPi'lr to Illustrate how 



Chicago. Sept. 9.— Jules Vedrine. 
driving a Deperdussin monoplane, was 
the first contestant to start in the race 
for the James Gordon Bennett 12,000 
franc trophy. Vedrine got away short- 
ly before 10 o'clock. Although there 
was considerable wind at the time, 
Vedrine refused to delay his start. He 
soon reached a speed of 103 miles an 
hour, according to the presiding offi- 
cials at the course. 

Driving his Deperdussin monoplane 
without a stop, he finished the course 
of 124.8 miles in 70 minutes, 56.85 sec- 
onds. ^ .^ ,AP r 

His average speed was about 105.5 
miles an hour, almost, but not quite, 
equal to his previous world record. 
Vedrines completed his spin before 
non. sailing thirty miles over the 4.14- 
mile course. 

Hopes that America still may have 
a chance of retaining the James Gor- 
don Bennett trophy which was won 
by Charles T. Weymann of the Isle of 
Shephy, Eng.. last year and which Is 
the symbol of world supremacy, are 
centered in De Lloyd Thompson, who 
win attempt a flight this afternoon in 
a Nleuport monoplane. It is generally 
believed, however, that his machine 
will be unable to exceed seventy miles 
an hour. Uncertainty existed whether 
any of the other American contestants 



would be able to start. . „ ^ . . 

The time taken by laps of Vedrine s 
run showed he kept up a fairly even 
speed. In the flr«t lap he made the 
four miles In 2 minutes and 24.58 aec- 

"I have won the trophy!" exclaimed 
Vedrines when he returned to the 
hangar. "That Is practically certain. 
There is no other machine on the ileia 
which can approach my time. It means 
much to France. Three times before 
France, who has taken such a prom- 
inent part in aviation, has seen the 
trophy captured by either America or 
England. Now I think we have it 

"BUGS""RAYM0ND'S 
SKULL FRACTURED 

Death Due to Assault h- 
stead of to Heart 



under arrest by tonight." declared on© 
of the detectives working on the death 
of the ball player. "Raymond was 
given a terrific beating at the Elsdon. 
111., baseball grounds a short time be- 
fore his death, and his skull was frac- 
tured then." ^ ^. ^ 
Saturday It was announced that 
Raymond had died of heart disease, 
aggravated by excessive heat. His 
body was found by a maid in a room 
of a downtown hotel. 

INTERCOLLWilATE 

GOLF TOURNAMENT 



Disease. 



Chicago, Sept 9. — City detectives and 
attaches of the coroner's office today 
reported that a post-mortem examina- 
tion showed that Arthur L. Raymond, 
former pitcher for the New York 
Giants, died Saturday as the result of 
a fractured skull, and not from heart 
disease as was at first supposed. 

" 'Bugs' Raymond died as the result 
of an assault and his assailant will be 



Manchester. Vt. Sept 9.— Golfers 
from half a dozen of the larger uni- 
versities in the Eastern parts of the 
country assembled here today for the 
seventeenth annual intercollegiate goir 
championship over the links of the 
Ekwanok club in this town. The col- 
lege championship was won last year 
by Yale, with Harvard and Pennsyl- 
vania following the former in the team 
competition and the latter in the indi- 

V i f) T 1 ^ 1 

The eight colleges enrolled in the as- 
sociation are Yale. Harvard. Princeton, 
Dartmouth. Williams, Pennsylvania, 
Cornell and Columbia. 

— ^ — 

Another Kacer Killed. 

Chicago, sept. ^.-Curtis Kd'vavAs ^ 
professional motorcyclist died at tne 
Alexandrian Brothers' hospital today 
as the result of injuries suftered .^at- 
urday night at the Riverview niotor- 
drome. Edwards" machine skidded 
while he was driving at a speed of 
fifty miles per hour. He was thrown 
against a railing and suffered a frac- 
tured skull and internal injuries. 



3ac 



James Donaldson, Dayton. Wright. 
3:30; Huronic. Ilanny. George Ste- 
phenson. Lukeport 10; Harvard, 11. 

» 

Detroit Passages. 

Detroit Mich.. Sept. 9.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Up: W. E. Corey. 12:10 
Sunday morning; Hill. 2:l3; Gary, 
Edenborn. 2:20; Wolf. (Wood) Gilbert, 
Jenney, 2:50; Morgan. Jr.. 4:2o; VVel's, 
4-4G- M. Sicken, Gawn, 5; Ksyrs. 5:30, 
Filbert 5:45; Cooke, 6:20; Westmount 
« 30: Polynesia. .Sierra. 7:25; Verona, 8; 
Hazard, barge, Knapp, 8:10; H. Lyman 
Smitli. 8:20; Winnipeg, Francombe, 
9:05; William Livingstone. 9:15; Gil- 
christ 9:20; Davock,9:35; Turret Court 
1010; J, C. Morse. 10:20; Thomas Scott 
10:40; Wllkin-ion. 11: Perkins. J. E. Up- 
son. 11:20; Norway. 12:05 p. m.; I. 
Boyce. Sophia Minch, 12:30; J. A. Don- 
aldson. 12:35; Panay. 12:45; Ontario. 
1:10: James H. Hoyt 1:35; Andaste, 
2-20: Kotcher, 2:30; .Selwyn Eddy, 2:45; 
Walsh. 3: Elba, 3:05; J. J. H. Brown. 
Ohl. Falrbalrn, Magna. Pathfinder, Sa- 
gamore Sacramento, Montezuma, Gram- 
pian, 5; Samuel F. B. Morse. 6; Prank 
Peavey, 0; .Schlessinger. 9:30; Hough- 
ton Nasmyth. 10:40; Siemens. Bryn 
Maw-r. 11: Holmes. 11:20; Bangor. 12:15 
a m.; Wainwright Alpena, 1:30; Eni- 
p'eror. 3; Turrett Chief. 6; Nobles. 7; 
North Wave. 9; C. H. Green. Genoa. 
Our Son. 10:40. < .^ o. ^ 

Down: Bickerdlke, 1:40 Sunday 
morning: Bethlehem, 1:50; R. R. Rhodes. 

Kopp 2:20; Berry, 3; Jupiter. 5:45; 
oweKO. 6:50; Shenango, 7:50: L. L. 

Fi.Hher 7:55; Frontenac, Chattanooga, 

8-30 Sultana. Morrow, Wyandotte, 9; 

Adriatic, 9:10; Malletoa, I Scott 9:55; 

McKlnney, 10; Samuel Mather, 11:15; 

Agnew, 11:25; St Paul, 11:40 Clement. 

Duluth, 12:30 p. m.; Widener, 12:55; 

Huron City, 1:20; Bunsen. Thomas. 

Philip Mlnch, 2:25; Leonard. 2:50; Co- 

ralia, Martha. 4; Tu.s.arora. 4:40; F. W. 

Gilchrist 4:50; Rosedale, 6:50; Lau^h- 

Iln. 6: French. 6:10; Northern Light. 

6:15; Eads, Corliss. 10; Niagara, 10:20; 

Alex Thompson. 1:15 a .ni. Monday; 

Bartow, 3; Kirby, 5: WW. Brown. 

American, 3:30; Neeblng. George King, 

barges, 6:50; Armour. 7:15; Buffalo. 

Cornelius. Smith Thompson. 8:30; Spo- 
kane. 8:45: Isabella. Boyce. 9:20; M. A. 

Bradley. Taylor. 11:30; Oscoda. TUden. 

11:40. 




Port of Dnluth. 



Arrivals: — Muncy. Northern King. 
Codorub, merchandise; A. P. Brower, 



team but merely to illustrate how 
marked was the Inequality between the 
offense and the defense. The Harvard- 
Tale game was equally unsatisfactory 
for the same reasons. 

Two Rival Tbeorle«. 
The point about the new football 
rules which will be of most interest to 
the critics of the game will be the In- 
fluence which they will have upon the 
line plunging type of game. One fac- 
tion insists that the new rules mean 
nothing el.se but a return to the old 
line-plunging type of game. Another 
faction contends that the new rules 
will tend to develop the running game. 
Only the .reason Itself will prove which 
theory Is correct . , „» .w« 

In advance of the opening of the 
season the weight of argum^ent seems 
to be with these who look to the res- 
toration of the line-plunging game. The 
development of football since the for- 
ward pa.*3 was first Introduced also 
bears out this contention. The forward 
nass was Introduced for the purpose 
of opening up the game, but to leave 
no room for the continuation of the 
old style of game It was further pro- 
vided that the distance to be gained In 
tliree downs should be Increased from 
five to te" yarda These two rules 
sounded the death knell of mass forma- 
tion- but they did more than this, in 
fhat'thev weakened the offense to such 
kn extent that many of the so called 
championship games resulted in 0-0 
scores. Naturally, the new rules had 
to bear some pretty severe criticism, 
most of which was Just 

Line PIunKlng Again. 
Ever since the radical amendment of 
the code, football coachf^s and tacti- 
cians have been working to Invent 
somi sort of an attack which would 
milie It poBslUe to score by straight 
"otball In this they have been part- 
ly utrccessful. and there has been a 
g^^aduafreturn to the old style of line 
Dlunglng. But with last season's games 
roache" had to admit that under the 
D?tsent rules they could not develop a 
coSent scoring machine. The Prob- 
lem that confronted them was either to 
eliminate the forward pass or to re- 
turn to the rule which gave a first 
down with five yards The committee 
compromised by deciding upon the ex- 
periment 6f removing some of the re- 
strlctlona on the forward pass and to 
allow an extra down In which to make 
ten yards. There Is hardly any reason 
to doubt after having seen the w-ay 
the (rame developed last year, that the 
line-plunglng game wUl be more popu- 



m Glass Block Store 

''The Shopping Center of Duluth" 

Tuesday Housefumishing Specials 







75c Inverted Gas 
Lamps, 65c. 

Inverted gas lamps, 
complete with globe, 
burner and mantle, 
like illustration: reg- 
ular 75c values, spe- 
cial Tuesday at 65c. 

Odd Lot Dinnerware, 5c Piece. 

— One big lot of 
dinner ware in 
patterns that we 
are discontinuing 
Is now offered at 
fraction of worth. 
r«^, Included are 7- 
jlnch plates, lunch 
plates, pie plates, 
cups and saucers, creams and 
sugars, platters and open vegetable 
dishes, regularly worth to $2 the 
dozen, choice Tuesday, with a limit 
of 12 pieces, 5c. 

$6 Dozen Cut Tum- 
blers, 35c Each. 
— High grade cut glass 
tumblers, as illustrated, 
beautiful buzz saw pat- 
tern; highly polished; 
regular $6 per dozen, 

Rneclal Tuesday, each 35c. 
special ^^^.^^ ^^^^ ^^.^^ ^^^^^^ 




$1.25 Hilken Oiled Mops %1. 

— Here's an oiled 
mop that is guar- 
anteed to do the 
work. It is the 
best oiled mop on 
the market and is 
sold on a money- 
back basis if not 
satisfactory after 
2 weeks* use. The 
mop retails reg- 
ularly at $1.25, 
special Tuesday at 
$1.00. 





$1.50 Nickel Plated 
Kettle, $1.19. 

— No. 8 size 
extra heavy 
nickel plated 
tea kettle- 
like illustra- 
tion; reg- 
ular 11.50 
value, spe- 
cial Tues- 
day, $1.19. 

$1 Universal Coffee 
Mill. 79c. 

^Universal coffee mill, 
with glass top and 
glass cup for receiving 
the ground coffee; air 
tight; like cut; regular 
|1 value, special Tues- 
day at 7»c. 
(Eouseuare Store, Bagftnent) 




/ ^\ 

Canning Requisetes 

— Complete lines of glass Jars, 
jelly glasses, rubbers, tins, etc., 
for the canning and preser\'lng 
at less than the usual low prlcea 





Cut Glass Cream and Sugar 
Sets, $1.98. 

— Fine grade cut glass sugar and 
creamer, in effective cutting, high- 
ly polished, special Tuesday, set, 
$1.98. {Qhina Store, TMrd Floor) 







Jl HIU TO START 
IN Sm BUSINESS? 



Report Gains Credence With 
His Purchase of Sl 

Paul Bank. 

■ ■ I II 

Organization of Big New 

Trust Company the 

Next Step. 



81. F»aul. Minn.. Stpt. 9. — (Spotlal to 
Tt.r fUr tl.l. ) — When it wa» offk-ially 
'••■•' today that James J. Hill 
' < tl two-thirds of the stoik 

t.i V... >'.^on(l NatJonal Bank of St. 
IHul. it littarni- nwthorltatJvelv known 
• iit Mr. Hili will establish' a trust 



rompany with a capital of 12.000,000. 
LotMl banktrs say the new trust com- 
pany probably will be tho largest in 
the Northwest. 

AH question about whether Mr. Hill 
would acquire the Second National 
bank was removed today when stock- 
holders controlUnK more than two- 
thirds of the stock agreed to sell to 
Mr. Hill for t'UO a share. The price 
offered is higher than that of the 
Block of any other bank In the Twin 
Cities except the Security National 
Bank of Minneapolis. 

Cne rumor in financial circles Is that 
Mr. Hill intends to embark in the steel 
business and that the purchase of the 
Second National Is the first spoke In 
the wheel. Mr. Hill is already Inter- 
ested in a steel plant at St. Cloud, and 
lately much attention to making eteel 
rails has been given there. 

This, coupled with the fact that Mr. 
Hill will soon have extensive ore beds 
on his hands, because the I'nlted States 
Steel corporation has cancelled its con- 
tract with h*in. has given rise to tins 
report. 

The actual transfer of the Second 
National bank to Mr. HIU probably wlU 
I take place next week. 



of the detachment with which Bran- 
don was riding. From this officer 
Brandon asked a rifle and cartridges. 
The next day the little force of fed- 
eriils had a brush with the rebels. 
Krandon was firing from the ground 
near the officer. 'There's ono for 
*(trttu "•' ^*^'** Brandon to the officer. 
i)cinli'ii& to " fJill<?n rebel. A few min- 
utes la(or fthOthe./fbel crumpled down. 

end Brandon, turnlnp I" '»^.*'„,^^"*^^„'^ 
aOded: That was for Icr.aOlOr "9^ ""^ 
more for MlgUCl.-" .'gain A rebel 
pitched forward, and Brandon, sliding 
over to the officer, handed him the 
rifle and cartridge belt with the re- 
mark that he bad done his part in 
making the score even. 



TAKE A LOOK 

ThrouBh .-jowr wardrobe and look up 
>oup winter wearltiie apparel and neud 
llieiu lo iiM to be Kreneh Ury < leaned, 
it will HiirprlMe you how uleely we 
Ux np Molird and Htained garmenta. 
Silkw. NHllnM. fiirH. htauketM and the 
moMt (Irtlcate falirlen are eleaned »o aa 
to brintc out all the oriiclnal eolora 
without Injury to the fabrle. Onr prieea 
■ re iiiodrrate and the work cannot be 
exeriled anywhere. Peerle"" Laundry, 
French i>ry CleaninK Department. Ilutb 
phoueM. -l^S 



NEW MEX ICAN C ONGRESS 

Progressive Party, Which Gave Madero the Presi- 
dency, in Control of Chamber of Deputies and 
Claims Balance of Power in Senate. 



Mexican congress convene.s Sept. 16, 
antl after that date it will be difficult 
for friends of the admiuislration to find 
ex<"tis.s for failure to carry out at 
h few of the promises made by 

1 t Madero when he was chief of 



City of Mexico, Sept ». — The new part of the old administration. The 

n£ w congress is supposed to be in sym- 
pathy with his ideas. Under the old 
congress, however, the administration 
was able to have enacted the most 
cherished reform — the constitutional 
amendment providing for the non-re- > 
election of the president. The electoral 
law was also altered, but the elections 
of the past summer betrayed so many 
defects In the new law that it will 
come up again for revision In this *«es- 
slon. One of the defects most glaring, 
It was found, was that it permitted a 
man to be a candidate for an indefinite 
number of offices at the same time. 
For instance, Francisco de la Barra, 
former provisional president, who wa» 
made a member of the senate on the 
Catholic ticket, was a candidate in four 
different states. 

Among those measures known to be 
ready for presentation at the session 
beginning In September are an em- 
ployers' liability act, the abolition of 
the Jefes polltlcos, an anti-peonage law 



t army that overthrew the 

1 - • I rnent. 

Th« ehamber of deputies will have 
on Its roll 1'43 representatives, ir.O of 
whom were elected by the Constitu- 
tional Progressive party, which gave 
Madero the president y. The minority 
of ninety-three is by no means a solid 
I'iiik. It inrli;ih.s representatives of 
thrrt- I'oHtical juitii;*, the Catholic. 
I nist and Independent. 

irogresslves also claim to have 
till! l> .lance of power In the senate. 
The npper hou.se In Mexico Is not the 
•^ t body, however, and undlsput- 

e ) ol in the chamber amounts 

r !y to control of congress. 

: the weird medley of revolu- 
ti -anda which "has reached 

ti :n the cainps of Crozco 

in !! t' iioriii. from those of Zapata In 
the south and from the trails of re- 
bellious peons in districts so remote 
that the names of Zapata and Orozco 
are rarely heard, the most dominant 
note Is that In which all unite — 'Ma- 
d» "■" "vist resign." For the most part 
t; s have vague rea-sons for unit- 

Ins 'u this denxand and all resort to 
the charge that the president has 
failed to fulfill the promises made in 
his "Plan of San Luis Potosi." 

Th.. h., rire is not without basis, but 



I PERSONAL I 

W. K. Culkin has gone to New York 
city and other Eastern points on legal 
matters. 

D. E. Cuppernul of Virginia arrived 
In l»uluth last night and is here today 
{•n business. 

L). F. Wetherby is here from Two 
Harbors and Is a guest of the Holland. 

D. H. Smith and W. B. Pratt of Vir- 
ginia were in the city for Sunday. 

O. S. P.rownell of Ely was in the city 
yesterday. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Lanlgan of Hib- 
bing were here yesterday. 

W. J. Trudgeon of Virginia la at the 
Lenox. 

J. I». Houston came down from Hib- 
bing yesterday. 

GIRLS WANTED 

50 <tr 100 girls to vtrap Bomile But- 
ter Bites. N.%TION.\L CANDY CO.. 



down our potato crop, as the tubers are i 
not all yet developrtt. —Flax is look- 
ing well and corn is shooting ahead. 
The corn certainly lOoks fine." 

♦ ■ 

BommIuk Ofrm Matel. 
J. w. Irwin ifl now. mknager of his 
own hotel, the St LRofc.T His getting' 
into harness was th\^^fcult of the de- ' 
parture of his managt r. J. H. Hlckey, on I 
Friday. Mr. Irwin ,wUl manage the! 
hotel personally for a time at least, and 
may continue to ir<WfiTiil*ly, 

I^awMuit ImnHard. 

A dismissal wiis AlMd Saturday after- 
noon in the lawsuit •♦ro#iht by Bessie 
M. Eden against Prank A. Greene In 
district court to r<nycr Jl.OOO on a 
note. The action. itMl fnderstood, was 
brought under a mtsaJpitrfhenslon. 

PariUi Not Weirr^nroniv^. 

Though the weather was fine in Du- 
lutit yesterday, the porks were not 
well patronized. There were t<o many 
wtt. cliilly days In August that Du- 
luthiaus s-eeni to have gotten out of 
the habit of going to the city's pleas- 
uie spots. "There were good crowds, 
however, on the exi ursion boat.^ on 
the lake and river. The sidewalks of 
the principal streets In the main part 
of the city were well filled with pe- 
destrians, largely theater-goers. 



^ 



Dr. H. Browa. 

Diseases of stomach and intestines. 
424-4;:u New Jersey building. 

•^ 

Ret u ma From Loni;; Tonr. 

Fred Jcnsvold has r»turned from a 
two months' touring trip in the East, 
where he drove T. A. Merritt's Garford 
automobile on Its long journey. 

— ^ 

.Artielea of ineorporatlon. 

Articles of incorooration were filed 
this morning with tne register of deeds 
by the Duluth-Moctezuma Iron com- 
pany. The new concern is capitalized 
at {50,000 and has the following incor- 
poiators; A. L. Agatin, A. J. McLen- 
nan and A. O. Robldeau, all of Duluth. 



Annual Clam Bake. 

The Clam Bake club will hold its 
annual clam bake on Madeline island 
the afternoon of Sept. 14. A boat will 
tran.'^port the members and their friends 
from Ashland to the island. The bake 
will be conducted along strictly sea-, 
shore lines. 




^^ 



ii> 



»v 



1732 West Superior strtH't. 



\ CITY BRIEFS I 

W until ilxtaibitji of .>l«ik. 

Milk Inspector Gust Hedman will en- 
deavor to have local dairymen enter 
and 'a measure for estabilshing "court.* ' *'^^'*'*** »^ t''*" competition of the In- 
01 Jurisprudence for the settlement of J^rnational I»airy Show association. 

The meeting will be held In Milwau- 
kee Oct. 22 to 81. Dairies from all 



t ■ 

I)' 

TU 

r-r.,- 

li. 



land titles in cases where the records 
are missing. In many hundreds of 
cases the records were burntd during 
the past revolution and in those revolu- 
tions yet existing. 

Another dramatic chapter was added 
to the story tf the massacre of soldiers 
and citizens at Ticuman by Zapatistas 
by Gerald Brandon, an American news- 
paperman working on El Diarlo of this 
city. Two of the passengers on the 
train as.saulted by the Zajatistas were 
H. L. Strauss and Ignaclo Herreriaa, 



parts of the country will be enter- 
ed. Inspector Hedman states that he 
Is confident that if E>uluth sends In Its 
best product it can take one of the 
first i>rize8. The milk must be pro- 
duced Oct. 15 and four quarts must be 
sent to the show. 



tnral defense of the presl- ] Mexican correspondents. Another was 



i has been that he has had Miguel Rivera, a newspaper photog- 



lime nor the legal machinery 
.. V for the carrying out of the 
Mi.'stil reforms. Not for one day 
■ his inaugiiratio.n has his country 
I free from rebels who loudly de- 
II ;i ruled "fulfillment of his promisees." 
and It y€t has the executive had a 
eongres.- on which he could depend for 
tlie support of the measures he has 
]>roml8ed. 
The cnniprei^s Madero inherited was a 



rai'her. All were slain, and their 
bodies, with tho.<«e of the other victims, 
burned. Brandon visited the long heap 
of human ashes a few days later, and 
there, according to a story written in 
the first person, which he sent to his 
paper, "swore to forsake his attitude 
o* neutrality and to avenge the death 
of his companions." 

The remainder of the story was 
brought here by the officer in command 



SterllaK (lnall«> PriatliiK. 

Thwlng-Stewart Co. Both phones. 114. 
* 
R«la Iliirta Potato Crop. 

Supt. (Jrout of the Jean Duluth farm 
said today that the potato crop of 
that place had apparently been great- 
ly Impaired by the King spell of cold, 
rainy weather through the month of 
August. "The vines do not look well 
at all," said Mr. Grout. "The recent 
sunny weather does not seem to have 
benefited them, for many of them are 
wilted and in general they do not look 
healthy. I think this is due to the fact 
that there was hardly any sunshine 
during August. This. I fear, will cut I 



BIk $!avlBK for Cigar Smokera. 

Clear Havana cigars at wholesale by 
the box, 10c cigars for 6c. Barthe- 
Martin company, wholesale grocers. 

JUDGE R. A. MOn 
KILLED BY TRAIN 

Was Rice Coanty Pioneer 

and Former Member of 

Legislature. 

Faribault, Minn., Sept. 9. — Judge 

Rodney A. Mott, one of Rice county's 

pioneers, was struck and killed by a 

northbound passenger train on the 

Rock Island tracks here today. 

Judge Mott practiced law here for 
half a century and has served In the 
state legislature and as a county offi- 
cial. Only recently Judge and Mrs. 
Mott celebrated the sixtieth anniver- 
sary of tlielr wedding. 



Reproductions 

in Oali and 

MatiOj^any 

Let us call your attention to the 
various Period Reproductions of 
English Furniture which we have 
on display in our showrooms. 
Beautiful Furniture, in oak and 
mahogany, for Living Rooms, 
Libraries, Drawing Rooms, Din- 
ing Rooms and Bed Rooms. None better can be found, even in 
the larger cities. 

We are exclusive representatives in this vicinity for the Berkey 
& Gay Furniture Company and the W. K. Cowan Company. 



^ ^^meAS r 



GOOD 

Established 1887. 




1st street and 3rd Tlvenue West. 



NEW CLASSES 

For the aooomniodatioii of thoae xwho 
conld not begin at the Duluth BualneNM 
DulverHity on Tuesday, neir elaHMeN In 
day and night Hchool Trill lie organised 
on .Monday, Sept. 0. College office 
open from 8 to S each ivcek day and 
from 7 to on Monday, '^^'ednesday and 
Friday eveninK". Location, 118 and i::0 
Fourth Ave. Weat, CMbrlatle building. 



SOLVING TH E TRAM P PROBLEM 

"Way Ticket" Method of Dealing With Vagrancy 
Accomplishing Revolution in the British Isles— 
— Gives Better Chance to Unemployed Who 
Want Work. 



S!S=;^»g*.ggs:g % a 



THE STORE THAT SELLS WOOLTEX 



Yon read 
altont '•Wofil- 
tex-* in all the 
FaMhion maga- 
r.incM. W'f have 
"Uwolle^"' r o r 
yoii. AhU for 
a Wooltex eal- 
alon — free! 



SnoceMNor to Gray-Tallant Co. 
113-115-117-119 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. DULUTH. MINN. 



C/«Me here 
and aee the 
new Wooltex 
C owi t m a u d 
Sn i t a — an d 
you'll k n o w 
why they are 
Mo popular with 
Kood dreoNerM. 



The Careful Woman 
and the Well Dressed 
Woman Are Early 
Buyers 

We are selling fall and winter garments NOW to the best-dreaaed 
women of this vicinity. 

They are always early buyers — ^which is one reason why they are 
known as well-dressed. 

For they have the first pick of the new styles and lead the fashion. 

Many women are buying now for still another reason. 

They believe in getting the most for their money and they realize 
that the earlier they put on their new clothes, the more wear they eet 
from them. ' * 

in .sf^lel* ^^' ^^^ *^** ^**^* ^* ***^" '*°* a'^ays have good choice 
Whether you buy now or later we can serve you welL 
But it is to your advantage to pick while the picking is at Its best. 
In every line of styles there are always certain particularly choice 

things which naturally go first and which It Is impossible to duplicate 
There is no advantage to be gained in price by waiting— unless you 

wait until the very end of the season. 

We sell Wooltex garments. Their sterling character is something 
at makes long wear enjoyable as well as economical. Wooltex coat^ 

They are built for service as 



th 

suits and skirts do not get shabby. 

well as beauty. 



Omo 



Ask the demonstrator what 
kind of a shield you should 
wear. 

All shields aren't alike- 
there are special shields for 
tall — for slender — for stout 
and for other people who 
need special shields. 

improved sanitary 




SUPERIOR 



Postal Bank (ironing. 

One of the heaviest months since its 
organization was experienced during 
August by the postal savings bank. 
The total receipts were 16,929, of which 
forty-two accounts are new. The to- 
tal number of patrons to date is 439. 
♦ 

ChiiPcli .luniversary. 

The twenty-fifth anniversary of the 
Swedish Mission church was celebrat- 
ed with elaborate services yesterday 
morning, afternoon and evening. Rev. 
J. J. I'aniels of Duluth conducted the 
morning servUes. and was assisted by 
Mrs. Daniels, who led the choir. 



London, Sept. 9. — The tramp problem court, and who Is believed to have been 



Mrs. La FoHctte Coining. 

Mrs. Robert La Follette, wife of the 
Wisconsin senator, will speak on suf- 
frage next Monday before the Douglas 
County Suffrage association. Mrs. La 
Follette will arrive here next Sun- 
day and plans for entertainment are 
now being ri.ade. 



Father Fardy Resigns. 

Rev. Father Fardy, ;V. O.. resigned 
yesterday from the pastorate of the 
Sacred Heart parish after serving the 
institution for the past nineteen years. 
Ill health is given as the cause of tlie 
retirement. Father Fardy Is succeeded 
l)y Rev. Father Fatrkk Lee, his first 
assistant for several years. 

Civic Cent»T Meeting. 

Miss Florence Two and Prof. A. D. 
Gillett will speak Thursday evening at 
the regular meeting of the Billings 
Park social and civil center at the 
Cooper school. Work for the winter 
will be outlined by the members of 
the organization following the princi- 
pal addresses. 



in the British Isles is in a fair way 
towards solution. The "way ticket' 
method of dealing with vagra.icy is 
accomplishing a revolution. Tho lat- 
est reports on the working of the 
system indicate that within a very few 
years the ranks of the rngsnd mendi- 
cants on the highways of the United 
Kingdom will be reduce! almost to 
vanishing point. 

The object of the "way tiokef is to 
give a better chance to the unem- 
ployed who really want work, and to 
ir.uke the way of the profcssivtnal 
tra»-np as hard as possible. The man 
who wants to work but is compelled 
to take to the road is taken into the 
pocrhout-e at night anl leltased next 
mcrr.ing instead of suffering the usual 

period of detention. When leaving he 
is given a ticket which entitles him 
to a certain allowance of bread and 
cheese along the road he Intends to 
take. He is also put in touch with 
the local labor exchanges and every- 
thing possible is done for him if he 
shows a genuine desire to obtain 
work. 

On the other hand, the habitual 
tramp obtains short shrift. Altei 
spending the night at the poorhouse 
he suffers the usual period of deten- 
tion and gets the allotted task. Fin- 
ally he is given the "way ticket," so 
that he has no excuse for begging. 
Very soon the psorhouse masters begin 
to look askance at tlie man who per- 
sistently presents the ticket, and his 
journey from village to village and 
from poorhouse to poorhouse in the 
counties where the system prcval'.s is 
not made any too smooth. "The tramp 
finally seeks a county where this meth- 
od does not prevail, so these sanctu- 
aries are beginning to adopt the sys- 
tem as self-defense. 

The system only becomes successful 
when the householders co-operate. 
Circulars are issued instructlug .hem 
that, since all vagrants have accets 
lo the bread tickets, there is no ex- 
cuse for giving food to beggars, and 
tramps who neglect to provide then- 
selves with the tickets .ir3 beginning 
to learn that the circulj-.rs have not 
fallen on barren sail. 
• * « 



the original Yorick, and James Bur- 
bage, who built the first English thea- 
ter, and his brother Richard, friend of 
Shakespeare. Still another name, re- 
calling the Elizabethan thespians, is 
cut In gilt letters on the altar, that of 
Nicholas Wilkinson, alias Toolev, 



of the city, all public timepieces must 
be synchronised. 

London's clocks generally have 
never been noted for timekeeping and 
the new regulation means tliat most of 
ihem will have to turn over a new 
leaf if they expect to synchronise with 
Greenwich time. Only three of the 
great clocks have proven themselves 
models of accuracy — those of St. Paul's 
cathedral, the Law Courts and Big Ben 
in Westminster palace. 

A tour of the streets proves that it 
is the simplest thing in the world to 
lose or gain time. By walking a block 
the pedestrian could gain anything 
from thirty seconds to two hours or 
he might lose as much. Four minutes 
could be gained by crossing Fleet 
street from one newspaper office to 
another, while a sporting paper on the 
same street had evidently started ita 
racing season by being five minutes 
ahead of Greenwich time. 

St. Margarets, which from its ecclesl- 



laS^^'b^e^dis^iifb^'uYe^'Ya^ch^^ATr?^^^ f«"^«' associaUons would be expected 

The po^or ge? thi H^^, of^'-tlJ,?/."kot^ft1,stk^n'-d?ng"^!,r J^e' 



one actor at 



poor of the parish 
money to this day, so 
least is not forgotten 

* • • 
The craze in London for regulation 
has reached the clocks. Hereafter ac- 
cording to a ukase of the corporation 



proachful looks of accurate Big Ben 
across the way. 

Indeed, there seemed to be a con- 
spiracy of disagreement among London 
clocks and on no street could more 
than two clocks be found to coincide. 



EARLY MAN IN SOUTH AMERICA 




Also 
belts. 

Main Floo 



-Notion Section. 



We Have Every Number 
in D. M. C. Crochet Cotton 

An import order came to us from Alsace Lorraine 
last week. 

Women who have been waiting will be glad to 
know of this timely arrival of these much 
wanted art threads. 

Come and see the new patterns for Crochet Bed 
Spreads. 

We*ll let you copy them without charge 
if you buy materials here. 

At Art Dept. — Third Floor. 



\\i 




Remodel Hotel Superior. 

Work was started this morning on 
the remodeling of Hotel Superior. 
The entire main fioor and parlors will 
be improved during the winter months 
An addition Is to be built to the struc- 
ture on Belknap street. 
» 

Struck By Xotorcycle. 

Andrew Warner of the Hotel Supe- 
rior was struck by a motorcycle yes- 
terday afternoon near Cvpress avenue 
on Twelfth street. Mr. Warner was a 
member of an automobile party and 
was standing on the road to allow C 
W. Erhart, driver, to repair the en- 
gine. Warner was hurled for some 
distance and when picked up was un- 
conscious. The Identity of the motor 
cyclist was not ascertained. 

— ♦- : 

HONORS AT COLLEGE 

Cleveland Plain Dealer. "W^hat was 
your son's social standing in college?" 

"Oh very fair. Why. he almost got 
into the Gibber and Squeak society!" 

"Indeed! How was that?" 

"Why, you know they " always hit 
them on the back as a sign they have 
been selected, and 0.?orge was hit on 
the back with such force that it knock- 
ed him down." 

"Mercy!" 

"Yes, indeed. He thought of course 
lie had been chosen, but he found out 
alterward It was the classt bully who 
hit him because he didn't like the set 
of his collar. But even that's a great 
honor." 



KEEPING HER HELP 

Cleveland Plain Dealer. "From Chi- 
cago, isn't he?" 

"Yes. A very unusual woman. She 
has such remarkable luck In keeplnK 
her help." 

•Hows that?" 

"Why she told me sjje liad had four 
husbands and only one cook." 



* 

The difficultie's of the clergymen 
and social reformers of more enlight- 
ened countries in their efforts to com- 
pel the fair sex to put more cloth .nto 
their skirts pale into inaigriificanre 
beside the troubles of the local fov- 
ernor of Inhambane. British East Af- 
1 Ice, who has almost caused a war 
by ordering the native maidens to at- 
tire themselves in European garb. 

The order particularly insisted thai 
the native women should not appear 
in public without skirts under pain of 
some grave penalty not specified. 

Never was an apparently Innorent 
sumptuary law received with sue | an 
outburst of rebellion. The commercial 
council resigned In a body and the In- 
dian storekeepers who deal In the ar- 
ticles of attire favored by the native 
ladles threatened to shut up shop in 
protest. The native belles took even 
more drastic action by refusing to 
come near Inhambane at all, with the 
result that the town was soon in dan- 
ger of a famine In vegetables, eggs, 
poultry and other necessary food sup- 
plies. The women who lived In town 
prepared to leave. 

The opposition became too hot for 
the governor, who withdrew the ob- 
noxious decree, and the belles of In- 
hambane again ^o about In their scant 
native costumes. 

• • • 

The London Shakespeare League Is 
busy with a plan for erecting In St. 
Leonard's church. Shoredltch. a tablet 
to the memory of the Elizabethan act- 
ors burled there. It is usual to think 
of Southwark cathedral as the actors' 
church. 'for it is there that Edmund, 
the brother and fellow-actor of 
Shakespeare, lies burled. But the first 
theaters were near Shoredltch, and it 
is there that the early actors lie at 
rest. All traces of the theaters have 
disappeared from the district; but, 
like many places in London, one of the 
unlovely streets perpetuates the mem- 
ory of departed things by the name of 
Curtain street. 

The original actors' church disap- 
peared early in the eighteenth cen- 
tury, when Dance designed the present 
structure to take Its place. The actors' 
graves have disappeared, but their 
names remains on the parish register. 
Among them are those of Will Somers, 
who delighted Uenry VIIL and his 



Five years ago the Bureau of Amer- 
ican Ethnology published a "bulletin on 
•Sketetal Remains Suggesting, or At- 
tributed to, Early Man in North Amer- 
ica," based on the researches of Dr. 
Ales Hrdlicka, curator of physical 
anthropology in the United States Na- 
tional museum. There is to appear 
shortly in similar form, under the title 
of "Early Man in South America," a re- 
sume 01 the investlgatons of Dr. Hrd- 
licka, in collaboration with W. H. 
Holmes, head curator of the depart- 
ment of anthropology In the United 
States National museum. Bailey Willis 
of the United States geological survey, 
and Fred Eugene Wright and Clar- 
ence E. Fenner of the geo-physlcal 
laboratory of the Carnegie Institution 
of Washington. 

Even before the completion of his re- 
port on ancient man in North Am 
Dr. Hrdlicka became interested 
evidence bearing on the correspon 
problem in South America, and sub 
sequently, at the suggestion of W. H. 
i^iolmes, he wag sent by the secretary 
of the Smithsonian institution, to visit 
Argentina for the purpose of making 
a study at first hand of the available 
material and an investigation of the 
most promising regions. 

In view of the Important position oc- 
cupied by geology in studies of this 
nature, Bailey Willis of the United 
States geological survey was chosen to 
accompany Dr. Hrdlicka. 

The chief objects of the expedition 
were: the examination of the skeletal 
remains relating to early man, in Bra- 
zil and Argentina; the study of the 
principal localities and ueposits from 
which these finds came; and, if pos- 
sible, the collection of osseous, arche- 
ologic, and other specimens bearing on 
the subject of man's antiquity. It was 
hoped that thorough Investigation on 
the ground would enable the explor- 
ers to form more definite conclusions 
concerning the finds, then the liter- 
ature relating to them warranted, and 
that possibly by means of new discov- 
eries additional light would be thrown 
on the whole subject of early man In 
South America, especially in Argentina. 
The party reached Argentina early in 
May, 1910. Dr. Hrdlicka spent two 
months in that country, while Mr. 
Willis remained somewhat longer, 
nearly all this time being given to the 
researches recorded In the report. The 
work was greatly facilitated by several 
of the local men of science, and* the au- 
thors express warm appreciation for 
the valuable asslsstance thus rendered. 
During the first part of the stay In 
Argentina. Dr. Hrdlicka devoted his 
time to the ^tudy of the available 
skeletal material attributed to anci- 
ent man, found in the various local 
museums, while Mr. Willis examined 
the various samples of baked earth 
and other objects believed to have 
been associated with the activities of 
prehistoric man. Several localities in 
Bucncs Aires where exposures could 
be studied, including the drydock where 
the •Diprothomo" skull had been found 
some time before, were carefully ex- 
amined. On May 24 the party set out 
for the coast where important speci- 
mens had been discovered, and a few 
days later were joined at Mar del Plata 
by the late Prof. Florentine Ameghino 
and his brother Carlos, who assisted 
the expedition materially, accompany- 
ing Dr. Hrdlicka and Mr. Wllll« for 
more than three weeks from place to 

fdace on the coast, and to several in- 
and points of interest. 

After the completion of this general 
survey. Dr. Hrdlicka visited the valley 
of the Rio Negro, whence came several 
fossil crania many years ago, while 
hLT. Willis proceeded to Arroyo Slasffo 



and Alvear, to study the geology of 
these territories and several specimens 
SLt''^'!;^ ^^'"''' ^^"PPO^^ed to be the pro? 
f-oSi .°'t ancient human Industry. 
Early in July, both explorers met "?aln 
n Buenos Aires, and after fir.lshinS 



their work in that region started for 
Ovejerlo, a locality in northwestern \r- 

frfil "^1 *^.''^i ^^'^^ '"'^"^^ '"<o prominence 
In the last few years through its vield 
of human bones; they also visited' Tu- 
h"/Vi^\ "f." "^''•^"- ^"'^ Mendoza. Dr. 
Mr ii-m. *''^". proceeded to Peru while 
-^^».^^'"*s returned to Buenos Aires. 
T„o.?lt researches occupied nearly three 
^.fi^* ?• E^ery specimen relatin- to 
ancient nian that could be found was 
examined, and every Important locality 
was investigated. Unfortunately the 
general results of the inquiry are not 
in harmony with claims previously 
made by the various authors who re- 
ported the several finds. On the con- 




ence of very early predecessors of th© 
Indian In South America; nor does It 
sustain the theories of the evolution of 
man In general, or even that of an 
American race alone. In the Southern 
continent. The facts gathered atteRt 

rw!it'T'^^^^fJ"^''^}>' ^^^ presence of the 
already differentiated and relatively 
modern American Indian. This should 
not be taken as a categorical denial of 
the existence of early man in South 
America, however Improbable such a 
conclusion may now appear; but tho 
position is maintained that the final 
acceptance cf the evidence on this sub- 
ject can not be justified until there la 
accumulated a mass of strictly scien- 
tific cbsc^rvationB requisite in kind and 
volume, to established a proposition of 
so great Importance. ^ y " """ "» 

r.Z.l'^ expedition secured numerous 
Snwfi^?'' P-'^J^f"tological, and anthro- 
pological specimens, some of which 
throw light on the question unde- in- 
vestigation. All these specimens have 
been deposited In the United statl, 

and^^'exh^blTir""* '^^ '"^^^" ^^"''^' 



Ihe report covering this subject, Bul- 
etin 52 of the Bureau of American 
ethnology, contains 405 oaKes 13 



plates, and many text figures 

ENGLISH WOMEN WIN A POINT 
London letter to the New York Trib- 
une: Members of the cabinet express 
w hngness to accept Lord Wolmer's 
bill which would enable English worn 

w^****,^*"";? ^° l^^ woolsack of th^ 
lord chancellor. The only members of 
the ministry who are said to frown 
upon this concession to "wornen's 
rights" are David Llovd George and 
^fl'Vv. ««"^*m:an. It Is unferstoSd 
that they have been prevailed upon not 
1^^°^^*^*.^ ^*^? measure, while their dis- 
approbation is to be accepted as a mat. 

n^J,'*^ \''1 "**'« consequence to be magi 
nified Into a cabinet "split." 

•The bill provides that a woman shall 

not on the ground of her sex alone be 

disqualified: 

(a) for being called to the bar as a 
barrister; or 

(b) for being admitted to the roll of 
solicitors of the supreme court and act- 
ing as a solicitor: or 

(c) for being registered as a parlia- 
mentary agent and acting as such or 

<d) for being admitted as a student 
at any Inn of court, or entering as a 
candidate In any examination, or tak- 
ing in the like manner and on the llks 
terms as a man any other preliminary 
steps necessary for any of the pur- 
poses aforesaid. 



Stores do not prosper Just because 
they are stores — nor even because they 
are GOOD stores. They must b* 
"pushed by publicity." 





mif/kaka^jSSmmmmmkm 



mmkm 



IBIIB" 




8 

THE DULUTH HERALD 

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER. 

—ESTABLISHED APRIL 9. 1883— 
PubUsJu'.l overv evening e\i efi .Simaay by 

THE HERALD COMPANY. 
Herald BuihUn«-. Opposite Postofftre S.iuare, 

422 and 424 West First St. . IHiluth. Mtnn^ 

lEaiiiml M iMcoiitl-claii* mata-t at the Ouluili i..«iafnc« uiidt-i Uio »rt of con- 

IjiBiH of XIanh 3. lit'K. ___^ 

TKI.KfM**^ KS — Well m»A 5Cf ■•« >»• . , „ . 

Buslrit'SB Of lice. 321. Kqtt oriat Uooins. li-«'- 

OFFIc"iAL PAPER CITY OF pTu L U T H . 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES: 

(By mall payable in advance.) 

Dally, otu' montli I -'i^ Dally. J.ix months $200 

JDaiiy. thiof months 1.00 l>ally. one year 4.«i> 

.•inturil«y llfrnld. un* y«-«r '!"S2 

\%.-.<Li, li.riil^l. wne year ••"•» 

R. liv 4-he.lt. iHHtofflfe "r.ler. r»>(rt»t.H>-»t U-ller or n- 

gimaa .. :. _., -v ,« [)«>»ble to Th» Ik-riiU cwmiaiiy. Uk«e poat- 

#fllr« ailtlniM ill Hill, iiitiutlii'i sl»u> ama cuutiiy. 

BY CARRIER— CITY OR SUBURBS. 

fialiv .«•!►. \v.«,>k * ,7 

Pat : 5.00 

r on Ihn cln-uUtlon iVii>»rUi»«it by ctUiiiK 3i». 
«M , ,. 1 *uy itiiiiptauit of sTTivp. 

1 u a.»iruig tlM •ilJii^ of your p»per clwnged lo ftre 

»iitl> I , , , , i.trwuMfii. 

Th ' ntiluth Hfialtl accepts advertlsinK contracts with 

the mtee that It haa the largest circulation 

of a* iiubUshed in Minnesota outaidj the Iwin 

On,. K.^ I il.if as an artvertislngf medium is i»pparent. 



Monday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



September 9, 1912. 



WHY THEY PICKED MINNESOTA. 

T!;e I'orald has a letter from Ralph W. Wheelock. 
f; , ,10 Governor Adolph O. Eberhart, in 

•whicli he makes reply to the charge "that the reason the 
failroads att;u-kc<i the rate legislation in this state was 



loll sure that the administration of Govern- 
u .iil.i not dialurb them or interfere with 



or i'Licriuu: 
their i>Ian>." 

Mr. \\ lioelKk's answer to this charge is that' 'this liti- 



,a!l i 



11 LKi;, before Mr. Eberhart became gov- 



ity have been relegated to places which they arc really 
able to fill, and are prevented from further interfering 
with the effective administration of the pure food and 
drtigs act. will the bureau of chemistry be in a fair way 
of redeeming its shattered scientific reputation. 

"Men who have conscientiously endeavored to ascer- 
tain whether or not certain ingredients in food and drugs 
sold to the public are harmful or not, and who have been 
bold enough to voice their convictions in reports, have 
been treated as rascals. The daily press has hailed with 
enthusiasm the appointment as head of the bureau of 
chemistry of a man whose past career holds out no 
promise f(»r future reform in the methods of administer- 
ing the law. A graduate of an agricultural college in 
the Middle West, he has never published any scientific 
work of importance; nor has he pursued any graduate 
studies. The relation of physiology to the pure food 
law is a sealed book to him. Far better would it have 
been if an intelligent civilian with an open mind had 
been reported, 

•Alas, for the pure food laws! Manufacturers who 
have money enough to tight in the courts and to engage 
experts at high market prices will continue to toy with 
it. and the poor public will continue to alleviate the 
pains of indigestion, contracted because of the bureau's 
ineptitude, with medicines whose sale the bureau ought 
to prevent. If 'muckraking* were still journalistically 
fashionable, what a sensation the e.\posure of the condi- 
tions in the bureau of chemistry would create!" 

The people some years ago became aware that they 
were being systematically robbed and sickened by dis- 
honest foods and drugs. 

They brought about the enactment of a fairly efficient 
law against such practices. 

And under Roosevelt and Taft the law has been ad- 
ministered by an official organization more careful of 
the profits of crooked manufacturers than it has been of 
the public health. 

This is one of the things which Wilson can be de- 
pended upon to give his attention to soon after March 
4, 1913. 





THE GOVERNORSHIP 



J 



A PulltifUn — 'TVo More. 

I.,e Sueur N«yvM: . It la a Kieat grame, 
Kberharfs friends'Will not uae tlie sec- 
ond choice pilyliege In the orlmary 
election. Eberhart la a mere politician. 
He never waq nioc«. 



WllllBK to iSiktf a Chanre. 

Cokato l^nterprlBe; .Sam Y. Gordon 
seeni.H to be th» .only Kubernatorial 
candidate who U sport enough to take 
a chance on Io^^hk the nomination. 
When it comes to a showdown, the 
others are perfectly wlllingc to "let 
.Sam do It." It iVa a case of priority 
in ttUng, Sam Y. can tell the others to 
go to. 



Up to (he Volera. 

Albert Lea Tribune: It Is to be re- 
gretted that there Is such a multi- 
plicity of candidates representing the 
Progressive views, while the machine 
stands as usual with only one man In 
the field. But It seems to us that if 
the Progressive voters of the state use 
their second choice judiciously, they 
aro bound to nominate a candidate the 
maclilne'a choice, and so bo able to 
elect a man for governor who will 
harlten to the desires of the people 
In.stead of "bending the pregnant 
knee" to the special Interests, as In 
the case at the present time in Mlnne* 
sota. 



it i~ 



CCr, 



Not so Trivial. 

Warren Register: We have seen no 
explanation from Governor Eberhart 
of his using the governor's contingent 
fund to pay subscriptions to dally 
newspaper.^ (the one.s, too, by the way. 
that are supporting him) and to pay 
clipping bureaus for newspaper ex- 
tracts. The amounts so expended are 
not so •trivial" as the governor's sup- 
porters try to make the people be- 
lieve — nor are the taxicab fares and 
several other of the items. 



hart newspapers of the state, and th*5' 
include most of the big dallies, except 
The Duluth Herald, hava been work- 
ing their political writers overtime the 
past two weeks In an endeavor to prove 
that Lieutenant Governor Gordons 
boom for governor has fizzled out. This 
is in keeping wUh the tactics of these 
papers In the past. It is their practice 
to act somewhat friendly to the ea.ndl- 
date they most hate to see elected, in 
the beginning of the campaign, and 
then towards election time, to swing 
against him all at once and declare his 
chance for nomination or election 
gone, and thus carry with them tiie 
support of numerous country papers 
also. They have tried these tactics In 
their effort to belittle Mr. Gordons 
campaign during the past few weeks, 
but we fail to notice that very many 
of the rural editors have fallen, al- 
though a few weakened for a while. 



TWENT Y YEAR S AGO 

Taken From the Columns of The Herald of This Date, 1892. 



•♦•The great fight for the heavy- 
weight championship is over, arid 
James J. Corbett now holds the title 
of champion of the world, having 
knocked out John L. Sullivan in the 
twenty-first round at New Orleans. It 
was a hot fight and Corbett won by 
reason of his science and generalship. 



•••Congressman Klttel Halvorsen has 
finally withdrawn from the People's 
party ticket as the candidate for lieu- 
tenant governor, and Swan Nelson of 
Washington county has been substi- 
tuted. 



liart had 



' trouble with Mr. Wheelock's reply is that 
die wrong charge. 

v; is tliat the railroads restored the three- 
rate and the higher freight rates in this 
ng all the states, because they felt se- 
... L.ifbance by the state administration. 
t was perpetrated July 1, ion, when Mr. Eber- 
H'Cii l:o\ .TiMr nearly two years, and after the 
J '. had a chance to test his mettle during 

three I rcvtutug years as lieutenant-governor and presi- 
dent of the senate. IT WAS DONE IN NO OTHER 
STATE. 

Thai the confidence of the railroads was amply justi- 
ijed ua> quickly proved. 

AtUiiipts to induce Governor Eberhart to call an 
extra session to show that the state was not submitting 
meekly to this outrage, and to redress the ignominy at 
Ica.st by putting railroad taxes up to a fair level, failed 
conspicuously. 

When the governors of other states rose to the de- 
fet; . Minnesota and determined to intervene in the 
rate cases, Governor Eberhart was not only not a party 
to the proceeding, but he ridiculed it. 

While the people carried the burden of a fifty per 
cent increase in passenger rates and a twenty-five per 
cent increase in commodity freight rates, the state, un- 
der Adolph Eberhart. was as motionless as a hundred- 
pound coward under a two hundred-pound bully. 

It was not until political exigency forced Governor 
Eberhart to call an extra session in the hope of saving 
Ills ov.;n political existence that it was possible even to 
get railroad taxes raised from a ridiculously low level. 

Mr. Wheelock has done the state a service by re- 
miiidnig it of this shame. It should not be forgotten by 
any citizen of this commonwealth. 



Maine. 

By tomorrow at this time we ought to know whether 
Maine has maintained her ancient reputation of "wentlng." 



Gordon Boom Not Dead. 

Fertile Journal: The Smith-Eber- 



THE OPEN COURT 



Mlicht Help. 

A3 r.' ar a?* it can be figured out at this distance, what 
New Y.irk needs most of all in a complete and thorougli 
n«w start. 

THRIFT. 

Thrift generally is learned in early youth, or not at 
all. At any rate, though it is easy enough to learn when 
you are young, it is desperately hard to learn when sud- 
den necessity overwhelms you. 

It is good to hear, therefore, that the pupils of the 
Duluth public schools have more than eight thousand 
dollars on deposit in the various school saving funds. 
The schools that are doing this are teaching a thing as 
useful as anything else in their courses. 

It i- ti >t surprising to hear also that Judge Ensign, 
who iirrsides over the juvenile court, believes that few- 
er child offenders have been brought before him during 



REGISTER TOMORROW. 

Duluth citizens who wish to vote at the primary elec 
tion next Tuesday will have to register for it tomorrow, 
or they can't vote. 

That is not technically true, because there is a com- 
plicated proceeding by which those who fail to register 
before can register on primary election day; but the 
proceeding is so difficult that it is much safer to accept 
it as literally true and final. 

Those who vote at the general election do only half 
their duty. The primary election is as important as the 
general election, and in many cases more so. 

Get yourself registered some time between six o'clock 
in the morning and nine o'clock tomorrow evening, and 
you will be on the safe side. 

**\ Ro«e Br Any Other Name.** 

If he wants to keep up to date. "Suspender Jack" Mc- 
Gee might change his sobriquet to "Stampede Jack." 

FOR THE PUBLIC WELFARE. 

The conference committee meets tomorrow to make 
up the city budget for next year. 

It is to be hoped that the committee will not fail to 
deal generously with the request of the board of public 
welfare, which has mapped out an admirable program 
and asks twenty-nine thousand dollars to carry it out. 

The Herald believes that it is the sense of the com- 
munity that this request be granted; that the commun- 
ity needs it and wants it; and that the conference com- 
mittee will be in harmony with the public will if it pro- 
vides this money, and out of harmony with it if it fails. 

Since no member of the conference committee di- 
rectly represents this side of the city life, it is to be 
hoped that every member will constitute himself a rep- 
tesentative of the public welfare and do his part in se- 
curing for that purpose the modest amount of money it 
requires. 

Tronble .\head. 

An anonymous letter-writer threatens to blow up the 
MlnneapolLs police headquarters. Now every man in town 
that has half a dozen or so sticks of dynamite in his house 
will be under suspicion. 



(BwiaMa of Tbe Herald are Invited to make fret 
iwe of thU column to euires* their lijeas about the 
topiiii of gemral Intero**; but dlscusiiloiis of «e«tarlaii 
relUlKU* differences are barred. LeHers should not 
exoxA 3M iTorda— the shorter the \ifilor. Tliey muit 
be wTilteii oil one aide of the i>ap«r only, and they 
nuul b« arcunipanltd in even' caae by the name and 
addrcas of the writer. Uutugh thew need not be pub- 
lulMd. A. algued leUw U aiwwa more «llec-llv«> 
Uowtter. ) 



Afraid of Second Choice. 

Luverne Journal: Eberhart is fight- 
ing the "second choice" as he would 
figTit a pest. The second choice votes, 
if very generally cast, will "get him 
and he knows it. 

It Will Not. , ^^ 

Cass Lake Times: "Will It be Eber- 
hart?" asks Tom Noswal. It will not, 
and before he gets through with his 
whys and wherefores, Tom agrees 
with us. 

One Good Reason. 

Fairmont .Sentinel: If the candi- 
dates opposing Governor Eberhart had 
any political sagacity they would con- 
fine their attacks upon the adm nlstra- 
tion to Eberhart's failure to join witn 
other governors in fighting the San- 
born decision In the railroad rate 
cases. Therein is enough campaign 
material if properly handled to deleat 
Governor Eberhart for renomlnation 
and relegate him to private life for- 
ever. 



In the Good Old 

Railroad Days 

John S. I'arde« In tlio American Magastno. 



•••Dr. Alex Forin of West Duluth 
has received his commission as as- 
sistant surgeon to the Third regiment, 
N. G. S. M., and ranks as first lieu- 
tenant. 



••*At Deerwood in three hours a 
few mornings ago, Mr. and Mrs. C. A. 
Pearson of Duluth caught eight mus- 
kellunge with a trolling line, the larg- 
est weighing 18% pounds and the eight 
weighing 100 pounds. 

•••Frank Houck, who shot Haggerty 
and Murphy in a Vvest Duluth saloon, 
was captured yesterday in a clothes 
closet off a room in the St. Charles 
hotel, where he boarded. Officer Roach 
made the arrest. 



engaged in engineering and surveying 
for twenty-five years and is at present 
assistant chief engineer of the Duiuin. 
Mlssabe & Northern, having charge ox 
the construction work. 

• ••Miss Florence Broadwell will open 
a private school on Sept. 14 in the 
rooms of the Saturday club on Second 
street. 

•••At the last meeting of the Street 
Railway Employes union. E. W Balrd 
was elected delegate to go to Indian- 
apolis on Sept. 12 to aid in the forma- 
flon of a national union of street rail- 
way employes. 

• •♦Leonidas Merrltt. Alfred Merrlt^ 
T R Merritt and Roswell Palmer have 

file^d uTe'plit'of M«"-;"\Sf ^^e'jPster 
the town of Grant, with the reguter 
of deeds. It contains the northwest 
quarter of the northwest Quarter ox 
section 10, 58-18. 



•••Quincy A. Thomes has entered 
the field for the Democratic nomina- 
tion for county surveyor. He has been 



How to Meet Abuse 



•••George L. Robbins. secretary, and 
E R Brfce. one of the directors of 
{he Great Northern Mining company, 
left yesterday on an extended visit 
to the company's property. 

•••Mrs. H. J. Johnson of West Du- 
luth has left for a visit with relative* 
in Michigan. 

•••Miss Lou Knaah of St. Paul. wh» 
has been visiting Mrs. E. Gillette of 
111 East Fourth street, has returned 
home. 



THE LAST WORD. 



To the Editor of The Herald: 

That list of factories published In 
The Herald Saturday evening was a 
revelation to me. I did not know that 
there were so many establishments in 
the city, and the fact that they are all 
in need of more men. should be suffi- 
cient reason for silencing the last 
doubter and fault-finder in Duluth. 

That this city is on the verge of a 
wonderful growth seems to be the be- 
lief of not only outsiders but our own 
residents also, now. and we seem to 
be In a fair way to develop a booster 
spirit here that will make such way- 
stations as St. Paul and Minneapolis 
sit up and take notice. 

GREYSOLON DU LHUT. 
Duluth. Sept. 8. 



Oh, 



THE 1904 CAMPAIGN FUND. 

Disregarding ugly details that have spread scandal 
and driven Roosevelt to furious denial m eighteen 
thousand words, there are facts about the 1904 cam- 
paign fund which the public is entitled to know. 

Disregarding the charge that corporation money 
the vacation period just closed than in any Previous 1 ^^jj^^^ Roosevelt to be friendly to the large interests, 
period, and that he divides the credit for this between , ^^-^^^ j^^ people believe and which nobody should be- 
the public playgrounds and the public school savings ac- | jj^^,^^ ^j^^^.^ ^^^ moral factors involved which ought not 
counts, both of which have helped to keep the little ones 
out of mischief. 

Both, clearly, are valuable factors in the community 

life. 



Or .^aybody'nf 

Now it t» .'»ald Governor Johnson of California may par- 
don the McNamaras. Would that move gain your vote for 
tlie Bull Moose ticket? 



THE SILVER UNING. 

Weil, anyway, few people get enough walking for 
the good of their health, and this is good walking 
weather. 



Don't Forset. 

Oh yes; and say — have you regt.^tered? 



UNDERMINING THE PEOPLE'S LAW. 

When the Federal pure food act was passed it was a 
jfrcat victory for the people. 

But that victory has been made empty by the official 
organization put in charge of its enforcement by Roose- 
velt and continued by Taft. 

Dr. Wiley, who would have made this law eflFective, 
and who would have acted invariably in the people's in- 
terests even if in so acting he threatened the profits of 
powerful crooks, has been crowded out. The Scientific 
American pictures the situation as it exists today: 

**'If anyone wV; 1 is at all familiar with the wretched 
organization of tlie bureau of chemistry and its un- 
scientific methods cherished the illusion that a new and 
brighter era was to dawn with the appointment of an 
encregetic, competent man to fill Dr. Wiley's place, and 
that the investigations of the bureau were henceforth to 
be so conducted that it would be unnecessary to main- 
tain at great expense a referee board to check up the 
work of the bureau, he is doomed to disappointment. 

*'Thc pure food and drugs act, as fine a piece of legis- 
I .jj^, rcss ever enacted, is destined to remain in- 

effective .-..<iusc the head of the bureau of chemistry is 
either itnable or unwilling to gather scientific evidence 
of Iraiid* and then present that evidence in legal form 



to be ignored. 

Granted that Roosevelt is unbribable, did he take cor- 
poration money for his campaign fund? That alone is 
immoral, if he did, and against public policy; and there 
is on record a receipt for ten thousand dollars contrib- 
uted by the United States Steel corporation. If he 
took corporation money and then worked against the 
corporations, that is immoral in another way. 

The fund that elected Roosevelt is variously esti- 
mated at three to seven million dollars. 

That's a good deal of money. 

How many of the people — what proportion of them — 
contributed to this fund? 

What was the average size of the contributions? 

How many contributed less than a thousand dollars 

each? 

How many contributed more than fifty thousand dol- 
lars each? 

How many of the contributions were from indivi- 
duals, and how many from corporations? 

An answer to these questions,, in which no names 
need be used, would be interesting and informing. 



The School Plcale. 

tt all cornea back when I hear 
their cry. 
As the chorus of glee goes a-rlding by. 
In picnic wagons bedecked with the 

leaves 
That tickled our necks in a way that 

weaves 
A magical touch o'er Memory's grace 
•Way back into childhood's loving em- 
brace! 

Oh, the Joy of the crowd as we turned 
the bend. 

And the shouts of the boy who sat on 
the end 

With his feet hanging over, and 
swinging-like 

To the tune of the hoofs on the coun- 
try pike. 

As out to the fair grounds the wagons 
went 

Loaded with joyous, glad merriment: 

•N then with our baskets, away we 

run, 
Wjth loud, wild shouts for the day 

begun! — 
Out there in the swings, and the games 

we played — 
And the races run — and the lemonade — 
The chickens and pickles — the salad — 

the pie — , , . , 

And ice cream piled on saucers high! 

•N the boy who fell in at the water's 

edge 
'N the boy who stepped In the thorny 

hedge — 
'N the boy who bumped his toe on a 

clod 
As over the fields he roughly trod — 
Who sat on the pie and was heard to 

declare: 
"I wouldn't a-done it 'f I'd known It 

was there!" 

And— oh. If we look, we can see them 

now! 
One hanging on to the tall of a cow; 
And one In the meadow in heat of the 

Percl.ed up en the top of a stack of 

hay 
And one in the barnyard, one in the 

trough, ,,.,,», 

And one in the empty ole hayloft! 

And. at last when the bell, so soft 

and low, . ^ ,-. 

In the distance says: " Tis time to go! 
The crowding, hurrying, scurrying 

t'i'?n ^ ,^ ... 

To be first in the wagon to sit with 

the men. ^ , 

And the good-by cheers as we drive 

From the picnic grounds, and scenes 
of play! 

And the long ride back to the school- 
house door. x.^ M ^ 

And night coming on, unthought of be- 
fore; , ^. 

And the last three cheers, and the 
song we sung. 

And the slow tramp home, and again 
among . . . » 

The home-folks— all tired out— but 
with stories to tell 

To mother, who enjoys them overwell! 
« • • • • 

It all comes back in a mystical 
way , , , 

As the little boy sleeps at clo.=ie of day. 

And dreams of the cheery-hued, child- 
ish things. ^ , 

And the cricket comes near and sings 
and sings! 

And night quiets down in a rapturous 
joy. 

In a prayer for the tired-out picnic 

boy! 

— W. M. Fogarty. 



Jim Hll came along one day 
and taught the railroad world, that it 
v.'as more economical to haul full cars 
In solid train loads. It was as simple 
as making an egg stand on end. but 
It opened a new epoch In railroad earn- 
ings. George H. Daniels promulgated 
the truth that courtesy Is an asset, and 
railway servants are today an uniform- 
ly obliging as they used to be not so. 
B H Harriman devised a new style of 
organization. The Pennsylvania incul- 
cated system in its magnificent school. 
Countless men in the operating and 
construction departments learned new 
wavs of doing things. 

The whq|e conglomeration Is new. 
Why, I can remember when the engine 
said "Whoof-whoof-whoof," and the 
baggage car picked up the passenger 
car In three jerks, one for each link In 
the coupling chain. Those were the 
days when one changed -cars five times 
between New York and Chicago — it 
was originally sixteen times between 
New York and Buffalo — and Mr. Pull- 
man's clumsy contrivances were con- 
sidered palatial. Those were the days 
when cut-rate ticket brokers— how 
long since you have seen a ticket brok- 
er's office? — lined the curb. In those 
day.<5. Conductor Simmons, the funny 
one. used to come down the aisle say- 
ing, "Pass, please, show me your pass," 
and pretend to fall dead if any one of- 
fered him a real ticket. That was not 
so very far this side of the strap-rail 
system when men used to pick up the 
tall behind the train and run ahead to 
tack it down again. ^ . ..^ ^ 

In the itnerlm some of the brightest 
men in the United States have been 
studying the railroad brusiness. They 
have been studying the cost of service 
till they almost know the answer to j 
some of the simplest questions! They 
have been studying rails and cars and 
locomotives and boilers and brakes and 
bridges and couplers and cement and 
accounting and advertising and audit- 
ing. 

Try to remember back thirty years, 
or twenty, or even ten. Every shipper 
had a rebate and every traveler a pass. 
The shipper who did not like his pub- 
lished rate went to the general agent 
and had a new one made. Then he 
went round the corner and got the rival 
agent to cut it. The biggest shipper 
of all not only exacted a rebate from 
the railroads from all that he — or It — 
shipped, but also extorted from the 
railroads the same amount for every- 
thing shipped by competitors. "Haul- 
ing for less than the cost of axle 
grease," was a common expression if 
not a common practice. 

As for the passenger department. It 
was a comic supplement. Every poli- 
tician had a pocket full of passes. 
Every country editor had a sheaf of 
annuals. Every shipper could have all 
he wanted for himself, his family and 
his wife's relations simply for the ask- 
ing And of the cash fares. It used to 
be said that what stuck to the celling 
belonged to the company when the con- 
ductor tossed for it. or that a* conduc- 
tor ought to be able to save more than 
his salary — a common expression if not 
a common practice. It was assumed on 
one hand that the passenger business 
never would pay its cost — the New 
Haven u.^ed to be pointed out as about 
the only road that had a profitable 
pas.scnger business — and on the other, 
so long as It cost nothing to carry one 
more passenger, since the train was 
running anyhow, that branch of the 
service came in handy to cultivate good 
fellowship and make friends for the 
road. A pass was cheaper than a cigar. 



Collier's: Woodrow Wilson s man- 
ner of meeting personal assaults is 
one which we trust will be maintained, 
even to the close of a violent catn- 
palgn. In the fierce fight over the 
democracy at Princeton charges mnu- 
merable were hatched against him, as 
is inevitable in any controversy where 
a whole pleasant system Is threatened. 
He let these rumors die their natural 
death. When he was running for gov- 
ernor it was charged that he liad put 
himself under obligations to Senator 
Smith and the New Jersey machine. 
He knew it was untrue, t>ut was con- 
tent to let his acts speak. When Smith 
wished to go to the United States sen- 
ate. Wilson prevented him. He was 
charged with ingratitude then, Just as 
ho had been charged with subserviency 
in advance, and he let time also take 
care of that. When the Harvey trouble 
arose he did not publish his version 
He let his opponent have the field, it 
was from his opponents themselves, in 
an incautious moment, that the world 
finally learned that the whole trouble 
Brew out of Wilson's refusal to accept 
Ryan's money. The Carnegie pension 
story was fixed up. doctored, circulated 
howled about, and again Wilson was 
quiet. On the very eve of tlje Balti- 
more convention the facts were so thor- 
oughly elucidated, without his partici- 
pation, that from that day to this few 
Sf his enemies have had the assurance 
to touch the subject. The governors 
managers, some of them are sure to 
urge him to fight baclc, to have 
Dunch" to "put g nger" Into his cam- 
paign.' For our part we wish he may 
retain this elevation; may say calmly 
what he thinks and plans; may leave 
noise and slugging to others; may re- 
main unruffled by the immediate value 
of mob excitement; and may be satis- 
fied with the approval of his own con- 
science. ^^ ^^ ^p^^^ 

The depth, and not the tumult, of Uie aoul. 
Governor Wilson, in a public refer- 



among the throng before your throne 
and he looked at me so long and 
strangely that I am sure he must have 

come for me." „ »„uan 

"Go then: go at once, the sultan 

said, and after the viziers departure 

he beckoned the angel of death to him 

•Why did you gaze so strangely at 
my grand vizier?" ««„~i 

•'I was only wondering," the angel 
answered "why the man was here, 
for 1[ hive orders to kill him late thl« 
afternoon in Smyrna." 



Before and After. 

Baltimore Sun: Taft is to be silent 
during the campaign. Roosevelt t9 be 
vociferous throughout, and Wilson is to 
speak when he has something to say. 

Which is a pretty soo^i . ^"f fji,^^' 
what will happen whoever is electeo. 

Taft^ administration would lively be 
ouiet and Theodores noi.sy, but Wil- 
son's w^ill be the one in which things 
are done. 



Oh, 



BunlncMH Opening. 

But maybe the idea is to form a copartnership of the 
pardoned in Wall .Street. It wouldn't make a bad firm 
name, either — "McNamara Bros. & Morse." 



LUCKY MAN. 

A dispatch in The Herald Saturday night told about 
a Chicago man from whose stomach the surgeons took 
iiineteen knives, seventeen nails, five knife blades, a doz- 
en screws and a silver dollar, all of which he had swal- 
lowed for the entertainment of his friends. 

He was a lucky man to find that dollar. It'll help 
pay for the operation. 

Foolish man to do this? Surely. But not much more 
foolish than those of us who swallow huge quantities of 
fancy foods and drinks and expect our stomachs to stand 
it always. 

Every fourth year everybody has something to be 
thankful for at Thanksgiving time, because the campaign 



Kot until incompetent officials now in places of author-] is always over by then 






Where the Man Who Expoiaed Balllnger 
•ttapdM. 

Baltimore Sun: There is no better 
Progres.sive In the country than Louis 
D BrandeLs — no man more 'horoughly 
Irnbued with that combined fervor for 
Rmelioratlng the condition of the 
laboring man. regulatine the corpori- 
tloiis and establishing the rule of th" 
teot.le which the Progr 's.slves clar.n as 
peculiarly their own. than he. And 
there are not many men v/ho think 
taore clearly? or express themselves 
more effectively th.in he. 

The face. (f«en.' that he is support- 
ing Woodrow Wttson In this cam- 
paign, and doing it whole-heartedly. Is 
significant. 

Oolas A^fter Water. 

Youth's Companion: A soldier cross- 
ing the barrack square with a p.ill 
met a sergeant who noticed that Mike 
was wearing a very disreputable pair 
«f trousers. ilntet>dlng to report him 
for unsoldierly appearance he stopped 
him and asked: 

"Where are yoU going? 

"To get some water, sor." answered 
Mike. .. ^ ,.. 

•What In those trousers?' 

••No. sor. in ;tht^ pall." 



Tribute to the Onion. 

Richmond Times-Dispatch: Kill the 
onion and you leave a gap in the uni- 
verse: Kill anything else and there 
Is a substitute. The potato Is akin to 
the cereals, 8<iuash and cabbage and 
turnips and cauliflower are of the 
same family, beans are elongated 
peas, the lemon Is a pessimistic or- 
ange, beef reincarnated grass, water- 
melons just the survlver of a yery 
fit cucumber, and so on. But the on- 
ion is sul generis; alone, unique, tri- 
umphant. It Is a special creation to 
tempt the palate of a weary world. It 
proves the fut'lity of man'.s wisdom. 
He might have guessed at everything 
else under the sun. but he would have 
never guessed an onion. Science may 
deduce a new star before It becomes 
visible, or radium before Its dLscovery, 
but this succulent, fragrant, starry, 
vegetable would have gone unlnvent- 
ed forever, had not Its own Inslnuat- 
ing. yet not ba.shful qualities forced 
themselves Into tear-brimmed eyes 
and liquescent anticipatory lips. With 
what a mixture of gratitude and awe 
should we view the spectacle of na- 
ture turning her energies to the trans- 
muting of mere clay into a vegetable 
with an artistic temperament! 



ence to the Bull Moosie party, not only 
refrained from attacking it but treated 
it with genuine appreciation, as a re- 
voU agafnst the evils «' ^^e o d-party 
rule In the same speech Wilson se- 
verely exposed the bosses of his own 
party In his own state— the very men 
on whom he is supposed to rely for 
Ws election. Is not that the keynote 
of a bette r day? 

This la My Creed. 

This Is my creed, 

This be my deed: 

•Hide not thy heart! 

Soon we depart; 

Mortals are all; 

A breath, then the pall. 

A flash in the dark— 

All's done— still and stark, 

No time for a He; 

The truth, and then die. 

Hide not thy heart! 

Forth, with thy thought! 
Soon 'twill be naught. 
And then In thy tomb. 
Now Is air, now is room. 
Down with false shame; 
Reck not of fame; 
Dread not man's spite; 
Quench not thy light. 
This be thy creed 
This be thy deed: 
•'Hide not thy heart! 

If God Is, He made 
Sunshine and shade. 
Heaven and hell; 
This we know well. 
Dost thou believe? 
Do not deceive; 
Scorn not thy faith — 
If 'tis a wraith 
Soon It will fly. 
Thou, who must die. 
Hide not thy heart! 

This Is my creed. 

This be my deed: 

Faith, or a doubt, 

I shall speak out. 

And hide not my heart. 

■^ —Richard Watson Gilder. 

Our Law. 

Collier's— Martin Van Buren, in his 
always interesting "Inqiilry Into the 
Origin and Course of Political Parties 
in the United States." after saying that 
the interference of judges in politics is 
always distasteful to "sincere Repub- 
licans " adds: "Their want of sym- 
pathy as a general rule, for P0P">ar 
rights is known throughout the world 
Certainly the bench and the bar are on 
trial in more than one respect at the 
present moment. There aremanv rea- 
sons One of the most constant irrita- 
tlons Is the habit of American courts 
of Sfaylng an absurd technical game In. 
sfe& of *golng for the obvious mean- 
Inir of the law, as the Bngiisn juages 
do* It looks like a private sport in- 
stead of a serious public service We 
have just been reading an account in a 
Washington paper of a proceeding In 

hlch a hotel proprietor was fliied 



Enthusiasm 



Henry Chester in the Nautilus: 
Enthusiasm is the greatest as- 
set in the world. It beats money 
and power and influence. Single 
handed the enthusiast convinces 
and dominates where wealth ac- 
cumulated by a small army of 
workers would scarcely raise a 
tremor of interest. Enthusiasm 
tramples over prejudice and oppo- 
sition, spurns inaction, storms the 
citadel of its object, and like an 
avalanche overwhelms and en- 
gulfs all obstacles. 

It is nothing more nor less than 
faith in action. Faith and initia- 
tive rightly combined remove 
mountainous barriers and achieve 
the unheard-of and miraculous. 
Set the germ of enthusiasm afloat 
in your plant, in your office or on 
your farm ; carry it in your atti- 
tude and manner; it spreads like 
contagion and influences every 
fiber of your industry before you 
realize it; it begets and inspires 
effects you did not dream of; it 
means joy and pleasure and sat- 
isfaction to your workers; it 
means life, real, virile; it means 
spontaneous bedrock results — the 
vital things that pay dividends. 



Pugii expressed regret that he could 
5"* V„i,» nwnv the convicted mans li- 

la 
it 



A Campaign Contributor. 

I'm feelin' purty easy with a con.?cienoe 

that is clear, 
As I read the all<^gations when election 

time draws near. 
I've given freely to assist the party 

that I serve; 
I've given lots o' speeches an' I never 

lost my nerve; 
I've given time to people who would 

ask me to explain; 
I've given all I had to give In energy 

an' brain. 
But I draw the line, emphatic. I kia 

say with honest glee 
Nobody's campaign fund has had A 

nickel out of me. 

There's no one who kin hint that I 
• have helped along the tricks 

That might be tried wh.»n Mammon Is 
turned loose in politics. 

I'm able to stand up an' wait the out- 
come of the race. 

An' look my check book (If I had one) 
boldly in the face. 

I never helped to raise the cash that 
mebbe might be spent 

In temptln' candidates from methods 
pure and innocent. 

My wealth of Intellect I grave, nor 
waited to be dunned. 

But I never gave a nickel to nobody's 
campaign fund. 

— Washington Star. 



Stamp Government Snfeat. 

Chicago News: Haiti needs a coui^e 
in government by mail, which is the 
only safe way to govern Haiti. 



Kor'^o'an fs -Tear"- old. girl. Judge 
Pugh 

cense''"He"could"ha've-done it had the 
word been "selling." but, as It was 
^d°s?enslng." |25 was the limit of pun- 

Ishment. ^ 

My Widespread Indebtedneas. 

Iowa 'Tenn. to my Cousin Cal. 

111. Pa It as soon as I Kan. 
Del. Johnsing (Col.) I owe for the 
Wash. 

And Mo. to the cook, Miss. Anne: 

Ohio high do the prices fly! 
And Interest has Ariz. 

I can't be Ga. for the 

must Pa. , „,. , 

O, La, but 'tis sad, I Wis! 

If I could find a man I could Conn. 

I'd Pa. the family Md.. 
But I've tried the loan agents over 
and Ore. ,, v, r> 

And I meet with a cold N. C. 

O Iowa Tenn. that I never Kan. Pa. 
And the Ga. friend wants must go 



And 



bills I 



III 



by; 



Not Guilty, of Courwe. 

Charles Edward Russell Irt the Com- 
ing Nation: Suppose a pri-soner to be 
brought before the bar charged with 
theft The Judge asks him what he 
has to say about the charge and the 
prisoner says: 

"Pooh' It is impossible, your honor. 
Don't you see that a great many thieves 
are opposed to me?" 

That would be Theodore Roosevelt s 
idea of a logical and final defense. 

It is in this way that he ••replies" to 
the charges brought against him by 
Senator Penrose. 

The charges can't be true, you know, 
because every trust newspaper in the 
United States is trying to beat him and 
of course they would not bo trying to 
beat him If the Standard Oil Company 
had furnished his campaign fund in 

Now will you keep still, rude disturb, 
er of the pious congregation? 1 think 
HO Let us next unite in singing On- 
ward. Christian Soldier.' after which ipariu.-- , j^ ^^^ ^^ vizier. 
Brother Perkins Will Uke, up the col- j ,.j* MaB^ just .eSn the Rn|el of death 



AND ALL WEEK. 
TONIGHT 



LYCEUM I 

WILLIAM A. BRADY (LTD.) Praients 
AMERICA'S BIQ PLAY 

BOUGHT AND 
PAID FOR 

BY GEORGE BROADHURST • 

Katineet. Wednesday and Sanirday. 
NiBht*— 25c t» $1.50; Matinew — 25« to $1.00. 



COMING— 8HEEHAN OPERA CO. 



never Mo. Pa. the Maine Mass. of 



my debts. 



But Ala. man'Kan do Is _(*> .^Ao^U-s 
— Augustln W. Brecden in Ll pplncott s. 



be 
his 



Kismet. 

London Opinion: Fate cannot 
*.v-jded A grand vizier asked 
master: the sultan, for permission to 
depart at once for Smyrna. 

"You mav go. vizier.'' the sultan an- 
swered. "But why this sudden dc- 



> TBEATER 



AvttiKMt 



MATINEES 

10c& 



NUhtt. ree, 2!(). 

SO* «■< 's*. 



THIS WEEK'S BILL 

QUS WEINBER8 

la "Main Llabchea" 

HOWARD 

LA PETITE MIGNON 

CLAUDIUS & SCARLETT 

RONAIR & WARD 

THE TWO ALFREDS 

AERIAL SHERWOODS 

WORLD EVENTS 
Tha Orvhwim Orahaalrs. 




— -■• ) t= 



4' 




\ 





Monday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



THE WILSON CAMPAIGN FUND 



^m ^ FEOFLE'S FI^ESDiEINIT 





SUBSCRIPTIONS RECEIVED AT THE HERALD OFFICE, DULUTH 



the wireless 8tat*«n=^«t Belott college 
18 beliiK entirely overhauled In 
preparation for t^e fhstallation of the 
service. 



f 






t A i»f:oi»i,ir!4 c\n- 

* A PtCOI'I.K'H 



* 

* Tbr fmllawlnK rontrlhutlouA t«i ^ 
•it tlie %1 liwwu 4*iiiupiilt;» fMud haw -itt 
m Wrn rr«rl*fd l»> I'll*? Herald: * 
i C. il'AMirt'MHml. Jr., Oulnth. fH»0 * 

^ A. f. %\«'li»» l>uiuth lfl» * 

•lil; T. 1. llltdKtWU. DulHtll 

It Alfrrtl Jmiuem. Dulutl*. .... 
» rrvd«Tl«- %%. I'alHf, Diilulk. 
il MHrt'iiM I.. Fny, Uulutli.... 

» llarrlM llmnt^tt. Uulnth 

91 VrHI I- Uyaii. DulutU 

* %%. J. .\urtli. Uululb 

» Jiikn (brittle. Ouliitli 

» 4 liNrlri* K. lluar. Uulutb... 

B Frauk Jordan, Duiutb 

jfc 4 harlm J. Hector. I»ulu4h.. 

* rrank Makww>*kl. Uiiluth.. 

* Jwkn Buyer, Uulutli 

* II. I». 4'urrea. I»ulM»h 

» Ulllluni Miller. Uulutb 

#■ tiettrite S^tt, Uulutb 

« Jiihn A. MaeUuuell. Uulutb . 

* I'rcil J. %t».'»M. Uulutb 

* 11. 11. Niilmon. Hit%Ml>ik ... 
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U . •• U ii-ki. Uulutb 

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« l.itui* Iteunett. Uulutb 

• rr-il MoimIv. Warroad. Minn 

II I.. KiiMenberg. Uulutb... 
i.. %t. Ilwulley, liraud Kajtidat 






T«»tal 



90 « 
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30 Hi 
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Governor Wil- 
.soHH unlv obligation will be to the 
whole people. He l>eMeve8 there should 
be no Hpoclal prlvlleKe.s in representa- 
tive Koverninent. Those who believe 
otlierwi.se are opposed to hlin. 

The tampaiKn is on. The forcea 

working a>ialnst (Jovernor Wilson are 

well supplied with money. They are 

are the common people of the [working asainst the people, and the 

people must fit?ht back. 

The Wilson campaign fund is grow- 
in*?, but much more money is needed. 
The people of the Northwest are pro- 
Kre.s.Hiv«\ They will contribute many 
Woodrow Wilson for relief from the ' votes to swell Woo.lrow Wilson's total 
«{:rindlnK oppression of conditions which ' oji Nov. 5. They should also contrib- 
are devised for the fattening of great ute as generously as they can to the 
interests. 

They are the men for whom Woodrow 
Wilson is makint? his fight against 
special interests and corporate domina- 
tion of government. 

This fight Is the people's fight. If 



The list of $1 and $5 subscriptions | an implied obligation, 
to the Wilson campaign fund is grow- 
ing, but it is not growing fast enough. 

The men who can afford to contrib- 
ute no more than J I to 15 are the 
men who should lie most interested in 
Woodrow Wilson's candidacy. 

They 
nation — the men who are the contrib- 
utors to. not the beneficiaries of, spe- 
cial privilege. 

They are the men who must look to 



campaign fund th.it will finance the 
campaign for a "People's President." 

B. L. Rosentjerg of 14 East Fourth 
street, writes in from Langdon, N. D., 
enclosing II: 

..^ „ ... -^ =,--- -- , "Enclo.sed please find money order 

Woodrow Wilson is elect'-d president for one dollar as a contribution to the 



Peoples Campaign Fund for a People's 
President." 1 liope to see Woodrow 



of the United .States, th.' i'. .^le will 

benefit. Tlie ni'-n of greu r : ■ ins are . .... . ,, . ,. 

opposed to Woodrow Wilson. They are', Wilson elected as our next president by 
throwing the influence of their wealtli I a big majority." ^ ,^ , . ,„ , „ 

and power against him. Every dollar eontrlbuted will go far 

Governor Wilson lias called up"ti Up- t<iward spreading the progres*ive 
people to aid him in his campaign, i movement that will elect Woodrow 
Much monev will be needed for the 'Wilson. No true progressive should 
I'Kitinii' 1^ of the campaign. The i fall to contribute his mite. 

til. (DOS 'me in small amounts. | Contributions will be acknowledged 

The .sub.sv riptions of $1 to »r. will mike by publication in The Herald, and each 
up the bulk of tlie ctinpaign fund, i c.intrlbutor will receive from the 
c >r Wil.sons attitude has cut him i Democratic national committee a hand- 

.1 democratic national committee I somely engraved receipt, suitable for 

oit ti'uti the u.sual source.^ of supply framing. Contributions should be 



TAKES BIO CATFISH. 

■ ' v 
La Crosse Mau Pulls Fifty-Two 

Pounder From River. 

La Crosse, W'lfl.. vSept. 9.— What Is 
thought to be on^ ol the largest flsh 
caught in this vicinity for some time 
was caught by Fred West, who got a 
catfish which weighed fifty-two 
pounds while tishitig at the bridge 
crossing Black river. Although a large 
number of catttaU have been cauglit 
(his year none nearly as large as this 
one has been secured and It is tliought 
that the weight of fifty-two pounds Is 
a record. 

DOCTOR KILLKD WHILE 

CROSSINli LONG VIADUCT 

Milwaukee. Wis.. .Sept. 9.— Dr. U M. 
Nugent, aged 28. was Instantly killed 
late Saturday night while crossing the 
longest street car viaduct in the United 
States. The body was wedged between 
the car and the railing of the viaduct, 
ninety-seven feet above the ground. 

The wrecking crew worked for three 
hours to release the body, and the side 
of the car and part of the railing 
was cut away. While the men were at 
work the automobile ambulance, wail- 
ing for the physician's body, caught 
fire, and another ambulance had to 
be sent for. 

WOMAN M APITATED 

AND MAN BADLY CUT 



i»» »»»^»»^ *^i0Ht**** * »»»»»»» a il 



for campatsti funds. They will accept 
no corporation money carrying with it 



mailed to 'Wilson Campaign Fund, 
Herald Office, Duluth. Minn." 



NEWS OF THE NORTHWEST 



MONUMENT 
TO MORGAN 



North Dakota Bar Proposes 

Memorial to Late Chief 

Justice. 



Would Divide State Into 

four or Five Judicial 

Districts. 



Grand Forks, N. D., Sept. 9.— (Special 
to The Herald ) — The erection of a 
nioniiment to the memory of the late 
Ju.-ti*.e David E. Morgan of the North 
l)al:ota supreme court la proposed by 
the North Dakota Bar association, the 
action being taken at the annual meet- 
ing of the association, wlilch has just 
1km n l.r.iughl to a close. A in'>nument 
that will cost fT.OOO was voiced in th.- 
i»9c»luti"»n adopted and the plan i.^ t > 
it llisinarck. the state capital, 
iti'jn uLso anthoriise.i the pres- 
I!..- is^.i. iation to ajipomt a 
.it .Ml (■ to open the cam- 
n'.'cessary funds for the 




Marquette, Mich.. Sept. 9. — Because 
the woman resented his attentions. 
Oiancento Cagllo, it is claimed almost 
decapitated Mr.s. Emilo Veceli with a 
razor at Princeton and seriously 
slashed Peter Armane who sought to 
protect her. Mrs. Veceli died Instantly. 
The murderer was captured in the 
woods last evening and was brought 
to Jail here. Armane Is in a critical 
condition. 



MKTHODIST CIIIIU H AT 

HIliL CriY DEDICATED 



deposits have been signed over under 
a plan for the reopening of the bank. 

IRONWOOD NOYeS. 

Ironwood, Mich., Sept. 9. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Mlaa Clara Sedestrom 
and Miss Peterson went to Duluth 
where they took a boat trip to their 
home in Chicago. 

W. H. KItto has left for Wapato. 
Wash., after visiting his father, sister, 
and friends here for the past month. 

Misses Margaret and Anna Downey 
left last Saturday for Calumet, where 
they will make their future home. 

The Norrle band of this city spent 
Monday at Bayfield, Wis., where they 
played during the day. 

William Hocking came from Duluth 
to spend a few days here with his par- 
ents. 

Emll Anderson, one of the local mall 
carriers, was operated upon for ap- 
pendicitis at the German Deaconess 
ho.spltal in Chicago last week. His 
condition is favorable and his speedy 
recovery Is looked for. 

ivli.sses Signa and Elsie Larson. 
Man.srteld street, are visiting friends 

in St. Paul. 

• ■ 

Waa Not "Gyp tfce Blood." 

International Falls. Minn.. Sept. 9.— 
(Special to The Herald.)— The man who 
was arrested here on suspicion that he 
was "Gyp the Blood." the criminal 
wanted in New York, was discharged 
after being held five days, as the police 
were satisfied they had the wrong man. 



of Marinette for the past forty years, 
died last week at the Marinette county 
asylum, where he has been confined for 
the last year, having been transferred 
there after his mind became visibly af- 
fected while he was being cared for at 
the county poor house. 

Racine — Judge Heck sentenced 
Thomas Corbett to five months in the 
county jail for beating his mother 
while intoxicated. The sentence was 
the most severe ever given a prisoner 
on an assault and battery charge in 
Racine county. 

Milwaukee — The hearing In the di- 
vorce suit of Mrs. Dorothy Evans, who 
charges her husband with having fifty, 
five affinities, reached a dramatic point 
when Mrs. Evans fainted twice on the 
witness stand in the court of Judge Or- 
rin T. Williams. The case was ad- 
journed. 



Hill City. Minn.. Sept. 9. — Impressive 
services were held here yesterday 
when the new Methodist Episcopal 
church was dedicated, with Superin- 
tendent E. K. Copper of Duluth in 
charge of the exercise.**. Dr. M. P. 
Buins of Minneapolis delivered a lec- 
ture in tlie afternoon and spoke last 
evening before a crowd that packed 
tlie building. 



#■■1 
T ' 



tl 



>K E. Morgan was chief Jus- 
• ■ North Dakota .supreme court 
it many years until his death 
:iia a few months ago. 

...„.( re.«?olution passe 1 

nti is that favoring 

uivi-^M'ii ./i ii.'- Stat" into four or 

judicial districts ii.,<til of th- 



bv 
tlie 

live 

twelve IV.' 
further i. 
sh'i" ^'' 

Mr 
I. 



lie 



■■■h it Is now divided. It 
.< that each district 

or more judge.s as in 
purpo.se of the change 

having a judge in the 
lies before whom a case 



Ml also opposed the con- 

. ..;... uviment which will come 

■ the next legislature provld- 

...., .... the initiative, referendum and 

ricall. The measure in its present 

f.>im was considered faulty in construc- 

t ! t,( 1 1 . 



NEW FAIR BUiLDlXGS. 

» — 

Many luiproveuients Planned at 
Hamltne Cor 1913. 

St Paul. Minn.. Sept. 9. — Anticipating 
til ii a .s ife financial margin will re- 
niaiii after the accounting of the state 
fair this year, a large number of ex- 
t«'t -provements are being planned 



.**•■ 
til 



iir hoard managers before the 

! K Harrison, assistant 

.s that if the condition of 

ury permits. extensive im- 

ts will be made in the agri- 



DONALD ROBERTSON. 

Karlstad, Minn.. Sept. 9. — (Special to 
Th'" Herald.) — Donald Robertson of 
Argyle has announced that he will not 
be a candidate this year fir represen- 
tative from the Si.xty-third legislative 
district. This leaves the other candi- 
dates no oppo.sition at the primaries. 
Paul Marschalk is a candidate In class 
2. and Walter Anderson of Badger in 
c!a.s.s 1, both from Roseau county. Oacar 
Wahlund of Warren is a candidate on 
the Democratic ticket in class 1. and 
the tight will be between him and An- 
derson. 



better suit the needs of the fair man- 
agement. 

Another contemplated Improvement is 
the extension of the grandstand roof. 



FIGHT WARM FOR 
ONE NOMINATION 

Five Sought to Run for 

Sheriff in Iron County, 

Wis, 

Hurley. Wis.. Sept. 9. — r=?peclal to 
The Herald.) — There were five candi- 
dates for the RepubUc.^n nomination 
for sheriff in Iron county. Frank M. 
Duffy capturing the prize by sixty-five 
votes over Dominic Rubatt, his nearest 
competitor. Duffy polled a very strong 
vote in Hurlej'. getting nearly as many 
votes as the other four candidates 
together, and in Mercer polled all the 
Republican votes but one. W. T. Len- 
non captured the nomination for dis- 
trict attorney over A. L. Ruggles by a 
vote of 441 to 291. and F- E. Atwood 
won out for clerk of the court over 
V. E. De Podesta by a large major- 
ity. 

N. J. Whiteside received the Repub- 
lican •nomination for a.s.semblyman 
from this district without opposition. 
Charles Bonino received tlie Demo- 
crTtic nomination for the same offU^e. 

Mr.<i. T. S. Harrington and daughter. 
Alice, left Friday for Trout lake in the 
state forest reserve near Woodruff to 
vl«it Neil, who Is employed by th© 
state fore.stry reserve. 

The school at Van Busklrk was 
struck by lightning Tuesday morning. 
One corner of the Imilding was torn 
one may be remodeled so that 'it willbff and the teacher's desk «maslied to 



culinrui building, grand stand and ad- 
mint.'Jtration building. 

ft Is planned to build two new barns 
for the cattle and horses on the west 
end of the grounds. The legislature 
will be asked to make appropriations 
» • ■ >\v agricultural building for the 
vhibits. If this is denied, the 
....; ;.. .; agers are considering tenta- 
tive plans to build onto the pre-sent 
biiihlit .' One corner was built out 
th; ve as an annex for the 

urn : linnesota exhibits. 

The tair board is also anxious to get 
an ad'^itiate adminl.^tration building 
'A ; irtmental If a new 

lu.. • annot be .- i. th'> present 



Die Oldest Blood Disease 

The most ancient hi.story furaishes evidence that mankind suffered with 
Contagious Blood Poison. The disease has come down through all the ages 
and is to-day, as it has ever been, a scourge and blight uiwa humanity. 
The symptoms of Contagious Blood Poison are the same as in its earliest 

history, but its cure has now become an accomplished 
fact. S. S. S. is an antidote for the vims of Contagious 
Blood Poison, and cures it in all its forms and stages. 
A person who has been cured of Contagious Blood Poi- 
son by the use of S. S. S. need not fear a return of its 
symptoms at any future time. This great medicine 
checks the progress of the poison and gradually but 
surely all sores and eruptions heal, ulcerated mouth 
and throat pass away, the hair stops falling out, cop- 
per-colored splotches fade away, and when the blood is 
thoroughly purified no sign of the disease is left. Plome Treatment Book 
and any medical advice free to all who write. 

WE SWIFT SPEOnC CO^ ATUNTA, CJL 




pieces. Miss Vera Swan.strom, the 
teacher, has just moved away from 
the de.«k when the lightning struck 
and was un injured. 

Mls.s^'s l.iuy Wierclnskl and Agatha 
Hoiilehan left Wednesday morning for 
Stevens Point to resume their studies 
in the normal .s-hool. 

r>oniinic Friola rturned Tuesday from 
a visit in Milwaukee and Chicago. He 
also took a trip on the great lake.s. 
visiting Detroit. Buftalo and other lake 
ports. 

Miss Annie Lavine left Tiie.'iday for 
her home in Chicago after having spent 
two months here visiting friends and 
relatives. 

Miss Clara Haun has returned home 
from Duluth and .X.shland. where she 
visited friends and relatives for the 
past two weeks. 

The young people of the Presbyterian 
• hurch will give a mu.sical and liter- 
ary program at the Presliyterian 
church on next Tuesday evening. 

Lawrence and Blanche Peterson have 
returned from an extended visit in St. 
Louis and the Dakotas. Their parents 
remained in Minneapolis to take in 
the state fair this week. 

Miss Abbie Croseh is vi.siting friends 
in Milwaukee. 

Mrs. A. Ladln returned Monday from 
a short visit to Duluth. 

Rev. Father Klopp of St. Mary's 
chor'h. who lias l>een enjoying a va- 
cation in Europe for the past two 
months, returned Thur.sday morning. 

Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Hoefner of 
Maycross, Ga.. are spending the week 
with Hurley friends. They arrived last 
Saturday evening and are stopping at 
the Cliristenson home. They seem to 
be well satisfied with their new lioine 
and conditions generally in Georgia. 

Phil Secor returned Tuesday after- 
noon from Iron River, Mich,, where 
he played two games of ball with the 
Iron River team. Iron River won one 
game and lost one, Rooney pitching 
tlie winning game. 

BANKDEPOSifS 
ARE SWELLING 



Increase Shows General Pro:- 

perous Conditions in 

North Dakota. 

Grand Forks. N. D., Sept. 9. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — The banks of the 
state are perhaps the most accurate 
barometer of prosperity and reports 
from every section show tliat the bank 

deposits in North Dakota are rapidly 
growing. By the first of November the 
increase will be approximately |150,- 
000.000. this being a conservative esti- 
mate in view of the fact that statistics 
indicate a creation of $200,000,000 in 
state wealth during the present crop 
season. As an illustration of how de- 
posits are increasing, the Grand Forks 
banks present an excellent example. 
The bank examiner's call on Sept. 1. 
1911. showed deposits of $1.&30.000. 
while Dec. 5 showed 13,282.000. or an 
Increase of Jl. 350.000. The most recent 
call this year was June 1. when the 
deposits were $3,046,106. Unofficial 
figures from the banks on Sept. 1 show 
approximately 13,500,000. The ratio of 
increase there Indicates total deposits 
In Grand Forks banks in November 
and Deceml)er will approxim.ate $5,000.- 
000. or an Increase of $1,500,000. The 
same conditions exist all over the state. 



DOLLAR BAY WIRE MILL 
SOLD TO ROEBLINO & SONS 



Houghton, Mich., Sept. 9. — Announce- 
ment has been made of the transfer of 
the Dollar Bay Land & Improvement 
company holdings and the plant of the 
Dollar Bay wire mill by the Hyams- 
Fiigelow interests to the J. A. Roebling 
& Sons company of Trenton, N. J. The 
Roebllngs are to build an enlarged 
wire plant and, it is understood, will 
employ at least 3,000 mill men within 
two years. Frank Foley, manager of 
the present wire mill, will be retained 
as manager. 

SPECIAL RAIL FOR . 

NORTH DAKOTA FAIR 



Bismarck. N. D. Sept. 9. — Commis- 
sioner Gilbreath has been notified that 
the Northern Pacific will make a spe- 
cial rate of 2 cents a mile in each 
direction for the round trip from points 
in North Dakota to Bismarck for the 
second annual North Dakota Industrial 
exposition. This is the first special 
rate granted in the state since the pas- 
senger rates were lowered by the legis- 
lature six years ago. 

WOMAN MANAGES IRON 

WORKS IN WISCONSIN 



Colfax, Wis.. Sept. 9. — The manage- 
ment of the Globe Iron works at 
Menomonie has been placed In the 
hands of Miss Rose Thompson of Col- 
fax. The directors of the company 
has given her full authority In tiie 
manangement of the plant. 

« 

Rofteaii County Fair. 

Roseau, Minn.. Sept. 9. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The Roseau county fair 
opens here tomorrow and continues 
for three days. Many strong attrac- 
tions have been secured. 



TO OPEN NEW ROAD. 



Is Formed By tlie Bed of Aban- 
doned Lo^j2:ing Road. 

Bemidji. Minn.. Sept. 9.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — Thirty Clearwater coun- 
ty farmers did an unexpected thing last 
week by filing a petition with the 
county commissioners In session at 
Bagley, oljjecting to the new ready- 
made road formed by the bed of the 
Red River Lumber company's aban- 
doned logging railroad. It appears that 
the persons who signed the petition 
were led to do so under the influence 
of arguments that the road would be a 
Bemidji artery to the detriment of 
Bagley. 

A petition signed by forty farmers In 
the vicinity of Mallard, requested the 
county to open the road as a public 
highway, and this the commissioners 
finally decided to do with the under- 
standing that Clearwater county is to 
be at no expense. 

About half the road is at present 
ready for travel and the work of pull- 
ing out the trees and leveling the road 
will proceed at once. 

BELOIT TIME SERVICE 

BY WIRELESS TELEGRAPHY. 

■ t 

Beloit. Wis.. Sept 9. — Belolt is soon 
to be the center of a unique and Im- 
portant electrical undertaking In the 
form of a time service furnished by 
wireless telegraphy. The service has 
been under contemplation for some 
time, but U It now an assured fact and 



BIk I.lvcN^ock Shipment. 

Badger. Minn., .Sept. 9. — (.Special to 
The Herald.) — The biggest shipment of 
livestock of the season took place here 
Friday and Saturday when eleven cars 
of stock, which had been bought up 
by local cattle buyers, were sent out. 



Dr. McGiliycu<l«1y Injnreil. 

Rapid City. S D.. .Sept. 9. — Friends of 
Dr. V. T. McGlllycudfly, former agent 
«t Pine Ridge and dean of tiie .State 
.School of Mines, have learned of a 
probably fatal accident he suffered at 
a lumber camp on the Jordan river, 
near Vancouver. The doctor was watch- 
ing a train being loaded with logs, 
when one of them suddenly rolled, 
catching him against the car and 
cru.shing him frightfully. 



Minnesota Briefs 



Warroad — The new switchboard for 
the Warroad telephone line has ar- 
rived and been put in place. 

Roseau — A record in the shipment 
of cattle from Roseau county was 
made Aug 30. when seven carloads 
were shipped from Roseau and seven- 
teen from Badger. The shippers were 
Iverson & Iverson. O. A. Rice, Lars 
Odegaard and Charles Meyer. 

International Falls— Jerry Dalley. 
employed at Camp 6. at Loman, com- 
mitted suicide by cutt'ng his throat 
with a razor. The remains were bur- 
ied Friday at the expense of the 
county. 

Crookston — Marcus Stephens re- 
turned Friday from Missoula, where 
he has spent the summer in a l)ank 
there. Mrs. Stephens and children, 
who are spending the summer with 
Mrs. Stephens' parents at Seattle, will 
not return for another month. 

Blackduck — Ole Hansen has left for 
Kristiania, Norway, where he wUl 
make his home with his mother and 
other relatives. 

Pine City — At the special election 
held Tuesday last the water works 
proposition was carried by a vote of 
137 for water works to 50 against. 
Sewerage also won out by a vote of 
129 for. to 51 against. 

Mankato — Robert Haedt, a farmer 
living in Decoria township, suffered a 
broken arm Wednesday evening, while 
attempting to crank his automobile. 

Bagley — M. J. Kolb of the Kolb In- 
vestment company has returned from 
a two weeks' trip into Iowa, where 
he closed a deal with a large real 
estate company for nearly 8.000 acres 
of Clearwater and Mahnomen lands. 

Willow River — Mrs. Thomas McMil- 
len and daughter Maude came from 
Duluth to spend Labor day with rela- 
tives and friends. Maude returned 
Tuesday morning. Mrs. McMillen will 
remain for a while with her daughter, 
Mrs. Hal Sherrick. 

Stillwater — Supt. Brennan and a crew 
of men left Sunday morning for the 
upper river to drive in the rear along 
the St. Croix after sluicing through 
the Nevers dam. It is expected there 
will be somewhere near 10,000,000 feet 
run into the boom on this sluicing. 
The boom Is expected to start about 
the middle of the week. 

Minneapolis — William Green, 16 
years old. Dodge Center. Minn., was 
seized with the cramps when he dived 
from a spring board at Tonka bay 
Friday afternoon, and was drowned. 
Young Green was a visitor to the state 
fair. He went to Tonka bay with 
friends for a swim and had been in 
the water only a few minutes. The 
body was recovered. 

South Haven — Thieves broke Into 
the Forsberg general store Thursday 
night and stole $35 worth of wearing 
apparel. Entrance to the store was 
gained by breaking in a back window 
and prying off an iron bar. 



Wisconsin Briefs 



Bayfield — Grand Lecturer Jacob Gre- 
her of the Wisconsin grand lodge of 
Masons of Milwaukee was a visitor at 
the local lodge In this city Tuesday and 
Wednesday. He had not been in Bay- 
field in two years. 

Eau Claire — The Eau Claire river is 
again doing damage along its bank.s 
at this point. Due to recent heavy rains 
the stream has risen considerably and 
with the Chippewa river some lower is 
very swift. 

Brooklyn — Mrs. Mima Hayne.i. wife of 
Postmaster P. A. Haynes. died while 
undergoing an operation for goitre in 
a Chicago hospital. 

Ashland — The Ashland division of the 
Wisconsin naval reserve has embarkeo 
on the lake cruise on the United States 
warship Essex, which will culminate at 
Milwaukee in the inspection of the re- 
serve by Governor McGovern. Sept. 10. 

Marinette — Peter Downey, a resident 



I Peninsula Briefs 

Calumet — Democratic leaders in 
Houghton county have been advised of 
the proposed visit of Woodbridge N. 
Ferris of Big Rapids, candidate for 
governor. to this city Thursday, 
Sept. 12. 

Houghton — The village council has 
decided to appropriate $750 for the 
purpose of helping the Houghton bu.si- 
ness men and Copper country fair in 
their efforts to bring the Newton-Duf- 
field pyrotechnic display here for 
three nights of the Copper country 
fair this month. 

Hancock — The Finnish Glee club has 
elected officers as follows: President, 
Matt Mattson; secretary, William 
Bred jack; treasurer. Arthur Hurja; di- 
rector. Prof. K. W. Kilka. 

Houghton — LA.lex Carlson, aged 24, 
died Thursday night at the Trimoun- 
tain hospital from the effect of in- 
juries sustained by a fall of rock in 
the mine on Aug. 28. Carlson was a 
resident of Painesdale. and is survived 
by a brother living at Hancock, where 
the funeral was held from the North 
Star hall on Sunday, Rev. M. Pesonen 
officiating. 

Hancock— «State Deputy D. N. Davis 
of the Modern Brotherhood q^ America 
will visit here on Sept. 13 as the guest 
of Superior lodge of this city. Deputy 
Davis is on a general tour of the 
Copper country and on Sept. 12 will 
visit in Calumet. 

Houghton — David Hodgson of Mon- 
treal, Que., Is here. Mr. Hodgson fir.st 
came to Houghton in 1852 and was 
Interested In the early exploration of 
the Kear.sarge lodge, on such proper- 
ties as the .Seneca. St. Louis and old 
Osceola. It Is twenty years since Mr. 
Hodgson has been in Houghton. 

Marquette — The Republican conven- 
tion will be held at the city hall in 
Marquette on next Tuesday, Sept. 10. 
Plans for the fall campaign will be 
outlined and twenty-five delegates to 
the state convention at Detroit will be 
selected. 



Wedded at Orainerd. 

Bialnerd, Minn., Sept. 9. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The marriage of Dr. 
Mervyn B. Purdy and Miss Elsie Raven 
of Perham was solemnized at the 
m.anse of the Presl>yterian church. Rev. 
W. J. Lowrie reading the service. They 
were accompanied by Leslie Purdy. who 
acted as best man. and Miss Rhea L. 
Raven, sister of the bride. Dr. Purdy 
is a son of Alderman Archie Purdy 
and recently g-raduated from the col- 
lege of veterinary surgery of Kansas 
City. 



I Dakota Briefs I 

Fargo. N. D. — George H. Cockburn, 
who has been the assistant secretary 
of the y. M. C. A. in this city for the 
past two years, has left for Des Moiness. 
Iowa, where he will visit his parents 
for a short time. Later ho will prob- 
ably take a course in one of the well- 
known colleges of that city. 

Bowman. N. D. — The Slope County 
News last week moved from Bessie to 
the property of the Farm, Land & Coal 
company, near the survey of the Mil- 
waukee road. This is in all probability 
where there will be a station when the 
road is built, and it will make a fight 
for the county seat of the new coun- 
ty. The postoffice address is Amidon. 

Burnstad. N. D. — It is reported that 
the Ringlings purchased 200 head ol 
horses near Burnstad. 

Fargo, N. D. — The remains of John 
Albert Hurley, the Canadian Northern 
switchman who was fatally injured at 
Rainy River, Ont.. were brought to 
Fargo for burial. The funeral was held 
.Saturday from St. Mary's cathedral, 
with Rev. Thomas Egan officiating. 
The deceased was 47 years old and is 
survived by a widow and five children, 
all of whom reside in this city. 

Devils Lake. N. D. — The entire light- 
ing and power property of the Devils 
I./ake Improvement company has been 
transferred to E. C. Corson of Fargo 
for a consideration of $175,000. It is 
understood that A. B. Kerlin. who has 
been president and chief stockholder 
in the improvement company since it 
was organized to take over the lighting 
plant, will go to Minneapolis to take 
a position with the Twin City Insurance 
company. 

Grand Forks, N. D. — Dr. J. D. Taylor, 
former mayor of Grand Forks, suffered 
a fracture of his right arm while crank- 
ing his automobile. The engine kicked, 
and in sending the crank around, it 
struck his arm. 

Fargo, N. D. — What promises to be 
the most important an^ best attended 
meeting of North Dakota Baptists ever 
held will begin in this city Tuesday. 
Sppt. 17, and continue till Friday, Sept. 
20. 

Grand Forks, N. D.— M. C. Bickert of 
Virginia, Minn., has brought his family 
to Grand Porks to make their home 
this week. Mr. Bickert has recently 
arrived from the Gopher state to be- 
come a member of Harry Masten's 
Grand theater orchestra. Frank Smith 
has also arrived from Watertown to 
play in the Grand orchestra. 



May Reopen Bank. 

Winnebago, Minn.. Sept. 9. — Judge 
Lorin Cray of Mankato. president of the 
National Citizens* bank of that city, 
will address a meeting of the depositors 
of the defunct State Bank of Commerce 
Monday evening. The depositors' com- 
mittee, of which A. E. Qulmby is chair- 
man, held a meeting last week, and it 
was learned that about $150,000 of the 



Unusual Showing 

— OF— 

Imported Jet 



Jewelry 

In our window. 

Brooches 
CoUar Pins 
Necklaces 
Lorgnette Chains 
Ear Drops 
Cuff Buttons 
Hat Pins, Etc. 

We also have a complete stock of 
Gun Metal and Black, EnameUewelry. 



Bagley &? Co. 

Jewelers and Silversmiths 
3J5 West Superior SU 

ESTABLISHED 2S85. 




have their printing done be- 
fore and after election by 

MERRITT & HECTOR 

Printers and Binders 

'.""prjirl.'? 112 W. First St. 




Renewed Vitality 
Rosy Cheeks 

SOME persons seem to be 
naturally weak and sick- 
ly. Others with the 
strongest constitutions break 
down after a long illness. It's 
simply a matter of deficient nour- 
ishment—an insufficient supply of 
the phosphates that are generated 
Into nerve and brain energy, the 
body salts that build up bone and flesh, the iron 
that makes rich, red blood. The digestive organs 
are too weak to extract them from the food you eat 

We have scientifically combined those vital body elements 
into a liquid form that is easily assimilated by weak systems — 

\V ebsters T onic 

— a food for nerves, brain and flesh. Also contains the well- 
known tonic bitters — dandelion and gentian. They stimulaU 
the appetite and the digestive processes — help you to relisn 
your food and digest with comfort 

Coatalna no quinine nor harmful drutf 6( any kind. Has a pleasant, 
•nappy taat*. Qtt tb« complete formula from the drucflst who sella 
Webster's Remedies, then aek your doctor what he thinks of tt 

Sold In two sizes. 60c and il.OO. Six bottles of the larM 
Blie (or K.OO. Tour money refunded If you are not satisfled 
with reiulta after a fair trial. 

There Is • Webster Chiaranteed Remedy for nearly erery 
eommon iU that does not requlrs a doctor. Hlch-grade Wll«l 
articles also. 

Tour drurglst has them or can gtt them for yov. 

Webster Chemical Company 

. St. Paul, Minn. 




from Duluth, Minn. 
Sept: 25 to 

Oct 10 



(Jantaje 



d<mm 



mi»i»^^ -_- 



Go and pick out your 
farm or ranch in sunny 
Arizona or California. 
Sure crops on irrigated 
lands. 

Go on the Santa Fe. Ride in 
a tourist sleeper; berth rate low. 
Eat Fred Harvey meais. 
A fast run on the Fast Mail. 
Choice d two other good trains. 

C. 0. Carpenter, Pass. Agt., 
Uetropolitui Life Bldg., Minneapolis. Mina 



h^ 



Write to C. L. SttKrmvM. Cen. ColoniMtioB 

Agent. 2301 Railway Exchange. Cbicaeo. for 

Amuna and San Joaquin \ alley laod folders, 

and six months free subsajption 

to"TheEikrth.". 



' BRAND ' 



Suited statest^ 



Why should you as a 
motorist put up with 
less service when 
sueh service as the 
following is custom- 
ary with users of 

G& J Tires 

"We thought it might in- 
terest you to know that 
our car equipped v.ith G 
& J Tires finished the 
first 10,000 miles. One ot 
your casings has never 
been off Ihe rim and looks 
good for several thousand 
miles more." 

W. P. MoPHKE. 
Denver, Col. 

You can get the same 
kind of service by using 
the same kind of tires. 

Specify the old reUable 
e & J Tires 

Duluth Distributor: 

Qoayie-Larseo Co., 

14 and 16 W. Superior St. 



^d Arizona.] 9I 

^lonisf 
tesions: 



/p 



^ 



* 



GHICKERIHG 
PIANO 



^ 



Howardi Farwell ft Go. 

120 East Superior it 

W. J.ALLEN. Mgr. 



^ 



Subscribe for The Herali 




10 



- *^. Monday, 



\ 




X THE DULTTTH HERALD 



September 9, 1912. 



STOMACH SOUR? OOT 
INDIGESTION ALSO? 

'tape's Diapepsio'' Makes 

Dpset Stamachs Feel Fme 

iffl Five Ninates. 



Tf whAt 



vuu just ale is §9Ur'"^ ^" 



or h. 
liurn 
III ' 
In- 

cmty 



IS 
111 



\v 



( > r 
II 



and 



, h ur lies like a lump C>T 

•iH to digest, or you bt-lch 

uitf w»ur, undigested food. 

i\r a {■ ' 'iizzinrss, nearl- 

fnlln. -V I. biid taste in 

-lomach headache — this is 

; F'a [>€''8 DIapepsin costs 

iiiv ,.n:s and will thorouKhly 

\«ur «.tit-t.f-i.rder stomach, and 

. nt about the ht>use in 

:ic «lse in the family may 

> h trouble or indi- 

st to show you 
..... ..rinted on the»e 

then you will under- 
lie trouble of all 
I why they u*<ually 
: ikr stomachs or 

a tea. Dia pepsin 

1 tastes like candy. 

-. tontains power 8Uf- 

iid prepare for as- 

... blood all the food 

s, it makes you go to 

'.vitii a healthy appetite; but, 

please you most, is that you 

. h and intes- 

and you will 

~ lives or liver 

astipation. 

have many Diapepsin 

fi.oi.i.' will call them, 

about this 

1. J.;. |v.ii-ition, too, if 

I little for indigestion 

:..; ur any other stomach 

' \. this minute, and for- 
> If of stomach trouble 



ISLE OF PINES 



n 



THE ONLY PLACE 

f PinwJ Is th« fT««tliig I 
1 waul to way right 
IS ALL RIGHT. I 

:] ■•■(■ f, ,'..,. I can 

, , ; •• 1 w ^\ man 

. ~ Latk tu iuiit loe >u Uie M- 

■ .•( all rii;' ' ■•■! 

. ." ;: r f 

i..-,!,r In r 

Hi* W ;. V 

ALL MUM r. 

H. L. SHEPHERD 

12 Manhattan BIdg. 



BARROWS 



The ni: town on the Cuyuna 

r.'uiiire, v going ahead with 

It.iis ;i!;<i tM.'.'nds. You can stiil 
sctuif a cli'ice business lot on 
Main street, if you act quickly. 
Til' now selling at from 

?4(it . and owing to the 

great <: 1 wiil double in price 

m a h:v.' iiioiuhs. 

F^ r farther information apply — 

IRON RANGE 
TOWNSITE CO. 

417 Torrey Building, Duluth. 



FOR RENT ! 

?*''f '■'■'im modern house at 

land $20 

a Hat. East Fourth 

flS 

• It el :lat, West 

t $30 

ii-st ftrt-et $35 

. s and flats be- 

HOOPES- 
KOHAGEN CO., 

2011 FIrMt .\a«ional Bank BldflT. 



PretietstBungalow 
in the City 

f 'n one of the best residence streets. 

SIX R<K»MK. AMi MODERN. 

\\ . ve this will fill your 

ideai" <-! a modest home. See us 
for particulars. 

CHAS. P. CRAIG & CO. 

r»01-r»03-r»05 Sollwoo<l Kuihitnn;. 



•f 



N. J. UPHAM CO 

STURCS AJUD BOUSES FORAuM^ 

Property for sal* in all parts m 
tb« cAy. 



18 TMIRO AVBIVVB 



WB9T. 



CROPS MORE TALKED 

OF THAN POLITICS 



T. T. Hudson, who has returned from 
a business trip to the F'acific coast, is 
very much impressed with the wonder, 
fill prain yield in the West this year. 
In Nebraska. Oregon. Washington, 
Montana and North Dakota, he ob- 
nerved, the crops of all kinds were of 
the first order. 

■•In the West" said Mr. Hudson, "'one 
l,*a'H more about good crops than they 
rto aliout polltica. Wilson seem8 to be 
popular among both Republicans and 
pemocratn." 




SlSflf4*ND IIRAND FILLA. fcrSS 

MBftkoownasEcst. Safest. Always Keliahl* 

SOLOBYDRIOOISTSEVERYWHERI 



5 WEST END 

HERALD nRANCHi \ 

Benaaa Oiava, Maaaser, lt»23 Weat Baperior 8tre*<. 



If 



la^ 



CHURCH TOO 
TROUBLESOME 

Many Dulutfaians Look UpoD 

Church Work as a 

Nuisance. 



Have No Time for Anything 

Bnt Business Says 

Pastor. 



•'Men. tpyJcal of Gallio, who was in- 
different to reliKion, are many and 
numerous in Duluth." said Kev. J. A. 
McGaughey, pastor of the Second 
Presbyterian church, 1515 West Supe- 
rior street, in his sermon on ••Gallio, 
the Indifferent Man.'* laat evening. 

"Gallio, who was a newly elected 
dtliuty in Rome, when Paul was 
brought tjefore him for teacliing tlie 
religiuu of Christ to the Jews, relut-ed 
to hear the proceedings. " said Rev. Mr. 
McGaughey. "There are such men in 
Duluth today and in every community 
for that matter who do not cure for 
the church, but spend their entire time 
in business, like Gallio. They do not 
want to be bothered by such things 
as the church and like Gallio have only 
lime for law and business. 

"I'aul had Just come from Athens, 
the great city of art and letters, to 
Corinth, the hotbed of iniquity and 
breeding place of sins. It was here 
that Paul licgan his work and was 
very successful from the start, win- 
ning over many Jews to his faith and 
teachings. This stirred the orthodox 
Jews, who had Paul arrested and 
brought before Gallio on a charge of 
worshipping God contrary to the law. 
The Jews expected to take advantage 
of the gentle disposition of Gallio, who 
was just elected a deputy of the 
courts. Gallio, however, refused to 
hear the case and ordered the partici- 
pants from the courtroom. He would 
not even hear Paul and after waving 
him aside, ordered the llctors to drive 
every one from the rooms. 

■Senfca. a brother of Gallio and a 
member of the Roman senate, declared 
at one time that Gallio was one of the 
most gentle men in the empire, and 
still he refused to take part In the 
church. He refused to hear the claims 
of religion and was at all times indif- 
ferent to the teachings of God. Gallio 
was a fine type of manhood and was 
alwavs a factor in government and law. 
But Gallio cared for no other things. 

•'There are hundreds of men In Du- 
luth today who are just like Gallio. 
They. too. refuse to have anything to 
do with the church and spend their 
entire time In business and govern- 
ment. Even in the churches, there are 
many who attend the services, but ab- 
solutely refuse to aid or assist In the 
work. They will not help in a Sunday 
school class, attend meetings or accept 
membership on boards or committees. 
They, too, are indifferent and as harm- 
ful to a church as Gallio. Men like Paul 
are always needed in a church, but 
never the indiffer ent like Gallio." 

SIN NOT DUE 

TO IGNORANCE 



Men Tempted By Fancied 

Greed or Pleasure Says 

Pastor. 

'•Sin Is caused by an impelling force 
which charms the sinner.' declared 
Rev. W. C. R. Wermine. pastor of the 
First Swedish M. E. church. Twen- 
tieth avenue west and Tliird street, in 
his sermon on "fenakes and Charmers" 
at the regular services last evening. 

Rev. Mr. Wt-rmlne does not lay the 
blame to a lack of knowledge. Those 
who commit crimes and sins, declared 
Rev. Mr. Wermine, have been taught 
the teachings of Christ and It cannot 
be said that they are Ignorant. He 
said further: "It is the lawyer and 
doctor charmed by the larger fee; it 
1b the merchanX allured by the short, 
but di8hone,st road to fortune; it is the 
politician resorting to mean methods — 
all charmed by the lust of power. 

'I have heard the pitiful sobbing 
of the broken hearted girl gone wrong 
who knew better; but she was charmed 
by the dance hall. 1 have received the 
unburdening of the young mans heart 
who has become the slave to some 
vice. Some of these things are not evil 
in themselves, but when they charm 
men's hearts away from Christ, they 
become evil. 

"I would have the business men of 
this city co-operate to make it hard 
for the business man to be dishonest 
and easy to be honest. I would have 
the lawver, the doctor and the poli- 
tician strive to make it difficult to 
employ mean methods and easy to do 
right.'' 

PULPIT WILLBE SlPPLIfiD. 

The pulpit of Clements Mission M. 
E church. 830 Garfield avenu.e will be 
occupied by the various Duluth pastors 
of the Methodist Episcopal church un- 
til Oct. 1. when a meeting of the con- 
ference will be held and a successor 
chosen to Rev. B. B. Hanscome. who 
left last week for Ely. Minn., where 
he accepted a call from the Methodist 

church. ... , 

Rev. E. K. Copper, district superin- 
tendent, said this morning that the 
regular services would be lield at the 
Clements church until a pastor was ap- 
pointed to the pulpit. Local pastors 
will take turns at conducting the 
services during the next three or four 
weeks, said \rr. Copper. In all proba- 
bility the new pastor will preach his 
first sermon at the church on Sunday. 
Oct. 6. 

Walker Faoeral. 



PASTORS WILL 
AID«HT 

Will Observe Oct. 27 as 

Anti-Tubercuiosis 

Sunday. 

West End Ministers W 
Preach on White Plague 
Campaign. 



In accord with the wishes of the 
state board of health all the West end 
churches will observe anti-tuberculosis 
Sunday, Oct. 27, with special services 
and sermons. 

The state board, which la now fight- 
ing the deadly plague, last year start- 
ed the movement among the churches 
of the state. The pastors in every 
city throughout the state are being 
asked to devote the day to the subject 
and the following bulletin Is being sent 
explaining the movement: 

"Churches and religious societies 
to the number of at least 100.000 will 
be urged to give special attention to 
the prevention of tuberculosis on Sun- 
day, Oct. 27, or en some day during 
the week preceding or the week follow- 
ing that date. This season has been 
t^et apart and designated as the Third 
National Association for the Study and 
Prevention of Tuberculosis. 

"That this is a vital problem among 
church cofigregatlons is evidenced by 
statistics which the national association 
gathered last year, which show that 10 
per cent of all deaths among church 
members are caused by tuberculosis. 
Based on these figures and on the mor- 
tality statistics of the census bureau, 
over 62.000 of the 33,000.000 communi- 
cants in the churches in the United 
States die from tuberculosis »:'very year 
This figure assumes that the death 
rate of 1.60 per 1,000 pop\ilation in thn; 
registration area applies to all church- 
goers when, as a matter of fact, the 
rate would probably be higher. 

"The chuches of Minnesota in 1910 
and mil gave quite general assent to 
this movement. In each of these years 
over 300 ministers of various denom- 
inations gave a special service to this 
subject. Fifty thou.^and persons were 
thus reached and were given a message 
of health and hope." 

Swedish W.*E. Church. 

The steward board of the First 
Swedish M. E. church. Twentieth ave- 
nue west and Third street, will meet 
In the church parlors tomorrow even- 
ing. 

The choir will hold its regular prac- 
tice Wednesday evening. 

Rev. C. W. R. Wermine will conduct 
the Thursday evening prayer meeting. 

The Epworth League will entertain 
at a soci.ll Friday evening at the home 
of Mr. and Mrs. W. Johnson. 2413 West 
Third street 



Regular Prices 

Are hower 
ThanEisewhere 




Successor to Grar-THllant Ca. 
IIS-IIS-IIT-IIV WKST SUPERIOR STREET. DULUTH, MINN. 



The Sale 

Continues All 

This Week 



Leave for Conference. 

Rev. A. G. Lltoren of Brooklyn. N. Y., 
spent the week-end at the home of 
Rev. Swaney Nelson. 2212 West Third 
street, and will leave with the latter 
this evening for Chicago, where they 
will attend the annual conference of 
the Swedish Baptist church. Other 
local residents, who will leave today 
for the conference as delegates of the 
local church, are Theodore Gustafson 
and Miss Carrie Erlckson. Mrs. C. 
Holm, also representing the First 
Swedish Baptist church, left for Chi- 
cago last Saturday. The party will 
return next Monday morning. 
♦ 

Will Leclnre Here. 

Miss Hester Gerier McOaughey of 
Houston, Tex., a sister of Rev. J. A. 
McGaughey, pastor of the Second I'res- 
byterian church, who Is spending sev- 
eral weeks at the home of her brother, 
will give a lecture Wednesday after- 
noon at a meeting of the Women's 
Home and Foreign Missionary society 
of the church. Miss McGaughey is at 
present secretary of the Houston Y. 
W. C A. and prominent In religious 
circles in the South. Up to five years 
ago Miss McGaughey was a missionary 
in India, having been compelled to give 
up the work owing to her health. The 
meeting will be held at the home of 
Mrs. John McPhall. &21 West Fourth 
str<r^et. who will serve a missionary tea 
during the afternoon. 



Classes Will Meet. 



Rev. J. J. Daniels of the Swedish 
I Mission church. Twenty-first avenue 
1 west and Second street, has called a 
special meeting tomorrow evening for 
the confirmation classes of the past 
three years. Mr. Daniels said this 
morning that he is planning to organ- 
ize a confirmation society of the 
church, which will have for Its mem- 
ibers all those who are graduated from 
! the classes each year. About 100 are 
expected to join the society tomorrow 
evening. 

i* 

Episcop-il Church Notes. 

The vestry committee of f»t. Peter's 
Episcopal charch. Twenty-eighth ave- 
nue west and First street, will hold Its 
monthly meeting in the church parlors 
this evening. 

The Rebecca guild will be entertained 
Thursday afternoon at the home of 
Mrs. J. A. Ehrenson, 2916 West Third 
street. 

St. Luke's guild will hold its annual 
bazar and supper in the guild rooTTi3 
Thursday evening. 

"Living Problems." 

Prof. J. O. Hall of Columbia univer- 
sity will give a lecture Thursday even- 
ing on "Living Problems" at the First 
Norwegian-Danish M. E. church. 
Twenty-fourth avenue west and Third 
street. Prof. Hall has made on exten- 
sive study of the subject for the uni- 
versity, and his ad<>^s8 Thursday is 
being given under the auspices of the 
ladies' aid society of the church. 



The body of Robert A. Walker, son 
of B K Walker, 2039 Minnesota ave- 
nue who died last Friday on his fath- 
er's' ranch at Gull Lake. Sask., arrived 
In the city this morning and is await- 
•ing the arrival of Mr. Walker, who is 
expected here this afternoon. The 
funeral will probably be held from the 
Olson * Crawford undertaking rooms 
tomorrow afternoon. 
1» 

Quarterly Conference. 

The congregation of the First Nor- 
wegian-Danish M. E. church Twenty- 
fourth avenue west and Third street, 
will hold its fourth quarterly confer- 
ence In the church parlors this even- 
ing. Every society and organlsiatlon 
of the church will make Its report for 
the year. Rev. James Sanaker of Min- 
neapolis, district superintendent, will 
preside at the meetins. 



West End Briefs. 

Rev. C. G. Olson of the Bethany 
Swedish Lutheran church. Twenty- 
third avenue west and Third street. Is 
conducting mission meetings on the 
range this week. 

Rev Edward Erlckson of the First 
Norwegian-Danish M. E. church. Twen- 
ty-fourth avenue west and Third street, 
and James Sanaker of Minneapolis will 
leave tomorrow for Omaha, Neb., where 
they will attend a conference of the 
church for the next two weeks. 

Mrs. David Oberg of Big S'prlngs. 
S. D la a guest for several weeks at 
the home of^Rev. and Mrs. Swaney Nel- 
son. 2212 West Third street. 

A Thoren will conduct the weekly 
prayer meeting Thursday evening at 
the First Swedish Baptist church, 
Twenty-second avenue west and Third 
street, In place of Rev. Swaney Nelson, 
who will leave the city this evening. 

The Ladles' Aid society of the Swed- 
ish Mission church will be entertained 
Wednesday afternoon at the home of 




Mantle 
Clocks 

OFF 



Now for a great 5-ciay Clean-up Sale of China, Dinnerware, Electric Portables, etc. Our Housewares Sale 
was a great success and it is our purpose to make our China Sale even a greater success. You should bear in mind 
that our regular prices would be considered bargains in most stores. Our reductions are all made from our 
regular low prices. 



$39.00 French 

China Dinner Set 

for $27.50 




This is a new set not before 
placed on sale. The body is of 
very high grade French China 
with a rich coin gold border. 
If you do not care for a regular 
dinner set, you can select what 
you wish from open stock at 
34 off and we will guarantee to 
match up your set for at least 
five years. 

Dinner Sets at 
'/» Price 




To close out three of our din- 
ner patterns we are offering 
them at exactly Yz Price. 



117.00 set, with rich 
golden brown border. 



$21.00 set, with very dainty conven- 
tional green 
border 



$8.50 



$ 1 0.50 



$23.50 set, with very rich gold band 
with encrusted effect — this is John- 
son Bros.' English Earlhenware_and 
very high 
grade for 



arinenware anu 

$11.63 



65c Com- 
' |»lete 
Inverted 
Gas Lamp 
for 48c 




China for Decorating 
at 1/2 and V4 Off. 

This china was formerly owned by Mrs. Ticknor of 
Superior. We bought it at a great reduction and now 
ofTer it to our customers at One-half to One-Fourth Off 
her prices. Nothing reserved. 

Fancy Decorated Plates 

Our new fall line has arrived and is certainly the finest line 
of decorated plates ever shown in this city. We are offering 
the entire line at much less than the regular value — choice at — 

2dc, 38c, 48c, 65c and 75c 

All Fancy China at V2 Price 

or Less 

In our clean-up of odd samples and close out of odds and ends 
we are offering fancy china which was originally on our 25c 
bargain table for 15c, 50c table for 35c, 75c table for 50c, $1.00 
table for 75c. 



$7.75 Dinner Set 
for $4.75 




All Other Fancy China 
Not Included on the Tables 

at V3 Off. 

Entire Line of Cut Glass 

1/4 Off 

During this sale we are offering our entire line of Cut Glass, 
(which are already the greatest values in the city at our regular 
prices) now on sale at y^ Off. 



Chair Seats 



Assorted shapes, 
sizes and colors 




Gas Mantles 



Inverted or upright, 
reg^ular lOe — 3 for — 




This set is a plain shape, dec- 
orated in conventional gold 
and can be matched up from 
our open stock. Set consists of 
6 pie plates, 6 tea plates, 6 
breakfast plates and dinner 
plates, 6 fruit saucers, 6 indi- 
vidual butters, 6 handled teas, 
2 open vegetable dishes, 2 plat- 
ters, 1 covered dish, 1 covered 
butter dish, gravy boat, pickle 
dish, sugar bowl, cream pitcher, 
bowl and cake plate. 

Electric Portables 

1/3 and V4 Off 




In order to close out some 
odd samples we are offering 
some great values in Electric 
Portables. 

$8.95 Portables $4.98 

$12.50 Portables $6.25 

$18.50 Portables $12.50 

$35.00 Portables $17.50 

Many others at great reduc- 
tions. 



Alarm Clocks 




Entirely new Alarm 
Clocks, with bell on 
intiide of case, not on 
top as shown, to in- 
troduce — 



59c 



Mrs. E. E. Anderson, 2521 West Elev- 
enth street. 

The Parthenoe society of the Swed- 
ish Mission church will meet Wednes- 
day eveniner at the home of Miss Edna 
Johnson, 123 Exeier street. 

The Epworth league of the First 
Norwegrian-Danlsh M. E. church will 
entertain at a free social In the church 
parlors tomorrow evening'. 

The Christian Enoejivor society of 
the Second Presbyterian church, 1515 
West Superior street, will hold a busi- 
ness meeting in the church parlors 
this evening. 

The Luther leagrue of the Bethany 
Swedish Lutheran church, Twenty- 
third avenue west and Third street, 
will meet In the church parlors to- 
morrow evenlner. 

Mrs. John Sinclair and daughter, 
Viola, of 2403 West Third street have 
returned from a six weeks* visit in 
the East. 

Mrs. J. A. Oladman of 1905 West .«?ec- 
ond street has returned frona a weeks 
visit at St. Paul . 

DEBS DENOUNCES BOTH 

ROOSEVELT AND TAFT 

Blsbee, Arl«., Sept. 9.— ."Roosevelt has 
never been a friend to the people ex- 
cept when there were press agents 
close by," said Eugene V. Debs, In an 
address to a large crowd at Warren 
park Sunday. 

Debs devoted most of his speech to 
denunciation of Roosevelt and Taft. 
His only reference to Woodrow Wilson 
was to say that his party was con- 
trolled by the capitalist class. 

SIX LECTURES TO 

NIGHT SCHOOL STUDENTS 

Prof. Eugene "Van Cleef will deliver 
a series of six lectures to the night 
students of the Y. M. C. A. before the 
Christmas vacation. He Is Instructor 
in geography at the normal school and 



CASTOR I A 

Por InfEintf and Children. 

The Kind You Have; Always Bought 



Bears the 
Signature of 




^;2^ 



hlg lectures will be of the practic.il 
phases of geography. 

The subjects selected are: "Iron Ore 
and Man," 'What Coal Means to Man," 
•Duluth — One of the World's Great 
Ports," "Climate and Our Minnesota 
Products," "Commercial Importance of 
Waterways," and "Climate and Man.' 
The course Is framed to give the stu- 
dent practical knowledge of how to 
investigate conditions in other sections 
cf the world, especially with a view to 
guarding against fake investments in 
lands and mines. 



NEW HIGHWAY 
ISJPENED 

Mackenzie Turnpike Longest 

Level Graveled Road 

in State. 



The Mackenzie turnpike, leading 
from Wheelock on the Duluth and St. 
Vincent road to the northwest corner 
of Itasca state park, a distance of 
twenty-eight miles, has been opened. 

The new highway, which runs 
through Clearwater county and touches 
the villages of Allda and Mallord, la 
a monument to the persistence of W. 
R Mackenzie, secretary of the North- 
ern Minnesota Development associa- 
tion. 

Mr. Mackenzie first suggested the 
road, tie made several trips to Clear- 
water county to get the county com- 
missioners Interested. He pertisted In 
pointing out the advantages of the 
road as a means of furthering develop- 
ment and as an automobile highway. He 
stirred the county commission to ac- 
tion and the road has been completed. 

The new highway is the longest 

fraded level graveled road In the state, 
t as a grade of but 1 per cent, and 
runs through some of the finest coun- 
try in Northern Minnesota. Seven land 
sales have already been made near 
Mallord, bo Clearwater county has 



reaped immediate benefit in settle- 
ment. 

The new highway will open a beau- 
tiful route for Duluth and Twin Citv 
automobile parties. By following the 
Duluth and St. Vincent road to Wlieel- 
ock and turning off over the new 
highway to tne Itasca state park and 
thence to the Twin Cities, one of the 
most beautiful automobile trips imag- 
inable will be possible. Coming the 
other way. automobile parties from 
the Twin Cities will be able to follow 
the same route. The return each way 
may be made over the direct highway 
between St. Paul and Duluth, so that 
a loop will be formed. 

The plans for the Duluth and St. 
Vincent road are progressing, and the 
good roads committee of the Northern 
Minnesota Development association 
hopes to see the road built next year. 

ACTRESS SUBPOENAED 

IN ROSENTHAL CASE 



Mlddletown, N. Y., Sept. 9. — Miss 



Laura Davis of Chicago, who Is slng» 
Ing here with a theatrical company, 
has been subpoenaed to appear before 
the grand jury in New Yt>rk to give 
testimony In the liosenthal murder 
case. The young wi>man Is said to have 
been at a hotel almost next door to 
the Metropole on the night of the mur. 
der, and to have witnessed the crimft 
from a window. 



ClalniN He U'a« Libeled. 

Brainerd. Minn., Sept. 9. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Mons Mahlum, member 
of the water and light board, has com- 
menced suit for libel In the district 
court for J20,000 against Hugo 
Schwartzkopf, alleging that certain 
libelous words were used by Schwartz- 
kopf in a petition and pamphlet re^ 
ferring to the board. 



Oabora Appoint* Wykes. 

Lansing, Mich., Sept. 9. — Governor 
Osborn has announced the appointment 
of Roger I. Wykes of Grand Rapids as 
attorney general to succeed Franlc 
Kuhn, who has been named as a justice 
of the Michigan supreme court. 



GROWS BEAUTIFUL, HEAVY BAIR; 

WE PROVE IT-25 CENT "DANDERINE'^ 

Destroys Daodroff— Stops Falling flair— Cleans and 
Invigorates Your Scalp— Delightfal Dress- 
ing — Doesn't Color. i 

. " -»( 



To be possessed of a head of heavy, 
beautiful hair; soft, lustrous, fluffy, 
wavy and free from dandruff is mere- 
ly a matter of using a little Dande- 
rine. 

It Is easy and Inexpensive to have 
nice, soft hair and lots of it. Just 
get a 25 cent bottle of Knowlton's 
Danderlne now — all drug stores rec- 
ommend It — apply a little as directed 
and within ten minutes there will be 
an appearance of abundance; fresh- 
ness, fluffiness and an incomparable 
gloss and lustre and try as you will 
you cannot And a trace of dandruff or 
falling hair; but your real surprise 



will be after about two weeks' us% 
when you will see new hair — fine and 
downy at first — yes, but really new 
hair — sprouting out all over your 
scalp — Danderine is. we believe, the 
only sure hair grower; destroyer of 
dandruff and cure for itchy scalp and 
It never fails to stop falling hair at 
once. 

If you want to prove how pretty and 
soft your hair really It, moisten a cloth 
with a little Danderlne and carefully 
draw it through your hair — taking one 
small strand at a time. Your hair will 
be soft, glossy and beautiful in just 
a few moments — a delightful surpris* 
awaits everyone who tries it. 




i 



Monday, 



THE DULUTp HERALD 



September 9, 1912. 



11 



^ 




i^"hM'*w*^^"f^ 



Etithu*ia«m la the plan of Inauifu- 
ratlng a pUno teachers' round table aa 
a new branch o( the work of the Mat- 
inee Mualcale wa« the keynote of the 

.nieetlnK huldthla niarniun; at tho x. 
W. C. A- by mc^mbiTs of the club tor 

'discus.'"'- 
Thh 

' ten'*---' 
"Cii ■ 

' pi 
a < 



f the plan. 

tracb.-ra of piano at- 

• tiim with Miss Josephlno 

I ,.t this department. 

' WIS il.Hiiiea to hold 

, III St M.j'ul.iy morning of 

,t MisM Carey's stufllo 

fii.m 10 to 11 oelock. the 

■ short so that busy teach- 

t have to give up too much 

^ will submit problems 

;iti<l Ukmu. coriunoii to 



will 1 



new V 
of 



if these subjects 
iliHfUssion at each 
! (..•iieflt may be 
..•tiee!» of others. 
^ whK h will be 
• uion of Music 
.11.; Child Mind." 
Hystem for I^iano 
Moat suisfactory l.^nigth 
-~ itid other vital 

. s ■•! Every mem- 
much Interestt'd in the 
nttcipite« a tjreat deal 
■'f the 



Will Take Part in All- 

Star Suffrage Vauaeville 



up r" >r 



Card 



CHILDREN'S GIFT. 



Little Girls Donate Books to No- 
ne ming Sanitarium. 

>f the R«"d. White and mue 
<'■"•) about nineh'en 
{I'srpose of raitinK 
., . ,':.! f,,r (',■■ .-hil- 



hilJron*.'' t 



H who will be 
Five pretty pic- 
were alao given 
little girls. 
10 to 13 years 
nutdance of in- 
1e the scrap- 
. .■* and picnic 
ilio money for 



'^^idcd 



. - .'lil.i; ..ri's niaji?a- 

", i .:.l U« U8e- 

• , , t ,<- 

. -fl 

.■.:s }-:uni v/'MUJ i ■• 

I.-* the little ori'> 

1. TO men fa. Game.? 

I as well as the 



Y. W. C. A. NOTES. 



Gyi 



Will Form Girls' Club and Have 
rm Frolic. 

' 1^ i:>een plamoiT 

'by ' Voung ' 

t-r; for t..' .. 

Jiuild- 

II ,. , •• '■ ."-.i em 

urr t )rdiaily invited. 

it s ooiock and a pro- 

nd other .so iai di- 

aiied out I' >r their 

iiifju. Itofre-shments will be 

of Birls worklngr In homea 

,tj tliai some such club be 

>nd a girls "Friendly 

ably grow out of to- 

iu i: X !» party. The plan la 

to i4irl.^ who are atrange here 

1.'. ..V (r- \»-^loome at the as- 

her memhera of 
i.. ■. ;i :. and to give them 

Ik ; i\ evening, at Iea.se once 

«vt;., - every two weeks aa ttit 

club may Ueside. 

tiywn F'rolle. 
A gymn i.slum frolic will alao be held 
there tomorrow evenlniy prior to the 
oi >f the new fall classe.'* under 

til- tion of Miss Bertha M. Parm- 

alee. 

All 2rir'« who have been mem her a of 
th ■ or who are interested 

In r g:irl.^ and women, are 

ۥ): i to this informal even- 

In. plans for the opening 

of Uiv -; nil! h^' tilked ovt-r. 

<i<'iie^H Ilnll.v. 
A 1 ■ -;& dilt-udani-e at the Geneva 





Kl!i t^/ml KEj U 

— AT SUMMER PRICES — 

,\.LL KINDS OF FUR GARMENTS 
MADE TO ORDER. 

BECKMAN'S 
FUR FACTORY 

16 K.\ST .srPKRIOR ST. 



d ZE^NITH 

^ TRUNK COMPANY 

\ 

i No. 8 Lake A ve. South 









V 



Atcaoe tnm rrelaa!k'i 



vwvwwvwwwwn: 



MRS. J. L. LAIDLAW. 

Mra James Lees I^ldlaw. wife of Banker Laldlaw. Is one of the prominent 
Buffrasrettea in New York who is taking an active part In the all-.star suffrage 
vaudeville attraction which Is to run an entire week at Hammerateln s \ Ictorla 
theater in New York. Mrs. Laldlaw la a fluent speaker and she has been chosen 
to tell the audience why It should Join the suftragre movement. 



rally meeting at the Young Women s 
Christian aa.fociation yesterday after- 
noon at the association building helped 
to make the meeting an interesting one 
and the social hour which followed 
pleasantly filled with mualc and the 
serving of refreshmenta. 
•'Open HoiiM*.** 
An informal open house On every 
Sunday afternoon has been planned and 
all girls and women of the city, 
whether members of the asaociiU'on or 
not will be welcome to drop in for 
an Informal visit there and at r> o'clock 
a song service will bo held. The girls 
In the building and out of It are look- 
ing forward with pleasure to these 
afternoons during the fall and winter, 
and expect to enjoy them fully. 

WORirTAKE~N UP. 



Musical Course Will Probably Be 
Carried Out. 

The course of musical attractions 
arranged for by the late Prof. Horace 
W Reyner will probably bo carried 
on by other musicians interested In 
the work whlcli he has done and In 
the musical upbuild of the city, and 
Duluth will probably have a chance 
of having the same attractions, con- 
tracts with which had been signed by 

Mr. Reyner. 

. ^ . 

Made State Officers. 

Two Duluth women, Mrs. P. L. De 
Volst and Mrs. J. A. P. Neal. were 
honored with election to office by the 
State Women's Suffrage association at 
Minneapolis. Mrs. De Volst was given 
the of f i- e of second vice president and 
Mrs. Neal was made a member of the 
board of directors. 

Duluth delegates who attended tUd 



convention state that the report of 
<rtction In the meetings was exagger- 
ated; that the transactions were all 
harmonious and were not featured by 
any unpleasantness among the dele- 
gates. 

They report tnat Duluth day was 
the bannt-r day as far as the suffrage 
movement was concerned, that more 
monev was collected for the cause that 
day than any other day during the 
week, and there was a larger attend- 
ance at the suffrage tent. 

Mrs. R. P. Boyington. who spoke be- 
fore the Minnesota Federation of 
Women's clubs on "Economy In the 
Home." said this morning that the Du- 
luth homecroft exhibit, which was giv- 
en a prominent place of display at 
the St. Louis county building, was one 
of the chief drawing cards of Interest 
there and that It was surrounded most 
of the time by large crowds of v'sltors. 

On the whole, the fair this year was 
the most successful In every way. she 
said, of any they have ever had. 

The other delegates to the suffrage 
convention had not returned this morn- 
ing. 

Banquet and Reception. 

A ban<iuet will t.-e served this even- 
ing at the Central Baptist church 
followed by a reception at which Mr. 
and Mrs. J. H. Oiffin. missionaries to 
China, who have been home on a 
year's furlough. will be guests of 
honor. 

The banquet Is the quarterly af- 
fair held for the reports of officers of 
the various departments and societies 
of the church. Besides the reports, 
toasts will be responded to and a 
musical program given. The entire 
congregation and friends of Mr. and 
Mrs Glffin are invited to call during 
the evening and greet the guests of 



*f 

e 




^¥MII@N 




By PEGGY PEABODY 




URS 



REPAIRED, 
REMODELED 
and MADE 
TO ORDER 



W© carry one of the largest and 
f!nest stocks of Furs In the city. 
Make your selection early. 

DULUTH FUR CO., 

335 West First Htr^t. 




Zrnlth «24. 



iXelroMe 4.S36 



Our Massage Treatments 

Are most succeaaful In preserving 
and improving the appearance of the 
face and neck. Appointments made 
by phone. 

KNAUF SISTERS 

24 Went Superior !«t.. Dalath. 



Trying to Catch Up With Things 
Left Undone. 

I'd like to have a copper cent for 
every person In this country who is 
busily engaged in the almost impos- 
sible task of catch- 
ing up with him- 
self, wouldn't you? 
It is a national 
evil, and If it is not 
overcome I do not 
doubt the predic- 
tions of a doctor 
that we shall all be 
in.sane in 200 or 
300 years. 

Falling behind la 
not an evil of busi- 
ness life alone. It 
s the fate of most 
..eople with regular 
duties to perform — 
busine.ss. social, domestic or whatever 
they may be, and It seizes hold of the 
young as well as the old, the giddy 
and the serious — it is all the same. 
There is something left undone which 
each would do. 

With some It is merely a source of 
Irritation; with others, in serious 
walks, a thing that leaves its blight- 
ing mark on that which they do ac- 
complish. 

And how the neglected tasks multi- 
ply! 

At first it was only one, but in what 
a short space of time the one is grown 
into many. It la a state of affairs 




honor who will leave In about a month 
for their posts In China to resume 
their missionary work there. 



mAi 



REAU-McWWTHY. 



Engagement AnQ_<[urtced of Well 
Known Couple. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hei^l ^. Iteau of 529 
Fourth avenue east 4»»«»<>unc<j the en- 
gagement of their daughter, Helen 
Adelaide to George D. McCarthy of 
this lity. The wedding will take place 
the latter part of the month. 

For Visitor. 

Mrs. George O. Smith of 1829 East 
Fourth street entertained at her home 
Saturday afternoon In honor of Mrs. 
Miller of Detroit, Mich., who has been 
the guest of her sister, Mr.s. William 
Wright. The dining room was pretty 
with sweet peas and asters, while 
dahlias and golden glow were effective- 
ly ui»ed about the living room, parlor 



and reception hall. 
Mesdamea — 

George Tl.scher, 

Nathaniel Kriz. 

Krelmer. 

E. Wagner, 

R. Kenney. 

G. R. Gleason, 
Misses — 

Grace Gleason, 

G. Hazen. 
Messrs. — 

Smith. 

Gleason, 



The guests were: 

William Wright, 

Miller, 

John Gonska, 

Fred Ruf, 

Smith, 



Clara Smith. 



Krelmer. 



Surprise Party. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Juten of 4'28 Sev- 
enth avenue east were pleasantly sur- 
prised Saturday evening by a number 
of their friends. Those present were. 
Messrs. and Mesdames — 

Gust Melander. Alfred Peterson. 

Henning Ander 
son. 



Jack Klder, 

Anderson, 

August Holm, 
strand. 
Misses — 

Esther Holm- 
strand, 

Selma Grant, 
Messrs. — 

Carl Olson, 

Carlson, 

John Juten, 

Freeberg. 



Frank Johnson, 
Victor Juten, 
A, Peterson, 
Nelson, 
H. Teppen, 
Carl Nyman. 

Florence Grant, 
Amy Peterson, 
Anna Nelson. 

Ostrom. 
Palmer, 
Adolph Juten, 
Jack Lavlne. 



Scandinavian W. C .T. U. 

The Scandinavian W. C. T. U. will 
hold its regular monthly meeting to- 
morrow afternoon at 2 o'clock with 
Mrs. L. Peterson, 601 Twenty-third 
avenue west. The subject for the aft- 
ernoon will be "Somebody's Son, " led 
by the hostess. 

• , — 

Special Meeting. 

A special meeting of the Modern 
Drama class of the Twentieth Centur.v 
club will be held at the clubroom of 
the library Wednesday. .Sept. 11 at 3 
p. m. A large attendance Is desired as 
business of Importance will be trans- 
acted. ..Vll women interested In the 
study of modern drama are cordially 
invited to bo present. 
• 

Strindberg Lecture. 

Sigurd Erdtman will deliver a lec- 
ture on August Strindberg, the late 
renowned Swedish wj-lter before the 
Modern Drama class of the Twentieth 
Century club early In the club year, 
the date for which will be announced 
later. Special interest is attached to 
this lecture as Mr. Erdtman was per- 
sonally aciiuaintod with this writer. 
* 

Rose Society. 

An important meeting of the Rose 
sociotv will be held Wednesday after- 
noon at the Y. W. C. X. board room at 
2:30 o'clock for the transaction of 
business connected with the state so- 
ciety, and a full attendance Is desired. 

m 

Art^ Meeting. 

The Duluth Art association will be 
held In the Commercial club parlors 
this evening at 8 o'clock. Important 
business is to be discussed and a large 
attendance is desired. 
• 

Church Meetings. 

The W'estmlnstci Auxiliary of the 
First Presbyterian church will meet to- 
morrow afternoon whh Mrs. A. C. Volk. 
2026 East First street. This will be the 
first meeting for this fall, and a large 
attendance Is desired. 

« • « 

The Weat Side Auxiliary of the First 
Pre.sbyterian church will meet tomor- 
row at 11 a. m. at Chester park, and 
In case of unpleasant weather the 
meeting will be held at the home of 
Mrs. A. G. Osman, 315 East Second 
street at the same hour. In either 
case a picnic lunch will be served. 
• • • 

Trinity guild will hold an all-d.iy 
meeting tomorrow at the guild hall of 
"Trinity pro-cathedral. 



for which the conscientious are dis- 
posed to feel some shame, mingled 
with resentment for condltlon.s that 
are forever whipping us Into a pace 
no mortal can sustain all the time. Yet 
the readiness, nay, eagerness with 
which we burn the candles at both 
ends, seeming to reck nothing of the 
cost. Is unbelievable. 

There is an everlasting whirl and 
grind that begins no one knows how 
and ends nowhere. In It are thou- 
.lands. trying to do many things, some 
of them not worth while, after a fash- 
ion. 

What should constitute recreation 
and reliixation la often the hardest 
work of all, because of our determina- 
tion to do the things that people ex- 
pect of us and trust to getting a 
chance to do the things that really 
Interest us and really count. 

The root of the evil lies In that we 
attempt too much. Not work, neces- 
sarily, but all the exactions of living 
that grow more and more complicated. 
Unless we curtail, these will make an 
end of us and a sorrj' one. 

My advice to the one so burdened 
with old responsibilities and duties 
that he knows not which way to turn, 
is, make a clean sweep of the whole 
lot, except those that conscience can't 
forswear. 

Make a fresh start and with the 
wisdom acquired avoid future mistakes 
of the kind, otherwise we shall be- 
come more and more a race of peo- 
ple who mean well enough but who 
must always fall short of the mark. 



OPENING DAY RECITAL 

— Given by — 

Tanis School of Enelish 

at 8:25 o'clock. Tuesday Evening, Sept. 
10. All pupils and friends are cor- 
dially invited — corner Fourth avenue 
west and First street. Melrose. 4733. 
JNO. TAIVI9, l>rlnelpal. 



Personal Mention. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. A. McGonagle are 
taking a trip in their private car to 
points In Michigan and Mrs. C. T. 
Falrbairn of Birmingham, Ala., is 
making the trip with them. 

• • • 

Mrs. Otto Haller. Mrs. R. D. Annls 
and her sister. Miss Voss, returned 
Saturday from Mlnneapoli-s. Ml.ss Voss 
who has been visiting her sister this 
summer will leave soon for her home 
in Boston. 

• • « 

Mr. and Mrs. Allen McDonald of 308 
Kighth avenue east have as their 
guest. Patrick Allen and their nephew. 
Jack Whitman of Montreal. 

• • * 

Mrs. George K. Nuss and daughters. 
Margaret and Beatrice, have left for 
the East where they will spend a few 
months visiting relatives. 

• • • 

Mrs. William Bryant of Cleveland, 
who has been visiting Mr. and Mrs. 
C. F. Green and daughter of 122 West 
F^fth street returned to her home 
Saturday on the steamer Harvard. 

• • • 

Miss Marlon Forbes. Miss Grace An- 
thony, Mias Hulda Soderbloom. chap- 
eroned by Mr. and Mrs. H. Hill are 
taking a two weeks' trip through 
Southern Michigan. 

• * • 

Mr.s. C. R. Webster and daughter. 
Maud.' who have been visiting for a 
week at the home of Mrs. R. T. Ser- 
rurier. Portland flats, left yesterday on 
the steamer James I* Brown for 
Cleveland. 

• • • 

Miss Barbara Naughton of 120 East 
Third street has returned from a visit 
to Minneapolis. 

• • • 

Miss Nan Connelly of Minneapolis is 
la a guest of Miss Naughton, 120 East 
Third street. 

« • • 

Mr. and Mrs. O. D. Morris of Minne- 
apolis are guests of Mr. and Mrs. H. 
W. Kline of East Fourth street. Mr. 
Morris was formerly manager of the 
Spalding hotel of this city. 

• • • 

Mrs. Alexander Marshall. Miss .Tean 
Marshall and Master Jack Marshall of 
this city win sail tomorrow from New 
York on the steamship Kronprinzessln 
Cecilie of the North Gerriian Lloyd line 
for Germany, where Ihey will spend a 
year. a^ ^i 

Mr. and Mrs. Henrv Nolte and family 
have returned to tflblr ' home after 
spending the summer at Lake Poke- 
gama, near Pine City, Minn. 

• • • 

Mr. and Mrs. N. C. WarVer of Hunter's 
Park returned Saturday from a week's 
visit at Fond du Lac, W|ff. 

• • • - 

W. E. Culkln and (latfshter Dorothy 
of Hunter's Park left today for Roches- 






^ 






Are the Authoritative Styles 

Today is Sepl 9 

AUTUMN OPENING 



HE latest original styles for 
Fall and Autumn dress can 
be seen in all the stores. 

Be Sure You See the 
Warner Models 

Originated to accord with the 
latest dress tendencies of the com- 
ing season. New features and 
designs for every figure. Low 
bust and longer skirts than ever. 

The Height of 
Corset Excellence 

You can form some idea of the st3^!e 
from the illustrations, hut you must see 
the corsets themselves to fully appreci- 
ate them. Then wear the proper model 
for your figure and feel the Warner, 
standard of quality and comfort. 



$ 



1 



At All the Stores 

•2 to '5^ Per Pair 



Every Pair Guaranteed 



ter, N. Y., where the latter will enter 
boarding school. 

• • • 

Mr. and Mrs. Simon Clark and family 
are occupying their new home at 1619 
Woodland avenue. 

• * * 

Miss Ramona Hoopes returned Satur- 
day from a week's visit at Minneapolis. 

• » • 

Miss Dorothy Peck will leave in a 
few days to resume her work at Vassar 
college, where she was a freshman last 
year. 

• • * 

Mrs. Proeman K. Randall of 4301 
Robinson street has as her guest Mrs. 
William Edwards of Minneapolis. 

• * • 

Mrs. L. A. Ink of Lakeside Is the 
week-end guest of friends at Eveleth, 
Minn. 

• • * 

Miss May Bell of Minneapolis spent 
the week-end with her parents. Mr. 
and Mrs. John Bell of 5220 Colorado 
street. 

• * * 

Mr. and Mrs. H. P. Thomas of 1830 
Sixtieth avenue east have returned 
from the Twin Cities, where they spent 
fair week. 

• • • 

Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Gassier of Lake- 
side are visiting at Eau Claire. Wis., 
this week. They spent last v"eek at 
the state fair. 

« • e 

Mrs. P. A. F-'nslay of Hibblng, M«nn^ 
Is a guest of Mrs. G. A. Squires of 17 
North Fifty-second avenue west. 



THE WIFE'S SHARE. 



What Proportion of the Family 
Income Should Be Hers? 

In Harper's Bazar, eight actual ex- 
periences of dividing up the family 
income are related. Here is one of 

them: 

"My husband and I believe we have 

the Ideal arrangement In regard to our 
income. We have been married eight 
years and think that much of our hap- 
piness has been due to our partnership 
In financial matters. My husband is a 
lawyer and part of the time his In- 
come has been Irregular and uncer- 
tain, but half of all the money, above 
office expenses, has been handed over 
to me. The first year our Income 
amounted to 11,200; the second year, 
J1.500; the third year. 11,800; fourth, 
fifth, and sixth years, about $2,000; 
and the seventh and eighth years, |4,- 
500. 

"We each have a separate bank ac- 
count, and out of my half I pay the 
grocery bill, laundry, electricity, gas. 
maid (If any), and all my own clothes 
and personal expenses. I also pay for 
the furniture unless my husband 
wishes to make a present to the house- 
hold. He pays the rent, heating bill 
when In a house, all car fares, thea- 
ters traveling expenses, extra dinners 
at a restaurant, and his own clothes 
and personal expenses. While my hus- 
band takes an Interest in his home 
and enjoys it thoroughly, he does not 
feel any of the anxiety or worry con- 
nected with Its management, and I en- 
joy greatly the management of my 
Bhare. Last year I saved enough out 
of my part to buy the lot for a sum- 
mer cottage. Together, In the eight 
years, wo have saved $3,000, so I think 
I may claim that this plan pays finan- 
cially. However, Its greatest value Is 
In the Independence, mutual Interest, 
and confidence in each other that it 

brings." 

« 

Says Women Can Dress Fashion- 
ionably and Yet Cheaply. 

In the Woman's Home Companion, 
Grace Margaret Gould, editor of the 
fashion department, says: 

"There is no need of a woman spend- 
ing large sums of money to be fash- 
ionably dressed. Style, the very latest 
style, and good taste In dress can be 
acquired by any woman." 



COMPOSITION OF COSMETICS 



Cosmetics must be considered in con- 
nection with the hygiene of the skin, 
since they are so frequently utilized 
for the care and Improvement of the 

complexion, sas-^s the New York Her- 
ald. Having recently made a special 
study of cosmetics, Drs. Nicolas and 
Jamben find it convenient to divide 
them into three classes — powders, liq- 
uid cosmetics and creams. 

Cosmetics in the form of powders 
should be very finely pulverized. They 
should ba applied by means of a tuft 
of swan's down, and the face is then 
lightly wiped. In addition to giving 
delicate tints to the complexion, they 
are Intended to absorb the greasy se- 
cretions of the s.^in and to protect it 
against the injurious Influence of cold 
and humidity. 

Rice starch is generally used as a 
base for these powders, that substance 
being particularly Impermeable and ab- 
sorbent. But chemical analyses have 
proved that many of the rice powders 
on the market contain talc, chalk, mag- 
nesia, white lead, alabaster or bismuth 
compounds as substitutes. 

To correct the too great transpar- 
ency of the rice starch and its lack 
of adhesive power, starch from wheat 
flour may be used, with a slight addi- 
tion of zinc oxide and bismuth subnl- 
trate. For instance: 

W'heat starch 93 parts 

BLsiuuth Bubnltrate 6 parts 

Zinc oxide 6 parts 

Orris root powder 1 part 

Mix thoroughly and pass through a 
silk sieve No. 120. 

The well known dermatologist. Dr. 
Unna, of Hamburg, uses a mixture of 
mineral and vegetal powders, which he 
particularly recommends for persons 
having a greasy and flesh colored com- 
plexion: 

Zinc oxide 2 grammes 

Red bole 2 grammes 

White bole 3 grammes 

Magnesium carbonate .... 3 grammes 
Rice starch 10 grammes 

Mix and pass through a fine sieve. 

Talc, when well prepared and well 
washed, should give a simple white 
powder, but it is not sufficiently ad- 
hesive and hence Is mixed with, other 
pulverulent substances, such as mag- 
nesium carbonate, white barytes. white 
lead (the use of which should be avoid- 
ed), bismuth compounds, carbonate of 
lime and powdered meerschaum. 

The following are some recipes for 
powders: 
Bismuth sub-carbonate ... 2 grammes 

Zinc oxide 4 grammes 

Ven'ce talc 8 grammes 

Chalk, precipitated and 

washed 8 grammes 



Rice starch 10 grammes 

Or the following: 

Bismuth subnitrate 4 grammes 

Zinc oxide 4 grammes 

Chalk, pulverized and 

sieved 15 grammes 

Orris root powder 3 grammes 

Oil of geranium 3 drops 

Red cosmetics owe their color either 
to carthamine or to carmine, extracts 
of vegetal or animal products and 
harmless, or again In vermilion, a salt 
of mercury, which may be irritant. 
These are mixed with white powders 
for cosmetics in the form of powders, 
as for instance: White bole, verv fine, 
12 grammes; carmine. 50 centigram- 
mes. 

Liquid cosmetics are prepared by 
placing the Insoluble white material 
powders in suspension in water to 
which is added some tincture of ben- 
zoin or eau de Cologne. 

Zinc oxide 19 grammes 

Venice taJc 2 grammes 

Eau de Cologne 15 grammes 

Rose water 15 grammes 

Creams are prepared with the same 
powder as other cosmetics by the ad- 
dition of a little white wax. spermaceti 
or even cocoa butter. The white col- 
ored creams are tlie most dangerous, 
as they frequently contain salts of 
lead and especially white lead, the 
repeated use of which may lead to 
symptoms of lead poisoning. The fol- 
lowing are recipes for white and pink 
creams composed of innocuous sub- 
stances: 

Venice talc 9 grammes 

Zinc oxide 1 grame 

OH of sweet almonds 10 grammes 

Spermaceti 10 grammes 

Mix sufficiently to give a homogen- 
ous paste. 

Venice talc 9 grammes 

Oil of sweet almonds 20 grammes 

Spermaceti 20 grammes 

Carthamine 1 gramme 

Blue cosmetics intended for bring- 
ing out and strengthening the blue 
tint of the veins are prepared by 
mixing talc and Prussian blue and 
forming a paste by the addition of a 
little water with a slight admixture of 
gum. These are harmless. 

Black cosmetics are made by mixing 
a fatty substance with lamp or Ivory 
black. It is used to make the eyes 
appear longer or to give the eyelids a 
blistered tint or also to make up ths 
eyebrows or eyelashes. 

Powdery or liquid cosmetics may 
be removed bv simple washing. But 
In the case of greasy cosmetics It Is 
necessary to first use cold cream or 
vaseline and a piece of fine linen to 
remove them, then to wash with warm 
water and soap. 



Order Your Furs Early 



The long cold winter will soon be here. Are you ready for 
It? Have you a fur coat or .set of furs? If not, now is the time 
to buy while our stock is complete. 

Perhaps you have some fura left over from last year, or 
maybe your fur coat is quite good only it needs repairing or a 
new lining. Bring it in now and we will fix it up to look almost 
as good as new. Or have it made over into one of the new 
styles for this year. We can please you. 

—THE QUALITY FUR HOUSE— _i 

H. S. WENGER 

(Melrose 1201; Grand 2343-y.) 
Oak HaU BuUdins. 203 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 




.1 II II I ll ___— _^— — ,^.^— . 

I 




____^_________^_ I I I f — ^ _____^.^_i^ 



Monday, 



THE DULUT^ HERALD 



September 9, 1912. 




GLT OUT OF THE H^V XOU MUTT. 
DO YOU KNOW WHWTIME H" IS? 





FAST INTO YOURSELF 
1N5TANTLR-P.D. a 




WHAT5 ALL THE 
HUSTLE ABOUT 
AMOS? 



WHY CONSAftN IT 
PETE-THIS IS THE 
FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL 



5AY MAN \ WANT 

TO GO TO rHIGHT 

5CH00L-VM GOIM' 

TO BE A BURGLAR 

WHEN \ GROW UP 





lvr^.g>gJ>7^/V — ■« 



\ 



WHOLESALE HOUSES 
AND MANUFACTURERS 

OF DULUTH, MINNESOTA 

f^Reliable Up-to-Date Concerns Who Do a 
Strictly Jobbing and Manufacturing Business, 



ASBESTOS. 
A. H. Krieger Co. 



BAKERS. 
Crescent Bakery C«. 



BLANK BOOKS. LOOSE LEAF 

DEVICES AND RULINa 

Wendlandt Brothers Co. 



BOILERS AND MACHINERY. 
Duluth Boiler Work*. 



BREWERS. 

Duluth Brewing & Malting Co. 

Pitger Brewing Co. 

BUILDERS' SUPPLIES. 
Paine & Nixon Co. 



BUTTER AND ICE CREAM. 
Bridgcman-RusscU Co. 



COAL AND COKE. 
Zenith Furnace Co. 



COMMISSION AND PRODUCE. 
Culbertson Brothers Co. 
Fitzsimmons- Palmer Co. 



CONFECTIONERY. 

Duluth Candy Co. 

John Wahl Candy Ca 

National Candy Co. 



DRUGS. 
Leithhead Drug Co. 



DRY GOODS. 
F. A. Patrick & Co. 



FLOUR. FEED AND HAY. 
H. F. Davis & Co. 






FOREST PRODUCTS. 
Duluth Log Co. 



FOUNDERS and MACHINISTS. 

Clyde Iron Works. 

Marine Iron Works and 

Peter Grignon's Shipyard. 

National Iron Company. 



FURNITURE. 
DeWitt-Seitz Co. 



GLASS — ART. PLATE. WIN- 

DOW. 

St Germain Brothers. 



GROCERS. 

Gowan-Peyton-Congdon Ca 

Rust-Parker-Martin Co. 

Stone-Ordean-Wclls Co. 

Wright-Clarkson Mercantile Co. 



HARDWARE. 

Kelley-How-Thomson Co. 

MarshaU-Wells Hardware Co. 



HARNESS MANUFACTURERS. 
Schulze Brothers Co. 



MEN'S FURNISHINGS. 

Christensen-Mendenhall- 
Graham Co. 



PAPER. 

Duluth Paper & Stationery Ca 

Martin F. Falk Paper Co. 

Peyton Paper Co. 



PLUMBING ft HEATING SUP- 
PLIES. 

Duluth Plumbing Supplies Ca 



SHOE MANUFACTURERS. 
Northern Shoe Ca 



MAY BUILD 
INJJLUTH 

Houghton Manufacturers Said 

to Have Eyes on 

Zenith City. 

Makers of Iron and Steel 

Castings Outgrow Present 

Quarters. 



If Duluth capital can be Interested 
a larije j-lant to manufacture iron an'l 
steel castiriKS will be brought to this 
city within a short time. Just what 
wrrk has been done in regard to ob- 
taining the necessary capital cannot be 
learned at this time, owinj; to the ab- 
sence from the city of those ap- 
proached in the matter. 

The firm which witihes to secure a 
foothold in Duluth is that of Carroll 
Bros, of Houghton, Mich. For many 
years they have been in the line of 
business mentioned in Houghton, but 
are impelled to secure another plant 
ff>r two reasons. One is that tliey have 
outgrown the Houghton plant and the 
other is the fact tliat in Duluth they 
w< nld be near their base of supplies, 
with improved shipping facilities. 

They do not contemplate removing 
their equipment from Houghton to Du- 
luth. but will keep the Houghton plant 
gf ing, for they have a great deal of 
work for mining companies, a steady 
and growing business. But they figure 
that a plant in Duluth would give them 
facilities for wld»r development, and 
for that reason they wish to form a 
new company here. 

The members of the firm have been 
In Duluth several times on this mis- 
sion and have received encouragement 
in the matter. It is quite probable, it 
it is claimed, that a company will be 
formed with Carroll Bros, at the head 
and a plant involving several hundred 
thousands of dollars will be built and 
equipped here. 



IRON AND STEEL REVIEW 



New York, fcVpt. ?. — The brilliant 
Augupt statements concerning sales, 
shipments and production of finished 
Bteel products overshadowed the sharp 
fa)"'"-' ' «r in business in most lines. 
i:.. lit conditions, however, a 

df new orders Is not of sig- 

111 .clflcations continue heavy 

ar is are running as close to 

fK as possible. 

. most important features 
a' nt is thf scarcity of semi- 

fii 1 Many -steel companies 

;ii ling the country for billiets 

ii- t bars and the steel corpora- 

j »st tl'sed contracts for 24,- 

prices for pig tin are re- 

an advance of $2 per ton 

r this year's shipment 

advance Is t-xpccted for 

\Vri'U!<tit pipe ad- 

. ton and light rails $1.2) 

illr<-'a(ls placed many small or- 
ders lor ranging from 1.50© to 
9,i00 tor. '■:. Including 5,000 tons 
for Mis.vouM iarifir. 6.000 tons for the 
New Havt n. 1>,000 tons for the Pere 



ti 


«I 
Ir 

a: 
I: 

\ 

P- 



AUTHORITY 



IN RELIGION 



Marquette and several lots of 6.000 tons 
additional for the Northern Paciflc and 
Harriman lines. 

The principal car contract was 2,000 
hopper cars for the Baltimore & Ohio. 
Steel building contracts were sharply 
ccntractfed. 

Buying of pig Iron In all sections 
developed less than half of the ton- 
nage ordered during the preceding 
week, but there is a large buying 
power still In the market. The output 
of all kinds of pig iron on Sept. 1 was 
at the rate of over 30,300,000 tons an- 
nually. 

UPPER MI(HI(l\N GAME 

IS REPORIED PLENTIFUL. 

Menominee. Mich.. Sept. 9. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — The deer, rabbit and 
partridge season will open Oct 15, the 
deer and partridge season to remain 
open until Dec. 1. while it will be law- 
ful to hunt rabbits until March 1. Ac- 
cording to reports from cruisers, flsh- 
ermtn and game wardens deer are 
more plentiful than for several years. 



series of entertainments, planned as 
follows: Oct. :il. an atliletic prtgram 
at wliiih it is planned to have at least 
two good local mat artists for a lead- 
ing feature; Nov. 18, a dancing party, 
wiiich will be free for the members 
and thtir lady friends; Dec. 16, a musl- 
tal and literary program; Jan. 20, 1913, 
an open installation of officers follow- 
ed by a .^peaking and musical program 
and dancing; Feb. 17, a basket social; 
Mart h 17, a masquerade ball; on April 
21, a great "round-up" meeting. 

RETURNING FROM 
HARVEST FIELDS 

Advance Guard of Laborers 

Drifting Back From 

West. 

Laborers are beginning to return 
from the harvest fields in the country 
tributary to Duluth. Many of the hands 
are staying on the farms to help with 
the thrashing, but there are many 
others who are drifting back into the 
cities. This is ti ue especially of tramps, 
wlio are never at all eager to stick to 
thfir Jobs. While some tramps make 
good workers while tl:ey are at it, 
most of them work a few d.ays and 
then ask for their time. Tliey consider 
tliemselves unsafe among other tramph 
if they have more than a very few dol- 
lars in their pockets. They purposely 
keep tliemselves poor as a measure of 
self-protection. 

Kailioad men are now complaining 
that they are greatly annoyed by 
tramps boarding freight trains to get 
ba( k from the harvest fields into the 
cities. The trami)s as a rule pay no fare 
either way. even if they have a little 
money. To pay railroad fare would 
be contrary to some of the most uni- 
versally recognized principles of "hobo" 
ethics. 

Boarding houses In the cities through 
this part of the country are now having 
quite a profitable trade in taking care 
of laborers who have returned from the 
harvest fields with their summer earn- 
ings. Many of these men have snug 
little sums stowed away on their per- 
sons and are not worrying about get- 
ting through the winter. 

SAYS HE KlLLilD STRANGER. 



r^. 



/ 



", [vX» 



Pure in ihe 
Making* 
SureiniKe 
Baking 

CALUMET 



,(• 



BAKING POWDER 



lSiw^.4 



Jnst an ordinary 
knowledge of bak- 
ing: requirements on your part is all that is necessary 
to produce perfect bakings with Calumet Baking 
Powder. Calumet by its purity and perfect leavening 
qualities does the rest. 

Leave your next baking to Calumet and note the 
improvements — also note the saving — for Calumet is 
economical in cost and use. All good grocers sell it. 



RECEIVED HIGHEST AWARDS 



jirtf 



■•!! 




»'-'^i» 



Faith in God Needs No In- 
fallible Churcb, Says 
Pastor. 

"Authority and Freedom In Reli- 
gion," was the subject of a sermon 
preached by Rev. George R. Gebauor 
at the I'^rst Unitarian church yester- 
day. 

After paying his tribute of apprecia- 
tion to the great founders of ecclesias- 
tical institutions and especially to the 
noble work of Gen. Booth, the speaker 
continued: "But what I wish to bring 
to you in all this is the fact, that for 
the successful establishment of a 
church three things are needed, viz: 
a fanatical faith in one's own gospel, 
the belief that this gospel is needed 
for the salvation of the world, and 
binding doctrines and absolute author- 
ity. These ihree things have mado 
the chunh alone possble and power- 
ful. Any religious community lacking 
In these things Is so much less of a 
church. Now If we accept this as true, 
we must admit that the liberal churcii 
is hardly a church at all: we are es- 
!^entially a congregation of religiously 
congenial people, and there It prac- 
tically ends. But after all the question 
Is not "Are we a church? but rather 
are we of any account as a congrega- 
tion of religiously congenial people.' 
Tne question in the deeper sense is 
r ot. 'what of the church, but what of 
religion?" While a religion with in- 
fallible dogmas has its place, is there 
no need for a religion which has no 
binding doctrine and no powerful or- 
ganization? Indeed I believe that there 
are millions of souls, who while per- 
fectly able to think and act for them- 
selves In most affairs of life, are spir- 
itually so flabby and weak, that they 
need some support outside themselve.*. 
They must follow the light of an 
other, some absolute authority, be- 
cause they have no light of their own. 
not even a little tallowdip of real faith. 
But after all I cannot admit that spir- 
itual development ends in Intellectual 
bondage and moral servitude. It will 
seem to me that even the best church, 
the noblest hierarchy is but makeshift, 
Is a measure of passing necessity. It 
is not a testimony of strength, but 
weakness, and every cathedral steeple 
shows how heaven-high men are still 
removed from the kingdom of heavei . 
And now If once more we turn to his- 
tory we find that after all some of the 
greatest religions have not been 
hierarchical. Where Is the hierarchy 
of Buddhism if we except Its degrad- 
ing parody In Thibet? There Is none 
and yet Buddhism has been to the 
Orient a gospel of salvation. The same 
might be said of Mohammedanism. And 
what shall we say of the founder of 
Ciiristianitv who never founded a 
church, and who It seems never 
thought of founding a hierarchy? 
Jesus did not think apparently that a 
great ecclesiastical institution would 
best further the cause of religion pure 
end unedfllcd. After all religion Is 
greater than any Institution founded 
in Its name and faith In God needs no 
infallible church for its proclamation. 
♦ 

Maccabec Activities. 

Duluth tent. No. 1. Knights of the 
Maccabees, has Instituted a member- 
ship contest for which three prizes ag- 
gregating JlOO have been offered. Dur- 
ing the winter the tent will give a 



Patrick Haley Tells Chicago Police 
of Murder in St. Louis. 

Chicago, Sept. 9. — Conscience-strick- 
en for having killed a man In St. Douis 
whose name he never learned, Patrick 
Haley, aged 57, has surrendered to the 
Chicago police and asked to be sent 
back to the Missouri city to answer to 
a charge of murder. 

"I have been dodging the police and 
suffering the tortures of an evil con- 
science, and I can't stand it any 
longer," said Haley. "I have not had 
a happy moment since I killed that 
man in St. Louis. Any punishment 
given me for the crime will be pref- 
erable to what I have suffered." 

Haley said he struck the stranger in 
St. Louis on the neck, fracturing his 
skull. He said the man died a few 
hours later and that he fled from the 
city to escape . arrest 

"I had known the man only a few 
minutes when the quarrel occurred, 
and I never learned his name," said 
Haley. 

Four years ago, Haley said, he went 
to a Chicago police station while in- 
toxicated and, • overcome by remorse, 
told the story of the crime, but the 
police paid no attention to him. 

Haley will be held until word la re- 
ceived from the St. Louis police. 

BELIE VESMaTkILLED 

WIFE AND HIMSELF. 



Portage Lake, Me., Sept. 9. — The 
bodies of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Emery 
were found in one of the bedrooms of 
the Emery residence here early by of- 
ficers who forced an entrance to the 
house. Both had died as a result of 
bullet wounds. 

Neither the husband nor the wlfo 
had been seen since last Wednesday 
evening and the mayor of the town, 
fearing foul play, ordered that a door 
be broken to discover whether the 
couple were in the house. 

The coroner believes that Mrs 
Emery was aliot to death by her hus- 
band, who then turned the weapon on 
himself. 

Emery was the son of a wealthy ma- 
hogany importer to whose estate be- 
longs the famous "Emery claim ' 
against one of the Central American 
republics. 

F0RMER'DEM0( RATIC 

CANDIL»ATES TO WORK 

New York. Sept. 9. — All the candi- 
dates for the Democratic nomination 
tor president before the recent Balti- 
more convention have been appointed 
to the advisory committee of the 
Democratic national committee for tho 
campaign of 1912. with William J. 
Bryan as chairman. 



The Army of 
G>nstipation 



b Growiaff SdmJIot Et< 

CARTER'S UTTLE 
UVEA PILLS «n 

iMAoonble — tbey 
wj ffy relid— 
thcjr pcmascatif 
euro Cowtlj^ 
tio^ Mil 



DaV* 



)IU UM 

en {of 





,3kk8MJMk*.SaIbwSUk 
SMAU PILL. SHALL DOSE, SMALL PRICI 

f Genoine taxMhcu Signature 




PROFIT FROM 
AMUSEMENTS 

Even Play Has Been Com- 
mercialized, Says Du- 
luth Pastor. 



Urges Hearty Support 
the Board of Public 
Welfare. 



for 



That the people should give hearty 
support to the newly organized Board 
of Public Welfare was a position 
taken by Rev. R. Edward Sayles, pas- 
tor of the First Baptist church. Ninth 
avenue east and First street, in his 
sermon yesterday morning on "Amuse- 
ments in Duluth." 

The pastor said the municipal own- 
ership of means of amusement was far 
better for the community than to al- 
low such agencies to be privately 
owned. He said, in part: 

"We have In our city a Board of 
Public Welfare. It has announced a 
program. I have considered exten.sive- 
ly Just one phase of the work Its pro- 
poses to do — that of amusements. It 
desires to substitute a farm for the 
jail, to provide for probation officers, 
municipal shelter, the unemployed. It 
wishes to create social centers, play 
centers, and educational centers. It 
deserves the support of every right 
minded man In the city. It is the be- 
ginning of a fine constructlvu work. 
It will ask the city council for an ap- 
propriation. Use your influence with 
your alderman. Get back of this board, 
it is the finest thing Duluth has been 
called upon to support for years. It 
contains, untold possibilities for the 
future." 

Speaking of the evils arising out of 
private ownership of amusement agen- 
cies, he said: "Play is commercialized. 
One bet of men has organized our 
young people Into industrial enter- 
prises in order to profit from their 
toll. Another set of men and women 
have entered the fleK1 — the neglected 
field of recreation and have organized 
enterprises that make profit out of the 
invincible love of pleasure. Alcohol is 
sold to stimulate gaiety, in order to 
empty pockets. Dance halls are opea- 
ed. Joy is confused with lust and de- 
bauchery. 

"To the lovers of pleasure and 
amu.sement who come into such a con- 
dition, sordid men and women bring 
pleasure, using it as a lure to vice. 
Many good people confuse this use of 
pleasure and pleasure. Amusement is 
used as a lure to vice In the evil dance 
hall. It is used as a lure in the saloon. 
The love of excitement is used to en- 
courage beginnings of the dope habit 
among the young." 

IOWA WRESTLERSAYS 

HE KILLED HIS FRIEND 



Des Moines, Iowa, Sept. 9. — Walter 
Hausafus, a local wrestler of the 
heavyweight class, appeared at police 
headtjuai ters and surrendered himself 
as the slayer of Elmer Wallace, a 
former friend. 

Wallace died last Friday night at a 
local hospital. He was found lying In 
a gutter in the business section of the 
town with his skull fractured and the 
police sent him to the hospital. Haus- 
afus. beyond confessing that he killed 
Wallace, would make no statement. 



LAST CHANCE 
TO REGISTER 

Voters Must Get Their 

Names on the Lists 

Tuesday. 

Registration on Primary Day 

Involves Much Red 

Tape. 



Tomorrow is the last registration 
day before the primaries and it is ex- 
pected that a large number will put 
their names on the rolls so that they 
will be eligible to vote at the pri- 
maries. 

Voters who do not register cannot 
vote at the primaries unless they sign 
an affidavit indorsed by two property 
owners. One man may not sign more 
than five such affidavits. The first reg- 
istration day surprised the politicians, 
nearly 4,000 names going on the lists. 
Tills was considerably les.s than half 
the vote, but it was highly satisfactory 
in view of the fact that the lav/ is so 
new that many are not familiar with 
its provisions. The polling places are 
as follows: 

First ward — First precinct, old fire 
hall, Fifty-first avenue east; Second 
precinct. Lakeside town hall; Third 
prtclnct, 1627 London road; Fourth pre- 
cinct. Hunters park grocery store; Fifth 
precinct, basement of the Endlon M. E. 
church; Sixth precinct, 118 Fourteenth 
avenue east. 

Second ward — First precinct, 408 
East Superior street; Second precinct, 
926 East Second street; Third precinct, 
510 Ninth avenue east; Fourth pre- 
cinct, 703 East Fourth street; Fifth 
precinct, 417 East Fourth street. 

Third ward — First precinct, 106 West 
First street: Second precinct, 110 First 
avenue west; Third precinct, 105 West 
Fourth street; Fourth precinct, 108 
East Fifth street. 

Fourth ward — First precinct, 811 
Lake avenue south; Second precinct, 
Finnish church, St. Croix avenue; 
Third precinct, 246 Lake avenue south; 
Fourth precinct, 203 East First street; 
Fifth precinct, 201 East Third street. 

Fifth ward — First precinct, 24 North 
First avenue west; Second precinct, 23 
North Fifth avenue west; Third pre- 
cinct, 715 West Superior street; Fourth 
precinct, 1101 West Superior street; 
Fifth precinct, McEwen's store, Duluth 
Heights. 

Sixth ward — First precinct, 1204 West 
Superior street; Second precinct, 1717 
Piedmont avenue; Third precinct, 419 
Twentieth avenue west; Fourth pre- 
cinct, 1814 West Superior street; Fifth 
precinct, 620 Garfield avenue. 

Seventh ward — Flr.st precinct, 2232 
West Third street; Second precinct, 2 
Exeter street; Fourth precinct, 31 
Twenty-eighth avenue west; Fifth pre- 
cinct, 3902 West Third street; Sixth 
precinct, 304 Central avenue. 

Eighth ward — First precinct. West 
Duluth police station; Second precinct, 
north side of Grand avenue west, be- 
tween Sixtieth and Sixty-first avenues; 
Third precinct, 13 South Sixty-third 
avenue west; Fourth precinct, 5510 Ral- 
eigh street; Fifth precinct, J. Maimer's 
residence, Vineland street; Sixth pre- 
cinct. Ninety-third avenue west and 
Clyde avenue; Seventh precinct, fire 



hall, New Duluth; Eighth precinct, flr« 
hall. Fond du Lac. 



BULLETINS TO 
BE SUSPENDED 

Government Bureau Forced 

to Economize By Reduced 

Appropriation. 

(From The Herald Wuhlngton Bureau.) 
Washington, Sept. 9. — Because of a 
reduction of |11,800 in the appropria- 
tion made for the collection and com- 
pilation of the data on shipments, the 
bureau of domestic and foreign com- 
merce of the department of commerce 
and labor has issued its last monthly 
bulletin on internal commerce, includ- 
ing the commerce on the great lakes. 
When the bureau of domestic and for- 
eign commerce was created during the 
last ges.-?ion of congress by the consol- 
idation of the bureau of manufactures 
and the bureau of statistics, the new 
appropriation was cut to the limit. It is 
stated by those in charge of the work 
that it cost the government about 
?4,000 annually to get the monthly 
statements on internal commerce. 

In addition to that saving, the bur- 
eau intend.'^ to economize by doingf 
away with the publication of the ad- 
vance sheets on the commerce of the 
entire country. The monthly survey of 
foreign commerce will be published as 
in the past, however. Data for the in- 
ternal commerce bulletins has been 
collected from commercial organiza- 
tions and transportation companies, 
and the bureau will continue to gather 
the information, in the hope that con- 
gress will next winter, make an ap- 
propriation which will permit the re- 
sumption of the publication of these 
statistics. 



AEROPLANE KILLS 

FOUR SPECTATORS 



Gray, Department of Haute-Sayonne, 
France, Sept. 9. — An aeroplane got out 
of hand at an aviation meeting here, 
and swept to the ground, crushinsr 
down a score of spectators, four of 
whom were killed outright. The pro- 
peller blades cut their way through 
the people as the machine sped over 
the ground. Ten persons were severely. 
Injured. 



"MELLIN'S FOOD 

BEST FOR mr 

'It 9ves me pleasure to mfonn you that , 
I believe beyond the shadow of a doubt 
you have the best food obtainable for the 
baby. I am in a position to know, for 
we've tried them all and didn't get any 
results until we tiied Mellin's Food. I am 
glad to recommend Mellin's Food to al 
enquirers.** 

Mr. E. L: Hhemu, 1 127 Lagima Sc« 
San Francisco, Cat. 

"Recdved your book on how to feed and 
take care of babies. 1 must say that Mellin's 
Food isall rig^t. I am feeding it to my tvsrins 
and they are doing finely on it Will recom- 
mend it to any mother who has a baby to 

take care of." 

Mr:. John Topp, R. No. 5, Geneva, Ib(L 

Write today for a free sample. 

MELLIN'S FOOD CO. • BOSTON, If ASS. 



Here*s Health ! 



'^ I 'HE best medicine you can take 

for sleeplessness, tnin blood, 
^^tnat tired reeling or a ^^groucn 
IS a glass of roaming* sparkling 



EXPORmBEEa 






x^^St 



V><^4 



JX5ER BRl- .. 



Bie 



M 



^^"■^A,.. 



^ 



'*»'««\Tu -^-: 



-.-^-rs^ All You Need For 
"^^i-Cuisii A Good Lunch 



And it's the 
most delicious 
"medicine" you 
ever took, tea 
Tliere is no beer 
more pure or brewed 
of better materials — nor 



O^ 



'^NSIKS' 






bottled in a more wholesome 
manner. 

Order a case for your home. Your family 
will enjoy it and profit by it. 

HTGER BREWING CO. 

Over 30 Years in Duluth. 




'^..- ■ v r > L 




^ mm — 
mm w 

I— N 



Monday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



September 9, 1912. 



IS 



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I LATEST SPORTING NEWS OF THE DAY 



4 

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SIX KILLED 
IN ACCIDENT 

Motorcycle Rider Plunges to 
His Death, Many Spec- 
tators Injured. 

Rider Making 52 Miles ao 

Hour When Wheel 

Struck Rail. 



with .^^ovtiunir's wi vtiiti»f ami | 

; , , ..V 'i- t!i,> I I.'---.: •> , ot tho rai'o " 

ir' Is \>'. ■■.■■> i>.i::.!ii^ when tlio 
I \i)l\\ woriuTi htfi;amt» 
lie traKiMlv iind w«'rt> 
I ;...>, I 1 ..< city ho.spltiil for trt-al- 
IV..-VA 

ll.i.'ih.i «i>?itm' Into f.inu' ;is a rnotor- 
t vrlijsl at I '^ AnKi'loa la.st FfUruary. 
ulu>n liw ua-i KivKii rredit for m-w 
rioardi* iit the om\ two, three and 
fonr-mn." .voiits. On tlu* Newark track 
la.tf II! bettere'l Hk' mile reoord 

i^iiti iif; the distance in 3U 2-5 

Albriarht. who waa killed In a 

1 mntotcyclc .ir.iaint ;it Newark. N. J.. 

I wa.«i born in D.miv.-i-, \vh.>re h\» par«*nt3 
*»tUl reside. He lett th(»ie a year awo. 
groins: to (^hieago. theiue t> Lom An- 
jje! ' »ul»aet|uently to Newark. 

1! - who also wii!« kllUd in New- 
ark, rode in bin firat f.»--<t r.ice In a 
D«nver park in 1911. 



. ^^rf^^N^^^^^'^^^^^i^^^^N^t^l 



N.- 



Bl\ 



k I • u- ' 1 



■;»t. 9: — ^Edilie Na»ha 

holder of several 

' • mot. H\ vole r.u'liigr. 

: iii 'i: t!u' c,.>ur.-«e at 

durins a 

death of 

I dins lUntMlt. while 

..ro uyuiij and thirteen badly 

rsly t*vo of t'lie si.< d • id posl- 

■" •) up to a late liour were^ 

in Albrirtht. a Denver 

. who waa ridin? tiiird In 

The other four w cv boys 

...,,.., ..,,. ,.,jj^ tfi,. .HiK,-.,*tator.H. 

I tor.-* were wit- 

.. I iour-nitl>! free- 

(iu- li^M.-rj; Texas 

..: ■ . f w.. n:tlfs an iuntr, 

•ful t»lt::i4.v H.> win ridinj? 

■ bank ul the track when 

..t hiB heavy machine 

i s'-' k the upper rail. He 

: I ti .St fifty feet Into 

.... j..un nave been Instantly 

body was shapeless from 

-t ivlifH it was picked up, 

' of hia wife, ."leated 

i . 1 boys in the bleach- 



tll>4 



-;'>i w ts thrown head (irnt in 
the atHer direction into the enclosure 
of the track wherj the champion's 
'• ; ' 'I ame alidin« down the ateep 
1 ir:'K in 1 .struck him. He was picked 
I. I. but he lived in an un- 

c - >ndition for more than two 

h.uijj after his removal to a hospital. 
He t!n t!!y succuaibed to hemorrhasre of 
the r - 

Th- ators injured were mainly 

tJ • !! ; and boys who were leaningr 
o • rail yelling encouragement to 

the nderji when they came tearing 
Into their midnt. A scene of panic 
among f - . tatora generally fol- 
lowed ti ,.'dy. 

•aiium where the accident oc- 
s in Vail.iburg. a suburb of this 
i..'.y. wn-ne bicycle and motocycle rac- 
ing ha v.. 



SUiidiiis of the Teanis. 





W'.ni. 


!..• 


Boston 


tfj 


:'. •• 


i'hihidelphia .. 


7H 


• 1 


Wanhinitton . . . 


T* 


:{ 


Chi- aKi 


■ •••••.•*'* 


t"| fl 


t )i>f f.ii r 


ill 


11 


Cleveland 


r. 7 


71 


New York 


4n 


sa 


St. Louis 


45 


8t> 



CaameM Toilay. 

No games scheduled today. 

CiauieM Yesterday. 

Detroit 2; St. Louis, 1. 
Cleveland. 5; Chicago, 2. 



Saturday'!* HeMilt. 

> • <:k, t; Philadelphia. 

• :id. 3; Oiiicago. 2. 

Idtiuit. 10; St. Louis, 5. 
Washington. 5; Boston. 1. 



COBB S( ORES WINNING 

RUN rOR THE TIGERS 



been a great fad this year. 
' ' -^n marked by a num- 
i both here and at 

l; ;-;ru«n iieacn, N. Y., but never in 
history al local racing has such a 
(ieaih li=st been recorded as was yester- 
day, 

Hix I Ul-rs started in the free-for-all, 
which was the last event on the pro- 
gr.HM It was a handicap event in 
wl'irii Hishan and Hay Simon is ..f Los 
An*;eles. an aid rival for preiiu-.r track 
hmors. each start im? from scratch 
tried to win. Fay Peck, another Los 
Angeles rider, started at the iiuarter 
mile irt uk and Albright and Frank 
King and John King of Newark, wore Minneapolis 
-ach given two full laps handicap. The Columbus 



Detroit. Mich.. Sept. 9.— Ty Cobb 
scored the run In the seventh inning 
which gave Detroit a 2 to 1 victory over 
St. Louis. Cobb tripled and then came 
home on a passed ball. Veach, De- 
troit's new outfielder continued his hard 
hitting and made a sensational throw 
to the plate in the first, cutting Jown 
Hogan. The score; K. H. fe- 

St. Louis 10000000 0—1 6 

Detroit 1 I x— 2 7 1 

Batteries — W'ellman and Alexander; 
Willett and Kocher. Umpires — OLough- 
lln and Westervelt. 




STILL TIED 
FOR PENNANT 

Both Jeffersons and Y. M. S. 

Win From New 

Dululh. 



Leaders Will Probably Play 

Deciding Game Next 

Sunday. 



The Jeffersons and the Y. M. S. are 
still tied for first place in the pennant 
race for the Dulutli-Superior league 
despite the fact that two games were 
played at Athletic park yesterday aft- 
ernoon. 

An effort will be made to have the 
leaders come together next Sunday to 
settle the championship. The New Du- 
luth team lost both games of the 
double-header yesterday. The Jeffer- 
sons grabbed the first game by a score 
of^4 to 8 and the Y. M. S. took the 
seUnd by the score of 10 to ». Both 
contests were interesting and fast and 
were witnessed by a fair-sized crowd. 

The detailed scores were as follows: 

The tabulated score: 

First tiame. _ 

N. Duluth— AB. It. H. PO. A. E. 

Wacha, of 5 2 1 1 

Dewey, lb 5 

Dash, c 3 

Root, rf 5 



WITHDRAWN 
FROM^RACE 

American Entry at Chicago 

Aero Meet Disqualified 

at Last Minute. 



Great Air Event Will Again 

Be Won By Foreign 

Driver. 



JIM BARRY. 



Jim Barry didn't enjoy his visit to Australia very much. He isn t enthu- 
'Biasti; about the "big money" American boxers are supposed to get in the 
Antipodes. Bjrry says that the only man who is making money- m Australia 
is Hugh Mclntosfi. tiie promoter. According to Barry. Mcintosh has Langford 
I 'and McVey tied up so they cannot leave. In order to take a colore^d man to 
Australia the promoter must put up a bond of $1,000 for six months and as 
lonK as he care-* to renew the bond the boxer must stay there. It is noticeable. 
hTwevlr. that fighters as a rule do not dodge return trips to that country. 



WALSH OFF COLOR: NAPS 
WIN EASILY FROM THE SOX 



igo, sept. y. — Walsh was off form 
in the first two Innings of yestertlay's 
game, and Cleveland scored five runs, 
which was enough to beat the locals. 
The score was 5 to 2. Mitchell pitche.l 
for the visitors and was in danger four 
times, but brilliant support pulled him 
througli. The work of Graney and 
Weaver w^ere the fielding features. The 
score: „ K. H. K. 

Chicago 10001000 0—2 7 3 

Cleveland 230 0000 0—5 8 1 

Batteries — Walsh and Kuhn; Mitch- 
ell and Carlsch. Umpires — Kvans and 
EgAn. 



Quillan. Schalk and Miles. Umpires- 
Anderson and Ferguson. t> u v 

Second game — „ « , „ a a i c •> 

Louisville XXl^Sa-^ 8 

Columbus ^^^A^J*. ^ A 

Batteries — Moskiman. Maddox and 
Pearce; Kimball and Smith. Uinpres— 
Ferguson and Anderson. 

MUD HENS AND'iNDIANS 

SPLIT E\ EN IN DOUBLE. 




Teaws. 



track is a u J >«t'^r mile and circular. 

, At the crack of the pistol Hashan 
leaped ahead of Seymour after six 
roui\ds of the course, during which his 
nvils had eaten his smoke, the pair 
».v.-ned up and in another lap Seymour 
passed Hashan with a terrific burst of 
speed. By varying margin.s. Seymour 
kept the lead until the last few lap.<j. 
Til ■ r'liUng was lined four de^p with 

r 1 aid hoys urging Hashan to 

,, ■ . ■,^ his rival. Just at the com- 
mea.emeRt of the last lap the cham- 
pion tried to siitisfy the crowd tor a 
de»ir .ffart Tne leader ran hig!; 

^n' I: iviviriif a narrow spa'-e 

for Ua.,han to pass, but the latter tried 
if If was then that he struck the rail. 
•\ . iif> really lost control of the 

, ,r merely misjudged the 

J >•' his run to the rail, is a 

1 iispute among the wituesaes. 

ihe ^spi'.cket of Hashan's wheel was 

loosened by the ^olJ.l^'O",,^"**^^,'^^"! 
Millinit into the crowd. Witnesses sa> 
n.Tn literally tore off the skull o a 
, ..,, 1,,.. ^ho had been one of the 
, -d enthusiasts at the race. 

k.iT)t control of his machine 

<'to safety when Hasha's 

,:i1in=r diwn the track. 

' ffree angle all 

, ... i-;;.t, the first of 

riders, who w.a3 making 

• to overtake the leaders. 

*w m sMn<-k bv the Hasha machine ana 

r- "■: -I fatal injuries. Ho went ov-er 

, %n at the enclosure, while his 

I /cle ran riderless for 100 feet or 

"oTth** Injured spectators ten were 

■^ when aid reached them. 

hofore reaching the operat- 

liiif tal. • e hospital and two others 

•*« the ns were about to work 

;*ver tneru.' Mrs. Hasha was sitting 



Toledo 

Kansas City 

Milwaukee 

St. Paul 

Louisville 59 

Indianapolis 52 



Won. 

,.9» 
, .95 
. . 90 
..77 
..74 
..72 



Lost. 

56 

59 

65 

76 
78 
83 
96 
104 



Indianapolis, Ind., Sept. 9— Indianap- 
olis and Toledo divided a double- 
header which marked the close of the 
season here, the locals taking the first 
game. 5 to 3. and the visitors the sec- 
ond. 4 to 1. Indianapolis outbatted and 
out outfielded Toledo, their victory be- 
ing gained by fa:-5t work on the bases. 
Krause was too much for the locals In 
the last game, striking out six and 
passing no one to first. The scores: 

First game— 1'- "* '^° 

Indianapolis ••• 1 » » 3 1 x— 5 12 1 

Toledo 00100110 0—3 9 4 

Batteries — Merz and McCarty; L. 
I'ct James. W. James and Land. Umpires — 
•*f5 Hayes and Handiboe. our' 

'^'i Second game — K. rl. n.. 

•SS^ Indianapolis .. . .0 1— 1 b 3 

.503 xJ,i(jjo '^ 00000 120 1—4 10 

■^^T\ Batteries — Hixon and McCarthy: 
.465! Krause and Land. Umpires— Hayes and 
•^^\ Handiboe. 



FITWELLS ARE 

DEFEATED 



Millen, if. 
Bystrom, 3b. 
Warden, ss. 
Corbin. p-c. 
Kruger, 2b. 
Underhill, p. 



.4 

.3 

.4 

.4 

,.4 

, .1 

.38 



Totals 

Jeffersons — AB. 

Landfield, ss 3 

Baker, c 5 

Blaski. lb 4 

Anderson, If 4 

Du Clett. rf 4 

Olund, of 5 

Hansen. 3b 5 

Whittle. 2b 1 

Knox, p 5 

Danielson, 2b. . . .3 



2 
1 

1 
1 
1 


1 
1 



8 

R. 
2 
1 
3 
2 
2 
2 
1 


1 



1 
2 
1 
1 
1 

1 
2 
1 


10 
H. 
U 
1 
2 
1 
2 
3 
S 

1 
1 



PO. 
1 

8 
10 
1 

2 

2 
U 


24 
PO. 


10 

11 
1 



1 



1 

1 

2 



^ Location of race oouri»e of the ¥^ 
^ acTocliib at Clearing, III. * 

Hft Itaee^Kor ^vorld's okamplon- ife 
^ Mhip and i:!.04M> fraue nlUer tro- ^ 
*■ phy donated in ItMM by Janaea 
^ (jiurdun Bennett. ^ 

^Je \%'orld'« i>re>«ent speed record.— ^ 
■3|^ 104( mileM an hour, held by Juies ^ 
^ VedrinCH. ^ 

i Uordon Bennett course — 124.8 ^ 



^ miles, requiring 
^ 4.14-niiIe course, 
^ pylonn of steel. 
a|e I'revluuM «vlnn 
^ CurtlHS, America, in 



30 laps 
marked 



around ^ 
by Mix ^ 

Icnn H. m 
lOOS); Claude ^ 



this powerful flyer that America's avia- 
tors based their hopes of retaining the 
Gordon Bennett tropliy. 

With this machine eliminated from 
the race, representative American avia- 
tors conceded that the world's cham- 
pionship and Gordon Bennett trophy 
would be won by one of the FrencU 
monoplanes. 

TRAVERSlS 
CHAMPION 

Defeats "Chick" Evans in 

Golf Finals at Wheaton, 

111. 



Plays Wonderful Game Dur- 
ing Last Round in 
Afternoon. 




2 



1 

3 
2 
4 



11 
A. 
1 
3 

1 


1 
1 
2 
2 



E. 


1 


1 
1 
2 

1 



Oamea Todny. 

Toledo at Indianapolis. 
Columbus at Louisville. 
Kansas City at St. Paul. 
Milwaukee at Minneapolis. 



(.amra Yenterday. 

St. Paul. 7; Kansas City, 3. 
Kansas City, 7; St. I'aul. 3. 
Minneapolis, 8; Milwaukee. 7. 
Milwaukee. 7; Minneapolis. 5. 
Louisville. 4; Columbus, 3. 
Columbus. 3; Louisville. 1. 
Indianapoli-s. 5; Toledo, 3. 
Toledo, 4; Indianapolis. 1. 



Satnrday'M Reauita. 

St. Paul, 3; Kansas City. 0. 
Milwaukee. 1; Minneapolis. 0. 
Columbus, 5; Louisville, 1. 
Toledo, 6; Indianapolis, 2. 



NATIONAL LEAGUE 



Drop On^Sided Game to 
Golden Rules of Su- 
perior. 

The Fltwells of Duluth lost to the 
Golden Rules of Superior yesterday by 
the score of 9 to la a game played 
across the bay. 

The Superior men had the game on 
ice almost from the start. Not one Du- 
luth man got as far as second base. 
Art Olson, the Rule pitcher, starred. 
He allowed but one hit, struck out 
nine men and walked none. Talbot, his 
opponent, was reached for fifteen safe 
bingles. The victory gives the Golden 
Rule team tne championship of North- 
ern Wisconsin and the Head of the 
Lakes. 

The score: 

The score: 
Golden Rules — AB. 
Campbell, If 



14 13 27 11 



.02240000 — 8 



Totals 39 

Score by innings: 

New Duluth 

Jeffersons 10002704 x— 14 

Summary — Two-base hits — Du Clett. 
Olund. Three-base hit — Corbin. Home 
run — Blaski. Sacrifice hits — Bystrom. 
Dash. Stolen bases — Landfield, Baker. 
Blaski, Anderson. Olund. 2; Danielson, 
2; Dash, Millen, Bystrom, Corbin, Kru- 
ger Double plays — Baker to Blaski. 
Struck out — By Corbin, 9; by Under- 
hill 2; by Knox. 7. Bases on balls — Off 
Corbin, 3; Underhill. 3. Passed balls — 
Dash. 4; Corbin. 1. Hits — Off Corbin, 10 
in 6 innings: off Underhill. 3 in 2 in- 
nings. Time of game — Two hours. Um- 
pire — Hackett. 

Second Game. 

Y. M. S.— AB. R. H. 
Summers, lb 5 



Standius of the Teanis. 



Won. Lost. Pet. 



New York . 

Chicago 

Pit-sburg ... 
Cincinnati 
Philadelphia 
St. Louis.... 
Brooklyn . . . 
Boston 



.89 


39 


.693 


.81 


48 


.623 


.77 


53 


.648 


.«.'? 


67 


.592 


.63 


68 


.492 


.55 


76 


.420 


.49 


79 


.383 


.39 


90 


.302 



KAWS DIVIDE DOUBLE 

BILL WITH SAINTS. 



We Loan Money 

ON WATCHES. DIAMONDS 

knd all goods of value. 

CRESCENT BROKERS, 

W. Si 
latahlisbed 1^96. 



4t3'<k W. SHparlmr St. 

New Vhune, Grand siafr-D 



THE NEW ST. LOUIS 

BNTIRELT EUROPEAN 

ThU hotel olfera exceptional 
advantagea to the tonriat anJ 
tra%eler. Dine in the tVood- 
:and Cafe, a atrlkiagly heaa- 
tlful decorated retreat. Serv- 
ice a la Carte. After the the- 
ater nupper vpecialtica. Kx- 
erileut nauaic 

€la(> UrealKfasta. 

Uoalacas Blcu'a Laacheoa. 



St. Paul. Minn.. Sept. 9.— St. Paul and 
Kansas City split even on a double- 
header, the former winning the first 
game, 7 to 3, and the latter the second. 
7 to 6. The second game only went 
seven innings. St. Paul tied the score 
in the sixth, but lost the game In the 
seventh when Carr walked, stole sec- 
ond and came home on Drake's single. 
The scores: 

First game — R. H. E. 

Kansas City O n 1 2 o O— 3 10 2 

St. Paul 1 1 4 1 •» ij X — 7 15 1 

Batteries — Vautjhn. Zabel and O'Con- 
nor: Laroy and Casey. Umpires — Con- 
nolly and Irwin. 

Second game — R. H. E. 

Kansas City 3 3 1—7 1 1 3 

.St. Paul 3 3 0—7 12 2 

Batteries — Schlitzer and James: 
Dauss. Rieger and Casey. Umpires — 
Connolly and Irwin. 



8. 



Gamea Today. 

Boston at Philadelphia. 
Brooklyn at New York. 

Games Venterday 

Cincinnati. 10; Chicago. 8. 
Pittsburg. 12; St. Louis 

Saturday'a Resulta. 

Boston, 2; Brooklyn. 1. 
Brooklyn. 4; Boston. 0. 
Pittsburg. 8; St. Louis, 1. 
Cincinnati. 6; Chicago, 5. 
Philadelphia, 5; New York, 0. 

CLBS LOSE THREE OUT 

OF FOLK TO THE REDS. 



BREWERS DROP TWO 

GAMES TO THE MILLERS 



HICKSY. 



laser. 



HOTEL HOLUND 



EUROPEAN 



I Model of Fireproof I 
I Construction \ 

A Maeaiflcent Structure— Equipment 
the Beit in th.; Northwest. 



BUSINESS MEN'S NOONDAY 
LUNCHEON SERVED DAILY I 



Minneapolis. Minn., Sept. 9. — Minne- 
apolis won both games of a double- 
header from Milwaukee, the first go- 
ing ten innings, and the second only 
five. Umpire Chill was forced to re- 
tire at the end of the first inning ow- 
ing to the heat and Unglaub and Cut- 
ting umpired the second. The scores: 

first game — R. H. E. 

Minneapolis ...0001050101 — 8 15 1 
Milwaukee 12 3 10 0—7 l.*; 

Batteries — Olmstead, Comstock, Wad- 
dell and Owens, Smith and Allen; Slap- 
nlcka. Hovllk. Cutting, Nicholson and 
Block. Umpire — Chill. 

Second game — ' R. H. E. 

Minneapolis 000 3 2 — 5 8 1 

Milwaukee « o 0— 2 

Batteries — Lellvelt and Owens; Wat- 
son and Hughes. Umpires — Unglaub 
and Cutting. _ 

COLONELS DIVIDE 

EVENLY WITH COLUMBUS. 

Louisville, Ky.. Sept. 9— Louisville 
and Columbus broke even in a double- 
header, the locals winning the first 
game, which lasted eleven Innings and 
the visitors the second contest, which 
was called at the end of the sixth 
inning on account of darkness. Huls- 
wltt's triple and Beaumlller's single 
sent Louisville's winning run across 
the plate in the first contest, while 
r<.liinihii8 won with ease In the second, 
t bv Meloan and Miller were the 

1 President Tom Chivlngton of 

th." tiui wltiie.'jscd the games. 

Th.- 

First itame — R. H. E. 

Louisville . . .2 1 f» 1 — 4 8 2 
Columbus . . .0 1 "' '» 2 o 0—3 7 2 
, Battories — Northrop and Schlel; Mc- 



Cinclnnatl, Ohio, Sept. 9. — Cincinnati 
made it three out of four from Chicago 
by winnng the final game of the series 
' here. Benion was wild, but Gregory, 
who relieved him. pitched excellent 
ball. The game was called at 5 o'clock 
to allow both teams to catch a train. 
Madden was hit hard and Summers was 
not only hit hard but was wild. Richie 
entered the game too late to save it. 
Beschers' home run in the seventh and 
Clark's double with the bases full in 
the third, were the features. Evers 
was put off the ground by Umpire 
Brennan for disputing a decision. It 
was announced today that Player 
S.7hulte would not be taken on the 
lOastward trip with the Chicago team, 
he having been disciplined by Manager 
Chance In the form of a suspension. 
The score: R- H. E. 

Chicago 110411—811 2 

Cincinnati 1110 3 1—10 12 6 

Batteries — Madden, Summers, Richie 
and Cotter; Benton. Gregory and 
Clarke. Umpires — Brennan and Owens 

PIRATES MAKE A CLEAN 

SWELP OF THE SERIES. 



R. 

5 1 

Nacey. rf 3 1 

Connell, 2b 4 1 

Williamson, 3b . 5 2 

McGrath, ss 4 

Bradley, of .... 4 

Cooke, lb 3 1 

.Mawdsley, c . . . 4 2 

Olson, p 4 1 

Totals 36 9 

Fitwells — AB. R. 

Young, ss 3 

Buski. c 3 

Doyle, cf 3 

Wicklund, lb ... 3 

Swanson. 2b 3 

JJintnig, 3b 3 

Talbot, p 3 

Switzer, If 3 

Baker, rf 3 



H. 
2 
1 
1 
2 
3 

1 
3 
2 

15 
H. 







1 






PO. 

2 

1 

3 

1 

1 


10 

9 



27 
PO. 



1 

7 

10 

4 

I 
1 





A. 


E. 














2 


1 


3 





2 


i> 














2 





7 





16 


I 


A. 


K. 



3 
2 

I 
3 
2 
5 
1 




Shoberg, rf 3 

G. Owens, ss. ... 4 

Murphy, cf 5 

Miller, c 4 

B. Owens, 2b. . . .4 

Fogarty. If 4 

Ahern, 3b 3 

Brooks, p 4 

Bordelien. rf 2 

Totals 38 

N. Duluth — AB. 

Wacha, of 3 

Dev.'ey, lb 5 

Millen, It 5 

Root, rf 5 

Corbin, c 5 

Underhill, p 5 

Bystrom, 3b 4 

Warden, ss. .... 5 
Kruger, 2b 4 



2 

2 
2 
1 

2 
1 



10 
R. 
1 
3 
3 
1 



1 




2 

2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 



10 

H. 


<» 

M 

2 
1 
1 
2 

2 




PO. 
14 



4 

3 

4 

1 







1 

27 
PO. 



9 

2 


10 



2 



1 



A. 



4 

1 

2 

6 

1 
2 


16 
A. 




1 


4 
2 



E 



^ tirabam-White. F.ngland, In 1010; ^ 
^ ChnrleM Terrea Weymann, Amer- •# 
*^ ioa in Ittll. * 

*: * 

yo | c»»y »»»»»»»*********»*» »* 

Chicago, Sept. 9. — Everything is in 
readiness for the Gordon Bennett 
world's championship aviation race at 
the Aeroclub of Illinois course at Clear- 
ing. III., today. 

There will be six contestants, three 
Americans and three Frenchmen. The 
American team which was selected yes- 
terday, consists of Glenn Martin, who 
will fly the Chicago defender; D. E. 
Lloyd Thompson, who will compete In 
the Newt)ort machine, and Paul Peck, 
in a Columbia aeroplane. 

France will be represented in the 
race by Jules Vedrines and Maurice 
Prevost driving Deperdussin aeroplanes 
and Andre Frey, driving a Hanriot 
monoplane. Both Vedrines and Frey 
took trial spins yesterday. 

The race may be run any time be- 
tween half an hour after sunrise and 
half an hour before sunset, accord- 
ing to the rules. If the weather is 
favorable, the race w'll. It Is said, be 
run between 9:30 and 11:30 a. m. 

Late last night announcement was 
made that the American defender, the 
powerful 160-horse power Burgess 
monoplane, especially built by a syndi- 
cate headed by Charles Dickinson of 
Chicago, had been withdrawn from the 

Dr Dickinson, It is said, nominated 
Norman Prince of Boston to drive the 
American defender in the race, but the 
committee selected Glenn H. Martin 
and declined to change the pilot after 
Mr Dickinson's protest. The fact that 
the method of control on the powerful 
racer had to be changed at the last 
minute to meet the requirements of 
the rules committee, was given as an 
additional reason for the withdraw- 
ing of the defender at the laist mo- 
ment. 

The American defender cost more 
than 130,000 to build and has never 
left the ground. 

Experts in air navigation, it is said, 
differed regarding the practicability of 
the machine, although Glenn Martin 
was anxious to pilot it in the race. 

The withdrawal of the American de- 
fender came as a surprise. It was on 



Wheaton. 111., Sept. 9 — Jerome TraV- 
ers of Upper Montclair for the third 
time became amateur golf champion of 
the United States Saturday. He de- 
feated Charles ('Chick") Evan.s, Jr., of 
Edgewater, 7 up and C in the finals of 
the national amateur championship. 
The East, represented by Travers, met- 
ropolitan champion, met the West in 
the person of Western Amateur Cliam- 
pion "Chick" Evans, and Evans met 
tlie fate he has meted out to his suc- 
cessive opponents in this tournament, 
losing by a long score. 

The cards tell the story. The first 
nine events, played in par. ended i 
up for Travers. Travers squared the 
match at the thirteenth hole, l>ut 
vans, playing his best, got the four- 
teenth and sixteenth. The seventeenth 
was halved and Travers outplayed 
Evans on the eighteenth, leaving 
"Chick" a lead of only one for the 
morning round. Evans left the green 
scar-faced and bathed in perspiration. 
His usual geniality was not in evi- 
dence, and he waived aside his friends 
and walked off slowly to his cottage. 
Travers €>«ta I^ead. 
The result in the afternoon was not 
in doubt after six holes had been 
played. Travers squared the matrh at 
the tw^entieth green, got Evans 1 down 
at the next, halved the twenty-second 
and twenty-third and then Evans last 
six holes successively. Travers was 
dormie 7 on the twenty-ninth green. 
Evans managed to halve the thirtieth 
and that was all. Smiling, he grasped 
Travers' hand, and the national cham- 
pionship was decided. 

"I was up against It, and golfero 
know what that mean.s," said Evans 
after he had gone to his cottage and 
changed his clothes. "Up against an 
unbeatable game. I did my best. I 
have no excuse that I was tired or hot 
or anything like that, I simply was 
up against it." 

Travers played the third nine three 
under par, and the last four holes two 
under par. Evans weakened In the last 
few holes. His drives were short, and 
his iron shots erratic. 



Frenchman Is the Winner, 

Lemans, France. Sept. 9. — Devay. a 
French rider, won the international 
motorcycle race held under the aus- 
pices of the Automobile Club of Sartlie. 
The distance was 396 kilometers (246 
miles), which Devay covered in ."i 
hours. 12 minutes, 35 seconds, about 48 
miles an hour. 




Totals 41 

Score by innings 

Y. M. S 

New Duluth 



9 10 24 



1 24 



Totals 27 ( 

Score by innings: 

Fitwells 0000 00000 — 1 

Golden Rules ...20031300 x— 9 15 



17 

R. H. E. 



1 



St. 
purg 
ers 



Louis. Mo., Sept. 9.— Pltts- 
pounded three local pitch- 
hard In the first sixth 
Innings, while the home team field- 
ed In good shape, the visitors mak- 
ing a clean sweep of the series by win- 
ning this afternoon, 12 to 8. In the 
first Inning Pittsburg scored eight runs 
on a pass, eight hits, three errors, a 
double steal and wild pitch. They 
scored again in the sixth on a pas.s. 
two errors and two hits. In the first 
inning O'Toole walked five men In 
succession and gave way to Hendrlx. 
who was relieved by Camnltz In the 
fourth after three runs had been scored. 
The .score: R. H. E. 

Pittsburg S00004 00 — 12 15 1 

St. Louis 3 .''. 1 1 — 8 12 6 

Batteries — O'Toole. Hendrlx. Cam- 
nltz and Simon; Steele. Woodburn, 
cJrlner and Wlngo. Umpires — Eason 
and Johnstone. 



ANNUAL CALL 
' TO GRIDIRON 

High School Squad Will Be 

Assembled This 

Week. 

The annual mustering of gridiron 
candidates at Duluth Central high 
school vi'lll take place this week. 
"Bunk" Harris, acting captain in place 
of "Matt" Brown, will issue the caU. 
Thirty young huskies are expected to 
make the try. 

The team will use considerable new 
timber this year, many of the old 
•vets" having dropped out. borne or 
the men of the second team of last 
year are expected to be in the ranks 
of the first this season. Among them 
are Capron. Gunderson, Wasgatt, Law- 
rence and Prudden. 

Prof. W. H. Schilling, basket ball 
coach. Is expected to fill the position 
of football coach this season. No 
practice grounds have been secured. 

TENNIS FINALS. 



8>vimmer A^ain Delayed. 

Dover. Enir. Sept, f. —iriose Pitonof 
of no.stc)n ^ tin prevented from 

making an t to swim tlie Eng- 

lish channel .\.si"rday owing to the 
heavy sea. Miss Pitonof has waited at 
Dover for two months for favorable 
condltiona. 



Last Matches in Labor Day and 
Boat Club Tournanicnt8. 

Bell and Kincaid won ,Uie final set 
In the match for the Labor day dou- 
bles tournament which w^ fcompleted 
Saturday at Oatka. 5*.: '^ ^ . . 

In the finals of the boaJLaplnb doableg 
tourney. Dinwiddle and IWiftedy were 
victorious over Graft ancT DB^kerman, 
6-1, 5-7, 6-4 and 6-2. , 
* Tt~ J 

Schulte Is Suspefflden. 

Cincinnati. Ohio, Sep/ 9.— Frank 
Schulte, right fielder of^^^^. Chicago 
National baseball team, Wto'Jast sea- 
son led the league in the number of 
home runs, has been suapead*! for the 
rest of the season without pay by Man- 
ager Frank Chance, for faflurd to keep 
In condition. The trouble is said to 
have been caused by SchJllte's failure 
to observe the temperance ruie which 
Manager Chance strictly enforces. 
Ward Miller will play rijjlit iield for 
tha club during the rest of tBl season. 



.80221011 X— 10 
.101031003 — 9 
Summary — Two-base hits — Murphy 
and Summers. Three-base hits — G. 
Owens. Murphy. Stolen bases — Dewey. 
3; Millen. Root. Underhill. Warden, 3; 
Kruger, Summers, Murphy, Miller, B. 
Owens. Ahern. Struck out — By Under- 
hill 10; by Brooks, 4. Bases on balls — 
Off Underhill, 3; off Brooks, 2. Wild 
pitches— Underhill. 1. Hit by pitched 
ball — Bystrom. Passed ball.s — Miller, 1; 
Corbin, 1. Time of game — Two hours. 
Umpire — Hackett. 

EVANS IS WINNER 
O F LOW SCORE 

Chicago Golf Club, Wheaton, 111., Sept. 
9. — Charles Evansj, Jr.. of Edgewater 
defeated Harold Hilton of the Royal 
Liverpool Golf club yesterday in the 
play-off of the tie for the low qualify- 
ing medal In the national champion- 
ship. Evans played better golf than he 
did on the day previous when he lost 
the championship to Jerome D. Travers. 
Evans turned in a card of seventy-two 
for the eighteen holes, while Hilton 
was three strokes over this. 

Evans' mark was the best made dur. 
ing the entire tournament. 

• • 

Wisconsiu-IUinois. 

Green Bay. 1; Oshkosh. 2. 
Aurora, 0-1; Madison. 9-0. 
W^ausau. 6; Appleton, 11. 
Rockford, 4-2; Racine, 6-8. 

■9 — 

Bicycle Record Broken. 

Salt Lake City, Utah. Sept. 9.— Alfred 
Goullet broke the world's bicycle rec- 
ordfor one mile in competition at the 
Salt Air palace, covering the distance 

in 1:47 3-5. 

♦ 

Utica Wins Pennant. 

Albany. N. Y., Sept. «.— The New 
York State league closed its season 
yesterday with Utica winning the pen- 
nant. 

_# 

Baseball DeaL 

Lincoln, Neb., Sept. 9.— A dispatch 
from Hugh Jones, president of the Lin- 
coln Western league club, announces 
the purchase of two pitchers — Wears 
of Kansas City and Taylor of the 
White Sox. 

• 

American Runner Wins. 

Paris, Sept. 9 —Hans Holmer, the 
American long distance runner, won 
the Paris Marathon over a distance of 
42 kilometers, 194 meters, (about 26 »4 
miles). His time was 2 hours and 43 
minutes. 

« 

Championship Decided. 

Battle Creek, Midi., Sept. 9.— By de- 
feating Battle Creek in the final game 
of the se.ason, Adrian won the 1912 
pennant of the South Michigan league. 
The Kalamazoo team, last seasons 
champions, finished last In this year* 
race. 




May be there is a better 
hat in the world than the 
Gordon. Just think of it! 

ORDON 



Good Hunting 

This Fall in Central and 
Northern Minnesota 

Game Warden reports game very plentiful. 
Ducks, geese, quail, grouse and prairie chickens abund- 
ant. Indications excellent for deer and moose. 

Open Seasons: 

For Wild Ducks and Geese .... Sept. 7 to Dec. 1 
For Grouse and Prairie Chicken . . Sept. 7 to Nov. 7 
For Quail, Ruffed Grouse and Partridge ^ Oct. I to Dec. I 
For Deer and Moose ..... Nov. 10 to Nov. 30 

Through train nightly with Standard Sleeping Cars and 
Coaches over the Northern Pacific-Minnesota and International. 
Frequent daily and nightly service to Northern Pacific points. 

Ask for "Minnesota Lakes" book, giving list of places, hotels, 
maps, etc., and "Game and Fish Laws" pamphlet. 

"Duck" work for a few daysl 




TICKET^ 
334 W. Superior St. 

DULUTH 



920 Tower Avenue 
SUPERIOR 

Or at UNION STATIONS 




Northern Pacific— M. & I. Rys 



• ■Si*'" 



I 



I 



.j>"- 1 I 
t r f ■ " • • 




11111 



II 



Monday, 





E DUXUTH HERALD 



September 9, 1912. 



/•«'»ift«««««««« ••#9#*«««%«««#^»«««#»«#«««««««%««^««%««-e««%»«««»««%»»«««««/»««*«#^«^,«^ 



ON THE IRON RANGES 






Whitinir. 



#*%e 



HIBBING LOSES 
TO BIWABIK TEAM 

Pitcher Grad; Blows Up in 

Foorlii, Allowing Six 

Runs. 



weJl. treasurt'r: Mrs. Frank 
federation set retary. 



ftll 
fin 



HOMESTEADERS 
DOIN G WELL 

District Twenty Miles North 

of Chishoim Is Very 

Productive. 



21, while 22 were graduated from the 
hiKh school lust June. There are 171 
eiircilitd in the various klndergnrtenn 
of the city and 162 enrolled in the ilrat 



Cliisholm, Minn, t-'t j t. 
to The Herald. > — Charies 
iU'nit'Strader living 
Mtth el htif, iitm«' 



A th.il 

V ..lid 
ifity. 



9. — (Special 

Battiun, a 

about twenty mileis 

to t'hishohn Sat- 

1 Hoid a load of rutabagas 

:ttii Jiirn 7.1 tents a bushel 

hiK report ot the yield of 

lul'U" there tan be little doubt 

section i« a wonderful loun- 

a l>iK I'l'otiter for St. Loui« 

1 1 1 I . . t • 1 1 < n 



imiE (ilKL, WHO WAS 

BITTEN BY DO(i, DIES 

Biwablk. Minn.. Sept. 9.— Mary PIb- 
darek, the 7-year-o!d dauKhter of Mr. 
and MrH. John I'isdnrek, who was ter- 
ribly bitten on the faof, arms and legs 
by a huge mastiff, died on Saturday 
evenlnK I'll tt en unmuzzled dogx have 
been shot by order of Mayor Hill. 



OFFICIAL MAP OF THE WEATHER 



HIBBINliPRILSTTO 

SPEND A YEAR ABROAD 



1 1 



I ( ' 




1 

6 
4 

1 4 





n lo. 



i>. 



I 1' II ti 



1 
1 
1 



I' 



1 
1 

:t 
1 



!> 
IJ 

A. 



U 



Mr. [-;. !!.>-< 
• Ill sibout h: \ • • ., i 
1 ifd on hJ8 aKf'iui" 
of the time with ox 



1. 

.1 L' i 



.1 



his 

■;: r- 



K. 



V 

II 



1 
i» 



ihinK 
.irm * 



or Kc 



for h 



1 



hi» pi. lie now < .. 
:.. j'Hid l&OO for a '• 
with the receipts of h: 
which has aU t>een ma., 
table raluiiiK. hay. iitotk. 



comfort - 

• " t'!t-nt;.' 

..r,. pur- 
He le- 
"f horses 

;■: I'duce 
ol vege- 



etc. 



H.I 

(lt'.r, 
1... ; 



, — ''I 
f 



•lb. 

,1'.-, 



r>eiii9fiii, 

(2). e. 

. Boyle. 



MINE NEARLY 
READY TO SHIP 

Consolidated Vermilion Will 

Enter Shipping List in 

the Spring. 

• ^r eelal to 

,-iiattd Ver- 

< ■. A'.r..::-: company, one 

silJOUii. is now pro- 

'y rf iron ore. The 

■ • • from water. 

!te beintf rt - 

blo'king out 

^ progre-sslng 

ii> fxiK ts« that 

will luive tin- 

• proi>erty, only 

.-^ary. The plant 

• i wan modern machln- 

• "re is of the name qual- 

• '"' mining w-iU be 

compared to the 

l.^.^■riiLon of thf »^teel 

(h now operates on a 

I. , . , ., i^maU Male. 



MEMORIAL DAY 
AT CEMETERY 

Observed By the Catholic 
Churches of Virginia, Eve- 
, leth and Gi bert. 

I Virfrinia. Minn. Sept. ft.— (Special to 
I The Herald.)— ^■un<iay m,.> • r y, rved as 
Memorial day by the Cathoiic ctuirches 
of Virginia, Eveleth and Gilbert, all 
of which bury their dead in Calvary 
cemetery, this city. Tne opeaking in 

I lie afternoon at the cemetery was by 
Kev. Father W. J. Powers ol Our Lady 
of LourdeB church and Kev. Michael 
Stngir cf St. John the Hurtist church 
(f'lli^hi. fathei Hillan if r .>Ieth and 
Fathei f'iernot of Gilbti t t^ c k part In 
the morniuK services at lie Virginia 
rhurcli-^^ '!">;e second Si.uilay in Kep- 
lemtH ; vear Is memorial day for 

he C'atholjc church. The 
• the cemetery was large 
day was exee^mivtiy hot. 
; •letli' nor Gill, .t has a 
■, lid the dead of tMsf cities 
brouKht to Virsrinia f.i buriul. 



v : 

ii 



PROGRESSIVE 
WOMEN'S CLUB 



Program of Virginia Society 

for Fall and Winter 

Opens. 



the «i' . 

a t • 

al' 

Nt It I f 

c»Tiietfi 

aie ail 



NEW LIBRARY 

FOR EVELETH 



Duiuth Firm Selected to Pre- 
pare Plans for Build- 
ing. 

Eveleth. Minn.. Sept. 9. — (Special to 
The Herald >—Ellerby. Kound & Sulli- 
van of Duiuth, at a meeting of the li- 
brary board Saturday niKl't. were se- 
lected to prepare plans and upeeifica- 
lioiis and superintend the construction 
of a public library in this city. 

The building will be located on Pierce 
street on the northeast coiner of the 
park site, between Fayal road and 
Pierce street, recently lairchased. It 
will cost about fliO.OOO. It is not prob- 
able that the construction contract will 
be let this year. 



Hlbbing. Minn., Sept. 9. — Father 
Joseph Heruatto, for five years pastor 
il thf Church of the Immaculate Con- 
ception in Hibbing, celebrated his last 
mas»8 as pastor of the church yester- 
day. He left today for Chicago, where 
he \\\\\ \ isit for a short time. Later 
hf wiii »;<} to lAiulsvlUe, Ky., where 
his brolhf-r Is pr.stur of 8t. Joseph's 
Mission church, antl in a few months 
will sail from New York for Europe. 
He will visit Lon<lon. Paris and his 

' hon.e in Italy. plir-ninK to sptnd m 
■ abroad. 

1- iith» :• .Joseph I'ollak. who suc<<eda 
him. has l-een pastor tif St. Joseph h 
church at Joliet, 111. 



STANDARDS FOR ELY'S 

WHITE WAY (HUNG UP 



i::: , Minn.. Sept. 9. — (Special to The 
litiiiid.) — The new standards for the 
white way are being eretued as fast as 
the contractor has the sidewalks com- 
pleted. The road roller purchased some 
time ago by the city council is being 
u>><\ to advantage, at> a boo.u has #een 
p..;!>-d ufioti If and it i.s being u.«ed to 
li.ist i»ii(l J ,;ii I' tl.i- J.i<iv>- iriiii ttand- 
ai U.-. 




gress meets, the anti-navy men might 
use the fact in justi.*i< alion of their 
failure to provide mor'- than one bat- 
tleship at the last Hes^;ion, alleging 
that they had piovided i lore funda 
than the department wau able to ex- 
pend. 



WINTON DEFEATS ELY 

BALL TEAM ON ERRORS 



Ely, Minn., Sept. 9. — Winton won 
the ball game here yesterday, defeating 
Ely by a score of 10 to D, mainly owing 
to Ely's err«>rs. Hits were evenly di- 
vided, the locals taking 11 to the visit- 
ors' 12. The features of the game were 
borne runs by Mayer of Winton and Lo 
Veau of Ely. Gianottl of Ely was 
credited with three two-baggers and 
one single. Erickson of Winton found 
Williamson for one three-sacker, one 
two-bane hit and one single. The bat- 
teries were Hoffnjan and MctJraw of 
the Duiuth White Sox for Winton, and 
Williamson and Martin Ivr i:iy. 



FOHECAST Til. 
Tl'KSI); 

Ki»r Iiuliitli, Suptrior 
lii<1iut>iit the Mnialia i 
Iri'u ritiiK«!: Centra:]} 
tuiiiKlit and TUfSilay ; 
In teuipcraturc; niuUerale 
triy Hinde. 



uortliwcHt 



SCAI-K. 

Miles Per 
Hour. 

Calm tJ to 5 

I-lplit 5 to in 

Moderate 15 to 2i 

Brisk 25 lo :i.'. 

High 35 to 60 

Oule JO lu C3 

UurrUane .... fld and above 
H. W. RICHARDSON. 
Loc&l Forecatter. 



EXPLANATORY NQTfS 

ObutTttioDi taken ai • a. m., •eTcnty-OAb mtHdlan time. Air pransura reduced to i«a kveL ^tSok^M (MmUooiv Ump) pan tbroagh polau of oqoil air presnire. Iscratan (ieUei Bm*) 
, pau Ihrougb poiDta of equal lempcralur.; 4i»wo only fo» aero, frtciing, 90°, and 100*. Q rlein Q partly cloudy; A cloudy; R taio; 8 ano*, M report misaicg. Anowa tj wHfc 
• llie wiad. tint Qgvrea, temperature; teeoB^ precipitatioo of .01 inch or mere for paat St bcure; (bird; maximDa wind Ttlorityi * 



FAIR 




If the weather 
man ha.s any Sun- 
days in stock that 
are more beautiful 
than the one he 
gave yesterday, he 
haen't shown them 
In a long time. The 
shower-while- you- 
sleep schedule is 
still in operation, 
but few are trou- 
bled thereby. More 
fair weather is pre- 
and tomorrow. 

prevailed a year 



nil! (Ipen UruK Ktorr. 

Chishoim, Minn., Sei>t, 9. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Arnold J. Hubin. for- 
merly asssociated with the city I^rug 
-■^tore in Chishoim, and who about two 
months ,igo left for Cle'eland, Oliin, is 
lutck. and announces that he has ar- 
ranged to open a drug store In the Ber- 



geron bui.ding. being 
with I'tter Spina. 



now associated 



Picnic al ( hlHliolRi. 

Chishoim. Minn., Seit. !'. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — he Socialist-Finnish 
nociety held a picnic at the Glen- 
Clark pknic grounds yesterday. They 
had the band out parading the street.s 
durinK the forenoon and drew a big 
crowd to the grounds. 



'^ ■ ■ ., 


■ • n, Sept. 9. — (Si>((ial to 


T 


iie F I cigre88i\e Wom- 


JV 


:■- titv will begin its 


V. : r.. 


^' ajion with a 


tin t~( : 


< :,. ! f .1 the president. 


M»>', 


iw.<Wv thi« evening. The 


<■•)■' 


the State Ff <ltr- 


il ' 


•s Met tings" are 


.« I . . , . • 


:a 1 and winter up 


1 1 ; i . ' * 


ot next year. The 


OI . 


i.ew, having been forra- 


e<. 


u the spring in order 


t. 


' '■ to commence work 


ti 


take up work along 


1r 


economics, music 


ii ' 


nilariJin ntovement.« 


u 


although the chief 


!>• 


i^ not philanthropic, 


b 


... , and iitlf-t levating. 


T- 


f Sern. If! Will bf at 


n 


- I.af;. vt.'t *f' Pi;s.«s that 


c : 


' " . i ■ '■• leinan 


V. 


■ ■ if. ft ! Ilig of 


1',. 


..if ar;-a;ip-cd 


< lub are: Mrs. 


I ■ ^ 


■!ent: Mis. Will- 


i: 


•Mrs O. P. 


.1. 


Frank Bid- 




MORNING STORY 

atory the comb tells 



THE COMB'S 

You know the 
It's a very discouraging «tory, too. 

Day by day, a few more strands are add* 
ed, of hair that is turning grey, losing iu 
vitality, its strength and its health. 

Grey hair is at unbecoming as old age. 
Natural pride should have its own say. 
You wish to look young and it is your 
DUTY lo appear so. You can't even LOOK. 
young if the silver threads begin to show. 

Be a "Young Woman" in looks, always. 
The grey hairs belong to the chaperon and 
to the grandmother. 

Stay out of the grandmother class 
your years justify it, by using — 

HAY'S HAIR HEALTH 



until 



Keepslou Lookin^^lbiin^ 



$1.00 and SOc at Dru< Storet or direct upon 
feceipt cf price and dealer's name Send 10c lor 
trial bottle.— Philo Hay Spec. Co. Newark, N. J. 
fat 6alt wtf Rteonmaadttf ay w. A. Afefetis- 



BUILDlN(i SIMMER RESORT. 

Located at Hoad ot Daisy Bay on 
Lak*- Vermilion. 

Tower. Minn.. .*-tpt. 9. — i Special to 
The Herald > — (;. l-abin, who is build- 
ing up a summer re.«ort here, was in 
town Saturday. His enterprise is lo- 
cated at the head <'f Daisy bay and 
when completfd will be one of the 
attractive pates on the lake. 

Harry Meeker, thief engineer at the 
hyoro-eiectric plant, was in town Sat- 
urday for the first time since the plant 
was started. He reports a big supply 
of water at the dam since the lug rain 
of Tiiursday nignt. the water running 
over the spillway again. 

v.. E. French and bride of Chishoim 
are enjoying a month's honeymoon on 
Lake Vermillion, where tliey occupy 
tme of the cottages on the islands. 

Kev. S. A. Jamieson of Duiuth was a 
Tower visitor on Saturday, being on 
his way to hli the puipit of the P'resby- 
terian church at Ely on Sunday. 

Flev. Mr. Raymond, the pioneer Pres- 
byterian pastor here, who was instru- 
mental in building the present edifice 
of that denomination, was in town a 
part of Friday and Saturday, and 
visited friends. 

The l^ake Vermilion Navigation com- 
pany will biiild a warehouse and ice- 
house at their dork at lakeside this 
fall to accommodate their j^rowhig 
freight and passenger busines.s. 



Will Itctarn Home. 

Marble, Minn., ept. 9. — Miss Cella 
Loherline tendered her resignation to 
Mes'sner Bros., last week. After a 
few days' visit at Meadowlands she 
will return to her home in Duiuth. 



dieted for tonight 

I'nsettled weather 
ago todaj*. 

The sun rose this morning at .^:2S 
and it will set at 5:33 this evening, 
giving twelve hours and fifty-five min- 
utes of sunlight. 

Mr. Richardson makes the following 
comment t.n weather conditions: 

•Since Saturday morning light to 
copious showers fell over Western 
<.:anada. North Pacific states, the Pla- 
teau rtxioD* Montana, Wyoming, the 
Ejustern DakotJts, .Minne.sota. Wiscon- 
sin, Northern Michigan and Atlantic 
states, principally in connection with 
low pressure areas now centered o^•^'r 
Southern Colorado and over the Oulf 
of St. Lawrence. Hot weather con- 
tinued Saturday and Sunday in the 
Lowei Missouri, Mississippi and Ohio 
v.allcys and Southern st.it'^s. The otit- 
lock favors mostly fair weather and 
moderate temperature in St. Louis and 
Douglas counties tonight and Tuesday 
but occasional local showers are prob- 
able today." 



night; Tuesday fair. 

Montana — 'Fair tonight and Tues- 
day; probably light frost tonight in 
low places. 

Upper Lakes: Moderate variable 
winds bccomlr,;;: northwesteily on Lake 
Superior; moderate southerly winds 
shifting to northwesterly Tuesday on 
Lakes Michigan and Huron. Unsettled 
we.ither with thunder showers tonight 
or Tuesday. 



Tbe Tcmpcmtiircfi. 

Following were the highest 
atures for twenty-four hours 
lowest for twelve, ending at 
today: 

IX)W. 

74 



for 
m 



New PaMor at Dukl. 

Buhl. Minn., Sept. 9. — Rev. C. B. 
Hanscon, the new resident pastor of 
the M. E. church here, held services for 
the first time yesterday. He was for- 
merly pastor of Clements Memorial 
church at Hamline and is a graduate 
of Hamline university. 



I AMUSEMENTS | 

TONKiHT S ATTRACTIONS. 



LYCEUM— "Bought and Paid 
(>i:i'HEUM— Vaudeville. 



For.' 



GILBERT DI'.FEATS 

THE MOHOMI TEAM 



Gilbert, Minn., Sept l'. — 'Special to 
The Herald.) — The (Jilbtrt baseball 
team in a fat-t game defeated the Mo- 
homi club team of Virginia by the .^core 
of 9 to 6. Botli teams put up u goorl 
article of ball. The game w:.s i laved 
ill the new ball park and ;t large crowd 
oi ♦Tithusiastic rooter « was r-restnt to 
< titer the home team to victory. The 
feature of the game was a three-bag- 
gei by Richards of Gilbert. Fcdlowintr 
was the lineup: 

Gilbert — Vlrirlle, p; E. Masterson. c: 
Ely, lb; Stevens. 2b: J. Small. 3b; 
Richards, ss; Hub Hosking, rf; Bee- 
croft, cf; M. Hcsking. If. 

Moh< mi — Mariffield. p; E Kreitzer, 
c Demis. llf; Smith, 2b: fdson, 3b: P. 
Kreitzer, ss; Solosky, If; Hayes, cf; 
Mitttn. rf. 

The umpires were D B. Sullivan iind 
E. Vlrirlle. Marriffield allowed sixteen 
hits and struck out nine men. Virirlle 
allowed six hits and »truck out si.\. 



ENROLLMENT AT ELY 

SCHOOLS SHOWS (JAIN 



Kly, Minn., Sept. 9. — (Special to The 
Hfifild.j — The enrollment of the city 
schools shows a good gain over last 
year and a very decided gain over the 
previous year. This year 1,342 are en- 
rolled. The Lincoln school has the lar- 
gest enrollment, liaving 312 pupils, the 
Central sthool being second with 286, 
and the high school third with 254. 
The number promoted from the eighth 
grade last June was 60. yet the fresh- 
man class at the high school only num- 
bers 48. The senior class only numbers 




"BOUGHT AND 

PAID FOR" 

Broadhurst's New York Suc- 
cess Opens Week's En- 
gagement in Dulotb. 

Buying and paying for a wife with 
money and whatever money can buy. 
will never bring happiness. A marriage 
by law is merely made legal in the 
eyes of the people, but does rot neces- 
sarily insure happiness. A white 
woman's marriage to a colored man is 
legal and means as much to each, as 
the marriage of a poor working girl 
to a captain of finance, when there is 
no feeling of love. 

These and man.v more ma.\jms are 
learned by Virginia Blairo, the hotel 
telephone operator, who married Rob- 
ert Stafford, the king of Wall Street, 
and one of the richest rnen in the 
country. Robert Stafford was a kindlv 
Husband when sober, but when drunk 
made life miserable for little Virginia 
It was then that Stafford's drunken 
self t<ild his wife what the marriage 
meant to him. There was no love on 
elthei's part, there was no fentiment 
nor was there ever a thought of hap- 
piness. 

"You would never have married me. 
if I had been poor." declared Stafford 
in his drunken rag''- "I bought and 
paid for you and you are mine~ as 
much as my furniture for me lo do 
with as I please." 

This was felt to be true by Virginia 
and the next morning she resolved to 
«o back to her old life. So Virginia left 
millions to jro back to the drudgery 
of the .«hop8 and cheap flats, for the 
sake of her own self respect. 

This is the story told in "Bought 
and Paid F'or,"' the Oeorge Broadhurst 
drama which opened for the week at 
the Lyceum theater last evening. A 
large audlenc*- witnessed the perform- 
ance, which is the first one outside of 
the long successful New York run at 
the Playhouse. Duiuth telephone girls 



GcBcrsU "Por^cnrntm. 

Chicago, Sept. 9. — Forecasts 
twenty-fbur 'liours ending at 7 p, 
Tuesday: 

Upper Michigan — Thunder showers 
tonight or Tuesday: cooler Tuesday. 

Wisconsin — Generally fair tonight 
and Tuesday cooler tonight; cooler 
Tuesday in east and south portions. 

-Minnesota — Fair tonight, cooler In 
west and south portions; Tuesday fair. 

Iowa — Ix>cal showers this afternoon 
or tonight; somewhat cooler: Tuesday 
fair-, cooler in east and south portions. 

North Dakota — Fair tonight and 
Tuesday; cooler tonight in east por- 
tion. 

South Dakota — Fair and cooler to- 



were the guests of the management 
last evening and watched with inter- 
est the story of little Virginia Blaine, 
the $10-a-week telephone operator, 
who married millions. 

The marriage of Virginia Blaine 
and Robert Stafford was not based on 
love, as he told Virginia. The girl at- 
tracted him and the marriage made 
things easier for Virginia's sister, her 
brother-in-law, and their haby. 

After marriage Virfrinia finds that 
her husband is a habitual drunkard, 
who refuses to promise to reform. The 
last straw is when he tells his wife 
why he married her, and l.'iter attempts 
to break into her room. Virginia leaves 
the next morning, leaving all her 
jewelry.^ and takes a position for $7 
a week. She goes to live with her 
equally reduced sister and brother-in- 
law, who evolve a plan by which the 
couple may be brought together. They 
succeed, and Robert and his wife meet 
again and all Is foi-given. They both 
discover that a real attachment exists 
between them. Virginia goes back to 
her wealth and riches, while the broth- 
er-in-law, who is a remarkable type of 
the sponger, again falls into his own. 

Geor-ge D. MacQuarrie as Stafford 
looks his part and plays it remarkalily 
well. As the drunken brute In the 
second act. his work is wonderfully 
realistic. His voice and stage presence 
are both above the ordinary and assist 
him In successfully carrying his part. 
Hobart .1. Cavanaugh as James Gilley, 
the brother-in-law. is a typical ship- 
ping clerk and his easy-going good 
humor proved the comedy of the play. 
Oku, the Japanese servant, as played 
by Adrian Rosley, Is a clever character 
actor. 

The telephone girl, with her ideals 
and hopes, is delightfully portrayed by 
Miss Diva Marolda. Her big scene In 
the second act with Mr. MacQuarrie 
was excellent. Miss Josephine Drake 
as Fannie Blaine, Virginias sister, is 
pleasing and her work intelligent and 
sincere. 

The action of the play takes place in 
Stafford's bachelor apartments, his 
home and at the home of Virginia's 
sister. The play will be repeated every 
evening this week, with matinees Wed- 
nesday and Saturday. 



High. 

Abilene »C 

AipMia 1* 

Allanrir City 84 

Kaltiiiiure 86 

Hstllcf.nl 62 

Itifinarc'k 78 

IU:-?. *;4 

Hiwtin W! 

nu!Tal<i 74 

Calltao' -'2 

• 'liarU-ston 82 

IMiuago 88 

foucirtlia 

«"()rni!> <'hrisli. ..86 

I»ciivcT 86 

Des Moiii«8 M 

T>w»:s Ijike 74 

Pmlge 91 

])-,ilni();!<' !>4 

DULUTH 66 

l»iiraiiKf> 74 

Kastljort 70 

Kilpuiiton 66 

KKcanalia 72 

OalNOttoii 00 

Oraiiil Forks 

fjiai.il Haven. . . .81 

(irwii Hay 82 

Hatteraa 84 

na»re 6« 

lIHeiia 60 

HcURhton 

Huron !)6 

Jarkiwnrllle 84 

Kainlcdiwi 08 

Kansss City 1*6 

Kiioxtille 02 

T.« Cifpsjie 

Ix>ul8Tllle 32 

MadUon 92 

Marniiftt«< 76 

Meilitlne Hat .'>4 

Mrmiilils 92 

Miami 

Mtla City 



«4 

6C 
66 
.'.0 
.'« 
42 
64 
€8 
40 
74 
74 
76 
78 
52 
72 
.'■)4 
70 
72 
5« 
46 
.■•.4 

64 
t>0 
C-i 
tig 
70 
74 
46 
40 
60 
04 
72 
44 
78 
»<8 
72 
70 
72 
62 
42 
7C 
81 
46 



temper- 
and the 
7 a. m. 

High. Low. 



Mllwaukfe !i2 



.Milium ilosa 

Ml tldia 

Mi>ti'(p>in( ry 
Montreal . . . 
Mcrhead .... 
New Orleaiu 
New York . , 
North Platte 
(*Klahoiiia 
Oiiialia ... 
I'arry .Sound 
riioer.ix . . 
Pierre 



..68 
. .60 

. :io 

. .74 

..!'4 

.!i4 

.84 

...in 

..08 
..t(4 

. . !i6 
..fi4 



PittebuiE 86 



Port Arthur 
Port land. Or... 
Prince AJbtTt 

Qu'Atr*l!€ 

Kalilfili 

HmiUi City 

Roaeb'jrg 

Kosweil 

St. Uula 

St. Paul 

Sa:t Lake City.. 
San I Metro .... 
Sen Kiaiiclsoo. . 



.66 
.66 
.r,2 
.68 
.1*0 
.74 
.68 
.10 
.114 
.1)4 
.58 
.70 
.66 



Kault Ste. Marie.74 

Seattle 64 

Slierlrtan 66 

Khrevetiort 96 

Kk ux City 02 

KpoKaiie 64 

Sprii.Kflelil. Mo 

Swift Current 62 

Tanii.a 80 

T<-le<lo 88 

Valentine 

WaKhlngton 84 

Wichita 

Willinton 70 

Wiiineruucca ....t4 

Wiiinlpee 72 

Yellowstone 56 



72 
48 
42 
70 

r,8 

62 
80 
C8 
60 
74 
76 
54 
62 
62 
62 
56 
50 
42 
44 
68 
58 

60 
76 
72 
48 
.'8 
.'.6 
60 
52 
46 
76 
72 
46 
74 
50 
72 
66 
60 
60 
72 
46 
32 
56 
32 



impersonations. Her songs and dances 
are well given and she scored quite a 
decided hit last evening. 

The bill is opened by the Aerial 
Sherwoods, a man and a woman, who 
present a flying trapeze act much sim- 
ilar to the one given by the Fiying 
Russells last week. Their work is 
apparently just as rapid and their 
feats as difficult as those of the Rus- 
sells. 

The last act is presented by the Two 
Alfreds who have an amazing head 
balancing act. They play musical in- 
struments while performing head to 
head balancing feats, and lovers of 
acrobatic work will find much to ad- 
mire in their turn. 

The moving pictures this week are 
more than usually interesting because 
of the fact that they show two of the 
candidates for president in action. 
Roosevelt is shown at the convention 
in Chicago, and Woodrow Wilson is 
shown accepting the nomination. It 
was noticeable yesterday afternoon 
that Wilson drew much the louder and 
more prolonged applause. 

The bill will continue all week with 
a daily matinee. 



GOPHER'S MEN TO 
NAVAL REVIEW 

Commander Eaton Receives 

Invitation to Take Crew 

fo New York. 

The Duiuth naval miiitia will p:\rtic!- 
jiate in the naval review which v.'ill 
be held in New York early in Octo- 
ber. 

Commander Guy A. Eaton yesterday- 
received a telegram from the secre- 
tary of the navy asking him how 
many men might be expected to at- 
tend. Commander Eaton elates that 
• his will be an excellent opportunity 
for the boys to get in touch with naval 
prC'Cedure and h(jptH that all who can 
get away will attend. Thf navy depart- 
nient will provide transportation and 
supplior. 



ALL IS HURRY AND 

BUSTLE IN AMERICA 



has been seen In Duiuth several times 
before, notably as leading woman with 
Wilton Lackaye, has a clever little bit 
of character work. 

It is a good average Orpheum bill 
this week, witn no big feature act, 
but with no act that has to be en- 
dured. 

Older folks will find much to enjoy 
in the act presented by Dane Claudius 
and Lillian Scarlett, and it is far from 
being uninteresting to the younger 
generation also. They play old favor- 
ite songs of half a century ago, the 
words being shown upon the picture 
screen. These nearly forgotten melo- 
dies which were the rage before the 
Civil war do not suffer by comparison 
with what pleases the popular fancy 
at the present time. 

Howard, the Scotch ventriloquist, 
has an act that Is in the front rank 
of such offerings. He has built up a 
little sketch around his two figures 
and himself. The scene takes place in 
a doctor's office, and while he offers 
nothing new or never seen before, his 
work is as good as that of any ven- 
triloquist sten at the Orpheum, and he 
gets a good measure of comedy out of 
it all. 

Romair and Ward, a young man and 
a young woman, have a very breezy 
and snappy little offering, consisting 
of songs, dances and sparkling dia- 
logue, which helps to pass fifteen min- 
utes most enjoyably. Their songs are 
catchy, and the act as a wiiole is up 
to date and attractive. 

La Petite Mignon, a very diminutive 
young woman with a powerful soprano 
voice, gives a series of imitations and 



MADE HER WELL WOMAN 

Mrs. \V. P. Valentine of Camden, N. 
J., says: "I .suffered with pains in my 
back and side, sick headaches, no ap- 
I»ctite. was tired and nervous all the 
time. Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable 

Compound made me a well w<^man 
and I wish other "iiiffering women 
would avail themselves of this valu- 
able remedy." 

For nearly forty years Lydia E. 
F'inkham's Vegetable Compound has 
been the standard remedy for female 
ills, and no sick woman does herself 
justice who will not try this famous 
medicine, made from roots and herbs. 



GUS WEINBURG 
AT THE ORPHEUM 

Well Known German Comed- 
ian Headlines New Vaud- 
eville Bill. 

Gus Weinberg dealing In pathos is 
as unexpected as Jimmy Powers play- 
ing Bernard Shaw would be. 

Duluthians have grown accustomed 
to Mr. Weinberg In German comedy 
roles of a burlesque type. He Is best 
known ea "The Burgomaster,'' but In 
his vaudeville vehicle his role calls 
for a mild humor that borders on 
pathos. He appears as an old broken 
down German musician In one of 
George , Hobarfs sketches, "Meln 
Llehchen," which headlines this week's 
bill at the Orpheum. It is a pleasing 
little ptaylet. with nothing very hil- 
arious or very emotional about it, but 
it provides several laughs and calls 
for a little furtive eye wiping. Mr. 
Weinberg Klves a good portrayal of 
the old German, and his company Is 
capable. Miss Mabel Carruthers, who 



"IN A BAD WAY" 

Many a Herald Reader Will Feel 
Grateful (or This Information. 

If your back gives out; 

Becomes lame, weak or aching; 

If urinary troubles set in. 

Perhaps your kidneys are "in a bad 
way." 

Doan's Kidney Pills are for weak 
kidneys. 

Local evidence proves their merit. 

Mrs. A. Christianson, 2529 \V. Sec- 
ond St., Duiuth, Minn., says: "About 
two years ago I had kidney trouble, in 
fact, I had noticed symptoms of it 
for several months. I did not pay 
much attention to the matter until I 
knew that 1 could not neglect it any 
longer. My l>ack was so weak that I 
couldn't lift anything and all the 
strength seemed to leave my hands 
and arms. I was in bad shape when 
I began using Doan's Kidney Pills 
but was surprised lo find that they 
helped me at once. After taking the 
remedy two days, my back was as 
strong as ever and my kidneys normal. 
Since then I have always kept Doan's 
Kidney Pills on hand and when I have 
used them they have done good work." 

For sale bj* all dealers. Price 50 
cents. Foster-Milburn Co., Buffalo, 
New York, sole agents for the United 
States. 

Renie;tiber the name — Doan's — and 
take no other. _ . _ . 



CYCLISTS AT 

THE EMPRESS 

Scharr- Wheeler Trio Head- 
line the Vaudeville-Pic- 
ture Program. 

Performing the most daring feats on 
the bicycle, the members cf the Scharr- 
Wheeler trio went through an act of 
thrills that bewildered two large audi- 
ences at the Empress yesterday. The 
trio is composed of two men and a 
clever young woman, each of whom 
helps make the act deserving of its 
lieadline position and one of the most 
sensational seen here for a long time. 

One of the young men goes through 
a Eeries of circling stunts, which art 
rarely attempted by other bicycle rid- 
ers on the stage. He performed the dif- 
ficult feat each time and succeeded in 
keeping the audience tense for several 
moments during the act. The other 
young man plays a comedy part and in- 
troduces a number cf otld shaped bi- 
cycles, which he rides with ease. The 
young woman also performed well. 

Mr. De Voy of De Voy & Dayton Is 
certainly light on his feet and his two 
dance numbers are worth while. Tall 
and lank. Mr. De Voy goes through a 
series ot steps that are as lunny as 
they are difficult and the audiences 
showed their appreciation of the num- 
ber by encoring the young man several 
times. Miss Dayton is an able piano 
player and both took part in the var- 
ious numbers. They introduce a num- 
ber of new jokes, which are used to 
fill in between the song and dance spe- 
cialties. 

Although young in appearance, Eddie 
Hill goes through his singing and talk- 
in act with the air of a veteran and 
he received a warm reception during 
his entertainment. His rendering ot 
"I Wish 1 Had a Home Sweet Home. " 
imitating the newsboy of the street, is 
entertaining. Mr. Hill has a pleasing 
voice, which he uses to advantage in 
the other numbers. 

The photoplays this week are all in- 
teresting, while one of them, showing 
scenes in Simla, India, is educative 
throughout. "Coronets and Hearts" is 
the title of one of the series, which 
takes the audience tlirough the East 
and West, showing a train robbery in 
Western Montana, an interesting dra- 
matic film. The same performance will 
continue throughout the week. 



C. A. .Soderlund of Htocklioirn, Swed- 
en, who is touring America and who 
v.'iil go to Washington goon to attend 
the international congress on hygiene 
and demography as a special delegate 
from the common council of Stock- 
holm, is a guest today at the Spalding 
hotel. 

"America is a great countrv. ' he 
said. "Everything is hustle and bustle 
and business and hurry. This is not 
my first trip to this country. I was in 
Chicago at the time of tlie great fair 
about twenty years ago. The clianges 
which have taken place in the big cities 
of New York. Chicago and Philadelphia 
are marvelous. In our country it takes 
years to build structures like you have 
in this country. Here you build them 
in a few months. Everything is hurry, 
hurry." 

Mr. Soderlund was much impressed 
with Duiuth. "1 think it is a beauti- 
ful place," he said. "1 expect to be here 
for several days. Do you have weather 
like this all of the time'/" 

Mr. Soderlund is a retired mechanical 
engineer and inventor. Sweden at large 
sent two other representatives to the 
same congress. They are physicians. 

CHILDREN'S 
CLOTHING NEEDED 

Associated Charities Issues 
Call for Discarded Wear- 
ing Apparel 

The Associated Charities has issued 
a call for children's clothing. 

A big supply is needed at once to 
meet the demands which have been 
made upon the organization, according: 
to Secretary Dinwiddle. 

"This is about the time of the year '• 
said Mr. Dinwiddle today, "when chil- 
dren are fitted cut in their new fall 
clothes and fall suits. This discarded 
clothing is often thrown aside and 
never- used again. 

"We would like to get all sorts of 
children's clothing. At the present 
time, there is a fair supply of other 
kinds (>f clothing at our aisposal for 
distribution, but there is a noticeable 
scarcity of children's apparel." 

Anyone having cliildren s clothing, 
although it may have been worn con- 
siderably, will do the A.«-sociated Chari- 
ties a favor by calling them on Zenitb 
'phone LN-I'j. 



REDFIELD GliTS (ONTRACT 



For Building iSt-w City Hall and 
Jail at Cloqiiet. 

Cloquet, Minn., Sept. 9. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — F. L. Redfield of Clo- 
quet has been rewarded the contract 
for building the new city hall and 
.iail. Only two bids were received by 
the city council, the other bid being- 
that of William Fawcett of Duiuth. 
The latter bid J11.930. Mr Redfield's 
bid was |n,500. The building will be 
erected on the site of the old city jail. 
The plumbing contract was awarded 
to Bergstrom & .Johnson of Cloquet 
for 12,350. Wiring and lighting will 
be done by the Owens Electric com- 
pany of Cloquet for 1419.80. their bid 
being the lowest. 

A contract for cement sidewalk was 
let by the city to Ed .lohnson of Su- 
perior for 8'/i cents per square foot 
for sidewalk. 14 1« cents per square 
yard for crossings, 40 cents for filling 
and 30 cents for excavating. 



THIRTY-FIVE HLRT WHEN 
TROLLEY CAR HITS TRUCK 



Cleveland, Ohio., Sept. 9. — Thirty-fivt 
people were injured, five of them ser- 
iously, when a special Lake Shore elec. 
trie car with a trailer attached, crash- 
ed into a brewery truck four miles 
west of Rocky River, near here. Sun- 
day. The cars were crowded wilb a 
party bound to a clam-bake. 

Ambulances and physicians were 
rushed to the scene from Cleveland. The 
injured were conveyed to the hospitals. 

The seriously injured: 

J. A. Heis, Cleveland, back broken. 

Bert Hays, Cleveland, truck driver, 
injured internally. 

George E. Schweiger, Cleveland, in- 
ternally Injured. 

Mrs. Carmelia Cellel, Cleveland, in- 
ternally injured. 

Miss Emma Norden, East Toledo, 
back crushed. 

The crowded cars were bound for 
Toledo, and left this city at 11:30 
o'clock. The accident occurred forty 
minutes later, the driver of the truck 
apparently not having heard the cars 
signal for the crossing. 



NEW BATTLESHIP IS 

TO BE REAL MONSTER 



Washington, Sept. 9. — The new bat- 
tleship Pennsylvania, the only one au- 
thorized by congress at the last ses- 
sion, will be fully as large as the great 
battleship which the British govern- 
ment has just ordered, according to 
the plans of the naval general board. 
Its displacement will exceed 30,000 
tons. 

The naval board already has out- 
lined the features of the new vessel, 
and an effort will be made to get out 
the advertisements calling for bids for 
construction of the ship before con- 
gress meets in December. Progressive 
navy men are impelled to this course 
by an apprehension that If the adver- 
tisements are not published before con- 



DULUTH, SOUTH SHORE ft 
ATLAHTIC RAILWAY 



II } i. 

soil n 



snouE. 



Modern ObservatlOH-Cafe Car*. 

Standard DrairtnK Room Slreping 

Cara. 

4 ANNUAL AUTUMN/I 
EXCURSIONS 4 

FROM DULUTH AND SUFCIIIOII TO 

Cheboysan f I2..%0 

Alpena V12.r>0 

Harbor lieach f IZ^'iO 

l*ort Huron f 12..M) 

netroit f lli-.-.tJ 

Toledo ria.OU 

Cleveland •14.00 

Buffalo f 14..'iO 

A'ia St. Iirnace and the Palatial 
<iteanieni of tbe D. & C. N. C«. 

L.eavlnK Dnlntk and Superior, Sept. 
8, II, 15 and 17. IV12. 

tickets good for 26 days. 

see: the great ball, games 
akd the big fair. 

american i.eagte baseball. 
ga.me!«, detroit, mich.: 

Detroit Va. Pkiladclphia, Sept, 10, 
11 and i:^ 

Detroit Va. Waahlnvton. Sept. 13, 
14 and 15. 

Detroit Va. New Ynrk, Sept. J7, 
18 and 10. 

Detroit Va. Doaton, Sept. 20, 21 
and 22. 

MICHIGAN STATE FAIR, DETROIT. 
Ml( H., 

Sept. 15tb to 2lMt Inrlaaive. 

THE FINEST RAH. AND LAKE 

TRIP THERE IS. 

For full partlenlarfi. appl> to anjr 
Mtatton or ticket aicent. 

JAMES MANEV. 

General Paaaenarer Asent, 

Dointh. Minn. 




» 



m 
m 



\ 

I- 

) 

/ 

I 

( 





m 



DULUTH HERALD 




WHEAT AND 
CORI^GOOD 

Cfidition Is Given in Re- 
port of Federal Gov- 
ernment. 



I high school. say. are the .Yj-.J.'?»^>«=» 
around my ©yea ve ry notic« *Dta- 

MIUIONAIRE IS 
GOING TO PRISON 

Charles L. Hyde of Pierre, 

S. D., Must Serve Time 

for Postal Fraud. 



Spring Wheat Production Is 

Estimated at 300,000,- 

' 000 Bushels. 



^V • -t..!!. Stn»t. ».— The September 
crop . '- ot the United States de- 
|»artmi?nl of agriculture, issued at 2:15 
p. rn . todiiy. and Compiled by the crop 
rrp..:tin.ar board from reports of cor- 
, -; and agents of the bureau 

,, ^. K'tvea a summary of tho 

con*'. 'n Sept. 1. or at time of 

harvi.-^i. .'f corn, spring wheat, oats. 
barley, buckwheat, potatoes, tobacco, 
f, a. rice and apple's, and a pre- 

law...... y estimate of the yield and 

quality of hay. 

The report follows: 

l'or«— Condition, s-'.l per cent, of a 

»i...„,.l ...mpared with SO per cent. 

V 3 per cni. on Sept. 1 last 

;, ; 81.1 per cent, the average 

condiuon on Sept. 1 for the past ten 

years The indicated yield per acre. 

tKstini:iti-d from condition reports, is 

2; : bushels. c<»m pared with «3.J 

t.u»hel» harvested last year and 27.1 

tu!«hfls«. the averase yield 1»06-H». •-'" 

%- ■ ated area. lOS.llo.OOO acres. It is 

::'d the final total production 

^^lu ...• about 2.9t).V ■' "'''■"'»• .*-'^"!" 

pared with 2.531 ' huXls 

ested lust year aii.i .,i^.. - . ousncis 
harvested in 1910. , ,, . . . ^ ,^^_ 

»Brin» Whe-ti Condition. 90.H per 
cent of a normal at time of harvest, 
compared with 1>0.4 per cent on Aug. 
1. 56.7 t-er cent at itlme of harvest last 
year, and 76 5 per cent, the average 
condition at time of harvest for tlie 
past ten years. The Indicated yield 
per acre, estimated from condition re- 
ports, la 1S.6 bushels, compared with 
9.4 bushels harvested last year, and 
13.4 bushels, the average yield from 
190« to 1!>10. On the planted area. 
1? i'i>i fW\ acres, it is estimated the 
r ■ ' .1 production will be about 
■ bushels, compared with I'Jl.- 
«Ji)0.i>00 bushels harvested last year, and 
i'Ol.Otnt.OOO bushels harvested in HUO. 

OatMi Condition. itiM per cent of a 
normal at time of harvest, compared 
with 90.3 per cent on Aug. 1. 64.5 per 
cent at time of harvest last year, and 
7i.8 per cent, the average condition at 
time of harvest for the past ten years. 
The indicated yield per acre, estimated 
from condition reports. Is 34.1 bushels, 
compared with 24.4 bushels harvested 
last year, and 28.4 bushels, the average 
yield from 1906 to laiO. On the plant- 
ed area, 37,S44.000 acres, it la estimat- 
ed the final total production will be 
about 1,21)0,000,000 bushels, compared 
with 922,000.000 bushels harvested last 
year, and 1,186,000,000 bushels harvest- 
ed In I'ilO. 

Barley: Condition. 88.9 per cent, of a 
norma! .it time of harvest, compared 
with 89.1 per cent, on Aug. 1. 65.5 per 
cent, at time of harvest last year, and 

81.3 per cent, the average condUion at 
lime of harvest for the past ten years. 
The indicated yield per acre, estimated 
from condition reports. Is 27.6 bushels, 
compared with 21.0 bushels harvested 
lasf year, and 24.8 bushels, the average 

' •' :'j»OK-lO. On tl)e planted area, 7,- 
acres. It Is estimated the final 
i>>t<ii production will be about 209.000.- 
000 bushels, compared with I6O.00O.OOO 
bushel.-* harvested last year and 174,- 
OOO.O'iO bushels harvested In 1910. 

Buckwheati Condition. 91.6 per cent, 
of a normal on §ept. 1. compared with 

88.4 per cent, on Aug. I, 83.8 per cent, 
on Sept. 1 last year and 86.4 per cent, 
the average condition on Sept. 1 for 
the past ten years. The indicated yield 
per acre, estimated from condition re- 
ports, is 21.3 bushels, compared wl'.n 
21 1 bushels harvested last year and 

19.5 bushels, the average yield 1906-10. 
On the planted area. 835.000 acres. It 
I3 estimated the final total production 
•will be about 18.000.000 bushels, com- 
pared with 18.000.000 bushels harvested 
last year and in 1910. 

1%'hlle Potatoes — Condition. 87. 2 per 
cent of a normal on Sept. 1, compared 
•with 87.8 per cent, on Aug. 1. ^9-^ per 
cent on Sept. 1 last year and 70 «> per 
cent, the average condition on ^'ept- i 
for the past ten years. The indl. ated 
vield t>«r acre, estimated from con<il- 
tlon reports, is 108 bushels, compared 
with 80.9 bushels harvested last year, 
and 96.8 bushels, the average yield har- 
vested 1906-10. on the panted area 
3.6S9.0.>0 acres, it i?, estimated tl^e «"* 1 
total production will be aj'out 3.8.00 - 
«00 bushel.'*, compared with 293.000.000 
bushels harvested last year and 349,- 
€00.000 bushels harvested In 1910. 

Xo|,«re«»— Condition. 81.1 per cent ol 
a normal, compared with 82.8 per cent 
on Aug. 1, 71.1 per cent on Hept. 1 last 
year and 81.6 per cent, the averagt 
condition on Sept. 1 for the past ten 
years. The Indicated yield per acre, 
estimated from condition reports l-s 
817.1 pounds, compared with 89.J.7 
pounds harvested last year ,and s-^ 
pounds, the average yield l^arYSted 
1906-10 On the planted area. 1.194.200 
acre.-*, it is estimated the final total pro. 
duct on will be about 976.000.000 pounds, 
compared with 905.000,000 Pounas har- 
vested last year, and 1.103.000,000 
pounds harvested In 1910. 

Flax— Condition. 86.3 P^r ceiit of a 
ntrmal on Sept. 1 compared with 87. d 
per cent on Aug. 1. 68.4 per cent on 
Sept 1 last year and 80.3 per cent the 
avera«e condition on Sept. 1 for the 
past nine years. The indicated yield 
per acre, estimated from condition re- 
ports is 9.7 bushels, compared with 7 
touishels harvested last year and 8.7 
bushels the average yield harvested 
r 1206-10. On the planted area, 2, 992, 00;,! 
acres, it Is estimated the total final 
production will be about 29,000,000 
tousheLs. compared with 19,000.000 
bushels harvested last year and 13,- 
000,000 harvested in 1910. 

Rlc« — Condition, S8.H per cent of a 
normal on Sept. 1, compared with 86.3 
per cent on Aug. 1, 82.7 per cent on 
Sept 1 last year and 87.9 per cent the 
average on Sept. 1 for the past ten 
ylar^ The Indicated yield per acre, 
estimated from condition ^^oports « 
32 7 bushels, compared with 32.9 bushels 
harvested last year and ^2:4 bushels 
the average yield harvested 1906-10 On 
the ulanted area. 710,100 acres. It is 
istlmated tht final total production 
will be about 23.000,000 bushels, com- 
pared with 23.000.000 bushels harvested 
last year and 25.000,000 bushels har- 
vested In 1910. 

Hay A preliminary estimate of the 

total production of hay Places it at "2.- 
000,000 tons, compared with S^*."'* '•^'*'^ 
tons harvested last V^ar and 69,000 - 
000 tons harvested In 1910. The qual- 
ity of the hay crop Is estimated at 
92 1 per cent, compared with 90.3 per 
cent last year and 91 per cent, the 
average for the past ten yars. 

Appieii — C:ondltlon 67.9 per cent of a 
normal on Sept. 1. compared with b.-).8 
per cent on Aug. 1, 56.2 per cent on 
Sept. 1 last year and 53.8 per cent, 
the average condition on Sept. 1 for 
the past ten years^ 

MADE HIm'fEEL OLD. 

Chicago Kecord-Herald: What ■ the 
matter?^ 

"Oh. nothing." 

"No, no. don t tell me that. Some- 
thing disagreeable or discouraging has 
happened. Your look shows it." 

"Well If you In-iist on knowing. I 
started out this morning feeling as gay 
and chipper as a boy of 20: but a little 
while ago I met a former sweetheart 
of mine and ehe told me that her sec- 
ond daughter had Just graduated from 



Sious Falls, a D.. Sept. 9.— Failing 
in his appeal to the federal circuit 
court of appeals. Charles L.. Hyde of 
I'ierre. banker and reputed to be the 
most wealthy man in South Dakota, 
must serve one year and tliree montiis 
in the federal penitentiary at Leaven- 
worth. Kan., and pay a fine of $1,500 for 
using the mails for fraudulent pur- 
posies. * . , 

He was convicted by a Jury before 
Judge Klllott of the United States court 
in this city In December last. Evidence 
was introduced that Hyde had repre- 
sented that lots which ho had for sale 
in the outskirts of I'ierre would rise 
rapidly in price, and that he had in- 
duced many persons to Invest their 
-savings in these lots, which were of 
little. If any. value. Evidence also was 
Kiven that he had Informed Investors, 
bv means of circulars, maps and let- 
tirs circulated through the mails, th.it 
Pierre had a number of natural ad- 
vantages and that there were valuable 
minerals in Its vicinity. 

Hyde has been ordered by the court 
to surrender him-self to the United 
States marshal within thirty days aft- 
er the decision of the federal circuit 
court of appeals is tiled in the federal 
court in Slou-v Falls. 



WANTED! 

Kxperleneed HteBOjsrapher. Mn»t be 
rnpld and aecurate. Beginner* need 

not apply. 

DIIATH I.O« CO>lP.\NY. 
Palladlo BulldioK. 



TAH LEADERS 
MAP OUT FIGHT 

John M. Harlan and Others 

to Camp on Bull 

Moose Trail 

Chicago. Sept. 9.— .\n agggresslve 
campaign for the re-election of Presi- 
dent Taft will be launched in the 
West this week by the Republican na- 
tional committee. 

In addition to Michigan, Colorado 
and Oregon, a thorough organization 
will be made In California, South Da- 
kota and Kansas, where the Roosevelt 
forces retain control of the Republican 
party. 

As soon as Col. Roosevelt's special 
train departs from Huntington. Or., 
Thursday. John M. Harlan of Chicago, 
with a corps of assistants from the 
New York and Chicago headquarters, 
will take up the trail on a special train, 
which will follow Col. Roosevelfa 
Itinerary through Idaho. Utah, Nevada. 
California and back into Colorado. Mr. 
Harlan, it was said, would make a 
vigorous attack upon Col. Roosevelt 
and his policies. 

ALASKAN UAILUOAD 

COMMISSION SAILS 

Seattle, Wash.. Sept. 9. — .The newly 
appointed Alaska railroad commission, 
composed of MaJ. Jay J. Morrow. 
United States engineer corps, chair- 
man; Dr. Alfred H. Brooks, Leonard N'. 
Cox. U. S. N.. and C. M. Ingersoll. civil 
engineer, sailed today on the revenue 
cutter McCulloch. The commission 
will go to Seward and other ports in 
Southwestern Alaska to Inspect harbor 
facilities and select the ocean terminal 
of the proposed government line. The 
commission will report its findings to 
congress. 

MEET TO ARRA.NGE 

PEHUY CENTENNIAL 

Put-in-Bay, Ohio, Sept. 9. — Fifty- 
seven members of the Perry's Victory 
Centennial Interstate commission met 
here today to arrange for the memorial 
celebration In 1913. Among others pres. 
ent were Oen. Nelson A. Miles, Col. 
Henry Watterson. Senator John P. San- 
born and President Oeorge H. Worth- 
ing. Excavation for the Perry memor- 
ial building will be started next week. 
The celebration will extend from July 
4 to Oct. 5, 1913. 

BE FAIPTtO^'HIS'NFOLKS. 



eternal fitness of things *o the other 
dav when there was a line of P»oP'e 
in fr^t of the box office window he 
determined to give the right seat to 
the rlKht person. .. .. 

The first one in line was a youth ac 
.ompanied by his sweetheart, so the 
ticket seller gave them «eata n Bl. 

The next was a young glU with a 
dog in her arms. 'Are dog. allowed in 
this theater'?" "Certainly, the t.eas- 
unr replied: "we bave a special seal 
ftjr dojjs. Put him In K9. 

•VVhew!" said the next, a P«/8P\'- "«• 
fut old man. 'but It's hot?" "Tl^ ticket 
man gave him a seat in Z low. . 

A Jolly young fellow ^f lo^r.^^i^ hSl a 
n.e a good seat.'' ho said. ^^^^ J-^^^e 
BOrtd dinner and want to enjov tne 
Show." Ho was handed a «^\t hi 18^ 

"Have you seen '^"y»n«JXn!in who 
me?- asked the y«""S. woman who 

came next. "No." said he„ ^"^^Vhaps 
1.... -yMit fika this seat anil pernap» 
you may fi'nd^ her " She ^-o^^.^.^tt^^ 
coupon and found It was marked Cl. 

"Hurry'" said the man whose turn 
If was next "I want to see the 
I:urtrin"go"up"" And the usher seated 

"^TVe^co^u^ntryman who next presented 
hlm.self Kot s.ated "> IJ- ^oted 

ONE MAN DIES IN 
MINNEAPOLIS FIRE 

Morris Johnson Suffocated 
and Eight Others Over- 
come, But Rescued. 

Mliineiipoin. Minn.. Sept. ».— (Spe- 
cial to Tha H.ralJ-l— One man waa 
aurtocaleJ l>y smoke, eight were over- 
come, but rescued, anj more than 100 

guests, many o( them halt ■=1»'».. ««J «° 
ih.. street or were assisted out by nre- 
men ma flr^ , which started from a 
aaaollne explos on in a garagre, spreao 
fo the Star and the ^Varwlck hoteU 
and menaced two nearby hostelrles 

'^T.cre'^o.'g-u.Vis in the mo-t -"-J: 

;,>onk'r"ref.m'g.'ng's.' iZ' i'o'!al'^^Jis -e'i- 
needed 816,000. , . ^ ^, 

V rnan who had registered at one of 
th^ hotels as Morris Johnson, lost his 
life. The Indications were that he 

had died struggling f '^^ HlThad tSrn 
fore he lost consciousness he had torn 
his clothing to ribbons in a vain ef- 
fort to make a rope by which he mlglit 
escape from a window. The door of 
the room had become jammed, the po- 
lice said. 



Oeorge H. Porlcy,^*^ member of the 
cabinet, as acting prlfhe minister, and 
Mr Perley is now serving in that ca- 
pacity Mr. Perlevflifa native of the 
Cited States an*|lthe ^"1 prime 
minister of Canada *W^o was not bor» 
^British subject. Ho was burn in 
New Hampshire, »»• -educated at St. 
Paul's school, concord, and at Harvard 
university, of which he is a graduate. 
He cine to Cansr«»-«rlth his parents 
when young and l.^ one of tie wealth- 
iest men in Ottawa/ havlnc laige lum- 
ber interests. Ile'liulao vTce President 
of the Bank of OttawU. He was bitter- 
ly opposed to rec^jrouity. 

"Canada's Yanke* i>*'lme minister and 
Canada's first milltonalre premier is 
the way Mr. Perley U referred to here. 
He Ts a cabinet minister without a 
nnrf folio and Mr ^-ttorden's action in 
Casllng over^the ministers holding 
portfolios has caused some comment, 
but he is known to be one of the prem. 
ter's most trusted advisers, especially 
In Important business matters. 



TOO LATE 
TO CLASSIFY 

One Cemt a Wor4 Each laiertton. 
No Advert»«en»*"* I-*" Than IB Cent* 

t FOR SALE CHEAP. * 

* • * 

it, Sl.'^O marble base, three-seat shin- * 

iiL ing stand, complete; good as new. * 

*; F. E. BLODOETT & CO., * 

-^ 20 West Superior St. * 



t A GOOD BUSINESS CHANCE # 

* * 

# •* 

^ For first-class shoe repairer with # 
J<. a few hundred dollars to buy a * 
*. complete quick shoe repair outfit; * 
a- good location; doing a fine busl- * 
■if. nesa. Call or write * 

if- t 

% F. E. BLODG"fcTT & CO.. * 

Jki 20 West Superior St. H- 



WANTED — TWQ BUS3 BOYS: MUST 
be neat. Hotel Holland. 



Answers. London: Whole volumes 
miglit easily be written upon the sub- 
ject of manners for the engaged girl — 
perhaps on no branch more particu- 
larly than the engaged girl's manners 
toward the relatives of her fiance. 

Much after miser*r would be averted 
if women realized the Importance of 
treating John's people in Just the right 
way — with Just the right amount of 
tact and deference. Scores of girls 
make tiie mistake of adopting a de- 
fensive sort of attitude towards "his" 
people. Others fail to create a good 
opinion with them because sheer nerv- 
ousness causes them to lose tlielr sense 
of proportion. 

Engaged girls, as a whole, are very 
much too fond of regarding their 
sweetheart as being tlieir own particu- 
lar property. 

Quite 90 per cent of girls fall to 
treat "his" people In the way they 
ought to. Sometimes It happens from 
pure thoughtle-ssness. In many cases 
it is the result of simple selfishness on 
the part of the individual girl. She 
wants John to herself — does not care 
an atom for the feelings of other T>eo- 
ple. though the other people may have 
held John dear for many years before 
she had even heard of him. 

Again and again we have been told 
of the forbearance which mothers 
should exercise toward their son's wife. 
What of the opposite side of the ques- 
tion — of the forbearance which a wom- 
an should exercise, not only toward her 
husband's mother, but toward his rela- 
tives generally? 

Again, many engaged girls place ah- 
surd restrictions upon what John shall 
and %vhat John shall not do where his 
family Is concerned. Such demands are 
not calculated to increase a man's re- 
spect for his fiancee. 

At a river party once a girl was so 
vexed with her fiance for helping his 
mother before herself Into a boat that. 
In a fit of frenzy sne sent back her 
engagement ring. But she waited in 
vain for a reconciliation. And there 
are scores of like cases. 

After marriage, too. intentionally or 
unintentionally, many young wives are 
cruel to their husband's people— they 
themselves are the first to realize this 
In after days, when they have married 
sons of their own. Scores of women, in 
earlv married life, regard their home 
aft "mine," Instead of "ours. In their 

Innermost being. t^,^,^ 

They have a ready welcome for their 
own folk, but John's people must only 
come when they are asked to come Of 
course. It Is wrong— quite wrong. There 
should be an equally ready welcome for 
both lots of relatives. 

ETERNAL FITNESS OF THINGS. 
Tit-Bits: He was a box ofrlce man, 
who, like the tailor, believed In the 



L W. W. PLANNING 
GENERAL STRIKE 

Haywood Says National Order 

May Be ksued By 

Sept, 30. 

Chicago, Sept 9.— William B. Hay- 
wood, head of the Industrial Workers 
of the World, today prepared to leave 
for New York, where he will take up 
the question of a general strike of 
Textile Workers throughout the United 
States Mr. Haywood said that It was 
possible a strike order would be issued 

**^Mr*H'ayw'ood came to Chicago to In- 
terest other branches of industry In 
what he terms the "unjust detention 
or Joseph L. Ettor and Arturo Oivan- 
nlttl textile workers Involved In tne 
recent trouble at Lawrence, M ass. 

INFANTILE PAUAIASIS 

LN JANESVILLE SCHOOL 

Janesville. Wi.^.. Sept. 9.— The high 
school here was closed today for fu- 
migation because of the discovery of a 
ca.se of infantile paralysis among the 
student.=i. The case is thought to be 
very serious. 

CELEBRATED AT OLD HANGINGS. 
Chicago Inter Ocean: Executions 
when criminals were hanged In the Old 
Bailey In London, had certain custom- 
ary sequel.s. The governor of Newgate, 
for instance, always gave a breakfast 
to those friends he had Invited to see 
the hanging, and by established custom 
deviled kidneys always fofmed the 
principal dish, although, as John Hol- 
llngshead had related, nearly everyone 
was obliged to swallow a glass of 
brandy fir.st. 

Another function described in Lon- 
don in the 'SOs" was tlie reception held 
afterward by the hangman at the 
Green Dragon, in Fleet street, where 
he took refreshment with his admirer.s 
and sold the fatal rope at the rate of 
sixpence per Inch. 

In the good old times nearly every 
criminal who was executed was cred- 
ited with a confession and "last dying 
words." whether he uttered them or 
not These were printed in thousands 
bv Mr. Catnach of Seven Dial.-*. And 
sometimes an offender was reprieved 
on his way to Tyburn and had the 
pleasure of reading his own obituary 
notice. 

Many of these broadsides, printed on 
a peculiar whitey-brown paper, can 
still be obtained in the neighborhood 
of the Dials at certain qtiaint. little 
shops that seem to have defied alike 
time and the "improvement acts." You 
can see them in the window alongside 
of old ballad.i. forgotten comic songs, 
chll'lren's toys, and bottles of ■ticky 
looking sweets. 

An execution which never took place 
was that of Edward Dennis, the public 
hangman, who, in 17H0, was sentenced 
to death for complicity in the Gordon 
riots. He was resnited and resumed 
his occupation. So thoroujthlv did Den- 
nis regain favor that in 1785 the sher- 
iff.H of London presented him with a 
gorgeous official robe "as a testimony 
to his ex>*ellent mode of performing 
busines.*!,"" Dennis found this robe not 
onlv Inconvenient when at work hut 
ratlier conspicuous at other times, so 
he sold it to Old Cain, a well known 
charlatan of the day. Decked in the 
hangman's robe and a pastebo.ird 
crown the fortune teller cut an im- 
posing figure. 



WANTED— BOY ABOITT 16 OR 17 
years to work in. store. Call after 
7 p. m. 2728 We st Third street. 

W\NTED— FIFTY OR ONE HUNDRED 
Klrls to wrap Bonnie Butter Bites. 
Apply National Candy company, 1732 
West S uperior street. ^ 

WANTED— COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
general housework; family of two. 
801 Eas t First street. 

Hair. Moles. Wartu removed forever. 
Miss Kelly. 131 West Superior street. 

Farm lands at wholesale prices. L. A. 
Larsen Co.. 214 Provldet;ce building. 



MARRIAGE LICENSES. 



"^ trailer nFTkilgore and Bellbena Fo- 

Robert Orrwell Harper and Charlotte 
Hulda Skuglund. 



SOLID GOLD WEDDING AND EN- 
gagement rings made and mounted 
to order at Henrlcksen's. 



Deaths and Funerals | 



EILER— Corwln W. Filer, 18 years old, 
son of A. W. Filer of Proctor, died 
this morning of a complication of 
diseases. The funeral will be held 
from the residence at Proctor at 1'2 
o'clock Wednesday and from the 
Norwegian church. Sixth avenue east 
and Fifth street at 2 o'clock. In- 
terment will be at Forest HIU ceme- 
tery. „„ , 

SIMON— Arthur C. Simon, 2,. years of 
age. died Saturday night at St. 
Mary's hospital of Brights disease. 
Mr Simon was well known down- 
town. He was employed as an assist- 
ant at the undertaking rooms of 
Charles J. Stewart. Previous to that 
e was in the employ of Flood & 
Horgan. The body was sent to his 
former home at Wabasha, Minn., yes- 
terday afternoon for interment. 

WALKER — Tlie funeral of Robert A. 
Walker, the son of Mr. and Mrs. B. 
K Walker of 20:19 Minnesota avenue, 
wiio died at Gull Lake, Sask.. will 
take olace tomorrow afternoon at 2 
o'clock from the First M. E. church. 
Third avenue west and Third street. 
Interest will be In Forest Hill ceme- 
tery 

OLSON — The funeral Of Florence, the 
2-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Louis Olson. 4«09 Magellan street, 
who died Saturday morning after a 
short illness, was held at 3 o clock 
this afternoon from the .St. James 
Catholic church. Fifty-seventh ave- 
nue west and Klnnear place. Rev. 
D W Lynch, pastor of the church, 
officiated and Interment was at Cal- 
vary cemetery. ^ * ta 

COTE — The funeral of Isaac Cote, 50 
years old, 5101 Main street, who died 
Friday evening after a two months 
illne.ss. win be held at 9 o'clock 
Wednesday morning from the St. 
Jean Baptlste church. Twenty-fifth 
avenue west and Third street. In- 
terment will be at Calvary cemetery. 

CROOK.':; — John Crooks, about 45 years 
old, died in the saloon at 509 West 
Michigan street alwyut 8 o'clock .Sat- 
urday night. The body was retnoved 
to the undertaking rooms of Flood 
& Horgan, where an autopsy showed 
that death was due to heart failure 
He has no relatives in this part of 
the country as f ar as can he learned. 

MONUMENTS — We have our own quar- 
ries and factory. Let a Duluth concern 
do vour vwrk. Hundreds in stock. P. 
N Peterson Granite Co.. 230 E. Sup. St. 



and to own. operate, utlliise. sell and 
dispose of the same; to buy. rent, lease, 
construct, utilize, maintain, sell, In- 
cuniber and dispose of all kinds of 
railroads and street railway lines, and 
to equip aifd operate the same wltn 
steam, electricity or other motive 
power; to manufacture, buy, sell ana 
generally deal In all kinds of njotor 
cars, motors, engines and all kinds ot 
machinery; to buy, hold, pledge, sell 
and transfer personal property; all 
kinds of merchandise, choses In action, 
mortgages, atocks, bonds, notes, bills 
of exchange and other evidences of in- 
debtedness of every kind and descrip- 
tion; to do business on commission 
and to act as agent, attorney or broker 
for other persons or corporations, in 
any business which such corporation 
might transact for Itself; to loan 
money to other persons or corporations, 
either as principal, agent or broker; to 
negotiate loans, and collect compensa- 
tion therefor, and to receive and en- 
force security for the payment of the 
same, by mortgage, pledge or other- 
wise, and to do any act or thing in anjr 
manner connected with or deemed ad- 
visable in the conduct of any business 
herein recited, or that may be neces- 
sary or advisable to accomplish or pro- 
mote the same. The principal place of 
transacting said business shall be in 
the State of Minnesota, and the general 
office shall be In the City of Duluth 
in said State, but the corporation may 
also transact business and execute any 
and all of the powers herein mentioned 
outside of the State of Minnesota, 
vi-herever Its Interests or business oper- 
ations may require or render It aa- 

ARTICLE 3. The period of duration 
of the corporation shall be thirty years 
from and after September 1st. 1912 

ARTICLE 4. The names and places 
of residence of the persons forming this 
corporation are as follows: U. i. 
Eagling. F. A. Kemp. Carl A Knutfon 
and John Heltmann. all of Duluth, 
Minnesota. . ^, 

ARTICLE 5. The government of 
said corporation shall be vested In a 
board of four directors, and the annual 
meeting, at which said board shall be 
elected, shall be held on the second 
Wednesday of September, each year, 
m the City of Duluth. Minnesota. The 
said board shall elect the following 
officers of the corporation: President, 
vice president, secretary and treasurer; 
the same person may be secretary and 
treasurer. The incorporators above 
named shall compose the first board of 
directors of the corporation, and shall 
act until their successors are elected 
and have qualified. 

ARTICLE 6. The amount of the 
capital stock of the corporation shall 
be Fifty Thousand ($50,000.00) dollars, 
divided into Five Hundred shares of 
the par value of One Hundred (JlOO.OO* 
Dollars each. One-half of this amount 
shall be common stock and one-hair 
■preferred stock. The holders of such 
preferred stock shall receive a fixed 
yearly dividend of seven per cent per 
annum, payable annually on the second 
Wednesday of September each year, 
before any dividend shall be set apart 
or paid on the common stock, but the 
holders of such preferred stock shall 
not be entitled *o any other or further 
dividend, and shall have no voting 
power on any question. AH of said 
capital stock shall be paid on call of 
the board of directors, and in such 
manner as said board may determine. 

ARTICLE 7. The highest amount of 
indebtedness or liability to which the 
corporation shall at any time be sub- 
ject Is Seventy-five Thousand ($75.- 
000.00) Dollars. 

In witness whereof, we have here- 
unto subscribed our names this 29in 
day of August. ^912. ^^^^^^^ 

F. A. KEMP. 

CARL A. KNUTSON. 

JOHN HEITMANN. 
In Presence of: 
W. H. GURNEE. 
SARAH WINER 

State of Minnesota. County of St. Louis 

On this 29th day <>« August, 1912. be- 
fore me. a Notary Public within and 
for said County, personally appeared 
O T Eagling, F. A. Kemp, Carl A. 
Knutson and John Heltmann, to me 
known to be the persons described in 
and who subscribed and executed the 
foregoing Certificate of Incorporation, 
and acknowledged the same as their 
free act and deed^ ^ quRNEE. 

Notary Public, 
St. Louis Co.. Minn. 
(Notarial Seal. St. Louis County. Minn.) 

My commission expires Oct. 5, 1915. 

State of Minnesota,. Department of 

State 

i hereby certlfv that the within in- 
strument was filed for record 'n this 
office on the 30th day of August. A. D. 
1912 at 10% o'olock A. M., and was 
duly recorded In Book V-3 of Incorpo- 
rations, on page 739. „^--„ . „. 
JULIUS A. aCHMAHL 

Secretary of State. 



OFFICE OF REGISTER OF DEEDS. 
State of Minnesota, County of St. Louis 

I hereby certify that the within in- 
strument was filed In this office for 
record Aug. 31, 1912, at 8:30 A. M and 
was duly recorded in Book lo of Misc., 

P^^^ '^*- M. C. PALMER, 

Register of Deeds. 
By THOS. CLARK, 

Deputy. 
D H., Sept. 9-10. 1912. 



MONUMENTS to order, direct from 
quarry, no agents; you save 25 pct. 
Chas. Benson. 2301 W. 2d St. Lin. 334, 



BUILDING PERMITS. 

T^^. Ffdrback, addition. Exe- 
ter street, between Pacific 
and Atlantic avenues I 150 

To D. Martlno, addition. Fifty- 
fifth avenue west and Ral- 
eigh St. set LOOO 

To O. M. Olson, frame cottage. 
Highland street, between 
Sixty-third and Sixty-fourth 
avenues 500 



WYOMING OIRL RIDES 8,000 MILES. 
New York Tribune: Alberta Claire, 
"the girl from Wyoming," arrived here 
a few days ago astride her little bronco 
Bud. When she .swung from her saddle 
opposite the city hall she completed a 
hor.sebaek journey of a little more 
than 8.000 miles since she left her 
home at Sheridan. >» vo. She was 
dreased In a kliaki riding suit, so fash- 
ioned that she could ride astride and 
wore a campaign hat and a red ban- 
dana. . . 

The rest of her wearing apparel she 
rarried In a remarkably small saddle 
bag behind her. It did not look as 
though it could hold much more than a 
lace handkerchief, but Miss Claire does 
not like to be littered up with super- 
fluous clothing. 

Miss Claire, who Is only 18 years old. 
Is 4 feet 11 Inches In height and tips 
the scales at Just 100 pounds, but *t is 
about 99 per ''ent nerve. She will make 
the return trip on her pony. 

s ■ 

CANADA HAS A YANKEE PREMIER. 
Canadian Letter to the New York 
Tribune: An amusing situation has 
arisen out of the absence of Prime Min- 
ister Borden, who is in Nova Scotia 
and who will leave for England soon, 
where with the minister of Justice and 
the minister of naval service he will 
spend three months In trying to for- 
mulate a new Canadian naval policy. 
Mr Borden has appointed the Hon. 



LBGAL. NOTICBS. 

"ARflCLEToFniNCOnPORATI^^ 

— OF— 

NORTHERN PACIFIC LAND & 

INVESTMENT COMPANY. 

For the purpose of forming a cor- 
poration pursuant to the provisions of 
Chapter 58. Revised Laws of Minnesota. 
1905, and the acts amendatory thereof 
and supplementary thet-eto, the under- 
slf?ne<l have adopted, : subscribed and 
acknowledged the following Certificate 
of Incorporation: 

ARTICLE I. The name of this cor- 
poration shall be "Northern Pacific 
Land it Investment Company."' 

ARTICLE 2. TH« general nature of 
the business of the corporation shall 
be buying, selling, leasing. Improving, 
mortgaging, holding. platting and 
otherwise dealing in any and all kinds 
of real estate; to acquire, hold, lease, 
bond. Incumber, sell and convey mines 
and mining property and mining 
rights and privileges of every kind and 
nature; to explore for, mine, remove, 
dispose of and deal In all kinds of ores 
and minerals; to accept and acquire 
franchises, and rlghts-'of-way for rail- 
roads, telephones and street railways. 



SUMMONS IN APPLICATION FOR 

REGISTRATION OF LAND— 
State of Minnesota, County of St Louis 

District Court, Eleventh Judicial Dis- 
trict. 
In the matter of the application I 
of Alger. Smith & Company, a 
Corporation, to register the 
title to the following described | 
Teal estate situated In St. i 
Louis County, Minnesota, 
namely: 
All those certain pieces or par- 
cels of land situated, lying 
and being In the City of Du- 
lulh County of St. Louis and 
state of Minnesota, upon a 
part of United States Govern- 
ment lot five, section eighteen, 
township forty-nine north of 
range fourteen west of the 
fourth principal meridian, 
more particularly designated 
and described as follows: 
Commencing at the intersec- 
tion of the west line of Soutli 
Fiftieth avenue west and the i 
center line of that branch of | 
the Northern Pacific Railway | 
extending from said City of { 
Duluth, to Superior. Wiscon- | 
sin, and running thence north ( 
along said westerly line of I 
Fiftieth avenue west seven I 
hundred feet to a point which • 
is the place of beginning: run- | 
ning thence west at right I 
angles to the last line six I 
hundred eighty-eight feet, | 
more or less, to a post on the \ 
southeasterly line of the j 
Northern Pacific Railway Com- I 
pany right-of-way which is j 
twenty-five feet at right I 
angles southeasterly #rom the ! 
center line of said railway; 
thence northeasterly at an 
angle of forty degrees and 
thirty-flve minutes to the right 
along the southeasterly line 
of said right-of-way seven 
hundred twenty-five and 
four-tenths feet to a point 
on the southerly line of 
lot eight, block two hun- 
dred forty-seven. Altered 
Plat of W^est Duluth. 

Third Division, according to 
said plat as recorded In the 
office of the Register of Deeds 
of said County of St. Louis; 
thence easterly on the south- 
erly line of said lot eight 
thirty-two and nine-tenths feet 
to a post; thence northeast- i 
erly along said right of-way, 
which Is fifty feet southeast- 
erly from the center line of 
said railway, one hundred 
forty-nine and slxty-siK one- 
hundredths feet to a post 
which Is twenty-five feet 
southwesterly from the center 
line of a curved branch of said 
Northern Pacific Railway; 
thence southeasterly on a 



curved line which Is twenty- 
five feet southwesterly from 
the center lino of said last 
mentioned railway track one 
hundred ten and flfty-seven- 
hundredths feet to a post In 
the west line of said Fiftieth 
avenue west; thence south 
along the west line of said 
Fiftieth avenue west five hun- 
dred ninety-five and forty- 
seven one-hundrodths feet to 
the place of beginning, ex- 
cepting, however, from this 
description all that portion 
of Fifty-first avenuo west, ana 
the alley between Fiftieth and 
Fifty-first avenues west, en- 
closed therein, the said tract 
containing five and seventy- 
five one-hundredths acres, 
more or less; and the fore- 
going description meaning and 
Intending to cover a part of 
Outlots "H" and "V " of Aud- 
itor's Plat of West Duluth 
Outlots. and all that part of 
lots two. three, five, six and 
seven in block two hundred 
forty-six. and all that part 
of lots seven, eight, nine, ten 
and eleven in block two hun- 
dred forty-seven, and all that 
part of lots thirteen and four- 
teen in block two hundred 
forty-eight of said Altered 
Plat of West Duluth, Third 
Division, which does not be- 
long to the right-of-way of 
said Northern Pacific Railway, 
and also th*j entire of lots 
eight to seventeen, inclusive. 
In said block two hundred 
forty-six. and the entire of 
lots twelve to seventeen. In- 
clusive. In said block two hun- 
dred forty-seven. 
Also all that certain piece or 
parcel of land situated, lying 
and being In the Ci^y of Du- 
luth, County of St. Louis and 
State of Minnesota, upon a 
part of Government lots five I 
and .six. in section eighteen.! 
township forty-nine north of 
range fourteen west of the 
fourth principal meridian. | 
more particularly designated i 
and described as follows: 
Beginning at a point on the 
west line of Fiftieth avenue 
west, In the City of Duluth, 
Minnesota, that is seven hun- 
dred feet north of the center 
line of that branch of the 
Northern Pacific Railway 
wnich extends from Duluth, 
Minnesota, to Superior, Wis- 
consin, and being the south- 
east corner of a parcel of 
land conveyed by The Minne- 
sota Loan and Trust Company 
to John Millen of Duluth. Min- 
nesota, by deed dated the 18th 
day of April, 1907. and record-, 
ed in the office of- the Regis- 
ter of Deeds of St. Louis 
County. Minnesota, on the 7th 
day of May, 1907. in book 276 
of Deeds, on page. 182. and 
running thence west at right 
angles to the west line of 
Fiftieth avenue west six hun- 
dred and eighty-eight feet, 
more or less, to a point on 
the southeasterly line of the 
right-of-way of the Northern 
Pacific Railway Company 
(formerly the right-of-way of 
the Duluth Transfer Railway 
Company). and twenty-five 
feet, taken at right angles, 
southeasterly from the center 
line of said railway; thence 
southwest along said right-of- 
way and parallel with the 
center line of said railway 
and twenty-five feet south- 
easterly therefrom to the in- 
tersection of said right-of- 
way with the south line of 
Outlot "J." according to said 
Auditor's Plat of West Du- 
luth Outlots. at a point seven- 
ty-five feet north of the center 
line of that branch of the 
Northern Pacific Railway ex- 
tending from said Duluth, 
Minnesota, to Superior, Wis- 
consin; thence east along the 
south line of said Outlot "J." 
being a line seventy-five teet | 
north of and parallel with | 
said last named center line, 
to the Intersection of said 
south line with the west line 
of said Fiftieth avenue west; 
and thence north along said 
west line six hundred and 
twenty-five feet to the place 
of beginning. 
Alger. Smith & Company, a cor- 
poration. 

Applicant, 
vs. 
City of Duluth, a Municipal Cor- 
poration; West Duluth Land 
Company, a Corporation, and 
all other persons or parties 
unknown, claiming any right, 
title, estate, lien or Interest 
in tlie real estate described in 
the application herein. 

Defendants. 
The State of Minnesota to the abovs 
named defendants: 

You are hereby summoned and re- 
quired to answer the application of the 
applicant in the above entitled pro- 
ceeding, and to file your answer to 
the said application in the Office of the 
clerk of said court, in said County, 
within twenty (20) days after the serv- 
ice of this summons upon you. exclu- 
sive of the day of such service, and. if 
you fail to answer the said application 
within the time aforesaid, the appli- 
cant In this proceeding will apply to 
the court for the relief demanded 
therein. , , , ^ ,, 

Witness. J. P. Johnson, clerk of said 
court, and the seal thereof, at Duluth. 
In said county, this 24th day of 
August. A. D. 1912. 

J. P. JOHNSON, 

Clerk. 
By B. G. RILLING. 

Deputy. 
(Seal, District Court.) 
HARRIS & PEARSON. 

Attorneys for Applicant. 
D. H. Aug. 26. Sept, 2. 9. 1912. 



composed of not less than three mem- 

Tlie names and addresses of Uie flr»t 
Board of Directors are: 

President, R. F. Berdle, Duluth, Min- 
nesota. 

Vice president, Carl Thiel. Hibblng. 
Minnesota. 

Secretary and Treasurer. Harry 
Kernes. Duluth, Minnesota. 

All of the above named officers shall 
hold their respective offices aforesaid 
until the next annual meeting of the 
corporation, to be held on the first 
Tuesday in July. 1913. In the City of 
Duluth, Minn., at 10 o'clock a. m., at 
which time and annually thereafter a 
Board of Directors shall be elected 
from and by the stockholders of this 
corporation. Any office except that of 
president and vice president may be 
held by one person. 

ARTICLE V, 

The amount of capital stock of this 
corporation shall be fifty thousand dol- 
lars ($50,000). wliich shall be paid In 
money or property, or both. In such 
manner and at such times and in such 
amounts as the Board of Directors 
shall order. The capital stock shall 
be divided into five thousand shares 
of the par value of $10.00 each. 
ARTICLE VI. 
The largest amount of Indebtedness 
or liability to which this corporation 
shall at any time be subject to be $20.- 

In witness whereof we have here- 
unto set our hands and seals this 3r4 
day of September, 1912. „.„..^,,, 
R. F BERDIE, 
CARL THIEL. 
HARRY KERNES. 
In presence of: 

BENJ. M. GOLDBERG. 
JOHN A. BLACKWOOD. 



State of Minnesota. County of St, Louta 

On this 3rd day of September. 1912. 
before me. a Notary Public within and 
for said County and State, personally 
appeared R. F. Berdle, Carl Thlel and 
Harry Kernes, to me known to be the 
persons described in and who executed 
the foregoing Instrument. and ack- 
nowledged that they executed the same 
as their free act and deed, 
as ineir ^j^^j m. GOLDBERG. 

Notary Public. St. Louis Co.. Minn. 
My Commission expires Nov. IT. 1917. 
State- of Minnesota, Department of 

Of 4 f A 

I hereby certify that the within In- 
strument was filed for record In thi-s 
office on the 6th day of Sept., A. D 
1912 at 9 o'clock a. m.. and was duly 
recorded In Book 3 of Incorporations 
on page 60. ^^^^^^ ^ .SCHMAHL, 

Secretary of State. 



OFFICE OF REGISTER OF DEEDS. 
State of Minnesota, County of St. Louis 

I hereby certify that the within in- 
strument was filed in this office for 
record Sept. 7, 1912, at 11 30 a. m , and 
was duly recorded in Book 15 of Misc., 

P*«' *^ M. C. PALMER. 

Register of Deeda. 
By THOMAS CLARK. 

Deputy. 
D. H- Sept. 7-9, 1912. 

ORDER FOR HEARING ON PETITION 

FOR ADMINLSTRATION.— 
State of Minnesota, County of St. 

Louis. — ss. ^ „ 

In the Matter of the Estate of Sophia 

M. Smith. Decedent ^ . ., ^ 

THP] PETITION OF Gertrude C. 
W'angenstein, having been filed in this 
Court, representing, among other 
thing.s that Sophia M. Smith, then be- 
ing a resident of the County of St. 
Louis. State of Minnesota, died intes- 
tate, in the County of St. Louis. State 
of Minnesota, on the 24th day of Au- 
gust. 1912; leaving estate in the Coun- 
ty of St. Louis. State of Minnesota, and 
that said petitioner is a daughter ot 
said de. edent. and praying that Letters 
of Administration of the estate of said 
decedent be granted to Eugene M. Kei- 

ley 

IT IS ORDERED. That said petition 
be heard before this Court, at the Pro- 
bate Court Rooms Irt the Court House 
In Duluth, In said County, on Monday, 
the 30th day of September, 1912. at ten 
o'clock A. M.. and aU persons interest- 
ed in said hearing and la said matter 
are hereby cited and required at said 
time and place to show cause, if any 
there be. why said petition should not 
be granted. . ^ 

ORDERED FURTHER. That this Or- 
der be served by publication in The 
Duluth Herald, ar^cording to law. and 
that a copy of this Order be served on 
the County Treasurer of St. Louis 
County not less than ten days prior to 
said day of hearing and by mailing a 
copy hereof to each heir or interested 
party at least 15 days before said day 
of hearing. „ ^ „^. 

Dated at Duluth. Minn.. Sept 9th. 
1912. 

By the Court, 

S. W. GILPIN. 
Judge of Probate. 
(Seal. Probate Court. St. Louis Coun- 

tv, Minn.) 
HUGH J. McCLEARN. 

Attorney for Petitioner. 
D. H.. Sept. 9, 16. 23. 1912. 



CERTIFICATE OFINCORPORATION 

—OF THE— 
INTERNATIONAL FILM, ADVER- 
TISEMENT k AMUSEMENT CO. 

We. the undersigned, for the purpose 
of forming a corporation under and 
pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 
fifty-eight (58). Revised Laws of Min- 
nesota for 1905, and any amendments 
thereof, and do hereby associate our- 
selves as a body corporate and do here- 
by adopt the following certificate of 
Incorporation. 

ARTICLE L 
The name of this corporation shall 
be "The International Film. Advertise- 
ment and Amusement Company." 

The general nature of the business 
of this corporation shall be to make, 
buy and sell photographic films, cam- 
eras and supplies of all kinds and na- 
ture; to engage in a general adver- 
tising business; to establish agencies 
for conducting the same and to con- 
struct, purchase, lease or otherwise ac- 
quire theatrical hall and amusement 
places of all kinds and description; to 
carry on the business of proprietors of 
advertisements; to own, operate, con- 
duct and furnish theaters and moving- 
picture shows "Films" and other 
amusements and entertainments of 
kinds to the public, and to purchase, 
own, use, lease, let, mortgage or hire 
any and all kinds of property, real, 
personal or mixed, necessary or con- 
venient and proper to conduct and 
carry on and transaction of said busi- 
ness The principal place of carrying 
on and transacting such business shall 
be In the city of Duluth. Minnesota, 
but the Board of Directors may from 
time to time designate some other place 
or places to transact soch business. 
ARTICLE 11. 

The time for the commencement of 

this corporation shall be 

1912. and the period of the duration 
shall be thirty years. 

ARTICLE III. 

The names and places of the peraons 
forming this corporation are: 

R r Berdle, Duluth, Minnesota, 

Carl Thlel, Hibbing, Minnesota. 

Harry Kernes, Duluth. Minnesota. 
ARTICLE IV. 

The management of this corporation 
shall be vested In a board of directors 



\l 



Sale of School and 
Other State Lands 



STATE OF MINNESOTA, STATE AUD- 

itor's office. St. Paul, September 3. 

1912. 

Notice is hereby given. That on Oc- 
tober 16. 1912, at 10 o'clock A. M., in 
the office of the County Auditor, at 
Duluth, St. Louis County. In the State 
of Minnesota, I will offer for sale cer- 
tain unsold state lands, and also those 
state lands which have re'<-erte.l to the 
state by reason of the non-payment of 
Interest. _ ^^ 

Termt: Fifteen per cent of the pur- 
chase price and interest on the un- 
paid balance from date of sale to June 
1 1913 must be paid at the time of 
salA The balance of purchase money 
is payable In whole or in part on or 
before forty years from date of sale. 
The rate of interest on the unpaid 
balance is four per cent per annum, 
payable In advance on June 1st of each 
year, provided the principal remains 
unpaid for ten years; but if the prin- 
cipal is paid within ten years from the 
date of sale, the rate of interest will 
be computed at five per cent per an- 

Appralsed value of timber. If any. 
must also be paid at time of sale. 

Lands on which the interest is de- 
linquent may be redeemed at any time 
up to the hour of sale, or before re- 
sale to an actual purchaser. 

All mineral rights are reserved by 
the laws of the state 

Not more than 320 acres can be 
sold or contracted to be sold to any 
one purchaser. Agents acting for pur- 
chasers must furnish affidavits of au- 
thorlty Appraisers' reports, showing 
quality and kind of soil are on file in 

***Listf of lands to be offered may be 
obtained of the State Auditor or the 
the State Commissioner of Immigration 
at St. Paul, and of the County Auditor 

at above address. 

at aoove g^j^ujjL G. IVERSON. 

State Auditor. 
D H.. Sept. 9-16-23-30. 1912^ ^ 



CITY NOT1CB9. 



CITY CLERK'S OFFICE-- 

Duluth, Minn. 

Notice is hereby gi>;en that applica- 
tions have been filed in my office by 
the following named persons for li- 
cense to sell Intoxicating liquors in the 
following named locations, viz : 

Oust Johnson at No. 413 West Mlchi- 
fiTsn stroot 

Chas. Govln at No. 701 West Superior 
street being a transfer from Salvatore 
Dl Santo at the same location. 

L R. Birch at No. 1540 Wtest Supe- 

' s'ald applications will be considered 
by the Common Council at a regular 
meeting thereof to be held on Monday, 
sept. 23, 1912. at 7:30 o"cU>ck^RM. 

City Clerk. 
D, H.. Sept. 9. 16. 1»12. D 293. 



16 



Monday, 



THE DULUTH. HERALD 



September 9, 1912. 




TREND STILL 
DOWNWARD 



Sunny 
Cheap 



Skies Continue to 
en America's Lead- 



ing 



Cereal. 



Same Conditions of Weather 

Also Send Flaxseed 

Prices Down. 



9 — Wheat 
reason of 



DuJvjth B-ard cf Tratlc. Fept. 
workfd >till lowtT today by 
ContliKit,; f.ibt rat-lf harvestlns and 
till -r thrtiuBh the apring 

wl r>uluth September 

wl.' lower, and there were 

deiuiivs* >i»i,\vi!*c on all the leading; 
Krwln markets oi North America. 
itufum closed 2c lower. Cash wheat 
clOBetl "ic over December. I'uluth Sep- 
ttinber mid November lln»e»:d closed 
l%c off and t'ttober and December -c 

Thi' iMi.rniiiK was again bearish 



the 
tlie 
cast 



wl.' 
w< 
1 . 






ijii. 
t'h 1 

Ul.'^ 

L 

Mi' 
lai 

tbf 
th' 

be; I 
leU 
in 

prt- 



on 

■ t ■. :i!ktts of North Amerita, 

ci'iulitions and the fore- 

tfit whole vi-ry favoiable 

- a:id tnruslUng opera- 

-ides of the Canadian 

:»t-. American primary 

:m were very large indeed. 

were roseate. The move- 

r;K wheat was enormous, 

• .. - :.'U1. 

wheat. which 

TStc assited, opened 

a and at noon waa 

sc .a^ked. Ailnneapolis. 

Winnipeg wheal were 



1 



wheat at 3;1S p. m. was 
The iirvtfsure ot Manitoba 
set world shipmtnts witn 
tutions from Russia and 
: the larse estimates of 
..t at crop, iill helped to 
:ket. though It was stead- 
t bv unfavorable weather 
i Kingdom and an im- 
:.d for American wheat. 
t lii:i.»e«'«l WorkM Lower. 
Thf fii!*' weather through most of 
the N' -t had the effect of bear- 

ing fl somewhat on the Duluth 

Hiarkt-t t a.. Trading was mostly in 
futures rrujshers still held off. not 
cartni; iv luy heavily In view of the 
bearish looks of things. Sellers, how- 
ever, were also conservative, and used 
the probability of frosts In the near 
future as a bull argument. At noon 
today Duluth September was >/ic off. 
Oct'ii < r HI1.1 December a cent off and 
N( .c off. Winnipeg October 

at o' was ^c up at $1.51Vi, 

beinK iO^sc lower than I>uluth C>clober. 
Buenos Ayres October closed Saturday 
%c up at 1 1.63 H. London Calcutta 
September and October today closed 
1^4C off at 12.09 i/fe. 



K€. 

No, 
Ni>. 
No. 

m. 

No. 

No. 
No. 

No. 

Koi 

No. 

No. 

Barley, 

B»rkj. 

Ilai ii'v 

Bai) 

VUi 

Mi 

No 

No - 

N.. 

No. - 

No- 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No 



C'MMli iialeH .Hoadajr. 

iiorllicru. (!.■>. ;-iO;> till, to nrf.ve 



:i3 t.u- ai.d 2-;h car. 
(■C»0 t>u. to arrive. . . 

t.i, ti) anive. 



jrs 



iwnticm. 



4 latH, 



■:>u. to wrlfe. 
(-li, 10 arrive. . 

1 car. to arrive. . . . 
1 JL". I'll, tn store. . 



I) 111. 



Ill rtiifni, 2 tars. . 

tisru. i i-nr 

Ml.taf. 1 car 

»ii*-al. 4 cara.... 
w)it<at. 3 cars . . . 
*lie»t, I car 



Z 

1 

3 

■i 

3 

3 

«ra tit- 
No gTMie 
No grade 
No grade 
No gruife 
No grade 
No grade 
No grade 
Mont, whtat, 
Bark-y. 
B»thy, 
Barley. 
Barley. 
Barlty. 
Bailfy. 
Harlcy. 
liarlry, 
Bailey. 
BarlM. 
Bii- ■ 

Bi:..., 
B^arlty. 



»h«at. 
wheat. 

whtut. 
wheat, 

H llMt . 

wheat, 
wheat. 

w tie at. 



cars. 
car . 
car. . 
curs, 
ear . 
car . 
cars 
car. ryo 



atid mixed. 



fr;rs, Ni.. 1 atMl 3 bard winter 



HO grade, 2 car» 
1 ear. no grade. 

1 car, ftetJ 

4 can 

3 cars 

■J cum 

i can 

2 car^ 

1 i-ar 

ir 



rt 



Oatn, 
0*tit. 
OalJt. 
Oatii, 
Oats. 
Ctets. 
Oatfl. 
Oaia. 
Oaui. 
Oata. 
Oats. 
Oata. 
Oats, 

o«t». 

Oats, 
Oats, 
No. 2 
No. 2 
No. 3 
No. 1 
No. 1 
No. 1 
No. 1 
N». 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No 



I car 

r;:r. 



t W 



1 

- 'A 

: 'A 

■ ■'•■', 
!"...", i ' vV. 
cam. 4 \V. . . . 
car 4 W 

ear. 4 W , . . 

ear. 4 • \V . . . . , 

1 car. nil grade. 

rye. 3 earn. tii'» 



slaiuetl . . . . 
very E« tly . . 



r>- 



cnr,s . . 
.-.'Id l.u. 



gra<le. 

to arrive 

tti a.Tive 

•irrUe Sept 

•.'. arrive Sept. . 
o arrhe 



I 
1 
1 

1 a... 

1 d'lnim. 

1 <h.nii;i. 

$ ■■ 
gre 



■ ■■*. 

•ja. 



arri\e. . . 
•jrive . . . 



i". 



(•,U('0 

:< cars . . 

., '-irx . . 
. 1 .ar. 



to arrive. 



.S7\i 

.»:■% 

.U 

.87% 

.87% 

.87>4 

.87H 

.87Vi 

.8B% 

.87% 

.8T>4 

.87% 

.881^ 

.»«% 

.«« 

.47 

.48 

.50 

.52 

.8IH 

.84H 

.84% 

.84% 

.84% 

.84% 

.88% 

.81% 

.81% 

.83 
.84% 
.8« 
.84% 
.85% 
.84 
.80 
.84% 
.80% 
.86 
.53 
.45 
.49 
.49 
.50 
.51 
.48 
.49 
.45 
.47 
42 
.4« 
.44 
.53 
.30% 
.2t<% 

. :w-i 
..to% 

.3l>% 

.Sl% 

.31% 

.31% 

.31% 

.30% 

.80% 

.31 

.31 '4 

.30'% 

.yti'i. 

.30% 

.n 

.63 
.62% 
1.71 

i.ri 

1.71 
.85 
.85 
.S4% 
.84% 
.84% 
.83 
.84% 
.81% 
.83 



AMERICAN WHEAT MARKETS, SEPTEMBER 9, 1912. 

Sent — Open High. Low. (.lose. Kept. 7. Y'r ago. 

Duluth 87£a 87% M% .8«%b .87%% l.W^a 

Mlnnlapoiis':::: .M% M\'% .84H-% .M%b "f.^J:^*' ^-^^.^t' 

Chicago 90-Vk .90% .90 .S>0%t> .»0%fc .1»^% 

WinnU^^g.'d^^^^^ .88% ."% .87%-%b .«»-%a .»»%«> 

DuluVl?"*'."'*'.*'.'^. . .S7%a .87% .8«%.87a .87b .87%-% l.oa%a 

Minneapolis S7%-^ .87% .87 -tl^.-^^ 11^^ 'V^T^. 

Chicago lK)%-iI .90% .H9H •**?>:'*"" •?k.^'* uV^'J^^ 

Winnipeg 85% .8&%b .84%K .»4%b .»bb .»7%b 

Duhuh^~ .»2% W* -"^a .»2%n 

Minneapolis 92%-% .•2% .91%-»2 .»2%-%b .»2%t, 

Chicago 94%-% .94% •»< % •J'^% ■»<•>•»» 

DULUTH DURUM MARKET. 

Open. High. Low. Close. Sept. 7. Y'r ago. 

Sept 86%a .1*6% .83% .83%b .»«%a 1.0l%a 

Oct 85a .86 .82% .82%b .8D%a 

Nov .84 .82% .82%n .85%n 

DULUTH LINSEED MARKET. 

Open. High. Low. Close. Sept. 7. Vr ago. 

Sept 1.71'Tta 1.71% 170 1.70 1.71 Vi ,^.40 

Oct 1.62 %a 1.63 1.61 1.61b 1.63 2.16a 

Nov 1.61 1.61% 1.60 1.60a 1.61% 2.1b 

Dec 1.58 %a 1.68% 1.57a 1.57b 1.59 i-Un 

Duluth close: New wheat — On track: No. 1 northern. 87%c; No. 2 north- 
ern }«4»4c; No 1 northern to arrive. 8e%c; Montana No. 2 hard to arrive, 85%c; 
No. 3 spring. 81 %c; September, 86%c bid; December, 87c bid; May. 92c asked. 
IHirum— On track: No. 1. 83%c; No. 2, 81%c. To arrive: No. 1. 83%c; No. 2. 
81 %c, September. 83 %c bid. October, 82 %c bid; November, 82'% c nominal; De- 
cember, 83c. Linseed — On track, northern. $1.75; northern to arrive Sept. 12, 
1171 September $1.70; October, $161 bid; November. $160 askea; December, 
$1.57 bid. Oats, on track. 31 %c. to arrive. 31 %v. Kye. on track. 63c; to ar- 
rive 63c 

Elevator receipts of domestic grain — Wheat. 366.713 bu, last year 236,»4» 
bu: barlev. 105,284 bu, last year 111.983 bu; hax. none, last year 3,302 bu; rye. 
ati,268 bu." last year 9,267 bu; oats. 28.240 bu. last year 3,077 bu; corn, none, last 
year 14.371 bu. 

Shipments of domestic grain — 'WTheat. 106.000 bu, last year 172,296 bu; oats, 
none, last year 4.500 bu; barley, none, last year 555 bu; rye none, last year 6»< 
bu. tlax. 8,599 bu. last year 9,972 bu. 

Elevator receipts of bonded grain — Wheat. 100 bu, last year 7,472 bu. 

Shipments of bonded grain — Wlieat, 51,954 bu, last year none. 



of the arrivals new seed. The trade 
conditions affecting the demand for 
linseed oil are quiet, and such are 
likely to prevail until the supply posi- 
tion if flax becomes more liberal. In 
the local market the No. 1 seed has 
been selling at the Duluth September 
price." 

• « • 

American primaries: Wheat — Receipts 
today. 3.103,000 bu.; last year. 1.514,000 
bu; shipments today. 1.130.000 bu; last 
year, 633.000. Corn — Receipts today. 
764.000 bu; last year. 816.000 bu: ship- 
ments today. 734.000 bu; last year, 
421,000 bu. 

Clearances — Wheat, 672,000 bu; flour, 
29,000 bu; corn, 4.000 bu; oats. 213,000 
bu.; wheat and flour. 803.000 bu. 

• • • 
Government report: Condition of 

corn. 81.1; spring wheat, 90.8; produc- 
tion of hay 72,000.000. 

• • • 

Duluth car inspection: Wheat — No. 
1 northern, 232; No. 2 northern. 68: No. 
3. 22; rejected. 2; no grade, 240: durum. 
218; winter, 14; mixed, 8; total wheat, 
804: last year. 313; oats, 39; last year, 
11; barley, 135; last year. 106; rye. 33 
last year. 7; flax, none; 
corn, 2; last year. 1; total 
1.013; on track, 665. 

• • • 

The followwing is from 
"The government report 
onl condition Sept. 1 for corn and con- 
dition when harvested of spring, wheat 
and oats. It does not give any yield 
per acre returns for wheat or oats. On 
the basis of our own local reports the 
government today should show a con- 
dition of corn between 80 and 81, which 
will be figured as indicating above 2.- 
900,000,000 bu. The condition of spring 
wheat should show between 90 and 91. 
and be taken as indicating about 300,- 
000.000 bu. The condition of oats 
should stand at about 91, which will 
be figured as Indicating about 1,260.- 
000,000 bu. Next month estimates of 
yield per acre will be made and thrash- 
ing results will show spring wheat 
more than a bushel per acre above pres 
ent Indication and oats nearly five 
bushels above." 




The following replies were received 
today to the crop inquiries sent out by 
The Herald: 

.\da, Norman county, Minn. — Wheat 
and flax crops are good. Spring wheat 
runs 10 to 27 bu to the acre, with an 
average of 17 bu; flaxseed 8 to 16 bu. 
with an average of 11, and barley 16 
to 40 bu, with an average of 27 bu. No 
flaxseed has yet been thrashed, as 
there is too much rain. 

Heron Lake. Jackson county. Minn. — 
Our spring wheat is grading mostly 
No. 3. It is very poor, running 7 to 12 
bu to the acre, with an average of 10. 
Flax is good, grading mostly No. 1, 
but the acreage is small. It runs 10 to 
15 bu to the acre, with an average of 
12 bu. Barley is badly colored, run- 
ning 20 to 60 bu to the acre, with an 
average of 35 bu. Oats are fine. 

Fredonla. Billings county, N. D. — 
Wheat and flax crops are good. Spring 
wheat runs 15 to 25 bu to the acre, 
durum 20 to 35 bu. flaxseed 15 to 20 
bu. and barley 20 to 40 bu. 

RoUa. RoUette county, N. 
thrashing has yet been done 
account of the late harvest 
much rain. 

Fessenden. Wells county. N. D. — The 
wheat crop Is good. Spring wheat Is 
running 10 to 20 bu to the acre and 
durum 16 to 25 bu. Barley is running 
25 to 80 bu to the acre. The flax crop 
is fair. 

Carrlngton, Foster county. N. D. — 
The quality of spring wheat is good 
and It Is running about 22 bu to the 
acre. Barley is yielding about 25 bu 
to the acre. Flaxseed looks good for 
10 bu if there Is no frost. 

I'emblna, Pembina county. N. D. — 
The rains and bad weather of the last 
week have done a great deal of dam- 
age to small grains, which have started 
to sprout. Wheat looked well before 
the rains. Spring wheat is yielding 
8 to 20 bu to the acre. The 
crop looks good. None is yet 
but it will probably go about 
the acre. Barley is thrashing 
bu to the acre. 

Bowbells, Burke county, N. D. — 
Sping wheat looks well, and is run- 
ning = *- *> = 



D.— No 
here on 
and too 



last year, 4; 
of all grains. 



B. W. Snow 
today gives 



flaxseed 
thrashed 
12 bu to 
25 to 30 



5 to 26 bu to the acre. 



D. — The 

Spring 

bu to the 

bu. The 



A GOOD FIRM TO SHIP 
YOUR GRAIN TO 

ATWOOD-URSON 
COMPANY, Inc. 

Special attention given to cash 
grains. We glv© all shltmenta our 
personal attention. 




MINNEAPOLIS. 



SHIP* TO 



POEHLER 



CO. 



Established 1865. 

GRAIN COIVIA^ISSIO.M 

MINNEAPOLIS. DULUTH. 



25 bu. The flax crop is very spotted, 
An early frost will get about 76 per 
cent of it The yield will be 4 to 6 bu 
to the acre, averaging 5 bu. Barley 
Is running 15 to 60 bu to the acre, 
with an average of 25 bu. 

Minot. Ward county, N. 
wheat crop looks A No. 1. 
wheat Is thrashing 20 to 30 
lacre with an average of 23 
flax crop looks good, having made 
great progress during the last month. 
None has yet been thrashed. Barley is 
running 40 to 60 bu to the acre. 

Bismarck. Burleigh county. N. D.^ 
The spring wheat crop is lair, running 
15 to 30 bu to the acre, with an acerage 
of 20 bu. ^, ^ ^^ 

Napoleon. Logan county. N. D. — The 
wheat crop is good. Spring wheat is 
thrashing 15 to 25 bu to the acre, with 
an average of 20, and durum is running 
the same. The flax crop is poor. In 
some parts of the county it is bllgljted 
on one side. It will run about 6 to 12 
bu to the acre, with an average of 
about 8. Barley is thrashing 30 to 60 
bu to the acre, with an average of 40. 

De Smet, Kingsbury county, S. D. — 
The velvet chaff wheat is quite smutty. 
Spring wheat is running 20 to 26 bu 
to the acre. Barley is running 40 to 
45 bu to the acre. The flax crop looks 
good. 

Rudolph, Brown county, S. D. — The 
wheat crop Is good. Spring wheat is 
running 12 to 28 bu to the acre with 
an average of 18. There is no acreage 
of flax to speak of. 

Wilmot, Roberts county. S. D. — The 
wheat crop is good. Spring wheat is 
going 15 to 33 bu to the acre, with an 
average of 26; durum, 20 to 35 bu to 
the acre, with an average of 28 bu. and 
barley 30 to 40 bu to the acre, with an 
average of 35 bu. The flaxseed crop Is 
fair but there is none thrashed yet. 

Mitchell. Davidson county, S. D. — 
Spring wheat Is running 10 to 12 bu 
to the acre. It has been damaged by 
too much rain. The fla.xseed crop is 
good and will run 8 to 12 bu to the 
acre. The crop of oats is light and 
none is coming to the market. 

Webster, Day county. S. D. — The 
v/heat crop is extra good. Spring 
wheat is running 10 to 40 bu to the 
acre with an average of 17 bu, and 
durum wheat 15 to 40 bu. with an 
average of 20 bu. The flax crop Is 
good and will run 8 to 15 bu to the 
acre with an average of 15. Barley is 
thrashing 30 to 40 bu to the acre and 
averaging 35 bu. On the whole the 
grain crops are the best this section 
ever had. 

Hardin. Yellowstone county, Mont. — 
There is a big acreage of wheat and 
the qualitv is good. Spring wheat Is 
averaging 30 bu to the acre and durum 
wheat 35 bu to the acre. The flax crop 
l» good, running about 12 bu to the 
acre. This is the first year flaxseed 
has been cultivated to any consider- 
able extent In this district. Barley Is 
running 35 bu to the acre. 

• « • 
Grain stocks in local elevators: 

Wheat— No. 1 northern, 623,302 bu; No. 
2 northern. 213,370 bii; No. 3. 1.234 bu: 
no grade, 7,506 bu: special bin. 354.- 
l.'n bu: durum. 409,142 bu; bonded, 78,- 
€;*!> bu; total. 1.687,458 bu; increase, 
ii..iT!f"stlc, 1,129.823 bu; Increase, bonded, 
iz^l'i bu; total increase, 1,142,636 bu; 
total vear ago. 1,658.160 bu. Oat-s — 
Ponded. 52.867 bu: domestic. 82,272 bu; 
ti.tal. 135.139 bu; domestic, increase, 56,- 
ntt bu. Rve — Domestic, 280,476 bu; 
Imrease, 169.309 bu. Barley — Bonded, 
"M '*21 bu; domestic, 574.205 bu; total, 
f.u\ 426 bu: domestic. 261,480 
Bonded. 6.191 bu; domestic, 
total. 38,672 bu; decrease, 
190,175 bu. 

• « • 
The Minneapolis Commercial West 

<»av8- "The wants of the crushers In 
the flaxseed market are rathfr limited. 
Thev are waiting for a freer move- 
rrent of the new crop. The receipts 
are moderate, but there Is considerable 



Cars of wheat received: 

Duluth 

averaging i Minneapolis 



Saturday 



and 



Sunday 
804 
909 
26 
183 
608 



Tear 

ago. 
313 
428 
93 
137 
217 
93,000 



Winnipeg 

Chicago . . . 

Kansas City 

St. Louis, bu 396,000 

• • • 

Saturday and Year 
Cars of linseed received: Sunday, ago, 

Duluth 4 

Minneapolis ' 25 30 

Winnipeg 6 

Foreign closing cables: Liverpool — 
Wheat. 3:18 p. m.. %d lower. Berlin — 
Wheat. %c higher. Budapest — Wheat, 
%c higher. 

• • • 

Minneapolis Indemnities: September 
puts, 86 %c; calls, 88 %c. 

• • • 

Liverpool stocks: Wheat, this week, 
1,856,000 bu; last week, 1,968,000 bu; 
last year, 2,603,000 bu; corn, this 
week, 86,000 bu; last week, 60,000 bu; 
last year, 2,032,000 bu. 

• • • 

On passage: Wheat — This week, 
37,112,000 bu; last week. 33,144,000 bu; 
last year, 33,024,000 bu. Corn — This 
week, 33,066.000 bu; last week, 32,- 
689.000 bu; last year. 6.951.000 bu. 

• • • 

Total world shipments: Wheat — Last 
week, 14.352,000 bu; previous week. 
13.466,000 bu; last year. 11.866,000 bu. 
Corn— Last week, 7.173.000 bu; prev- 
ious week. 6.368.000 bu; last year, 2.- 
525,000 bu 

• • • 

The official wheat report of Ger- 
many says the quantity raised is sat- 
isfactory but the quality is not. Oats 
have been seriously damaged. 



MINNEAPOLIS MARKET. 



Wheat Is in Narrow Range 
Touches Now Low Marks. 



and 



Minneapolis, 
was in narrow 
lows on this 
Local receipts 

'.4 r - 



h^i^at 



to 



started a shade 

32%®82%c. and 

hold within tkose 



r j>n 

sfTt 

77Vi^or lard, 
iln: wheat — 



rovlsions ragged from 

to 12%c lower, with 

or pork, 10.72% to 

~ and $10.15 for 



waa small, 
to %&>Ac h' 
seemed disposed 
limits. m> 

First sales fr , 
unchanged pric< 
January $18.96 
$10.75^10.77 
rlb». ^ 

Cash grain: wheat — No. 2 red, $1.03 
©1.04%; No . 3 re d, 94c@$1.03; No, 2 
hard. ^l%efliiH>o, 3 hard, 90@>91%c; 
No. 1 northern. 9JJ6'93c; No. 2 northern. 
88691c; No. Sf northern. 84@88c; No, 2 
spring. 88^91f;^o. 3 spring. 84^88c; 
No. 4 spring, liHl 87c; velvet chfjf, 86 
©91c; durun1!*tfl>92c. 

Corn — No-2-j8%@79c; No. 2 white. 
SOCf/^-Slc; Nan yellow. 78%®79%c; 
No. 3. 78>4&ilRir^: No. 3 white, 80%© 
80%c; No. 3 yellow. 78%(&79c; No. 4. 
77%©78c: No. 4 white, 79%@80c; No. 4 
yellow. 78®7$%c, 

Oats — No? 2 white, 34% ©35c; No, 8 
white, 32i4©33%c; No. 4 white. 31%© 
32%c; standard. 32%©34%c. 

No. 2 rye. 6Sr. Barley. 45®72c. 



rve 
Timothy, $2.50®4.25. 
$12.00©17,50. 



Clover seed. 



When- 


- open. 


irifh. 


Low. 


Clone. 


8«I>t . . . 


. .«o-% 


.90H 


90 


.9V% 


D«c ... 


■ .90% 


■ .90% 


.89% 


.89% -90 


May ... 


■ (•4H-H 


.94% 


.04% 


.04% 


Corn— 










SrVt ... 


. .T.SH-H 


.73% 


.78 


.73% 


Dec ... 


. .54%-% 


.54%- 


% .53% 


.53% -54 


Mior . 


• .52\-% 


.53% 


.51% 


.&S 


Otta— 










8<i>t ... 


. .32% 


.32% 


.31%-% 


.31% 33 


Deo ... 


. .ii%-% 


.32% 


.32% 


.32%-% 


Mur ... 


. .34K-M 


.S4%- 


% .34% 


.34%-% 


Pork— 










Sept ... 





IT.IO 


IT. 02% 


17.10 


Oct .,., 


.IT. 15-17% 


17.22% 


17.12% 


17.22% 


Jan .... 


.18.90-93 


18.95 


18.85 


18.90 


l*rd— 










Sept ... 


• . . 


11.15 


11.10-12% 


11.12% 


Oct .... 


.11.17% 


11 20 


11.12% 


11.15 


Dec ,,, 


.10.80-82% 


10 82% 


10.72%-T5 


10.72%-T5 


Jan .,., 


10.72%-;7%10.77% 


10.67% 


10.07% 


Short 


Hlha— 








Sept . ,. 


.10.77% 


10. M 


10.70 


10.80 


Otl ... 


10.82%-a3 


10.9i% 


10.82% 


10.82% 


Jan 


.10.13 

New 


10.15 


10.10 


10.10-12% 




f York 


Grain. 




New 


York. Sept, 9.- 


—Close: Wheat — 


September, $1.00%: December, 


98 %C. 



LiTcn»ool GralB. 

Liverpool, Sept. 9. — Wheat — Spot, 
steady; No. 1 Manitoba, 8s 5%d: No, 2 
Manitoba, 88 4d; No. 3 Manitoba, 88 2d; 
futures, firm; October, 7s 6%d; Decem- 
ber, 78 4%d. 

Corn — Kpot, quiet; American mixed, 
old, 7s 3%d; new American kiln dried, 
78 2%d; futures, steady; September, 58 
3%d; December, 56 %d. 
« m 

Corn and Wheat Bulletin. 

For the tweuty-foitf hours ending at 8 a. m.. Moa- 

day: 



bu. Flnx — 

32,481 bu; 

domestic. 



SELL TO ARRIVE ON BULGES 

C. C. WYMAN & CO. 



MILUTH 



BRAIN COMMISSION 



MINNEAPOLIS 



Minn.. Sept. 9. — Wheat 
range, but easier. New 
crop were registered, 
heavy. September closed 
%c lower than Saturday: Decem- 
ber %(g>%c lower and May %@%c 
lower. Local elevator stocks decreased 
300.000 bu for two days. 

Cash wheat In good demand: market 
a trifle firmer. No, 1 northern sold 
for 1(5 2%c above September. 

Millstuffs — ShlpmentF. 2,595 tons. De- 
mand strong. 

Wheat — September opened 84%® 86c; 
high. 85%&85%c; low. 84%@S4%c; 
closed. 84%c; December opened 87%c to 
8714c; high, 87%c: low. 87%©87%c; 
May opened 92%c to 92 '4c; high, 92%c; 
low. 91%e92c; closed, 92%@92%c. 

Closing cash — No. 1 hard. 87 %c; No. 
1 northern. 85%li86T6c; to arrive. 
85 %c: No. 2 northern. 81%@84%c; No. 2 
hard Montana. 84%c; No, 3 wheat. 79% 
$81%c. No 3 yellow corn. 73c: No, 3 
white oats. 30c. No, 2 rye, 62@63c. 
Bran in 100-pound sacks. $20. 

Flour — Market strong and active. 
Shipments, 53.512 bbls. First patents, 
$4.35'S'4,65; second patents. $4,20(&4,55; 
first clears. $3.20^3.50; second clears. 
$2.30(@2.60. 

Flax — Receipts. 25 cars: year agof 30; 
shipments, none. Demand continued 
active. Closing price. $1.72(5)1.74. 

Barley-s-Re«elpts, 204 cars; year ago, 
2S1; shipments, 65. Demand good. 
Closing range, 40® 66c. 



CHICAGO MARKET. 



Wheat Gets Below 90 Cents for the 
First Time This Season. 

Chicago. Sept. 9. — For the first time 
this season wheat today dropped below 
90c a bu. Primary arrivals for the week 
were the largest on record for the 
present time of the year. The opening 
was unchanged to %c lower, December 
started at 90c to 90xc. varying from 
%c lower to %c up. and declined to 
89%i&'89%c. 

Only a feeble rally ensued. The close 
was .steady, %(&%c net lower for De- 
cember, at 89%^ 90c. 

I^ecember corn opened %®%c down 
at 54',<ii>54%c. but rallied to 54%c. 

The market hardened a little fur- 
ther but then slipped back with wheat. 
The dose was easy with December % 
(&%c net lower, at B3''^(S;54c. 

Bidding up of the September deliv- 
ery made other options in oats rela- 
tively firm, although actually business 



STATIONS. 



state of 
Weather 



Temperature 



Miniieapolla It . Cloudy 

Alexandria .Pt Cloudy 

Crookaton Cloudy 

Detroit City ,.,,.. .Cloudy 

HalaUd Rain 

MuiiteTldeo l»t. Cloudy 

New nm Cloudy 

Park Itaplda Pt, Cloudy 

Rochcvter Pt, Cloudy 

Wtnnebaco City Cloudy 

WortblDfton Clear 

Atierdeeo :..,. Clear 

.MlUbank Qoudy 

.Mitchell t Cloudy 

rollotk Cloudy 

Kedfleld Ooudy 

Biom Palla near 

81»e»on Clear 

Watertown Pt, Cloudy 

Yanktou Pi. Cloudy 

Amenta Cloudy 

BdwIielU Clear 

DlckliuKM) Pt. Cloudy 

Fesstiiden Cloudy 

C.rarton Pt. CIoud> 

JameHtown Cloudy 

Laiigduu Ooudy 

I.ariaiore Hear 

LtatKjii Cloudj- 

Mtnot Pi. Cloudy 

Napolenn RaliUcB 

Peniliina Clear 

Watii^ton '.-... ; .Cloudy 

lUlliiigH Clear 

SOuluth Cloudy 

{.Moorlirad Cloudy 

J«t. Paul .^ '..Clear 

{La C*roafi« . ..,i.';^'.v..v.. .Cftar 

lllurou Cloudj 

IPierre Cloujiy 

JRapld City Cloudy 

t Hlsmari k * . . . Clear 

jltevUs Lake Cloudy 

KJraiid Forka ....' Clouily 

JWlUlnton <*lear 

JHafre y Hear 

SMUee nty , .,,Clear 

tlWinnlrec Pi. Cloudy 

tJQu'.Viwelle Cloudy 



94 

94 
88 
94 
92 
98 
0« 
93 
92 
04 
88 
94 
96 
94 
82 
06 
94 
flO 
04 
»6 
00 
72 
80 
76 
80 
74 
70 
82 
04 
74 
T8 
76 
100 
64 
6fl 
84 
»4 

06 
81 
74 
78 

74 

70 
66 

72 
68 



B 



Rain- 
fall, 






Co 



74 
C6 
60 
83 

.^8 

64 

72 
66 
T2 
70 
72 
50 
60 
62 

m 

60 
60 
60 
69 
66 
«0 
42 
46 
1,2 
66 
54 
52 
56 
60 
46 
52 
50 
54 
36 
68 
62 
72 
72 
64 
62 
58 
50 
54 
60 
4« 
46 
46 
56 
44 



.22 

.06 

.74 

.04 

.26 









.01 









.02 










.94 



» 





.04 



.10 
.02 
.10 






.16 








REMAKK8— Showen fell o»er Iowa. Northern Wls- 
eonaln. Mliinwola, the Eaatem Oakotaa, Haskatcfae- 
waii and Alt>«rta: hot weather prevailed In the lower 
tUaaourl, upper Mtaalisippi and Ohio > alley tttatea. 
U. W. KU-HAHnsON, 
lAcal Forecaaler. 



LOSSES ARE 
RECOVERED 

Bank Statement and Mexican 

Situation Cause Heaviness 

in Stocks. 



Declines Regained on Buy- 
ing, Due to Government 
Crop Report. 



New York, Sept. 9. — Last week's bank 
statement which showed the surplus 
reserve to be a very nominal figure, 
and the Mexican situation, were held 
accountable for the comparative heavi- 
ness of today's market. 

Harrlmans. which sold ex-dividend 
and Reading were mildly pressed for 
sale, with less pressure against Hill 

Canadian Pacific rose on rumors that 
opposition to the stock Increase had 
been overcome. Coppers, and steel were 
under restraint, probably In connec- 
tion with the forthcoming statement of 
operations for August. 

Among specialties Sears-Roebuck 
and Goodrich were conspicuous for 
gains of 6 to 5 points respectively. 
Bonds were steady. 

Three-point rise in Sears-Roebuck 
and 1 point in China Copper 
were offset at the opening of 
today's stock market by weakness in 
Union Pacific, American Smelting and 
a few other active issues. Price 
changes in the main, however, were 
limited to fractions, with a slight pre- 
ponderance of gains. 

Canadian Pacific was the only rail 
road stock that figured to any extent 
In the early demonstration of strength. 
Speculation otherwise ran to special- 
ties. 

Dullness checked the decline at mid- 
day, but recoveries were of little con- 
sequence. Coppers were unaffected by 
producers* reports showing a decrease 
for August of 3,579.047 pounds. 

The market closed irregular. Buy- 
ing increased on the government crop 
report and there was a pretty gener- 
al recovery of earlier losses. Colorado 
Fuel and the Tobacco issues were con- 
spicuously strong. 

New York stork quotatlonx furnished b; Gay A 
Stureia, 326 West Suturlor streK. 



STOCKS— 



I Ulglt-I Low. I Close. ISept, 7 



{.Not Included In the dtoiriet arerate. | — Mazl- 
mum of yesterday. mlDlmum of laat nlcbt. •— Hlch- 
tal ytaterday. t— Lowest for twenly-fuur boura, end- 
ing 8 a. m.. sererty- fifth meridian time. 

NOTE— The a»era«e hi^hert and lowest temper- 
atures are made up at each ceuter from the actual 
number of reports reoelied, and the average precipl- 
taUon from the utimbcr of statlona reporting 0.10 
Inch or more. The "aUte of weather" la Uut prs- 
vaUlng at lUne of ofaMTtaUoib 
* 

South St. Paul Llveatock. 

South St Paul, Minn.. Sept. 9. — Cat- 
tle — Receipts, 4.800; killers' steady to 
strong; steera |6.00@8.25; cows-heif- 
ers. $3.25@6.00; calves, 25c higher; 
$3.50^9.50; feeders' steady to lO^'lSc 
higher. . f3.5a®6.76. Hogs — Receipts. 
500; steady to lOc higher; range, $8.2o 
©8 50; bulk. $8.40@8.45. Sheep — Re- 
ceipts, 3,100; steady to 25c lower; 
lambs, $3.00Ct'6. 26;- wethers, |3.50@4.00; 
ewes, |1,35(&3,65. . 

Mld^mr Horse Market. 

Minnesota Transfer, St. Paul, Sept, 9— Barrett & 
ZlnimcnDaa report: The demand cmtered on good 
big young draft bi rses auHable for heavy hauling and 
work In the logging c«aa«. SlilpmetiU were made 
to Benildji. Bena. CUmuet and Uululh. Minn., and 
Iron Hlver and WUoeier. Wis. Iteceipta liniltfd. 
Mules and common classes of horses found few tak- 
ers. Values aa follow: .,^^„,- 

nrafter*. extra ' 2Sf ?SS 

Vnltvn. choice „?^,,? 

Drafters, common to good ' *'^ i? 

Farm mares and horses, extra 140(^/180 

Farm mares and horses, choice 115(pl40 

Fano horses, common to good 70^113 

DeUtery 12»@,210 

Privets and saddleis 'J?^.1?S 

Mules, according to slzfr. • IjO&HQ 

• ' • 

Cklcaso Livestock. 

Oiicagn Kept, it— Cattle— Rec»iptJ, 20,000; market 
Bteadv shade up; beeves. $;.7.-.(ji 10,70; Texas steers, 
$4 75e6:»0; vregtern steer*. $5 S't" 9.15; stocktrs and 
feeders $4 25g"7.1j; cows and heifers, $3.00®8.10; 
calv« '$8.50@11.75. Hog*-Uec«.lptj.. 29.030; market 
slow "generally ."ic abi.ve Saturday; light, $8.50® 
e 20- mixe^l, |8.00fey.;iO; lieavy. »8.80<a8.90; rough. 
$7 86e8 00- pigs, fSi'yfeS.M: bulk of sales, 18.20 
6 8 85 Sheep— Kecni)t». 40.OC0; market steady to 
strong- native. $S 40^4 65; westeni, $3.50(6 475; 
yearUn'gs, $4.6J«!(5.65; lambs, native. $4.70@7.25; 
western. $4.25^7.35. 

Wew York Money. 

New York. Sept. 9. — Money on call 
Rtronjr 3^4 per cent; ruling rate. 4: 
closing bid. 3%; offered at 4. Time 
loans strong; 60 days. 5 per cent and 
90 days. 5; six months, 6(@)5>/4. Close — 
Prime mercantile paper, 6% to 6 per 
cent. Sterling exchange easy with 
actual business in bankers bills at 
4 8335 for 60-day bills, and at 4.8635 
for demand. Bar sliver, 62i4c. Mex- 
ican dollars. 48i'ijC. Government bonds, 
steady; railroad bonds, steady. 



Amalgamated 

Anaconda '. 

American Cotton Oil 

American Telephone Co. . 

American Beet 8ugar 

American Snieltiiig 

American Locomotive .... 

Atchison 

Baltimore & Ohio 

Brooklyn Kapid Transit... 

Canadian PacUlc 

Car Foundry 

Colorado Fuel & Iron 

Chesapeake & Ohio 

Consolidated (ias 

Central Leather 

American Can 

Krle 

Erie let 

(iri>at Noriliem pfd 

Cirtat Noriliem Ore 

General Kle<-tric 

(iuggeiihelmer 

InterborougU 

do pfd 

I/ehigh 

I.x>ulsvUle & NashviUe 

Missouri, Kansas & Tata*. 

Missouri Pacific 

New York Central 

Northern Pacttlc 

Norfolk aiid Wo6t«?m 

National Lead .*. 

Ontario & Western 

Pennsylvania 

People's Gas 

Pressed bletl 

Betldehem Steel 

Keadlug 

Kock Island 

Ilepublic Steel & Iron 

Hutiber 

Southern Pacific 

Sugar 

Southern HaUway 

St Paul 

Texas OU 

Union Pacific 

Stoel common 

do pfd 

Virginia Cbemical 

Westliighouse 



88^4 
46% 
56% 

144% 
74% 
86% 
43% 

108% 

106% 
90% 

275% 
•1% 
3S 
80% 

145% 
30% 
40% 
36% 
53% 

139% 
46% 

182% 
59 
19% 
58% 

167% 

162% 
28% 
40% 

115 

127% 

iie% 

60% 

37% 
124% 
116% 

37 

40% 
169% 

26 

27% 

51% 
110% 
126% 

30 
107 
130 
169% 

7S% 
113 

4«% 

88% 



87% 
45% 
5«% 

143% 
74% 
85% 
43% 

107% 

106% 
89% 

174 
61% 
33% 
79% 

145 
30% 
39% 
85% 
52% 

138% 
46 

182 
59 
19% 
58% 

167 

162% 
28% 
40% 

114% 

126% 

116% 
60% 
37% 

124 

116% 
37 
40% 

168 
25% 
27% 
51% 

109% 

126% 
29% 

106 

129% 

169% 
72% 

112% 
46 
87% 



88 
46% 
56% 
144 

74% 
86% 
43% 

108% 

106% 
9) 

174% 
61% 
34% 
80 

145 
30% 
39% 
36% 
52% 

139% 
46 

182 
50 
19% 
58% 

167% 

162% 
28% 
40% 

115 

12C% 

110% 
00% 
37% 

124 

116% 
37 
40% 

168% 
25% 
27% 
51% 

109% 

126% 
20% 

107 

129% 

169 
78 

112% 
4« 
87% 



88% 
46% 
50% 

144% 
74% 
86% 
4« 

108% 

106% 
91% 

273% 
61% 
33% 
80% 

145% 
31 

3'J% 
3«% 
53% 

138% 
4«% 

182% 
59 
19% 
68% 

167% 

lO'J 
28% 
41 

115 

127% 

116% 
00% 
37% 

124 

116% 
37% 
40% 

169% 
25% 
27% 
51% 

111% 

126% 
29% 

106% 

IbO 

172 
73% 

112% 
47 
88% 



Total sales. 290,900. 



BOSTON COPPER STOCKS 



'I'he Button stock quotations furuitiiied liy Gay A 
Sturgls, 326 West Superior street. 



Listed Stock* — 



Bid. I Asked. 



!••••»• 



London Stocks. 

London, Sept. 9. — American securities 
opened steady and anout unchanged 
today Trading was light and prices 
moved Irregularly during the first 
hour. At noorj- the inarket was steady 
with" values ranglrig from % to % be- 
low Saturday's .New York closing. 



Cotton ' Market. 

New York, Sppt: 9— The cotton mar- 
ket opened firm ai an advance of 9 to 
17 points. Realising was extremely 
heavy around th* opening prices. The 
market eased -off «hortly after the call 
and during th**.' middle of the morning 
was nervous and*'-' unsettled within a 
point or two af Saturday's closing fig- 

""^Futures clogWd steady: Closing bids: 
September, ll,l4; October, 11.32; No- 
vember 11.40; December, 11.54; Janu- 
ary 11.44; fVahruary, 11.49; March, 
11.57; May, ll.^i; iuly. n.67. 

Spot closed Tquifst: middling uplands. 
11.75; middlin^F- ftulf, 12.00. Sales, 100 
bal«& ^ 



Adventure . 

Ahmeek ..•••• 

Algomah 

Allouez 

Amalgamated 

Arizona Commercial .. 

Boston & Corbln 

Butte & Ballaklava. . . 

Butte & Superior 

Chlno 

Calumet & Arizona.... 

Calumet & Hecla 

Centennial 

Copper Range 

Daly West 

East Butte 

Franklin 

Glroux 

Granby 

Greene Cananea 

Hancock 

Indiana 

Inspiration 

Isle Royale 

Keweenaw 

Lake .....*..*.••••••• 

La Salle 

Mayflower 

Mass •....•••■... 

Miami • 

Michigan 

Mohawk 

Nevada Consolidated . 

Nlpissing 

North Butte 

North Lake 

Old Dominion 

Ojibway 

Osceola 

Pond Creek 

Quincy 

Ray Consolidated . . . 

Shannon 

Shattuck 

Shoe Machinery 

Superior & Boston... 

Superior Copper 

Swift 

Tamarack 

Tuolumne 

U. S Mining common. 
Utah Consolidated . . . 

Utah Copper 

Victoria 

Winona 

Wolverine 

Zinc 

UnllHtcd Stocks — 
Arizona & Michigan... 

Bay State Gas i- 

Begole 

Bohemia 

Boston Ely 

Cactus 

Calaveras 

Calumet & Corbm 

Chemung 

Chief Consolidated • . • 

Corbin Copper 

Cortez 

Crown Reserve 

Davis Daly 

Dobie 

Dome Extension 

First National 

Goldfield Consolidated 

Hollinger 

I^ Rose • • • 

Mines Co of America, 

Montana 

New Baltic 

Ohio Copper 

Oneco 



8 

3 

6% 

4 

8 

6 

6% 

sy* 

49Vi 
43»4 
81Mi 
660 
20 
58 

4H 
13% 
10% 

6% 
66>4 

9% 
27 
18% 
18% 
34% 

1 
36 

6 
13 

7 
29% 

2% 
68 
22% 

8% 
34% 

6% 
60% 

4 
114 
20% 
89 
21% 
16% 
22 
65 

1% 
46% 
107% 
40 

2% 
46% 
11% 
65% 

3 

4 
93 
31 

5c 
22c 
1% 
3% 
1 

9c 
3 

"4% 

1% 
90c I 
90c 



Houghton 

Porcupine Gold 

Raven 

South Lake 

Southwestern Miami ... 

Superior &. Globe 

Temiskamtng 

Tonopah 

Tonopah Belmont 

Tonopah Extension . . . . 
United Verde Extension. 

West End 

Wettlaufer 

Yukon 




Cotton Gin Report. 

Washington, Sept. 9.— The first cot- 
ton ginning report of the census bu- 
reau for the 1912 season, announced to- 
day, shows 729,926 bales ginned prior 
to Sept. 1. 

THE PRODK'e markets. 



8% 
3 

5% 
4 

8 

5% 

7 

3% 
49% 
43% 
81% 
653 
21 
58% 

4% 
13% 
11 

5% 
56% 
10 

27% 
18% 
19 
36 

1% 
36% 

6% 
13% 

7% 
29% 

2% 
68% 
22% 

8% 
34% 

6 
61 

4% 
115 
20% 
90 
22 

16% 
22% 
66% 

ITa 
46% 
107% 
45 

2% 
45% 
12% 
65% 

3% 

4% 
93% 
31% 

16c 

24c 
2 

3% 
1% 

12c 
3 1-16 

10c 



3% 


2 5-16 


12c 


7c 


2 1-16 


3% 


12c 


2% 


1 3 


2c 


2% 


80c 


1% 



1% 

00 
.00 
3% 

7-16 

37c 

16c 
2% 
3% 

13c 
2% 
3% 
2V4C 
2% 

84c 
1% 



Quotations given be4ow indicate what the tetailera 
pay to the vholesaler, except tlie iiay list, vihicb gives 
what the farmers receive from the jobbers. 

OHANGES— 
California valeneiaa, fancy, according to 

size 4.50© 5.00 

CAIJKfUtNIA I„EklONS— 
Extra faiK-y. per box 6. SO 

KltClIB— 

California plums, 4-ba8ket crate 1.50@ 1.6S 

Washington Italian pluma, per 4 -basket 

■ crate 1.2S 

California yellovr free-stone peaches. per 

box 85@ .90 

Wasliington Elberta peaches, per box 80@ .90 

California Bartlett pears, per bu box 2.75 

('alifonila "B" hardy pears 2,25 

Washington pears, per bu box 2.25 

Blue grapes, lu lb baskeU 22® .25 

California white seedless grapes, per crate 1,50 

California Malaga grapes, per crate 1 . 50 

BEKKIES— 

Blueberries, 16-qt case ^ 2, 25 

Blackberries, per lO-Qt case 1.7S@ 2.23 

Puyllup blackberrtee, per 24-qt case 2.75 

APPLES- 

New, 1912 stock, per box 1,50 

Fancy variety applee. bbl S.25@ 3.50 

CraliaitUes, per b^.x 2,25 

WATEUaiEIX)N8— 
lovra and Illinois, each, according to size, ,20® .25 

CANTALOCPER— 

Colorado, staiulard crate 3.00 

Iiuiiana gem melons, per basket 75 

CELERY— 

Kalamazoo, doz ,,..\ 38 

Michigan, 4-doz boxes 1-25 

BANANA8— 
Fort Limon. per lb 04% 

TO-MATOES- 

Red homc-gTQwn, per bu 1.00 

Yellow horao-grown, per bu 1.50 

Green, home-grown, per bu 75 

BUTTEH— 

Creamery, per lb 29 

Dairy, per lb 24® .25 

CHEESE— 

Twins lOH 

New York twim 18 

Block .Swiss, per lb No. 1 19 

Wheel Swiss, per lb 20 

Primoet 07 

Brick chceee, per lb 16 

EtJOS— 
Vteib 24@ .25 

SUOAR— 

Cane granulated pugar, lOO-lb 5.58 

Beet granulated sugar, lOO-lo 5.48 

CAHBAGIi— 
Home-grown cabbage, 100-lb crat« , 1.25 

KRESH VEGETABUiS— 

Minnesota lettuce, head, per bu 1.25 

Beans, green and wax. btt baaketa 1.25 

Parsley, per doz 35 

Garlic, new Italian, per lb 12 

Radishes, per doz •• •*<! 

Minnesota cucumbers, per bu 1 . 00 

Minitesota dill cucumbers, per bu 1.65 

Peppers, per bu 1-25 

Minnesota green onions, per doz 17 

Mini»e«ota uiilnach. per bu 60 

Iowa yellow onions, per 100-lb sack 2. 00 

Iowa red onions, per lOO-lb sack 1.75 

White pickling onions, per bu 2.25® 3.50 

Mlnneeota peas, bu 1-25 

Minnesota cauliflower, per. bu 1.75 

Mlunesota green com, per dos 12 

Bummer squash, per bu 1.25 

Hubbard squash, per doz 1.75 

Pumpldns, ptr doz 1.50 

Minnesota egg plant, per bu 2.00 

Minnesota ground cherriw, pet bu 2.50 

ROOTS- . 

New k>ects, per bu •* 

New carrote. per bu M 

New rutabagas .90 

POTATOES— _ 

New. bu ....40® .45 

Sweet, bu 1-50 

MI8CELLANl':OUS— 

Beans, navy, per bu 8.50 

Bean«, brown, per bu 3.50 

MFK^TH— ,_ 

Beef, per lb 8® .14% 

Mutton, per lb 8® .09 

Pork loins, per lb 15® .16 

Veal, per lb Ofe' -12 

Lamb, per lb li® •" 

Lard, per lb .11* 

PKt».SED POULTRY— 

Hens, per lb 15 

C.eeee. per lb 16 

Dry picked turkeya 22 

Blag roosters 12 

Broilers, per lb 19® .20 

LIVE POULTRY— 

Ileus, per lb H@ .14% 

BroUers. per lb 17@ .19 

Stag roosters 12® .14 

hay- 
No. 1 prairie .$12.00 

No. i prairie -•■• 11. CO 

No. 1 timothy, per ton 14.00 

No. 2 timttliy, per ton 13.00 

No. 1 mixed timothy, per ton 13.00 

No. 2 mixed timothy tiay, per ton 12.50 

» 
ChleWLgO. 

Chicago, Sept. 9.— BuUer— Steady; receipts. 11,202 
tubs; creamery extras, 28c; extra flists. 26>>ic; flrete. 
2SVkc; seconds, 24c: dairy extras, 24Vic; firsU. 23%c; 
seconds. 22Hc; ladles. No. 1. 22c; packing, 2Ic. 
Eggs— Steady; receipts, 9,303 cases; at mark, cases 
included, 17H@18%c; ordinary flrsU, 19c; firsts, 21c. 
Chewe— Steady; daisies, 15\®16c; twins, 15%® 
15Vic; young Americss, 15^®iec; long horns. 15\& 
16c Potatoes— Steady ; receipts, 70 cars; Minnesota 
and Michigan, 45e50c; Wl8a)nsin, 40(«50c. Poultry 
— Live easy; turkeys. 13c; cbickeus, 14 ^c; springs, 
l«c. Veal— UuU. 9®14^4c 



Mink, dark aad brnm T 

Mink, pde S 

Beaver t, 

C*t. nlld 4 

Fiaber, dark S9 

Fisbcr, pate 10. 

Fox, r««l » 

Fox, dark rroaa ti. 

Fox, ptie cn'sa 15. 

Fox, silver dark 400 

Fox. sliver pale 800 

Wolverines T, 

otter, dark »0. 

Otter, pale 12. 

Lynx SO. 

Marten, dark 20. 

Marten, dark brown and pale fl- 

Weasel, wl.lte 1 

Weasel, stained, damaged 

Wolf, timber , 5. 

Bear as to size , 

Badger, civet and bouse cat, cross 



.M 


•.w 


«.!• 


.Sd 


4.M 


t.9% 


.00 


<.0« 


4 


.so 


8.00 


.00 


15.00 


i«.ii$ 


.00 


400 


a 


.00 


«.50 


.00 


20.00 


19.00 


.00 


12.00 


]0,0» 


.00 


4!Hi.«0 


300.00 


00 


20U.0O 


150.0» 


.00 


690 


4.50 


.00 


16.00 


11.0* 


.00 


8.00 


4.0» 


.00 


22.00 


12.0» 


00 


15.00 


10.00 


.50 


5.00 


3.2« 


.00 


.05 


.a* 


20 


IS 


.10 


.00 


3.50 


3.0» 




S®20 


»•• 


and kit Iok. 



COPPER STOCKS 



VERY STEADY 



L.l«4ed Stocka 

American Saginaw . 

B. A. Scott 

Butte Ballaklava . . 
Calumet & Arizona. 



New York. 

New York, Bept. 9.— Butter— Steady: receipts, 8.063 
tubs; creamery extras, 28 14 @ 29c; firsU, 27(&28c: 
state dairy finest. 27®27%c: process extras, 25%® 
26c; flrsts. 24^4^25c; Imitation creamery, firsts, 23 ',4c; 
factory June make flrsts, 23c; current make, firsts, 
22 He. Cheese — Easy; receipts, 806 boxes; state whole 
milk colored, specials. 16gl6%c; do, white, 16c; 
state, whole milk, average fai»cy. lO^c; do, undec- ) CactUS •••••• 

grades, 14fel5\4c; lUisies best, 16Hc; skims. 4(al3c. '■ Copper Queen 
Eggs— nrm; receipts. 1.346 cases; fresh gathered | Denn Arizona 
extras, 27(ti28c; extras, firsts, 25(ct£6c: flrstt, 23@24c; i Duluth Moct. 
fresh gathered, dirties. No, 1, 20(a20M|c; fresh gath- ; Qjroux 
CTcd diecks, go<d to fine. 18',t(»19c; refrigerator f5_„p„_ Cananea 
fimu, seasons storage c'.iargea paid, 22Vii®24c; west- ^^r^^ne «.,Hndnea. 
em gathered whites, 2€@29c 



Most of the copper stocks toda/ 
changed scarcely at all from the clos- 
ing figures of Saturday. Butte & Su- 
perior, however, was a notable excep- 
tion, making a gain of about $1.60. 
Greene-Cananea and North Butte were 
slightly off. The Copper Producers' 
report, issued at noon today, waa a 
bullish document., showing a decrease 
of more than three and a half million 
pounds in the American visible supply, 
of copper during the month of August. 
This, however, was not followed by, 
any general upward movement of the 
copper stocks, a movement that might 
have been expected. The general Steele 
market of New York was languid and 
rather weak and seemed to have a cor- 
responding effect on the coppers. The 
copper metal market of L.ondon closed 
today with spot Is 3d lower and fu- 
tures Is 3d higher than yesterday's 
close. 

* • • 

The monthly copper producers' state- 
ment, received today from New York 
by Gay & Sturgls and Paine. Webber 
& Co.. shows a decrease In the Am- 
erican stocks on hand during the 
month of August of 3.579,047 pounds. 
The report shows the copper stocks on 
hand on Sept. 1 to be 46,101,374 pounds, 
against 50,280,421 on Aug. 1; produc- 
tion, August, 145,628.521; July, 137,-^ 
161,129; domestic delivery, August, 78,- 
722,418; July, 71,094,381; foreign de- 
livery, August, 70,485,150; July, 60,- 
121,331; total deliveries, August, 149,-. 
207.568; July, 131,215,712. 

* • • 

New York. Sept 9. — The statement 
of the Copper Producers' association 
for August shows a decrease in stocks 
on hand of 3.579,047 pounds, compared 
with the previous month. 

Total production was 145,628,521 
against 137,161,129 In July, with do- 
mestic deliveries of 78,722,418, a gain 
of 7,628,037, while foreign deliveries of 
70,485,150 represented a gain of 10,- 
363,819 pounds. Total deliveries of 
149,207,568 pounds were 17.991,S&6 
pounds in excess of July. 

* • • 

Paine, Webber & Co. today received 
from Foster at Boston the followingi 
closing copper letter: "Acti\ity in the 
local market today was confined al- 
most entirely to a few specialties. 
Butte & Superior was well taken all 
day, advancing to $49.50 and closing! 
near the top. Chino and Pond Creek 
were also active and strong. The dec- 
laration of the regular dividend on 
Wolverine had no effect on the stock 
and the price hung around $93. North 
Butte was strong at the opening but 
weakened fractionally late in the ses- 
sion. Range declared 50c quarterly di- 
vidend and a few odd lots sold frac- 
tionally. The Copper Producers' report 
was exceptionally good, but had no 
effect In the present dull market." 

* • * 

Gay & Sturgls today received from 
I. J. Sturgls at Boston the following- 
copper closing letter: "The news to- 
day was unqualifiedly bullish, more so 
than at any t'me in a very long while. 
The government crop report shows 
conclusively that we may confidently; 
expect an unprecedentedly large crop, 
which greatly exceeds in volume and 
value anything in recent years.' Pros- 
perity comes fundamentally from the 
earth and prosperity is here. Any 
amount of talk or conjecture to the 
contrary Is futile. A strong healthy 
man who is normal mentally cannot 
be driven to a sick bed by a quack 
doctor and the politicians will soon 
find they are talking in the air. The 
copper report showed a large gain in 
production, which consumption took 
care of, and cut into surplus by 3,679,- 
000 pounds more. Profits by copper 
mining companies last month as a 
w*iole must have exceeded any montli 
since March, 1907. supposing produc- 
tion of that period had been sold at 
current prices. Prices were strong all 
day, but made few advances because of 
a speech of Candidate Wilson predict- 
ing much lower duties. This has been 
inevitable for two years and should 
have been prepared for. There is no 
reason except that tight money that 
will prevent higher prices. Tight 
money is due to trade expansion and 
means increased earnings all arouncL" 

* • • 

Closing quotations on the Duluth 
Stock exchange today were as follows: 



ElgiB. 

Elgin. 111.. Sept. 9. — The quotations 
committee of the Elgin board of trade 
today declared butter higher and firm 
at 27% cents. 

HIDES, TALLOW AND FURS. 

GREEN PALTED niI>ES— 

Hide market continues steady, although some of 
the large tanners are out of the market at these high 
prices claiming hides arc too high on a parity with 
prices of leather. The general opinion is the top has 
been reached. 

Market steady at quotatloDS. 



Keweenaw 



No. 1. 
■ iVH 

.13^4 

.IIH 
.13% 
.18 
.95 
3.85 



No. 2. 
.12% 

.12% 



O. 8. steers, orer 60 lb 

O, 8. cows. 25 lb and up. and steers 

under «0 lb • 

G. S. cows. 40 lb and up, branded 

G. 8. long iiaired kips. 8 to 15 lb.'... 

G. 8. veal calf. 8 to 15 lb 

O, 8, deacon skins, under 8 lb.,. 

G. 8. horse hides • 

Green hides and calf l@li4c less Uian salted. 

DRY HI1»ES— 

Market steady. 

r»ry western, over 12 lb 

Dry Minnesota, Pakota, Wisconsin 

and I<iwa, o>tr 12 lb 

Dry calf, under 5 lb, all sectiona 

TALLOW AND GREASE— 

Market very quiet. 

Tallow in cakes 

Tallow m uarreia 

Grease, white 

GrcaM, yellow and brown 

trliip in tight, two- headed barreU to avoid leakage, 

SHEEP PM.TS— 

Market steady; demand gocd. 

G. 8. peltjt, large 

G. 8. pelts, small to medium.. 

O. S. sbearllngs 

Dry butcher pelts, lb..... 

Dry murrains, lb 



...A.... 



No. 1. 
.22 

.18 
.23 

No. 1. 
.06 
.0514 
.05 

.04H 



.11.00 
. .20 
. .33 
. .13% 
. .18 



.12% 
.16H 
,75 
1.30 



No. a. 

.20 

.16 
.21 

Na 1 

.05 
.04% 
.04 
.03 



1.40 
.75 
.30 
.14% 
.14 



LEATHEH— 

Texas oak sole A 

Hemlock slsughter sole. xx... 
Hemlo<k slaughter sole. No. 1 

Uemli.ck dry hide sole 

Heailock liarnww leather 

Oak harness leather 

Kurs are generally higher. 

FURS— 

Skunk, black „ .. 

Skunk, short stripe..... *•;'>• 

Skunk, long narrow stripe f.»'> 

Skunk, broad stripe and white... LOO 

Mu.skrat. spring ""^r? 

RaccooD 



—Per Lb- 
No. 1. No. 2. 



.43 
.S5 
.34 
.32 
.40 
.42 



.41 
.34 
.83 
.31 
.42 
.44 



Large. Medium. Small. 
. .«3.&0 *2.50 $1.50 

2.00 

1.29 
.65 



3.S0 



3.25 



1.25 

1.00 

.50 

40@>70 

1.50 



North Butte ^*\^ 

Ojibway 

Red Warrior 

Savanna 

Shattuck 

Warren 

Warrior Dev 

milMted Stock* — 

Butte & Ely 

Butte & Superior 

Butte & Superior, old. 
Calumet & Montana... 

Calumet & Corbin 

Calumet & Sonera.... 

Carmen 

Chief Cons 

Cliff 

Com, Keating 

Elenita 

Keating 

Mowitza 

North American 

San Antonio 

St. Mary 

Sierra ................ 

Summit .............. 

Tuolumne 

Vermilion 

Sales. Shares. 
Butte & Superior... ..2 
North American • • • 300 
Vermilion -^^O 

Total *^^ 



Bid. 


Asked. 




5.00 


10.25 


10.75 


3.25 


3.75 


81.12 


81.50 


.10 


.18 




.12 


5.50 


6.00 




1.75 


6.37 


6.50 


9.87 


10.00 


1.00 


1.25 


34.12 


84.37 


4.00 


4.60 


1.00 


1.12 




2.60 


22.00 


22.50 




6.00 


.90 


1.00 


.80 


.90 


49.12 


49.25 


4.91 


• • • « 




.12 


• • • • 


.10 


• • « • 


4.23 


• • • • 


.60 


1.75 


1.87 


.85 


.8/ 




.25 




8.50 


2.00 


2.1» 




.25 


1.00 


1.13 




S.75 




.10 


1.00 


1.25 


.10 


.12 


2.75 


2.87 


2.25 


2.75 


High. 


Low. 


48.50 


• • • • 


1.06 14 


• • • • 


2.25 


• • • • 



GAY & STURGIS 

BANKERS AND BROKERS. 
S20 We«* Superior Street. 

Member* New York and Boatoa 
Stock Bxchangea. 

SPEC.*- A^EJT^^g^TO ..OC*.. 



rHvate wire* to 

n^.*nm HoOKhtOB, 

5::;"^irk. calumet. 

Chlcaso, 



Hancock. 



PAINE, WEBBER & COMPANY 

BANKERS AND BROKERS. 
Member* New York Stock Exck.uBC, Bctou Stock Exchaase. Cklcas* 

Board 01 Trade. 

SPECIAL ATTENTION TO LOCAL CURB STOdCS. 

M. J. O'BRIEN, Rcaldeut M»r. JOS. R. PATTERSON, Aaa»t. Re*lde«t Mgr. 



i 



' I 



4 



"' i. 



liSonday, 



THE DULU'nH HERALD 



September 9, 1912. 



n 




ti it« 



Some One of Today's "For \ 
Sale'* Ads May Offer You r%. 




TO SA VE 



You Real Money in Buying 
Something You Really Need 



DYE WORKS. 

I'st and most reliable. All work 
done in Duluth. Work called for and 
delivered. Both 'phone* 18SS. 23a 
Eaat Superior street. 

tforthweutern Dyeing 4 Oloanlns Co — 
Oldest reliable dyers and Freuoh dry 
cleaners in Northwest. 19 I-ik« Ave. 
north. •Phonea: Ne w. l."iUi. old. Ui7. 

FOR REM— lOTTAG ES. 



FOR REXT—f:- 
cottage. ■ -■■ •■■'■■', 

Btreet. " ' - 



ni MODERN 
1116 Eaat Fifth 



RAILROAD TIME TABLES. 

DULiTtH, MISSABE & NORTH- 
EKN RAILWAY. 

Office i 4:iG \%eMt »>uperlor St. 
'I'h oMe. imi>. 

■' . — ■ — — 

Lean*. ___^_ 

• ■ '■-: ■"►'t.^twlm. VlrdiiU. Et«- 1 

Siiarju lUutiK. I- •3.2I»» 

■t)U J 






. :•. tsyarta. TBtwal 
tttiBiiiut i'lilsholm. SUaron 
llSuUi. Virtlnta. Ev«l«Ui. 

I Vimuila. I'ov'lt. lUiiwr. Fort . 
W.IOfin 1 : - '• x- -ir. Bau- » ••.Slam 

•— P»iijf, ■■• -^ '■ ^ ■■ ^*y- 

Cafe. Mb.*ervation Car, Mesaba Ransd 
Points. SeUil Veatibuled Traia. Modern 
Sleepers through to Winnipeg. 



THE DLLITH & IROxN RANGE 
R.41LH0AD COMPANY. 



OtLlT'l— 



Uwftf. 



Kn:.r 



I It 3.30»flii 

Two Har&ora. Tow- j* 7.30«« itlj OOn 
:, la. Ui^aDik. Mc- t 2.*5»iii i» « 00»« 

I _^r'.a. Eveletli. UU- I'l l.3O|lBitx»0.30p« 

t k-,rt «uj \' iti.ua*. X S - 

»_Ua>Ij «au:<?i>t SumUj. I— Ml««l 




ADDITIONAL WANTS 
ON PAGE 18. 

|_ |_ I X "L I I - » - ■ "» ~> ~ l '^ ~ ~ i ~ " ■ ~ ' ^t 

FOR RE1«T-^H0USES. 



f HOUSES. * 

* t 

t * 

i^ For rent — 8-room detached housp, -JJ 

if. 29 West Second street; will be "ii- 

it- put In good condition; rent |4^. # 

* * 



FOR SALE MISCELLANEOUS. 



* POR SALE. * 

* *■ 

* t 

iti Durlnjf our recent sale we found ■i(' 
■j^ it necessary to take tn several or- *• 

* Rans and pianos, and to make # 
i^ room for a large shipment of baby # 

* grands we will let those pianos ^ 
■#. and organs go at cost of repairing *• 

* and drayage. # 

* f 



^ For rent — 10-room modern house, ie 
if. 413 Fourth avenue east; ^ood *■ 
■}(. condition; $45 



Hi 10-room house. 2014 East First *■ 
•it street; modern and in good con- *• 
a. ditlon; will runt this partly fur- * 
4 nished for |50 or unfurnished *•' 
if. for |45. * 

a. New, thoroughly modern, 11-room *■ 

^ semi-detached brick house, 1905 -^ 

Kast Third street; hot water *■ 

heat, two bathrooms; rent |65. if- 

* 

* 
it 



JOHN A. STEPHENSON & CO., 
Wolvin Building. 



STORY & CLARK PIANO CO., 

426 West First Street^ 

Opposite Postoffice. 



:){•- FOR SAL.K. *■ 

# Garland piano in good condition; * 
if. regular price $275; for quick s.ile *• 
^ $80. Payments as low as $1 yer * 
■^ week accepted. H- 

a. TERRY & GILIUSON, * 

if. 405 Central avenue. West Duluth, * 
^ Minn. * 

4 'Phone Cole 100 or Calumet 109-L,. ■^ 



HORSES, VEHICLES, ETC. 



HORSES! MULES! HORSES! 

BARRETT & ZIMMERMAN'S 
MIDWAY HORSE MARKET. 
THE LARGE.ST IN AMERICA. 
500 to 800 head of horses and mules 
constantly on hand; fresh horses arriv- 
ing from the country every day. If you 
need draft horses, general purpose 
hores. delivery horses, or horses and 
mules for railroad construction we can 
All your order. Private sales daily. Part 
time given if desired. See our horse.s 
before you buy. We can save you money. 
BARRETT & ZIMMERMAN'S 
MIDWAY HORiiE MARKET, 
ST. PAUL. MINN. 



-D*ll|. I-UAUj except 

tlua. t— U»Uj t*cn?t Mouii** 



X— tiuiiUAy ouly. 



DULUTH & MORTHERM HINNESOTA RAILWAY. 
OtMw. 310 Lonsdaie Bld«.. Duluth. 

^..,:,.. ,,,,.,-i u Kuue UUer daUy Kxcept Sun- 

j, . A L U. iraiua ie»vtii« Uuluth «t J .it 

^ ' tag *t *:*J p. m. dally; iicept Suail»y. 

*o«i.cvto *i irMuec *iih Mimd Jl»tai» Han* "toen 

lUllUlIltf- 



"Hey, Bill, fly over to the hardware store and get a file, then well cut 
the bars and get the loot!" 



FARM AND FRUIT LANDS. 



Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic. 



L.eii«e- 



STA'nu.vs. 



Arrive 



"i? 4Safn li.iS^oi.... Oulutti ....-lO.aOam ti-'W*" 

(So« Ltoe ftUua StalioJi.) 

tS.I2aJn •5.4apni.... Sutetlor ....•tO.OWm fS.IOjm 

\StM Lluu L'uluii SUUOZL) 

ft 20«m •« aSfim.... iiupenor .... •*.50*« t3.00»a 

lUaivui l>eiwt.) 

Arrive LMTi^ 

t7 S3*™ S. «*»... Houghton ...fjl.MP" 

ta 53|im 6 JOam C»luiii«t ....rIO lOpm 

rj 05|im M.mam. .. laiipeimna ...•12 20*« ''•*°*''' 

t7 43l!m •S.OOa'n.. M*rauer.ti ...♦ll.jOpia t5.20aill 

©lO iOam.Sault Ste. Harit. •3.25i>ai 

•«.00am... lluiitreal ... "9 Mpm •8.20pBi 

•S.ZOpm.... Boawu ....•I0.00a« •«.3Ua.» 

t« 05aiii"*9 •3*'»--. Montreal ...•lO.OOamMO.OOpm 
tlO OBpm'K) 2C«iii....Ne» Y.«lc.... *7.l3pm ^H 30m 

:— l»aiij i'ic*t>t SunUay. *— l>»il». 



HOTELS. 
Iiiif»erial Hotel 



Tbe C' 



:!ace to atop at la Duluth. 

„^„ i and up-to-data ia «nMy 

HUU.U3 Tie ANO UP. 
X0S-2lta WMt SufMlor StrMt 



Tbor- 



llfW 



St. James Hotel 




SITUATION WANTED— YOUNG NOR- **-^^IJ.^*^'^**###^Wf-;J^*liJ*****^^ 
wegian. 24, business college grad- * „ . , ^, 2J 

uat? spealilng and writing Perfect* FOR SALE. | 

German and good English, with a *. _,.,„ * 

number of years- experience as book-^)^ AN EXCEPTIONALLY FINE ■* 
ke^er and general office clerk, also ; ;^ FARM ON WHITE FACE RIVER, ii 
as reporter for a mercantile agency, i # ' -,v 

both In Norway and Germany; slxi* — *• 

months in this country; desires occu- if. it- 



if. FOR RENT. # 

* 310 Fourteenth Ave. E., 6 rooms, * 
if. bath; $15. % 

* 1218% East Fourth St.. 5 rooms; * 
i'- water and sewer; $15. # 
ifr 1303 Va Lake Ave. 3.. 5 rooms; $11. * 
it. 1820 West Second St., 6 rooms; # 
ii- heated, all conveniences; $35. H 
if. 1007 East Second St., 9 rooms; all # 
je. conveniences; $40. # 
« N. J. UPHAM CO., * 
it 18 Third Avenue West. # 
i^yif^f^if.if.^if^ii^^iif^i'ii'if^ii'fii^it^^ 



FOR RENT. 



pation by reliable concern in this 
city; any capacity: salary moderate. 
Addr ess Y 444. Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED — DRAUGHTS- 
man desires position in Duluth or vi- 
cinity; long experience, chiefly me- 
chanical, some structural. C. H. 
Richter, 324 Kedzle avenue, Chicago. 
111. 

SITUATION WANTED — YOUNG MAN 
with a stenographic and business 
experience would like a position at 
once, as stenographer or oflflce as- 
slstant. Address Z 493. Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED BY ENGIN- 
eer holding second-clasa papers; am 
total abstainer and reliable; position 
In city preferied. Address U 366, 
Herald. 



3U-2I5 Wwt Suparior Straat. 

Buror-<'» Siriotly modem. Under new maaas*- 
Meot. 
prteca I 



■a to deix)U and boata. Popular 
LUWi by Mfoek. 12.00 aod u». 



REPORT OF THE CONDITION 

— OF— 

THE AMERICAN EXCHANGE 

NATIONAL BANK, 

At Duluth, in the State of Minnesota, 

At the Close of Business, 

feept. 4, 1912. 

RESOURCES. 
Loans and discounts $ 5,6a0.56S.6j 

Overdrafts, secured and 
un.s. : ! 

U. S. to secure cir- 
culati'ni 

TJ. S. bonds to secure pos- 
tal aavinisa 

Other bonda to secure pos- 
tal savings 

Bonds, securities, etc 

Banking house, furniture 
and fixtures 

Due fro"' •> -Honal banks 
tnot r- I gents) .... 

Pue fru:;. ^.-xie and prl- 

\'ate banks and bankers, 

triiir •■i>rtTpanies and 

nks 

1)1. : approved re- 
serve agents 

Cl.ecka and other cash 
item.<! 

Exchanges tor clearing 
house 

Kotes of other national 
ti^xnilcs • 

Fractional paper currency, 
nickfls and cents 

lawful Money Reserve In 
Bank, viz.: 

Sp- i.. $436,390.00 

1 nder 

i;s.()ii0.00 



2.967.21 
300,000.00 

20.000.00 

50.000.00 

25.000.0') 

325,000.00 

332,945.77 



197,643.89 

4,010.794.76 

16,033.10 

64.771.07 

177.450.00 

1,906.29 



SITUATION W.\>'TED— STENOGRA^ 
pher de-sires position; high school 
and business college training; good 
writer: excellent references. G 507, 
Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED— YOUNG MAN 
with experience aa olerk and time- 
keeper, wishes position: can furnish 
best of referen cea Z 500, Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED— FIRST-CLASH 
bookkeeper Is open for position; 
manufacturing and banking expe- 
rience. D 361. Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED — OLD MAN 
would like position to look after 
steam boiler. T 451. Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED— AS ASSISTANT 
bookkeeper, office clerk or time- 
keeper, by young man. X.Y.. Herald. 



•*• Only two hours" ride from Duluth; ■^ 
a^ one-quarter mile from station; if. 
^ buildings extra well built, consist- f> 
iif. ing of a log house, 45 by 25, two # 
^ stories high; two fireplaces, four ■?(■ 
■^ bedrooms, bathroom, greenhouse •^ 
ifr off same 11 by 24; cottage, 24 by # 
;l|^ 24, with runway to same connected i^ 
if. to main house, containing kitchen it- 
if. and two sleeping rooms; large it- 
it woodshed, frostproof dairy build- # 
i(. ing, 12 by 24, complete with sep- if. 
if. arator. engine and icebox. Large i^ 
if. cow bam. 38 by 60. with cement *» 
4 floor, roothouse. chicken house, if- 
i^ toolhouse. etc.: water works sys- * 
4 tera for all buildings. Size of ■^ 
if. farm, 165 acres; 60 acres cleared H- 
i(> and cultivated. If sold at once, if- 
if win include several thousand feet if- 
ie- of sawed lumber, wood-sawing # 
if. outfit. 7 acres of potatoes. 1 acre * 
if- cabbage. 4 acres of rutabagas, 15 # 
if. tons of hay. registered Jersey bull. •^- 
if- 3 years old; machines and numer- if- 
iif. ous tools. This Is one of the most * 
*. choice spots on the White Face * 
■*. river. Photographs of the build- if- 
# ings can be seen at our office, if- 



5 rooms, 26 Seventh Ave. W 122.50 

5 rooms, 16 Seventh Ave. W 25.00 

7 rooms. 529 V» E. Superior St 20.00 

8 rooms. 309 W. Fourth St 30.00 

8 rooms. 412 Sixth Ave. W 30.00 

8 roomji, 811 E. First St 37.50 

R. B. KNOX & CO., 
Exchange Bldg. 



FOR RENT — FOUR-ROOM HOUSE; 
water, sewer and electric light; hard- 
floors, $9 per month. 316 Va 



FOR SALE — POOL AND BILLIARD 
tables. Large stock of new and sec- 
ond-hand billiard and pool tables; 
also bar fixtures, show cases, tables, 
chairs and refrigerators; time pay- 
ments. Write for catalogue. Merle 
& Heaney Manufacturing company, 
621-523 Third street south. Minne- 
apolis. ^ 

FOR SALE— FURNITURE FROM OUR 
Grand Rapids, Mich., and Rockford, 
111., factories, sold and delivered di- 
rect to you from our Duluth show- 
rooms, 2201 West First street Car- 
loads just received. You don't pa.y 
retail prices and your credit O. K- 
Cameron, factory distributor. 



HORSES! 100 HORSES! 

Drafters, delivery, farm hor.ses and 
mares. Fine drivers and ponies. Our 
prices are the lowest; part time 
given. We buy, .sell and exchange 
horses, wagons and harness. 

RUNQUIST & CO.. 
Sale stable. 209 West First street. 



WAGONS— CUTTERS — SLEIGHS. 
Complete line always on hand; bar- 
gains In grocers' and butcher.s' wag- 
ons Write for catalogue. L. Hammel 
Co.. 302-308 East First street, Duluth. 

FOR SALE— BAY HORSE; WEIGHT 
1.420 pounds; 10 years old. 29 West 
Third street. Call between 6 and 7:30 
p. m. 

FOR SALE — BIG BAY MULE; SOUND 
as a dollar; cheap. The Radford com- 
pany. 



FOR SALE — 40 horses; all sizes. 28 
E. l.st St., Western Sales Stable Co. 

FOR SALE— 30 HORSES AT ZENITH 
Sale & Boarding stable, 524 W. 1st. St. 



WANTED TO BUY. 



WANTED TO BUY— ON EASY PAY- 
ments, modern 5 to 10-room, central 
house; state location, price and 
term s in first letter. R 395, Herald. 

WANTED TO BUY — SECOND-HAND 
roll top desk, three-foot; In good con- 
dition. Address, stating price, E. R. 
H., Herald. 

WANTED TO BUY — SECOND-HAND 
furniture and stoves. Joe Popkin, 29 
West First s treet; Grand 253-X. 

WANTED TO BUY— A FIRST-CLA.SS 
ba.se-burner; must be in good shape. 
Addre ss Z 506 Herald. 

WANTKD TO BUY — A LARGE OR 
amall tract of land for Investment. 
I 69. Herald. 



WANTED TO BUY — TRACT OF TIM- 
ber within few miles of railroad. X 
340. Herald. 



H. POPKIN BUYS SECOND-HAND 
stoves and furniture. Lincoln 295-X. 

LITMAN BROS. BUY SECOND-HAND 
stoves and furniture. Both 'phones. 



FOR SALE-COWS. 



FOR SALE — ON'B 2 Vz -YEAR-OLD 
cow and two 1>4 -year-old heifers, 
bred from good stock. Inquire of J. 
E. St. George. Allen Junction, Minn. 



UPHOLSTERING. 

Furniture, Automobiles. Carriages; rea- 
sonable prices. E. Ott, 112 Ist Ave. W. 



wood 

West Fourth street Inquire 
West Fourth street, downstairs. 



316 



FOR SALE. 
Street car bodies, suitable for camp- 
ers or homecrofters, in perfect condi- 
tion, with or without heating plant 
DULUTH MACHINERY CO., 
Third Avenue East and M^chisran 
Street 




FOR RENT — THIRTEEN-ROOM 
house, suitable for boarding or lodg- 
ing house. 532 West First street. In- 
quire 501 West Michigan street 

FOR RENT- ElvEVEN-ROOM MOD- 
ern house. 1905 East Third street 
Apply 1901 East Third street Mel- 
rose 2374. 



van RENT— HOUSE, 1915 WAVERLY 
avenue. Glen Avon. Inquire Mrs. 
John Macleod, at house or 500 Torrey 
building. 



FOR RENT— IN LAKESIDE OCT. 1. 
thoroughly modern six-room house; 
can be seen any time. 4123 Robinson 
street. 



a- Price $12,000. 



WHITNEY WALL COMPANY, 
301 Torrey Building. 



PERSONAL. 

PERS(>NAL— ?ROf"'gTrARD, CLAIR- 
voyant and palmist. 30 W. Sup. St 
Six questions answered for $1. 



PERSONAL— YOUR COLD IS DAN- 
gerous. If neglected it may lead to 
a complicated disease: cures effected 
daily at European Mineral St Vapor 
Bath parlors, 17 East Superior street 
Rheumatism and neuralgia cured. 



PERSONAL — ORDERS TAKEN FOR 
crocheted corset cover yokes. Irish 
crocheted opera bags and all kinds 
of tatting done. Call 521 East Fourth 
street, or 'phone Grand 2189-X. 



564.390.00 



HedempHon fund with U. 
a. tre:i!iurer i5 per cent 
of circulation) 

Due from U. S. treasurer. 



15.000.00 
5,500.00 



Total $11,759.970 .74 

LIABILITIES. 

Capital stock paid in $ 500,000.00 

Surplus fund 1,000,000.00 

Undivided profits, less ex- 
penses and tax«3 paid.. 313,743.92 
National bank notes out- 

standing 291,500.00 

Due to other national 

banks 241,950 . 00 

Due to stare and private ^^„ „.. ., 

banks and bankers 402,353.44 

Individual deposits subject ^ 

to check 7,415.3^6 . i 4 

Demand certificates of de- 

po.slt 320,102.41 

Time certificates of de- ,,,._„.„_ 

posit ^'^^'^'Hztl 

Certified checks 28.877.59 

Cashier's checks outstand- 

ing 24,240.57 

Postal savings deposits... 44.9C1 .78 

Reserved for taxes 12,000.00 



Personal— Ladles — Ask your druggist 
for Chichester Pills, the Diamond 
Brand. For 25 years known as best, 
safest, always reliable. Take no oth- 
er. Chichester Diamond Brand Pills 
are sold by druggists everywhere. 



itifif'i^if^f^f'if.if.if^^i.if^if'if^ifit-it'it'if^-'i^^ 



PERSONAI^-WANTED— A CHILD TO 
board, between 2 and 6 years of age; 
no other children in family. Write 
for information. Call at 110 East 
Seventh street; Melrose 2505. 

PERSONAL — MY WIFE. MARY 
Alavine Selby. has left my bed and 
board. I will not be responsible for 
any debts contracted by her. Henry 
Selby. 

DRESSMAKERS. TAILORS and house- 
wiTea have your sewing machine re- 
paired before the rush by Frank Pop- 
kin. 1 W Superior St Grand 619-D. 



Mrs. Vogt 17 E. Sup. St Shampooing, 
balrdre.ssing. 50c; manicuring. 23c 
•Phones; Mel. 3153; Grand 1S72-X. 



Total 



.$11,759,970.74 



State of Minnesota, County of St Louis 

I, W. G. Hegardt Cashier of the 
above named bank, do solemnly swear 
that the above statement Is true, t* 
the best of my knowledge and belief. 
W. G. HEGARDT. 

Cashier. 
Correct — Atteslt: 
M. M. PEYTON. 
G. A. TOMLINSON. 
S. G. KNOX, 

Directors. 
(Corporate Seal. American Exchange 
National Bank of Duluth.) 



PERSONAL— SILVERWARE CLEANED 
at your own home; guaranteed good 
work. Call Uncoln 361-A. 



PERSONAL — WANTED USE OF Pi- 
ano for storage; no children In fam- 
ily. Call Melrose 5292. 



Massage — Constipation a specialty. Mar- 
garet Nelson. 218 W. Sup. St Room 8. 



# FOR SALE. # 

a- *• 

* * 

*. We have over 100,000 acres of if- 

■^ fine farminjf land In Pine and *• 

■h- Kenabec counties, in tracts of 40 if- 

# acres and up, as low In price as if- 

# $8 per acre. Also some very good if. 
if. Improved farms at low price and if- 
4 easy terms. Now (September) is # 
it one of the beat months for looking ^ 
it at land. it 

it! _ ^- 

# * 

# C. H. GORDON & CO.. # 

ju i^ 

if. 507 Torrey Bldg. *> 

it '^ 

ARE YOU LOOKING FOR A FARM 

HOME? 
The American Immigration Co. offers 
unparalleled opportunity In the g^ea^ 
land opening of the Round Lake 
country; 150.000 acres; fine land, rich 
soil: open for settlement In the heart 
of Wisconsin choice hardwood lands; 
easy terms. See their representative. 
F. L. LEVY. 
510 Torrey Building. 



FOR RENT— EIGHT-ROOM HOUSE; 
all modern improvements. 931 East 
Fifth street Inquire 929 East Fifth 
street. 

FOR RENT — GOOD EIGHT-ROOM 
warm and pleasant furnished house. 
418 Fifteenth avenue east 



FOR SALE— IF YOURE LOOKING 
through this column for bargains, 
place your order now with the East 
End Furniture store. 228 E. Superior 
St for good furniture. Compared with 
other stores we save you 100 per cent. 

FOR SALE— SLIGHTLY USED AND 
rebuilt typewriters; prices from $20 
up. Machines rented for $1.50 to $2.50 
a month; rental applied as payment 
Hersey & McArthur. 319 West First 
St Phone. Mel. 3248; Grand 2054-Y. 



FOR SALE— THREE ORGANS AT $15 
each; one Kanich & Bach piano. $70; 
one Hazelton piano, good as new, 
$225. J. F. Welsmiller. 203 East Su- 
perior street 



FOR SALE — Second hand woodworking 
machinery, portable sawmills, trans- 
mission appliances, pipes for steam, 
water and furnaces. Duluth Mach Co. 



FOR SALE— A COUNTING ROOM 

desk in first-class order. Apply 

room 413. Palladlo building. 'Phone 
Melrose 1360; Grand, S41. 



WHERE TO GET WHAT YOU WANT 

EACH FIRM A LEADER IN ITS LINE 

Consult this list before placing your order, if gou want 
the best at a price you like to pay. 



AWNINGS, TENTS, PACKSACKS. 

POIRIER TENT & AWNING CO., 413 
East Sup erior street Both 'phones. 

The awning specialists. Duluth Tent 
& Awning company, 1608 W. bup. St 



For Sale — Get a typewriter for 17 cents 
a day; all makes at greatly reduced 
prices. Edmont 3j0 W. Superior St. 

For sale or rent, very cneap, slightly • 
used shot guns and rifles. J. W. 
Nelson, 5 East Superior street. 



ACCOUNTANT. 

MATTESON & MACGREGOR. 

PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS AND 

AUDITORS. 

Business Counselors and Systematizers. 

702-703 Alworth Bldg., 

'Phones : Melrose. 4700; Grand, 71. 

i M. LESTER, 412 PROVIDENCE 
building. Both 'phones, 862^ 



ACCOUNTANT— F. D. HARLOW, 40i 
Lonsdale building. Melrose 1208. 



FLORIST. 

Dul. Floral Co., wholesale, retail cut 
flowers; funeral designs. 121 W. Sup. 



GRADING, SODDING & SEEDING. 

THE BEST BLACK DIRT AND SANDY 
loam for sale. H. B. Keedy, 1711 
London road. Both phones. 



HAT SHOPS. 

Hats cleaned and blocked, equal new. 
Union Hat Shop, 28 Lake ave. north. 



FOR REINT — SIX-ROOM MODERN 
house. Park Point Edmont 330 West 
Superior s treet. 

Padded vans for moving furniture. 
West Duluth. &■ Duluth Transfer Co. 



SITUATION WANTED— FEMALE. 



SITUATION WANTED — ENGLISH 
nurse; capable, experienced, com- 
bousekeeper to Invalid or 
person; references. V 475, 



panion. 
elderly 
Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED — ENGLISH 
nur.-5e; capable, e.xperienced; com- 
panion, housekeeper to Invalid or 
elderly person; references. V 475. 
Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED— BY SCAJ4DIN. 
avian woman of middle age. a place 
as housekeeper; has 3-year-old boy 
whom she wishes with her. 1002 
Bay street. Supe'rior, Wis. 



FOR SALE— SEVENTY-ACRE FARM; 
best of location, near Duluth: twenty- 
five acres cultivated; fair buildings: 
fine timber; first-class soil; good 
roads; a bargain at $2,700; adjoin- 
ing farms held at twice this amount 
Wnltney Wall company, 301 Torrsy 
building. (207.) 



I?X)R SALE — CHEAP. 160 ACRES GOOD 
farm land, situated In St. Louis 
county near Cook. Minn. This is a 
fine loamy soil; hou.se. barn and well 

and ten acres under cultivation. Let giTUATlON WANTED 
me know when you will look this 
over. Ed. Hurlbut. Gilbert Minn. 



SITUATION WANTED — BY HOUSE- 
keeper, can furnish good references. 
Address Mrs. M. R. Johnston. Clo- 
quet. Minn.. General Delivery. 



SITUATION WANTED— POSITION BY 
young lady, stranger in city; five 
yeais' experierce as cashier; good 
references. Call Park 110-A. 



SITUATION WANTED— YOUNG LADY 
desires position as office assistant; 
can do general work; best of refer- 
ences. G. K.. Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED — FIRST-CLASS 
hou.sekeeper wants place In private 
family or hotel. 127 North Sixty- 
fourth avenue west. 

SITUATION W-cvNTED — BOOKKEEP- 
Ing or stenographic work to do even- 
ings; have my own typewriter. 
'Phone Melrose 4546. 

SITUATION WANTED— BY EXPErT 
enced head waitress, out of town. 
Address B. E. Olson. Gen. Del.. Du- 
luth. 



FOR SALE — YOUR OLD STOVE 
taken in exchange on new heater or 
range at R. R. Forwaru & Co. 



FOR SALE— LADY'S SEALSKIN JACK- 
et; size 36; very reasonable. Z 447, 
Herald. 



FOR SALE — HOUSEHOLD PURNI- 
ture; party leaving city. 4405 Regent 
street. 



FOR SALE— CHEAP— NEW METHOD 
kitchen gas stove. 1021 East Second 
street 



FOR SALE— TWO 11-FOOT FLOOR 
cases. Chamberlain-Taylor company. 



FOR SALE — Phonograph parts; repair 
work done. E. T. Schlender. Mel. 2619. 



AUTOS, MOTORCYCLES, MOTOR- 
BOATS. 

tTre repairing absolutely 

guaranteed; the oldest, most reliable 
shop in town. Duluth Auto Supply Co. 
412-14 E. Superior. Zen. 2163-A; Mel- 
rose 4102. F. W. Neuman. Mgr. 



Old auto tires bought; highest prices 
paid. Northwestern Iron & Metal Co.. 
17 E. 1st St. or Eighteenth avenue 
west and Railroad St. Either 'phone. 



BOATS BOUGHT AND SOLD. MOTOR 
Boat exchange. 611 Torrey building. 



BUSINESS CHANCES. 



SITUATION WANTED— GOOD SEAM- 
stress would like sewing by the day. 
Call 1608 Melrose. 



FOR SALE — HOMESTEAD RELIN- 
quishment; forty acres fine land. 5Vi 
miles from town. Write Box 99, Cass 
Lake. Minn. 



FOR SALE— FARM LANDS IN PIERCE 
and Benson counties between new 
lines of Soo and Great Northern; are 
best investment in North Dakota. 
Write Asa Styles. Esmond, N. D. 



Subscribed and sworn to before me 
this 9th day of September, 1912. 

J. D. JIAHONEY, 

Notary Public. 
(N^*arlal Seal. St Louts Co.. Minn.) 
if/ commission expires July 21, 1913. 



Personal — Combings and cut hair made 
into beautiful switches. Knauf Sisters. 



RENTAL AGENCIES. 

FLATa 

4 rooma 104 S. 39th Ave. W $9.00 

4 rooms, 121 19th Ave. W. 1«.0C 

HOUSES. 

7 rooms. 1818 Piedmont Ave IS.OO 

6 rooms, 1713 Jefferson 8t 20.00 

6 rooms. 807 Park place 36 00 

9 rooms. 107 8th Ave. W..- 45.00 

5 rooms. 1610 E. Superior St 46.00 

10 rooms, 1431 E. 2nd St 55.00 

J. D. HOWARD & CO.. 

209-212 Providence Building. 

Melrose 193. Grand 326. 



WANTED TO RENT. 

WANTED TO RENT— OCT. 1 IN EA.ST 
end, five to six-room house or flat 
with .some yard; must be modern; 
family of three; state rent and loca- 
tion. O 494. Herald. 



WANTED TO RENT — SIX-ROOM 
flat with barn to accommodate one 
horse; must be central. ■ Address Z. 
453, care Herald. • 



WE BUY AND SELL FARM AND 
timber lands; locate gov. claims. Kjo- 
stad & Le Sage. 401 Palladio building. 



DRESSMAKING. 

F^RST^C'LXS^DRESS^^AJKING DONE 
work guaranteed. 11 West Second 
street. Mrs. La Vem De Rusha. 



DRE.SSMAKING AND LADIES' TAI- 
lorlng. 20 West Superior street Mel- 
rose 5019. 



STENOGRA- 
pher wishes position; experienced. 
Odgen, 858-D. 



SITUATION WANTED — BY COLORED 
girl. 18 years, position as waitress or 
maid. Call Melro.se 4303. 



SITITATION W.VNTED- PLACE TO DO 
general housework by young girl. 
Call 3815 West Fifth street 



SITUATION WANTED — AS HOUSE- 
keeper. Call 112 First avenue east. 



PRIVATE HOSPITAL. 

PRIVATE HOSPITAL— PROSPE(jriVE 
mothers will find a pleasant home 
before and during confinement at 
Ashland Maternity home. Ashland, 
WlSv Infants cared for. 



Private home before and during con- 
finement; best of care by professional 
nurse; babies also cared for. Mar- 
garet Finkle. Call Melrose 2464. 214 
Ninth avenue east 



BUSINE^SS CHANCES— WANTED. SEV- 
eral parties ladies and gentlemen, to 
join me in a moving picture theatri- 
cal enterprise; must Invest some 
money; this Is an acceptionally good 
Investment Write Clarence E. Crane, 
Grand Forks. N. D. 



CARPENTER REPAIR WORK. 

Remodeling or repairing work done 
neatly. Call Aug. Anderson. Mel. 4958. 



Work done neatly. Q. Pearson. 207 W. 
1st St Zenith 1274-X, or Park 97. 



CARPET CLEANING WORKS. 

INTERSTATE CARPET CLEANING CO. 
L. Sinotte, Prop., compressed air and 
vacuum cleaners and rug weavers. 
1928 West Michigan St Both 'phones. 



CLAIRVOYANT-HAIR SPECIALIST 



Mrs. Anna, clairvoyant In Bryant & 
Co.'s hair-growing parlors, who 
grows a head of hair or no pay. Odd 
Fellows' hall. Lake avenue, Mel. 1145 



CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

Duluth Engineering Co.. W. B. Patton. 
Mgr., 613 Palladlo bldg. Specifications 
prepared and construction superin- 
tended for waterworks, sewerage, etc 



JANITOR & WINDOWWASHER. 



PUBLIC JANITOR AND WINDOW 
washer. Prudence Robert, the best 
new window-cleaner in tlie city. Mel. 
4196, Grand 2285-Y. 120 Pioneer blk. 



KEY, LOCK AND SAFE WORKS. 

LAWN MOWERS SHARPENED. CEN- 
tral repair shop, 115 W. Michigan St. 



MUSICAL l.NSTRUMENTS. 



A Haakonsen, dealer 
and expert repairer, 
at J. W. Nelson's. 5 
East Superior street 




BOSTON MUSIC CO., MUSICAL MER- 
chandise. 6 and 8 West First street 



MUSIC LESSONS. 

VTOLBrMANDOLHrBANJoTGl^^ 
18 Lake avenue N. Prof. Robinson. 



MOVING PICTURE SUPPLIES. 



CHEMIST AND ASSAYER. 

Duluth Testing laboratory. C. A. Graves, 
Mgr. Assays, chemical analyses, ce- 
ment tests, Edison Bldg. 214 W. 1st. 



CHIMNEY SWEEPER. 

Ed McCarty, chimney sweep and furnace 
cleaning. 5129 Glendale; Mel. 4865; 
Park. 39- Y. 



FOR RHNT— 38-ROOM ROOMING ANt» 
boarding house, newly painted and 
patpered; completely furnished; will 
sell furniture cheap; 25 steady board- 
ers; rooms well filled. Call or write 
Mrs. Ralston, 122 E. First St., Duluth. 



FOR SALE— ESTABLISHED DRESS- 
making business cheap; nets $100 
per month; four furnished rooms in 
house pay the rent; will sell furni- 
ture of the four rooms, two machines 
and mirror if desired. P 218, Herald. 



FOR RENT— BEST EQUIPPED BUTCH- 
er shop, between two grocery stores; 
tile and marble trimming; swell show 
window with ice tank, will make rent 
very reasonable to right party. Call 
1030 West First street 

We buy and sell rooming houses, hotels, 
confectionery and grocery stores and 
every other kind of business. See us, 
DULUTH BUSINESS EXCHANGE, 
609 Torrey Building. 



Business CHiances — For rent — Brick 
building on Garfield avenue, equipped 
for picture shows or can be used for 
meat market or grocery. Grand 2201-Y 



BUSINESS CHANCES - 
Small confectionery 
store. Inaulre 102 
street 



FOR 

and 

West 



SALE— 

grocery 

Second 



GOOD DRESSMAKER WANTS WORK. 
Prices rea.sonable. CTall Melrose 4431. 



EXPERT WORK IN ALL KINDS 
dre.<ismaking. CaU Melrose 4629. 



DRESSMAKING AND LADIES' 
lorlng. "Phone Melrose 1177. 



TAI- 



FOR RExNT— BARNS. 



FOR RENT — BARN. 121 WE.ST 
Fourth street. Apply Martin Buggle. 
Grand Union Tea Co. 



STOVE REPAIRS. 



WE CARRY IN STOCK REPAIRS FOR 
10.000 different stoves and ranges. C. 
F. Wiggerts & 9oa. 410 E. Sup. St 



MRS. HANSON, GRADUATE MID- 
wlfe; female complaints. 413 Seventh 
avenue east Zenith 1225. 



PRIVATE HOME FOR LADIES DUR- 
Ing confinement; expert care; Infants 
cared for. Ida Pearson, M. D., 284 
Harrison avenue, St Paul. 

Private home for ladles during con- 
finement Mrs. M^ry Barrell, nurse, 
3510 Woodland avenue. Grand 370-Y. 



Mrs. E. Nlvela, midwife and private 
home for ladles. 328 South Sixty- 
third Ave. W. Telephone Cole 316-D. 



Mrs. H. Olson. gra^Juate midwife — Pri- 
vate hospital. 329 Notth Flfty-clghth 
avenue west. Cole 173. 



LYDIA LEHTONEN. MIDWIFE. 2406 
West Second 8t 'Pkone Ltneola 47&-A. 



FOR SALE — GROCERY STORE. VERY 
well located. Call at once. Clarke- 
Wertln company, 200 Alworth build- 
ing. 



BUSINESS CHANCES — FOR SALE — 
Hardware fixtures and tin shop; good 
location. C 446, Herald. 



BUSINESS CHANCES — FOR SALE— 
Grocery stock and fixtures. 106 West 
First street. 



AGENTS WANTED. 



AGENTS — ^DISTRICT AGENT. SICK- 
ness, accident. Insurance; stock com- 
pany; liberal policy; Insures both 
sexes; claim settlements and business 
methods strongly commended by In- 
surance examiners; our liberal profit 
sharing contract gives wonderful op- 
portunity for good, permanent In- 
come to capable producers; repre- 
sentatives wanted In all states. Ad- 
dress Federal Casualty, Detroit. 
Mich., givlnff referencea. 



CIVIL ENGINEER & SURVEYORS. 

NICHOLs'X'FARRELJr'ITFMAl'^^ 
tan Bldg. Anything in engineering. 



CARD ENGRAVING AND STAMPS. 

Consolidated Stamp & Printing Co., 
Barker & Orr, props., 14 4th Ave. W. 



DANCING ACADEMY. 

COFFIN — 26 Lake avenue north. Either 
'phone. Open afternoon and evening. 



DRESSMAKING SCHOOL. 



Miss Gray's school of garment cutting 
and making, also patterns cut to 
measure, 3rd floor of Geo. A. Gray.Co. 



Standard School of Dressmaking, even- 
ing classes. 20 W. Sup. St. Mel. 60l» 



9 



Theaters equipped from 
machine to screen; film 
service; moving picture 
machines. Second band ma- 
chines sold cheap. Duluth 
Film Exch'ge, 107 2d av. W. 



Motion picture outfits bought and sold. 
"National- Co.. 417 W. Michigan St 



PHONOGRAPH REPAIRING. 



E. T. Schlender, sue to Bates Music Co., 
expert phonograph repairer; parts of 
all makes in stock. Call Mel. 2619. 



PATENTS. 

PATENTS — ALL ABOUT P.\TENTS. 
See Stevens. 610 Sellwood building. 



PAINTING AND PAPERHANGING. 

For painting and decorating, see 
Youngdahl & Dlers. 223 W. 2nd St. 



REAL ESTATE. 



L. A. Larsen Co.. 213 Providence Bldg. 
City property, lands, loans, fire ins. 



DANCING LESSONS. 

Lynn Dancing Academy, lady instruc- 
tor. 18 Lake avenue north. Hall for 
rent Melrose 1146. 



DENTIST. 

Dr~W. H. Olson. 222 New Jersey Bldg. 
All work guaranteed Both 'phones, 



DETECTIVE AiJENCY. 

NORTHWESTERN DETECTIVE AOBN- 
cy obtains Information confidentially, 
317 Columbia building. Grand 909-A 



FURNITURE RE-COVERED. 

Let Forsell do your UPHOLSTERING, 
334 B. Superior St. Both 'phones. 



WATCHES REPAIRED. 



Guarantee Main Springs. $1.00; watch 
cleaned, $1. Garon Bros.. 213 W. 1st 



RUG WEAVING. 

FIRST-CLASaTwORK^^^^^^^'siLK CUR- 
tatns a specialty. Melrose 3341. 



SWEDISH MASSAGE. 



Luzlna Ojala cures rheumatism and 
stomach trouble. 348 Lake Ave. S- 



A E. HANSEN. MASSEUR, 400 NEW 
Jersey Bldg. Old 'phone 4273 Melrose. 



GRADUATE MASSEUSE, 305 EAST 
First street. 'Phone Melrose 4494. 



SAFETY RAZORS SHARPENED. 



Safety razor blades of all kinds sharp- 
ened and put in first-class condition. 
30c per dozen. Quayle-Larsen Co. 





Monday, 



DULUTH 




jptember 9, 1912. 




Some One of Today's '^Furnished f^l^^rBC Vi\tl fit/? Jk ^liliTOQQ 
Rooms to Renr Ads Probably VjIl/t5o 1 \J%J if*t^ rkUlM^M fCOO 




FOR 30c 





YOy S^i ©ET iOLLA^S 
fm THDNGS YOU NOW 
LET @0 T© l^yOi 



SDWE MM. 



Otli! Pieces! of Furniture, Gas Stoves, Refrigerators, 
Bcwing Machines, Bicycles. Phonographs, Dressers, 
fianos, llurses. Dogs, Poultry, Buggies or Wagons 
CAN BE SOLD QUICKLY AT A FAIR PRICE 



THRO THE HERALD FOR SALE ADS 



One Cent a Word Kaeh Insertion. 
No Atlvertlsements Let* Than 15 Cents. 

TTelp^vvaSted^emaleT 

WANTED— COOK. OUT. SAl^KY fCO; 
cook, out. salary |r»0; co«k. out. sal- 
ary |45; cook, for otty. |10 per wtek, 
room and board; count* r girl, out, 
126, room and board; dining room 
girls, out. $U0 and |22; girl for farm 
homt;; cashlt-r and checker, city; girl 
for housework on rang" 'n modern 
hume. salary |::&; wages start as soon 
as you hire out; don t have to work 
until Sept. 20; srentral housework 
glrlB for city. ln<iulre at Central Em- 
ployment c-ompany, 125 West Superior 
street. 

WAN TEIV- HIGH SCHOOL GIKL TO 
assist with llglit housework after 
Si-hool for her board and room. 632 li 
West Third street; 'phone Melrose 
2468. 



One Cent a WoVd Each Insertion. 
I Xo AdverUsementB Less Than 15 Cents. 

ADDITIONAL WANfS 
ON PAGE 17. 

FOR REiM— ROOMS. 

NEW HOTEL ALEXANDRIA- 
822-324 West Second street, now open 
for business. First-class suites and 
single rooms, with bath and tele- 
phone in all rooms; all modern. Fine 
table board, |5 per week^ 



[ One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
Xo Advertisements Less Than 15 Cents. 

ToiTSiNT^^^JiAfsr 



WANTED— IMMEDIATELY, COMPE- 
tent waist draper; also sleevemaker 
and steamstresses; steady employ- 
ment. McCoy, 503 Columbia building 



WANTED — MAID FOR GENERAL 
housework; small family; sU-room 
house. Mrs. F. H. Johnson, B601 East 
Superior street. 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework; three in family. Apply 
1121 London road. Telephone Mel- 
rose 4802. 



WANTED — MACKINAW COAT MAK- 
ers. Apply Chrlstensen-Mendenhall- 
Graham company. 514 West First 
street. 



One Cent u Wortl Each Insertion. 
Ko .%il%ertiMnienls Less Than 15 Cents. 

ISephone Directory' 

-OF— 

BUSINESS 
HOUSES 

Below ycu will find a 
condensed list cf reliable 
■ .siness firms. This Is de- 
nned for the convenience 
I uf busy people. A telephone 
'order to any one of them 
win receive the same care- 
ful attention as wouUJ be 
1 given an order plactd in 
' ttrson. You can safely de- 
pend upon the reliability 
of any one of these firms. 
Old New 

'Phone. Phone. 

DRIGCilSTS— „ „ 

Eddie Jeronlmus, Fh.t:. 12-13 
DKJiTlSTS— 

Dr. F. H. Burn€tt,D.D.S.4608 
OVK WflHKS — 

Zenith City Dye Wk8.1888 

Northwestern Dyeing 

St. Chaning Co 1337 

LAi:VDRIES— 

Peerless Laundry 428 

Yale Laundry 479 

Lults Laundry 447 

Home Laundry Co.... 478 

Model Laundry 2749 

Puritan Power 1378 

Troy Laundry 257 

MRAT IWAKKET— 

Mork Bron 1590 




One Cent a Word Each Ineertlon. 
No Advertisements Less Than 15 Cents. 

ifilFu ANTE D— M ALE. 

(Continued.) 



WANTEl^ — GOOD GIRL IXR GENER- 
al housework; good home for right 
party. 30 North Twenty-fourth ave- 
nue west. ^____ 

WANTED — COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
general housework; small family. 
Mrs. D. G. Ketcham. 2016 East Supe- 
rior street. 



FOR P.I^NT — COMPLETELY FUE- 
niiihed light huusckeeplng suites, 
froniin^ on Kuptrlor street, save 
carfare; also single rooms for rent 
reasonable at La Salle hotel. 12 Lake 
avenue north. 

FOR RENT — WELL FURNISHED, 
warm comfortable rooms, large and 
small; at very reasonable rates to 
steady roomers; transients accommo- 
dated. The Verona, a 10 W. Third St 



* ^ 

i& BELLEVUE TERRACE. * 

#• Seventh avenue west and First St. * 

* Three or four flats for ren» of four * 
4 or five rooms each; bath, gas for * 
*• cooking, gas and electric lights; * 
i^ rent very reasonable. * 

* N. J. UPILAM CO., * 

* 18 Third Avenue West *• 

* * 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
No Advertisements Less Than 16 Cents. 

(Continued.) 



FOR RENT— NICELY FURNISHED 
rooms; all conveniences; hot water 
heat: board if desired. Lincoln 263- 
D; 2323 West Fourth street. 

FOR RENT — FURNISHED ROOM; 
strictly modern; |10 per month. 114 
East Third street. 



WANTED— HIGH SCHOOL OR NOR- 
mal girl to assist with housework 
for room, board and small wages. 
907 East Fifth street, upper flat. 



WANTED — EXPERIENCED GIRL 
telephone operator to work even- 
ings. Western Union Telegraph com- 
pany. 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework: family of three. 718 
East Third street: call evenings. 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. 217 North Fifty-fourth 
avenue west. 



J^ WANTED. # 

# First-clas-s furniture salesman at * 

# once; Scandinavian preferred. # 

^ BAYHA & CO. * 



1072 

90 9 -K 

18S8 

1&16 

428 
479 
417 

478 
1S02 
1378 

257 

189 



# WANTED. *> 

I' ^ 

a- Live, energetic young man, 16 or # 
ii. 17 years of age. to make himself * 

* generally useful. * 
■ji v 

* STACK & CO.. # 

# 21 and 23 West Superior St. # 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework; family of three. 71S 
East Third street; call evenings. 

WANTED— ALL KINDS OF FEMALE 
help at Park Employment agency, 15 
Lake avenue nort h. Both 'phones. 

WANTED— COMPETENT GIRL FoR 
general housework; small family. 
Appl y 1431 Ease Superior street. 

WANTED— COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
general housework; small family. 14 
North Nineteenth avenue east. 



FOR RENT— FURNISHED ROOMS FOR 
man and wife housekeeping; lake 
view; very handy. Call evenings, 1515 
West Michigan street, second floor 



* FOR KENT. * 

* 1218 East Fourth St., second floor, * 
j^ 6 rooms; water and sewer; Jib. * 
■*. 323 V4 W. Fourth St.. 6 rooms; bath * 
i^ gas for cooking; $18. "* 
a. 1824-1826 W. Second St., 4 roorna «f- 
^ each; heated, all conveniences; ^ 

* 122. * 

* N. J. UPHAM CO., * 

* 18 Third Avenue West it 

* * 

* FOR RENT. * 

* See our list of strictly first-class # I 

* houses and flats. We have them * 
H. heated and unheated. All centrally ^- 
^ located and in good neighborhood. -* 

* MASSACHUSETTS REAL ESTATE * 
■* COMPANY, *■ 
a. 18 Phoenix Block, City. # 

* * 



FOR RENT — FOUR ROOMS AND 
basement, 227 West Fourth street; 
newly papered water and electric 
light; water paid; »10 per month. 
Call Grand 726-A. 



FOR RENT— NICELY FURNISHED, 

well ventilated and heated rooms, 

with baths, en suite and single. 17 

East Superior street. 



FOR RENT — THREE OR FOUR 
rooms at Lakeside; modern excepting 
heat; one block from car line. 4509 
McCullough street. 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. Mrs. Rattenbury. 2318 
Roslyn avenue. Hunter's Park. 



WANTED— GIRLS AT CENTRAL EM- 
ployment agency, room 3, over Big 
Duluth store. Both 'phones. 



WANTED — YCUNG MEN OVER 18 
for positions paying f50 per month to 
start. Will require preparation. Ask 
for Mr. Rublin, room 501, Hotel Hol- 
land. 



REAL ESTATE, FIRE 

INSURANCE AND 
RENTAL AGENCIES 

Duluth Rtalty Co., e08 1st N. Bank bldg. 
V. L ItakowBky & Co., 201 Exch. Wdg. 
E I) Field Co.. 203 Exchange building 
W. €' Sherwood, 118 Manhattan bldg. 
Gelly-Sniith Co., 306 Palladio building. 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework; no cooking. Inquire 507 
Fourth avenue west. 



WANTED — FIRST-CLASS STENOG- 
rapher with several years' experi- 
ence. Z 437. Herald. 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework: family of two. 524 East 
Third street. 



HELP WAKTED— MALE. 

H WANTED. * 

# ^ 

# Actlv<-, intelligent men, between * 

# 25 and 40, for conductors. Apply * 

# 9 a. m. * 

# * 

# D. C. MOORE, Superintendent. # 

ip 2t>31 West Superior St. * 

2k # 

W. —500 MEN TO SEE OUR UN- 
rt<nt!n«d pledges. 25 shotguns. 25 
rinef, ISO overcoats, 25 fur coats, 2 
graphophones, sewing machine, type- 
writers, 200 railroad watches, etc., all 
on fale now. Keystone Loan Co. 22 
West Superior street. 

WANTED— A.N EDITOR AND BUSI- 
iiesa manager to take charge of a 
national monthly newspaper, well 
estatllshed. with a good circulation; 
Want a man of experience and abll- 
Ity. Apply B 339. Herald. 

WANTEl*— HOUSE SHOEK; MUST VO 
floor work; also be able to toe and 
fit shoes; will pay good steady man, 
t;i 50 per day year round. Address A. 
J. Fe llows. Fergus Falls. Minn. 

WANTE,r>— MEN AKT) WOMEN FOR 
government positions; $80 a month; 
write for li-«t of positions open. 
Franklin Institute, department 181 
S, Rochester, N. Y. 



WANTED — LEARN THE BARBER 
trade; big demand; big wages; easy 
work; few weeks complete by our 
method; free beautiful illus. catalogue. 
Moler Barber college. 27 E. Nicollet 
Ave., Minneapolis, M'nn. Estab. 1893. 

WANTED— FOREMAN FOR LOGGING 
camp; must be experienced and capa- 
ble man; write full particulars. J. S. 
Morrison estate. State Savings bank 
building. Laurium, Houghton coun- 
ty, Mich. 

WANTED— MEN TO KNOW L BERG- 
Bteln, the clothier, at 521 West Su- 
perior street, being unable to sell 
his business without a great loss has 
decided to continue same. While 
away the business will be managed 
by Je ns Drogavold. . 

WANTED — COMPETENT MA.N AND 
wife to take ^arm on shares; no ob- 
jection to one child; references re- 
Quir ed. A 454. Herald. 

WANTED— PEOPLE TO TRY FAMOUS 
Finn Bath. 148 St. Croix avenu?. 
Open every Tuesday. Friday and Sat- 
urday. 

WANTED— YOUNG NLAN FOR DELIV- 
ery wagon; must be hustler; strictly 
business; work year around; good 
Job. J. Schelde, Jamestown, N. D. 



WANTED — CO.MPETENT GIRL FOR 
general housework. 711 East First 
street. - 

WANTED — AT 1222 EAST FIRST 
street, a girl for general housework; 
small family. _^___ 



FOR RENT— THREE UNFURNISHED 
modern heated rooms, for light 
housekeeping, $18 per month. 522 
Fourth avenue east. 

FOR RE.NT- TWO BRIGHT, WELL 
furnished room in a new house; all 
conveniences. 608 North Twenty-fifth 
avenue west. ^ 

For rent — Two nicely furnished heated 
rooms; running water, etc.; rent rea- 
sonable. 118 East Superior street. 



That Ought to Be 
Yours From Now On 



SECRET SOCIETIES. 

PALESTINE LODGE NO. 7K 
A. F. & A. M. — Regular meet- 
ings first and third Monday 
evenings of each month at ► 
o'clock. Next meeting, Sept. 
16, 1912. Work — Regular busi- 
ness. James H. Matteson, W. M.; tt. 
Ne sbitt, secretary. ^ 

IONIC LODGE NO. 186. A. F^ 
& A. M. — Regular meeting* 
second and fourth Mondiy 
evenings of each month at &> 
o'clock. Next meeting. Sept. 
9, 1912. Work — First degree. 
Warren E. Greene, W. M.; Burr Port*r^ 
secretary. 

KEYSTONE CHAPTER NO, 
20. R. A. M. — Stated convoca- 
tions, second and fourth 
Wednesday evenings of each 

month at 8 o'clock. Next 

meeting, Sept. 11, 1912. Work— Regular 
business. Carl E. Lonegren. H. P.; Al- 
fred Le Richeux, secretary. ' 



FLATS FOR RENT 



BY WHITNEY WALL CO.. 
201 TORREY BLDG. 



;V' A modern 7-room house in a de- ^ 

* llRhtful neighborhood, near * 
if Eighteenth avenue east on Sec- *• 
7^ ond street; two bathrooms; hot * 

* water heat, gas range; rent ?40 * 
■a- per month. "* 

* * 



* A large 6-room flat near Twelfth -Jf 

# avenue east on London road; •Se 

# large living room, 16 by 21, % 
ii- overlooking the lake and bar- # 
T^ bor; all rooms are large and i(- 
•fC- airy, with plenty of daylight; •S^ 
*. heat, water and janitor service; * 
•ft. rent |55 per month. '3f 

* * 

■it-i London road, near Twelfth avenue i(- 





FOR RENT — FURNISHED FLAT OF 
four rooms, new plumbing, newly 
furnished and decorated, one of the 
finest homes in the city, no car fare, 
reduced rent until spring, to desir- 
able tenants. Call 218 Fourth avenue 
west, Flat D. 



east, a comfortable 4 -room flat •^ 
in a delightful location over- # 
looking the lake and harbor; ■*- 
has Just been thoroughly reno- * 
vated; strictly modern and up- * 
to-date in every way; heat, -Sf- 
water and janitor service; rent f* 
140 per month. # 

* 

* 




WHITNEY WALL CO., 
301 TORREY BUILDING. 



FOR RENT — NICELY FURNISHED 
rooms; modern conveniences; use of 
'phone. 625 East Third street^ 



FOR RENT— FIVE ROOMS, WATER, 
gas and light; $12. Call 420 First 
avcnJe east. 



FOR RENT— PLEASANT FURNISHED 
rooms', central location; modern con- 
veniences. 202 West Third street. 



For F:ent— Nicely furnished, well ven- 
tilated, heated rooms, with baths, en 
suite or single, 17 East Superior St. 



FOR RENT— VERY DESIRABLE FIVE- 
room flat; hardwood floors and fin- 
ish throughout; all modern except 
heat; gas and electric lights, gas 
range with coal attachment; water 
paid; very bright and cheerful and 
very central; $23 per month. Apply 
E. D, Field & Co., Exchange building. 

FOR RENT — WAHLDORF — FIVE 
rooms, equal seven, with wall beds, 
heat; janitor, completely equipped 
kitchen; finest centrally located in 
city; $45 to $56, V.'ahl & Messer, 
20 8 Lonsdale building. 

FOR RENT— A VERY DESIRABLE 
brick flat; 5 rooms and bath; hot 
water heating plant; large store 
room; use of attic; within easy walk- 
ing distance of business center; rea- 
sonable rent. Call New 'phone Lin- 
coln 335. 



FOR RENT— TWO WELL FURNISHED 
rooms for light housekeeping. 101 
South Fifteenth avenue east. 



FOR RENT— THREE ROOMS, MOD- 
ern. gas range. $10 per month. 132 
Eleventh avenue west. ^ 



FOR RENT— STEAM HEATED FUR- 
nished room; all conveniences. 124 
We st Fourth street. Flat B. 

FOR RENT — NICELY FURNISHED 
room; all modem, private family. 
902 East Foruth street. 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. 2706 East Superior 
street. Telephone Melrose 4691. 



FOR RENT — ROOM; VERY CEN- 
tral: every convenience. Call even- 
ings. Melrose, B544. 



FOR RENT — THREE-ROOM FLATS, 
upstairs and downstairs; $13 and $14; 
61-3 West Third street; downstairs 
305 and 309 Sixth avenue west, $14. 
Apply to Henry Taylor, 603 Palladio. 
Grand, 2 066- Y. 

FOR RENT— AT 119 WEST FIRST 
street, four-room flat; hardwood 
floors, bath, gas and electric light; 
rent $19. W. C. Sherwood & Co., 118 
Manhattan building. Both phones 226. 



FOR RENT— FOUR-ROOM, STEAM 
heated flat, Munger terrace: gas 
range, bath, electric light and jani- 
tor service. F. I. Salter Co., 303 Lons- 
dale b uilding. 

FOR RENT— 121 FIRST AVENUE 
west, steam heated brick flat; gas, 
bath, electric light, janitor service; 
all modern; $50 per month. F. I. 
Salter Co., 803 Lonsdale building. 



FOR RENT— 829-831 EAST THIRD 
street, four-room flats. Gas. bath 
and sewer; rent cheap and in good 
location. F. L Salter Co., 303 Lons- 
dale building. ^^^^__ 



FOR RENT— 724 EAST SIXTH 
street, second floor flat: sewer, elec- 
tric light and water; just a block 
from the new Ninth street car line, 
$15 per month. F. I. Salter Co., 
303 Lons dale building. 

FOR RENT— FOUR-ROOM FLAT; IN- 

quire 105 First avenue east^ - 



A DULUTH COUNCIL NO. ,«► 
R. & S. M. — Stated convoca- 
tions, first and third Fridays 
of each month at 8 p. m. Mo 
meeting until further notice. 
Philip Bayha, T. I. M.; Alfred Le 
Ric heux, recorder. 

DULUTH COMMANDER Y NO. 
18, K. T.— Stated conclave, 
first Tuesday of each month 
at 8 o'clock. Next conclave, 
^ Sept. 10, 1912. Work— Red 

Cross degree. William D. Underhill, E. 
C; Alfred Le Richeux, recorder. 




SCOTTISH RITE— REGULAR 
meetings, every Thursday 
evening at 8 o'clock. Next 
meeting, Sept. 12, 1912. Work 

^ — General business. Henry 

Nesbitt, secretary. 





FOR SA^LE— HOUSES. 



FOR RENT — VERY DESIRABLE 
five-room flat in center of city; hard- 
wood floors and finish; water paid 
by owner; $23 per month. E. D. 
Field & Co., Exchange building. 



FOR RENT — FOUR-ROOM BRICK 
flat; hardwood floors, gas, bath, elec- 
tric light; $16 per month; 23 East 
Fourth street. Call at 506 West Su- 
perior street. 



ZENITH CHAPTER NO. 25» 
Order of Eastern Star — ^Regu- 
lar meetings, second and 
fourth Friday evenings or 
_ each month at 8 o'clock. Next 
meeting, Sept. 13, 1912. Nellie L. Allen, 
W. M.; Ella F. Gearhart. secretary. 

EUCLID LODGE NO. 198, A. 
F. & A. M. — Meets at West 
Duluth second and fourth 
Wednesdays of each month 
at 7:30 p. m. Next meeting 
Sept. 11. 1912. Work— First 

degree. Mason M. Forbes, W. M.; A. 

Dunleav y, secretary. _^____ 

DLT:.UTH CHAPTER NO. B9^ 
R A. M. — Meets at West Du- 
luth first and third Wednes- 
days of each month at 7:30- 
p m. Next meeting. Sept. 18, 
1912 Work — M. M. degree. 
M. J. Murray, H. P.; A. Dunleavy. sec- 
retary. 





FOR RENT— FURNISHED ROOMS; 
all modern conveniences. 214 Sixth 
avenue west. 

POR RENT — FLTRNISHED ROOMS 
for light housekeeping. 1119 East 
Third street. 



GIRL 

1828 



FOR GENEFtAL 
East Superior 



WANTED — 
housework, 
street^ 

WANTED — COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
general housework. 711 East First 
street. 



FOR RENT — NICELY FURNISHED 
front rooms; modern, 2115 West Sec- 
ond street. 



WANTED— KITCHEN GIRL, ALSO 
dishwasher. 2531 West Superior 
street. 



WANTED— GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. 217 Fifty-fourth avenue 
west. 

WANTED AT ONCE— GIRL FOR GEN- 
eral housework. 1125 East Superior 
street. 



FOR RENT — THREE NICE ROOMS 
at 22 East Fourth street. 



FOR RENT— SIX-ROOM ITASCA FLAT. 
420 East First street; modern in 
every way except heat; cheap rent. 
John A. Stephenson & Co., Wolvin 
building. 



FOR RENT— FIVE-ROOM FLAT, TWO 
blocks from Soo depot; all modern 
except heat; rent $26. Wahl & 
Messer, 208 Lonsdale building. 



FOR RENT— THREE ROOMS; WATER 
and li ght. 618 East Sixth street. 

FOR RENT — Ft^NlSHED ROOM, 
all modern. 1530 East Superior street. 

FOR RENT— FOUR ROOMS. INQUIRE 
418 »4 West Sixth street. 



REAL ESTATE LOANS. 



WANTEEV— BRIGHT YOUNG MAN TO 
learn wholesale paper business; age 
20 or 21; 10 and 12 West Michigan 
street. 



WANTED— YOUNG MAN TO ASSIST 
in cleaning room. National Dyeing & 
Cleaning company, ai9 East Supe- 
rior s treet. 

WANTED — MACHINE MEN FOR 
sash department. Duluth Lumber 
company. 364 Garfield avenue. 



WANTED — WOMAN TO COOK FOR 
family of seven. Apply Frederic ho- 
tel. ^ . 

WANTED— DINING ROOM GIRL, CHO- 
lette hot el, 917 West Michigan street. 

WANTED— GIRLS AT MRS. SOMERS' 
employment offic e. 15 Second Ave. E. 

WANTED— GIRL FOR GENERAL 
house work. 1019 East Second street. 

I WANTEt>— GIRL FOR GENERAL 
I housewo rk. 1116 East Second street. 

I WANTED— A NURSE 
i East Fifth street. 



GIRL. 2331 



WANTED— ERFiAND BOY, ALL DAY 
work. Apply Christie Lithograph & 
Printing Co. 



WANTED— YOUNG MAN AS OFFICE 
clerk; state age, experience and sal- 
ary expected. T 448, Herald. 



WANTED^PRESS FEEDER. APPLY 
Christie Lithograph & Printing com- 
pany. 



WANTED — GOOD BUTCHER AT 732 
Fourth avenue east. 



WANTED— GIRL TO MAKE BEDS, IN 
forenoo ns, at 101 East Superior street. 

WANTED — KITCHEN OIRU 1131 
Garfield avenue. 



% WE HAVE FUNDS * 

^ On hand that we can loan at 5 per * 
* cent on select real estate security. » 
^ NO DELAY. 



FOR RENT— FINE FOUR AND FIVE- 
room flats, very warm for winter; 
low rent; Eleventh avenue west and 
First street. Mel rose 1018. 

FOR RENT — ONE FIVE-ROOM FLAT, 
all conveniences except heat. 524 
Cascade street. Inquire 621 Lake 
avenue north. 



FOR RENT— ONE FOUR-ROOM FLAT, 
$12; one five-room, $13; and one two- 
room, $6. Call at 126 Eleventh ave- 
nue west. 



FOR RENT— MODEFtN, SEVEN- ROOM 
flats. East end; special inducement 
to term lease. Dunphy, Columbia 
b uilding. 

FOR RENT — MODERN SIX-ROOM 
flat. East end; garden In rear. In- 
quire 1222 East Third street. 



F. I. SALTER COMPANY, 
302-3 Lonsdale Bldg. 



MONEY TO LOAN. 



WANTED— A NEAT APPEARING 
young man who Is willing to work 
for $18 per week and advancement. 
Apply on or before 9 a. m., 221 Man- 
hattan building. 

WANTRD— A.NY ONE CAN MAKE 

selling our money makers, 

. by mail 35 cents. Call or 

write. Torrey Supply Co., Torrey 

building, Dulu th. Minn. 

WANTED — MECHANICAL DRAFTS- 
mer. receive $ir,0 monthly; prepare 
at home four months; low rates: 
private instruction. P. O. box 433, 
Newark, N. J. 

WANTED— GOOD TAILOR TO WORK 

by week. Hultgren & Bowden. Ill 
Third avenue west. Board of Trade 

building^^ 

WANTED—TEAMS FOR RAILROAD 
work in Superior. Olund-Engberg 
Employment company. 505^ West 
M i c li i g an street. 

WANTED — A BOY TO DELIVER 

guo.li:. Apply 313 South Fifteenth 
avenue east, between 5 and 7 p. m. 



WANTED — AN EXPERIENCED 
houseman. Appl y Hotel Hollan d. 

WANTED— .STRIPPER AT LA RAZON 
Cigar Co. 714 East Third street. 



TIMBER LANDS. 



FOR SALE— WE BUY AND SELL 
mining and timber lands. Improved 
farm lands in Minnesota, Montana 
and North Dakota, homesteads, tim- 
ber claims, farm loans. Barney Eden, 
407 Manhattan bui lding. 

FOR SALE— 120 ACRES OF MINERAL 
land in town 55, range 17, very good 
signs for iron ore; will sell at $14 
per acre if sold soon. Address O 491, 
Herald. 



^ SPECIAL RATE LOANS. ^ 

# These payments pay botfc interest ^ 
« and principal. # 

# YOU MAKE YOUR OWN TERMS. # 
« $10— Return $0.45 wkly; $1.80 mly * 
« $20— Return $0.90 wkly; $3.60 mly * 

# $30— Return $1.35 wkly; $5.40 m ly * 
^ Jso- Return $2.25 wkly; $9.00 mly * 
« Other amounts in proportion. ■* 

# DULUTH FINANCE CO.. ^ 
Z. 301 Palladio Bldg. * 

$10 TO $100. $10 TO $100. $10 TO $100. 

ON FUiTnITURE, PL\N0S OR SALARY, 

At charges honest people can pay. 

No red tape. No delay. 

WEEKLY OR MONTHLY I AYMENTS 

Arranged to suit your Income. 

DULUTH LOAN COMPANY 

307 Columbia Bldg. 303 W. Sup. St. 

Open every day and Wed. & Sat, cvgs. 



WE HAVE ON HAND A LARGE 
amount of money which we are loan- 
ing out on improved real estate; low 
rate; prompt and efficient service; 
no delay, cf L. Rakowsky & Co., 201 
Exchange building. 



FOR RENT — FOUR- ROOM MODERN 
flat, 28 Fourth avenue east. Inquire 
18 Fourth avenue east. Melrose, 2659. 



FOR RENT — NICE FIVE-ROOM 
brick flat. Inquire 424 Ninth avenue 
east. 

FOR RENT — FIVE-ROOM FLAT, AT 
519 East Fifth street. Call or phone 
Chrl stensen, 26 West Superior street. 

FOR RENT— TWO FLATS, FIVE AND 
four rooms, modern conveniences, 
cent ral. 608 West Third street. 

FOR RENT — ONE SEVEN ROOM 
heated Dacey apartment. 1008 East 
Third street. Either 'phone 423. 



^ FOR SALE. * 

* ONLY $100 CASH REQUIRED, f 
7^ balance on easy terms, for an 8- ■^^ 

* room modern house at 1204 East 

* Third street. See 

* W. M. PRINDLE & CO., 
^ Lonsdale Building. 

if. * 

*. FOR SALE. * 

if- Eight-room house and barn in best * 

* of repair, on Fifty-fourth avenue * 
i^ west; two lots, hardwood floors, *•' 

* electric light, well water; price ^ 

* $1,260; $100 cash, balance monthly. * 
1 THOMAS OLAFSON. * 

* 5417 Ramsey Street. West Duluth. * 

* * 
^ FOR SALE. * 
$ $500 cash, balance $20 per month, it- 

* buys good 8-room house, entirely * 
•S^ modern except heat; stone founda- ■^ 

* tlon, hardwood floors. Location * 

* 608 North Fifty-seventh avenue * 
if- west. See „^ "* 
a- W. M. PRINDLE & CO.. *, 

* Lonsdale Bldg. * 

FOR SALE3— $600 CASH. BALANCE TO 
suit, buys a new eleven-room house 
on Forty-eighth avenue west, one 
block from care line; hardwood floors, 
light, water; lot 33x112. Could not 
be built for $3,000 but will sell for 
$2,700 if taken at once. John A 
Forsman. 5202 Ramsey street. West 
Duluth. 

FOR SALE— NEW. WELL-BUILT, SIX- 
room house and bath: concrete foun- 
dation, water, sewer, gas and electric 
light; lot 30 by 140 feet; half block 
from car line. Will sell cheap if 
taken at once. 718 East Eighth 
street. _^ 

FOR SALE — WEST END 11 -ROOM 
house; fine condition: rented $28 per 
month: for quick sale $1,600, with 
$500 cash. W^hltney Wall company, 
301 Torrey building. (438.) 




EUCLID CHAPTER NO. 6«r 
Order of Eastern Star— Regu- 
lar meetings, first and third 
Tuesday evenings of earn 
month at 7:30 at West Du- 
luth Masonic temple. Next 
meeting, Sept. 17 1912. Work— Regu- 
lar business. Elsie J. Bailey, W. M., 

Esther E. Murray, secretary. 

ZENITH COUNCIL NO. 161_ 
Roval league, meets the sec- 
ond and fourth Thursdays ot 
the month at 8 p. m., K. of ^. 
hall, 118 West Superior street. 
- Next meeting, Sept. 12, 191SL 
Initiation. O. S. Kempton, ■'•«l\o»t,30* 
Wolvin building: collector. H. A. Ha.". 
18 East First street. . 





W'l 



nilLrTH TKNT. NO. 1. K^^O"T8 OT 
tue M«cciib*€s cf Ibe World. meeU m« 
and third Monday* ot «ch loontto l* 
M.cc*bee liall. 21 L»ke avenue i.ort^ 
Charles O. Kutler, comm»nder, «M 
North Fifty-Berenth *ve«ue »wt ; J. ^ 
Grtlneau. rwoid keeper. «'«ce In haU. H*>"7;^» •• 
a! u. 1 p. m. amy- Z«°>"' P*""'- ^"'"'^ "'^^ - 
DULUTH LODGE NO. 505. 

W Loyal Order of Moose, meets 
every Monday evening at » 
Tclock, MoosI hall. 224 West - 
First street. M. E. Scott^ sec- 
retary. 30 4 Columbia building. 

BROTHERHOOD OF AMER- 
Ican Yeomen— Duluth Home- 
stead No. 2131, meets every 
Thursday evening at 8 » clocK 
at Yeomen hall. Woodmen 
building. Twenty-first avenue 
we*-, and First street. Bert \N. LoneT" 
well, foreman. 'Phone, Grand 736. Mr*. 
J A Bellmeur, corresponoent, l tjxeier 
stre et. New 'phone, 229-D Lincoln. 

ZZ UNITED OUDEU OF FORKSTHW^ 

Court Eastern Star, No. 8€, U. O. r. 
hall, corner Fourth arenue west antf< 
Klrsl street. Ncwtou H. WUscn. C^^^ 
j:i8 Torrey tuililln«: Jull* Wilson, yr^ 
'^M tary No. 2011: West Fourth street; Buiy 
MUiitT^tieasurer". twom 2S Wmthrop blocJt, new 'phooe • 
Grand.' 1080-X. 

IMTEUlAl/ CAMp; NO. 2:0€ - MEKTO - 
al Maccabee hall. Lake a\enu« nortli. 
second and fourth Mondays oX eacfc • 
month. Bert Erlcltsoc. oudsuI; C. F. 
l-:arl. clerk, box 411. 









CITY AND VILLAGE LOANS IN MIN- 
nesota. Buy or build a home on 
monthly payments. C. A. Knlppen- 
berg, 300 Alworth Bldg. 'Phones 697. 
Grand and Fifty-sixth avenues west. 



WE WRITE INSURANCE IN STRONG 
companies, make city and farm loans, 
and solicit some of your business. 
Wm. C. Sargent, 208 Exchange Bldg. 

MONEY TO LOAN— LOANS MADE ON 
timber and farm lands. John Q. A 
Crosby, 305 Palladio building. 



WANTKD — MI:N TO DIG DITCHES. 
.See Mr. Watson. Hartley's Allandale 
farm, near Wodland dairy. 

WANTED— WHITE PORTER. HOTEL 
Holland billiard room. 



WANTED— YARDMAN. ST. 
hospital. 



LUKE'S 



WANTED — YARDMAN AND BELL 
boy. Hotel McKay. 



WANTED TO BUY— STUMPAGE OR 
timber land within few miles of rail- 
road. J. A. F. 5202 Ramsey street. 
West Duluth, Minn. 



WE LOAN ON ALL KINDS OF PER- 
sonal security at Icwest rates. Call 
on us, 430 Manhattan B'dg.. and get 
rates. Duluth Mortgage Loan Co. W. 
Horkan. New 1598-D: Melrose 3733. 



Money to Loan — Low rates, no delay. 
Duluth Realty Co., Ist National Bldg. 



Money to Loan — Any amount; low rates. 
Cooley & Underhill, 209 Exchange. 



Loans on farm and city property. North- 
ern Title Co., First Natl Bank Bldg. 



FOR RENT— FOUR-ROOM FLAT, ALL 
modern, $19.50 per month. At 421 
Second avenue east. 



FOR RENT— FOUR-ROOM FLAT; ALL 
modern, except heat. 1412 Jefferson 
street. 



FOR RENT— FIVE- ROOM FLAT; ALL 
conveniences except heat; rent rea- 
sonable. 1027 West First street. 



TOK SALE — $1,300 BUYS SMALL 
house on 60-foot lot. near Cascade 
park; only $200 down. 527 Manhat- 
tan building. 



FOR RENT — MODERN HEATED 
flat: no children. 419 East Fifth 
street 



LOST AND FOUND. 

IJO^rV^^^GOl^ NEClS^ACFp'^CHARM 
engraved M. A. G., on westbound 
Lakeside car or Fifteenth avenue 
east. Return for reward to 1424 East 
Third street; Melrose 4743. 



STRAYED OR STOLEN — SMALL 
dark brlndle puppy, with spot in 
white marking on head; $5 reward. 
Mrs Morton. 501 West Sixth street. 



TIMBER AND CUT-OVER LANDS 
bouKht; mortgage loans made. John 
Q. A. Crosby, 305 Palladio building. 



MONEY FOR SALARIED PEOPLE AND 
others upon the'r own names; cheap 
rates, easy payments; conttdentlal. 
L* H. Tol man, 510 Palladio building. 

MONEY TO LOAN ON DIAMONDS, 
watches, furs and all g.^ods of value. 
$1 to $1,500. Keystone Loan & Mer- 
cantile company. 22 Wes» Superior St. 



FARM. TIMBER AND CUT-OVER 

lands bought and sold. F. B. Rossom. 
109 Manhattan building. 



FOR SALE— EIGHTY ACRES TIMBER. 
Apply box 244. Central avenue, Su- 
perior. Wis. 



NOTICE— I BUY AND SELL TIMBER 
stumpage. Ralph Banta. Brookston. 

Minn. 



1 buy standing timber: also cut-over 
lands. Geo. Rupley, «16 Lyceum Bid«. 



CLAIRVOYANT 4ND PALMIST. 

fTm^UTH'S " l^ANOmiTE^^CLAmVO Y - 
ant and palmist. Prof. Glrard. 20 W 
Sup. St. Six questions answered 
fl. Send date of birth. 



FORTUNE TOLD, MAN OF M|S- 
tery tells past, present, future. His 
predictions will surely a"»*«^>'0" 
Three 2-cent stamps and birthdate 
gets wonderful horoscope. Prof. 
Raymond. Peoria, iii. 



LOST— GOLD BAND BRACELET WITH 
turn to Sibbitt's Millinery for reward, 
turn to Sibt.itth' Mi l linery for reward. 

LCtST— TAN CRAVENETTE ON SPIRIT 
Lake train Saturday night; return to 
North ern Shoe company. 

LOST— PLAIN GOLD BRACELET ON 
Wednesday afternoon. Call Melrose 
6363. 



FOR RENT— SIX-ROOM FLAT. MOD- 
ern except heat. 1611 East Fourth 
street. 

FOR RENT— FIVE-ROOM FLAT, ALL 
convenien ces. 312 Ninth avenue west. 

FOR RENT — FOUR AND FIVE-ROOM 
flat": modern. 731 West First street. 

FOR RENT — MODERN BOUR-ROOM 
heated flat. 212 East Third street. 

FOR RENT— THREE ROOMS; WATER 
and light. 518 East Sixth street. 



RENT— STORES, OFFICES, ETC. 

FOR RENT STORE. 

No 20 Third avenue west; dimensions 

18 by 100 feet; with or without 

basement. ^^ 

N. J. UPHAM CO.. 

18 Third Avenue West 



FOR SALE— THAT MAN 'FIDER" 
sells houses. Talk with Elder. 18 
Third a venue west. 

FOR SALE— MODERN EIGHT-ROOM 
house in fine condition, gas and elec- 
tric light; furnace heat, hardwood 
floors throughout, stationary wash- 
tubs. A snap for quick sale. 1412 East 
Four th street. ^ 

p55 sale — NEW SEVEN-ROOM 
house at Lakeside, strictly modern, 
hot water heat; one block from car 
line. $4,300. $500 cash. A. F. Kreager, 
406-7 Torrey building. 



FOR SALE— AN EIGHT-ROOM HOUSE 
near Twentieth avenue west and 
Fourth street; very cheap. Address 
C Hendricksen, Lake View postoffice. 



FOR SALE— FIVE-ROOM BUNGALOW 
on easy payments; gas, water, sewer, 
etc ; normal school district See or 
call Dr. G. W. Davis, both 'phonea 

FOR SALE — PLEASANT EIGHT- 
room house and lot, 50x80, near car 
line. West end; party leaving. Terms 
to suit purchaser. Lincoln 309X. 



•9. CLAN 8Tf:AVART, NO. 50. O. 8. C.-- 

.JSl as MeeU first and third Wedneedays ea«* ^ 
month. 8 p. m-, « U. O. F. hall, coraer 
Fourth avenue west and Ural »*'•*• 
Next regular meeting Sept. IWh. AUK 
---——- Macrae diief; PerdTal .M. Yffui.6, mct*- 
tary; John Burnett, financial secretary, 313 Twt» 

building. - 

PIAMONT> LODGE. NO. i\ K. of P.-- 
Meeta every Monday ercning in Sloan's 
iiall. coniw Twcnlteth aveime w«l wad 
Sut«rlor street George E. Huren. C. U, 
s. L. Pierc«. K. of R. a S. 




K. OF P. ^ 

NOUTH BTAB LODGE, NO. S5, K. 
p_Meet« every Friday evenUif at 
Ue hall, 118 West Superior tirert. U J. 
Knarke C C. 310 Wolvm building; S. A 
Uearn 28 North Twenty -eigtitU »TeiM« 
w€8t, k. of n. tt 8. 



DULUTH LODGE, NO. 28. 1. O. O. F.-MEETS 
every Friday e»€ulng at 8 o'clock al Odd 
Fellow*" hall. 18 Lake avenue nortb. 
Nt-xt meeting n.ght. Friday evening, SqJ. 

13th Flirt degT*«. Bud K. Forgj-, N. G. : R. A. 

AndtreoD, Rec. Sec.; A. H. Paul, Fin Sec. 

DULITH E.\CAMPMENT, NO M. I. 
O OF.— Meet* en the aecond aad 
fourth Thursday* at Odd Fellivrg" ball. » 
I^ake avenue north. Next meeting nigBjW 
Aug. 22. Bu»ln€B»-Work. O. H. UUa^ 
C. P ; W. J McDonald, Ilec. Scribe; U 
H. Marlow. Fin. Scribe. 



A^ 



FOR RENT— LARGE AND SMALL 
stores, located in all parts of the city, 
suitable for any kind of mercantile 
business at low rental. See Martin 
Smith. No. 6 South First avenue 
east. 



FOR SALE— REAL ESTATE. 

WANTED — AN Or FER --N A MOST 
beautifully wooded island on Rainy 
lake; worth $12 per acre; will sell 
for any reasonable amount; give me 
an offer per acre: must be «'ol<i at 
once: fifty-one acres. Address W 4b«>, 
Herald. 

FOR SALE— 45x100 FOOT LOTS ON 
Twentieth avenue east and btxtn 
street; prices and terms right; best 
residence location in the East end. 
A H. Burg & Co., 300 Alworth Bldg. 



LOST— F'I,AIN GOLD BRACELET ON 
Wednesday atternoon. Call Melrose 
13«3. 



SCHOOL or EKGLiSH. 



TANIS SCHOOL OF ENGLISH FOR 
foreigners will resume work in Sep- 
tember; opening day recital, Tues- 
day evening. Sept. 10. Jno. Tanls 
rlncipal. Wlnthrop block, corner of 
curtb avenu* wwt and Flrat street. 



For Rent— Suite of lour ofTlces. with 
dressing rooms and shower bath, suit- 
able for speciallit; large room for 
llaht manufacturing: one or two front 
offices. Apply Christie building. 



FOR RENT — STORES — BEST LOCA- 
tlon in city, opposite Union depot, 
suitable for restaurant or lunch 
counter. Inquire 501 West Michigan 
street. 

FOR RENT— STORE SUITABLE FOR 
confectionery. Good location. Ad- 
dress B 44$ H«rald. 



FOR SALE— TWO NICE LARGE LOTS, 
close to Hunter's Park. $625 takes 
both. Terms. O 477 Herald. 




A. O. V. W. , ,,.,- 

FIDEUTV LODGE. NO. 105 - MSB^' 
Tt M.ccal*« hall. 21 Lake "*«"« ?°rt^ 
erery Tl.ursda, « 8 P ,m ^talUn»- 
nienibers welcime. "• *-°f w-- *wi" ti 
E. riering. recorder; O. J. Mumdd; •- 
ancier. 217 Eart FUlh street^ 



MODKKN SAMARITANS. 
AIJ'HA COVNCIL. NO. 1-TAKE NO- 
tU-e- Tliat lleneflcenl degree meata lee- 
ond and fourth Tuesday*, and tb« 8«a— 
ariian degree the first and third Tues- 
days at K. P. hall. 118 We« SuperlM- 
rt^t J. Kelly, G. 8.; Wallace P. 
WeUljauk". scribe; T. A. Gall, F- 8.. 

First National l*nk bcUdhig. Mra. D. C. BufMtU 

Udy G. S. 





FOR SALE— 2%-ACRE LOT AT WOOD- 
land. $175. Whitney Wall company. 



BOARD OFFERED. 

BOARD AND ROOM BY THE DAY OR 
week. Mrs. Tammelln. 626 West 
First street. Hotel Imatra. 

BOARD OFFERED — BOARD AND 
room. »10 West 6«cond street. 



ROYAL ARCANUM. DITLUTD COUW- 

cJl No 1483— MceU second a:id fourtB^■ 
Tu«day evenings at .\Iacc»l.bee haD, 81 
Lake avenue north. CUntcn Brocka. aee- 
retary 4C1 Columbia buUdli:g. 

Mei^aba Council. No. 149S— Meet! arA 
and third Wednesday evenings at C»- 
lonib a hall. W«t end. A. M. Johnson., secretur.- 

117 North Twenttet h avenue west. ^ 

ORDEU OF OWLS, DULUTW 
Ne»t. No. 1200— Meet Ingu are beld 
firtt and third Wtdne«tUys of ekdk 
month at Eagles hall, 418 We«t 8n- 
perior atreet. Joseph E. Feake. • 
reury, 22 East Superior ■met. 




HAIRDRESSWG PARLOR. 



MME. MOISAN. 215 W^est First street. 
Shampooing, facial massage, scalp, 
treatments. Expert hair-dyeing anS 
coloring; combings and cut hair 
made up in switches or any sbap* 
desired. 'Phone Grand 2401 for ap* 
pointmenta. 



IIIIU^^^^^^^^^^ ■I 



\ 



U. 



■ » - j m^mmmmma^mm^amm 



I 






A 



.- \ 



-».— -»■ 




■wiiiiex 



THE DULUTHHERAL 




VOLUME XXX— NO. 132. 



TUESDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 10, 1912. 



TWO CENTS. 



DR. DUMAS SAYS HE 
IS READY TO BE SENT 



TO THE PENITENTIARY 



Former Cass Lake Mayor 

Goes to Be Sentenced 

for Arson 

Declares He Is Innocent M 

Has No Money to D^ 

fend Himself. 

Government Attorneys Attend 

Court Owing to Federal 

Indictmenti 



Casi Lako, Minn.. Sept. 10.— (SP«ial 

to The H.r.i;d,V-^l»r. I». F. l-umas will 



REPUBUCANS CARRY 
MAINE BY PLURALITY 
OF OEY 3,557 VOTES 



SYMPATHIZERS OF STRIKERS 
HURL STONES AT STREET CARS 



TWELVIif JIRESTS ARE MADE 



leave t) 
11 ••• 



1 

%: 

tJIt i: 

of ' 
t' 

V . .. 

Mci 
sit ■■ 
\\ 
was* 
ftl !« 



;-iun.!i for Bemidjt to re- 

;ce from Judge McClenahan 

of his conviction a year ago 

, his attempted burning of 

',. .- and store at Puposky, 

charged that Dr. Dumas 

I his I'lace, was the heaU 

ed gang of tire- setters 

nualr.st convictioJi and 

1 of that con- 

- a sensattoi. 

rtiirin Minnesota. Judge 

viU go from Brainerd to 




Haines Elected Governor and 

Legislative Majority Is 

Republican. 

''Best News Taft Has Heard 

Since Entering the 

Wbite House/' 



HOT TIME IN 
WISCONSIN 

Bull Moose Meeting at Mil- 
waukee Promises Lively 
Tilts. 



Portland, Me., Sept. 10.— The political 
overturn in the Maine state election 
yesterday. In which the Republicans 
won back the governorship, won three 
of the four congreBsmen and a suf- 
ficient majority on a Joint ballot in the 
legislature to assure the election of a 
Republican United States senator, be- 
came more apparent today with revised 
and additional returns. 

William T. Haines of Waterville. Re 



publican, was elected governor by a 
plurality of 3.557 over Governor Fred- 
rick W I'laisted, Democratic candi 



•hisi morning the doctor 

more valu- 

lich he will 

jKMiti. iwo patients 

>4 to have their hands 

. ttiag Arnold Larson, who 

!■ in a gawmlll ac ia.. nt two 

• • nther John Lmgel. 

at oft in the Far. 

■'■«■'•>'• 

: busy up to the time 

iwk only a few minutes 

- interview which he says 

ly one given any news- 

.^: 

- 1 ;tn. i>,^i.r:ea to take my sentence 

like a man. feeling absolutely 8uj;e ^^f 

.,. >., this matter. 1 couiu 

and 1 if'ok upon It as 

., . , ,,. , -., ...on. I have exhau.«ited 

ins in the light, and could not 

d,. ....<. rwise but quit. Numerous friends 

have voluntarily offered to assist me 



1- 

•V'. 
V, 

Tin ■ 

T: 

t 
r 
t 



my 
not 



flna' 
In I 

wit: 

l..a k ■ 
me ' 



EDWIN C. BURLEIGH, 

Republican Candidate for Senator 

From Maine. 

EUCHAW" 
IN SESSION 

Oyer 150,000 Delegates and 

Visitors at MeetiDgs 

in Vienna. 



..iiv },iit I did not feel justified 
1 them. I leave here 
of the people or Cass 
■ d will make it easier for 
through the ordeal which Is 
comiMK. That the people of ^Tass Lake 
iVcod by me nobly is shown by .my «^- j 
tensive practic* "Ince Ihia afTalir 

stai t*«l." 

♦ 

Feilvrfll .%t«or«*yi» «» Haml. , .. 

Bemldjl. Minn.. Sept. 10— <SP«<^'»\ *° 
The Herald.)— According to the plans 
t.^\ ,^ xe I'r. l>. F. Dumas, former 
ma <'«'t-«s I-ake and prominent in 

Norm .u Minne.sota as a successful 
phvsician, will be a .convict In t^e 
»tate s prison at Stillwater within 
forty-eight hours. Sometime late this 
afternoon Dr. Dumas will be arraigned 
before jSdge w. S McClenahan In dls- 
trlct court, which convened here this 
morning, to receive Rent^n^ on an 

arson charge K»"o^'"K ..^'^U^ alo lilt 
mous PupoBky raid of a >ear ago last 

■'"df* Dumas was convicted on this 
Charge here at the September term 
of court last year. The case was cer- 
Sle to the supreme court by Judge 
Mcrliiahan on alleged Irregularity of 
U,e . lictment. The supreme court up- 
held he indictment, which caused the 
jury verdict to hang oyer the doctor » 
bead : r.d it is to receive sentence on 
ih is .. . Uct that he now appears. Alex- 
ander L. Janes. ^»«i«J^^^ ^""fl^^LfL.: 
eral. Is here to look after the state m 

''^Although Judge C. M. Stanton opened 
I le Dre"ent term of court. Judge Mc- 
Clenahan. before whom Dr. Dumas was 
tried came up from Brainerd to pass 
lente'nce. United States District Attor- 
ne V C P Houpt of St. Paul and As- 
sistani United States J->istrict Attorney 
Oakley of l>uluth are here to Protect 
the governments interests. Federal 
Indictments are hanging over Dr 
Dumag. The Puposky stt.re that was 
entered for the purpose of robberj and 
arson, the state, alleges, also con- 
tained the postofflce. 

Riimom of Coiifeti-loB. 
Wild rumors of a dramatic ena to 
the long drawn out Dumas' sensation 
ire u'li'-d bv attorneys on both sid^s 
*J^. "e 'Dr. Dumas' friends laugh 

It It out of Brainerd that he is 

to make an open court confession and 
'take his medicine." George U. Spear 
jf (Jrancl Rapids was recently employed 
t>y Dr. Dumas a.«» his attorney. What 
his move will be when the case Is 
z&\\t.A this afternoon is not known, but 
It ■ vtd here that an appeal to the 

»u, ourt will be requested. 

IV iiu.H is done.' said Mr. Janes at 
noon today, 'it will be up to the Judge 

to • " a stay of sentence or to im- 

pc tcnce at once, and we shall 

urK- '■■=- latter course, for the state 
believes that Dr. Dumas has been 
shown leniency enough and that he 
now should be senter^ the peni- 

tentiary, where he bel- We shall 

right vigorously any further effort to 
delay justi ce in thi s case." 

ADAM BEDE TO 
TRAIL MOOSE 



New York. Sept. 10.— Chairman Hllles 
of the Republican national committee 
announced today that he had selected 
United States Senator Henry Cabot 
Lodge of Maj=Rachu.settB to open the 
national Republican campaign In Ohio 
Seot 21- Senator Lodge will speak in 
Columbus on that date. It was also 
announced that Secretary Nagel of the 
department of commerce and labor will 
be the first member of P*re»ident Taft r 
cabinet to take the stump in behalf 
of the president's election He is ex- 
pected to do his speech-making in the 
northern part of New York state. 

John H Harlan and J. Adam Rede 
it also was announced, will stajt at 
once on a speaking tour, following Col. 
Roo«evelt through Oregon, Idaho. Ne- 
braska and Colo rado. 

increas¥1n1jnfilled 

TONNACiE IS REPORTED 

New York. Sept. lO — The unfilled 
tonnage of the United S'ates Steel cor- 
ooration on Aug. 31. totalled 6.163 375 
ions as compared with 5,957,079 ton» 
on July 31. 



Vienna. Austria. Sept. 10.— Under the 
protection of Emperor Francis Joseph, 
the twenty-third eucharist congress 
today >>•»*» Hs labors, which are to 
be continued until Sunday next. Dele- 
gates and visitors numbering upwards 
of 160,000 and Including representa- 
tives from the United States. South 
America and Canada and from all the 
countries of Europe, have gathered in 
the city, which is decked with flags 
in honor of the great ecclesiastical 

'^''S^papal legate to the co"fX«; 
Cardinal Van Rossum, ^"'^^^^ ,-*«^.?;^ 
from Rome, and was '^^^''^J\.^2a t,v 
Hofburg. where he was received by 
the emperor and members of the Ira- 

^*Thi seJ^iiTs business of the coijgress 
wni becin with a festival assembly In 
St Steifhens tomorrow when the papa 
brief will be read. . Addresses then will 
be delivered, setting forth the prin- 
ciples of the congress. 

On Thursday there will be a pontin- 

cal high mass »« /»^« i^Vhe oarishes 
communion mays in »". t^« Pf.^lf.l'.t^ 
and churches of the city. Sectional 
meetings for the discussion of ques- 
tions affecting the welfare and prog- 
ress of the cHurch will be held every 
day in the cathedral and some of the 
larger parish churches. f„_.t,on of 

The last and crowning function oi 
the congres.« will take place Sunday 
morning when an Immense procession 
will march from St. Stephens along the 
R ngstrasse to the Hofsburg where low 
mMS will he celebrated by the papal 
^glte^ on top of the great entrance 
u-nff^wav The emperor and ail tne 
^ember^s of the court will attend the 
service which will be conducted with- 
in the "view oC ^tKOOOpersons. 

GRAHON BOY IS 
INSTANTLY KILLED 

Grand Porks, N. D.. Sept. 10.-(Spe. 
cial to The Herald.)— Gaining posses- 
slon of a weapon which had been left 
in an automobile after a hunting trip, 
Eugene, the 9-year-old son of Mr. and 
Mrs. H. I* Haussman of Grafton, was 
Instantly killed last evening. 

The boy. together with a sister and 
brother aged about 4 and 6 years, 
was in the yard of the Haussman 
home. Sam Nelson, employed In the 
Haussman drug store at <^«"aV«^"' ^„*f 
been hunting during the afternoon, 
and on returning honrie had left a shot- 
Kun In the automobile which had been 
driven into the Haussman garage. 

While the members of the family 
were at supper the children secured 
the gun. Whether It was already 
loaded or they placed the shell In the 
gun Is not known. 

HVE TRUE BILLS 
FOR SCHWIHAY 



COLORADO HAS 
FIRST PRIMARY 

Progressives Are Taking No 

Part in Voting for 

Candidates. 

Denver. Colo.. Sept. 10.— Colorado 
awaits with interest the tesult of the 
state's first primary election today. 
The registration has been heavy, many 
cities reporting totals exceeding prev- 
ious registrations. The canvass for 
votes In Denver ended last night with 
a big Republican rally at one theater 
and a debate at another between Gov- 
ernor John F. Shafroth and Thomas J. 
O'Donnell. candidates for the Demo- 
cratic nomination for the long t*!Tni lo 
the United States senate. 

Nominations will be made for presi- 
dential electors, two United States 
senators, lour congressmen and com- 
plete state and county tickets. The 
Progressive party will not participate 
in the primaries. It has nominated Its 
state candidates by convention and It 
plans to place Its electoral candidates 
on the ballo t by petition . 

ILLINOIS LIQUOR 

DEALERS IN SESSION 

Peoria. 111.. Sept. 10.— The Illinois 
State Liquor Dealers' Protective as- 
sociation met in thirty-third annual 
convention here today. There are 400 
liquor men present. National Presi- 
dent P T Farley and National Vice 
President Henry Maiwurm of New 
York, other national officers and Pres- 
ident J. J. Langan of the Wisconsin 
association are attending. 



of 3.557 over 
erlck W. I'laisted. D*^ 
date of Augusta. The vote, with 
twentv-eight towns missing, was: 

Haines, Republican. 70,072; Plaisted. 
Democratic. 66.&15. 

Two years ago the vote for governor 
was: Bert M. Fernald. Republican. 64,- 
g7o p w. Plaisted. Democrat, (J,4J5. 

The missing twenty-elKht towns two 
years ago cast 751 votes for the Repub. 
lican candidate and 846 tor the Demo- 
cratic leader. 

Three Republican ConsrreMmen 

Congressman Asher C. Hinds, First 

(Continued on pa ge 5. second column.) 

MAlNE^mfS 
PLEASE WILSON 



They Show That the Demo- 
crats Are Gaining Strength, 
He Says. 

Atlantic City. N. J., Sept. 10.— <3cv- 
ernor Woodrow Wilson today declared 
himself satisfied with the outcome of 
the gubernatorial election In Maine. 

"I think the results are very satie- 
factory." he said, "ba-^d on the re- 
sults of both four ye*ir» ago and two 
years ago. Two years ago the Renub- 
llcans were divided, but this time they 
were united. That makes a great dif- 
ference. In 1904, as I remember, a 
Republican governor was electea oy 
25 000 and President Taft's majority 
was about 14.000." 

Governor Wilson added that the es- 
sential thing to consider was that 
while the Republicans in Maine got to- 
gether. the Democrats had more than 
held their own, reducing normal plur- 
alities extensively. He thought also 
that the vote In Maine »howed the 
same drift" as it did in Vermont, namc- 
Iv that the Democrats were not losing, 
but gaining votes In states ordinarily 
Republican. ^ »,„w„w 

•The governor came here on behalf 
of the state to attend the ninth an- 
nual encampment of tioe United Span- 
ish War Veterans. He was accom- 
panied by his military staff. He will 
review the parade this afternoon and 
deliver an address of welcome to the 
veterans tonight 



Division of Opinion as to 

State Ticket Is 

Decided. 

Milwaukee. Wis., Sept. 10.— Called 
primarily for the purpose of nominat- 
ing presidential electors, there prom- 
ises to be a lively time at the state 
convention of the Progressive party in 
Milwaukee tomorrow because of the 
determination on the part of some of 
the delegates that a state ticket shall 
be named. 

County Chairman F. E. Davidson of 
Milwaukee, Charles K. Lush and others 
favor the naming of a state ticket from 
top to bottom. They argue that unless 
this plan is carried out the party will 
have no regular representation with 
which to go before the people two 
years hence. 

UlckH WantM Limit. 

On the other hand. Provisional State 
Chairman Norman L. Baker, Col. John 
Hicks of Oshkosh, Wheeler P. Blood- 
good and others would wind up the 
work of the convention with the se- 
lection of presidential electors. 

McGo vern is between two fires. It 

(Continued on page 5, first column.) 

JOHNSON ON THE 
ILLINOIS STUMP 




California Governor 
Begin Wisconsin Toar 
Wednesday. 

Chicago, Sept. 10. — To speak to nine 
Illinois cities in as many hours was 
the task that faced Governor Johnson 
today when he arrived in Chicago from 
Detroit The longest address of the 
day was scheduled for Streator, where 
a Progressive rally was to be held at 
the fair grounds. -^ , m ^ 

Cities to be visited were Rockford. 
Freeport, Dixon, Mendota. La Salle, 
Streator, Ottawa. Aurora and J ol let. A 
brief stop was made In Chica»o but 
the governor did not alight from his 

*^^Frank H. Funk, Progressive candi- 
date for governor of Illinois, and sev- 
eral Progressive leaders joined the 
oarty at Chicago for the one-day tour. 
Governor Johnson planned to return 
to Chicago tonight and start on a Wis- 
consin tour tomorrow. 



— Copyrighted by Brub»ker. 

AMOS MUSSELMAN. 

Lansing, Mich., Sept. 10. — Amos Mus- 
selman was named at the primaries to 
be the Republican candidate for gov- 
ernor of Michigan. His only opponent 
was F. E. Martindale. Mr. Musselman 
Is from Grand Rapids. 

hearmoney" 
planuuded 

American Bankers Are Told 

Aldrich Scheme k 

Fine Thing. 

National Association at De- 
troit Addressed By Liv- 
ingstone and Bonynge. 



Women and Children Pas- 
sengers Given No Chance 
to Escape. 

Strikers Claim Mob Was 

Composed Entirely of 

Outsiders. 

Parade Is Planned — Car 

Service Crippled — Many 

"Students" Here. 



The first trouble of the street rail- 
way strike took place last night at 
Twentieth avenue west and Superior 
street, wjjen a mob consisting of sev- 
eral hundred men, boys and women 
bombarded passing street cars, throw- 
ing stones and sticks and shouting Im- 
precations at the motormen and con- 
ductors. 

In several instances conductors were 
pulled from the cars and pounded. On© 
car was badly damaged with sticks 
and stones and, it is claimed, the lives 
of the twenty or more passengers were 
in danger. It is claimed, however, that 
strikers were not in the mob, as all of 
them were attending a meeting In 
Sloan's hall at the time. Certainly no 
strikers were taken by the police in 
the arrests which followed, at which 
time fourteen were gathered In. They 
were mostly youths who seemed to 
think the strike and the gathering at 
the corner a good chance to "start 
something." 

Frank Thompson, a West end pho- 
tographer, who with his wife and an- 
other woman, was on the car which 
was so badly wrecked, declares that 
the assault was most cowardly. Neith- 
er women or children were given a 
chance to get off the car and missiles 
flew thickly through the windows and 
onto the rear platform where the pas- 
sengers crowded in an effort to get off 
and out of the fire zone. Mr. Thomp- 
son says that he recognized one street 
car man with whom he has ridden In 




THE STRAW HAT'S SWAN SONG 



9/#««#^# 



VV0V4 -TVVt ^hk. 



v^ov/ OUR FAT 
F^v^hD looks* 



Marinette. Wis., Sept. 10.— The grand 
Jury Investigating county affairs re- 
turned an Indictment against Sheriff 
A B Schwlttay today, consisting of 
five different counts. He is charged 
with accepting money for the protec- 
tion of a Rambling house and a house 
of ill fame while he wa* district at- 
torney and during bis term as "herlff. 

The sheriff was immediately arrest- 
ed and taken before Circuit Judge 
Qulnlan, where his bond was fixed at 
«<> 000 
"sho'rlff Schwlttay is the nominee on 
the Republican ticket for the assem- 
bly 

The grand jury Is still In session. 

• — 

FrrvwMB Beaomlaate* 

Albuquer<lue, N. M.. Sept. 10— Late 
last night the Democratic state «^on. 
vention renominated Congressman Har- 
vey B. Ferguson. 




Detroit, Mich., Sept. 10.— Welcomed 
by the governor of Michigan, the mayor 
of Detroit and local financial leaders, 
the American Bankers' association held 
the opening session of its annual con- 
vention here today. Several thousand 
bankers are in attendance. 

At^er the welcoming speeches and 
the response, delivered by Robert J. 
Lowry of Atlanta, Ga., President Wil- 
liam Livingstone of Detroit read his 
annual address, which was followed by 
reports from General Secretary Fred E. 
Farnsworth, New York; Treasurer J. 
Fletcher Farrell, Chicago; General 
Counsel Thomas B. Patton. New York; 
the executive council and the standing 
protective committee. 

Praised Aldrlck Plan. 

The Aldrich currency plan was 
warmly approved by President Llvlng- 



(Continued on page 6, third column.) 

WILSON GOES TO 
ATLANTIC CITY 

Governor Will Address the 

Veterans of the Spanish 

War. 

New York, Sept. 10.— After a day's 
stay here conferring with the leaders 
on the plan of his campaign. Governor 
Wilson left early today for Atlantic 
City, where he will review a parade 
this afternoon of the Spanlsh-Amerl- 
can war veterans, now holding their 
annual encampment there. 

The Democratic national committee 
has secured a private car for the use 
of Governor Wilson during the cam- 
paign. 

SAY MRS. SZABO 
DID NOT DROWN 



(Continued on page 5. second column.) 

TWO BRITISH 
F LYERS KILLED 

Army Lieutenants Are Vic- 
tims of Double Aviation 
Fatality. 

Oxford, Eng., Sept. 10. — ^Another doti- 
ble aviation fatality, the second with- 
in a week, occurred today to mem- 
bers of the army flying corps, when 
Lieut. C. A. Bettlngton and Lieut E. 
Hotchkiss, both of whom had just been 
given commissions on probation, were 
killed, while flying past Wolvercote. 

The machine In which the officers 
were maneuvering had passed over 
Oxford and had reached a point Just 
outside Wolvercote when the motor 
appeared to stop and the aeroplane 
fell to the ground from a height of 500 
feet. One account of the accident says 
that an explosion occurred while the 
machine was In the air. 

The body of one of the officers was 
found In the river and the other was 
picked up In a field. They were young 
men who only recently had received 
their flying certificates. 

A big battle In the army maneuvers 
In which a number of officers of the 
flying corps are taking part, began 
yesterday and the newspapers this 
morning refer in glowing terms to the 
success of the aviation corps. 



DIPLOMAT 
JllPSBAIL 

Fails to Face Charge of Ab- 
ducting Young Girl From 
Scotland. 

She Regrets Action and Tells 

of Former Elopement — 

Police Seek Nolan. 






^HE. FUMHV BVP^S- 



New York. Sept. 10.— Physicians who 
performed an autopsy today on the 
body of Mrs. Rosa Menshlk Siabo, ex- 
humed yesterday In a Jersey City ceme-,, 
tery, declared this afternoon that they 
had found indications that the woman s 
death was due to causes other than 
drowning. A further examination, the 
result of which will be learned tomor- 
row, they said, would determine the 
exact cause of death. 

Mrs. Szabo was drowned while boat'ng 
mine whether any violence was used 
before she was drowned while boating 
on Greenwood lake with her lawyer. 
Burton W. Gibson. After Mrs. Szabo's 
death Gibson probated a will purported 
to have been left by Mrs. Szabo. In 
which she bequeathed her estate of 
110 000 to her mother. Mrs. Petronella 
Menschik. and appointed Gibson as her 
executor. , , . 

The deputy consul general of Aus- 
tria-Hungary alleges that it was 
known that Mrs. Menschik. wa» dead 
when the will was drawn, and that a 
woman was procured to pose •m Mra 
Ssabo'a mother. 



New York. Sept. 10.— Harry E. Nolan 
of Washington, D. C. recently ap- 
pointed secretary to the United Statoa 
legation at Panama, failed to appear in 
police court today to plead to a charge 
of abducting 16-year-old Marlon Mc- 
Vickor of Newport News, Va. His cash 
ball of $1,000 was ordered forfeited 
and two detectives were dispatched to- 

'"'AfVer^d'^clarlng the $1,000 ball for- 
feited, the court fixed bail at $2 500 for 
Nolan when arrested and paroled the 
McVicker girl in the custody of the- 
Florence Crittenden mission. The «r- 
raignment was then declared postponed 
until Sept. 17. 

Gtrl FrOM Glasgow. 
Nolan was arrested last ^"'K/J* °" 
complaint of agents of t^« <>>d^t>on;»"- 
lon Steamship company that the Mc- 
Vicker girl, whose father is reputed to^ 
be a prosperous innkeeper at Glasgow. 
Scotl and, had departed from the steam- 

(Contlnued on page 6, third column.) 



I 



4ii 



A. 



^■i 





Tuesday, 



THE DUI^UITH HERALD 



September 10, 1012. 




WF^\THKft— Fair toiitglit aii.l Wadoe»a«y: eooier tonight: tu<ltt to m o<tifr>t« wind*. 

REGAL SHOESi 

Fall Styles Now 
on Sale 

$3.50, $4.00 






ant 



$5.00 
















Oa)|J^R£y|Hg^ 



WAS DRIVEN 
FROM HER HOME 



one sweet dream 

.\iU« and Goapava 

Minn., Judging from 

I' related yeater- 

tales of woe 

"ce decree to 

irsed cruelty. 

sa wanted the 

I 1 -;ertioii. 

' ^ •iiiije, Mon- 

irs ago and »:anie 

- .rtly afterwards. 

ruployinent in a mine 



CHAMBERLiUN- 
TAYLOR CO. 

Office Outfitters 

Desks, Chairs, Filing 
Devices, Stationery. 

323 West Superior Si. 



near Crosby. She Is 21 and he Is four 
yeara her senior. 

Gospava, the plaintiff In the suit for 
divorce. In reply to her husband's 
charge of desertion, declared that her 
personal effects were thrown out of the 
hou.se and she after them. 

In r • Instances of cruelty, the 

wife I that Mudres had often 

struck h'T. and that on one occasion 
he had threatened to cut off her nose 
and dlsilRure her face. There are no 
children In the family. 



PRIVATE iNSTRUCTiON 

In EnglLsh branches is Riven in day or 
night school at the Duluth Business 
University. Foreijifners or those whose 
early education ha.<j been neglected 
should take advantage of the excellent 
opportunities offered here. Students 
may enroll at any time. Location, 118 
and li'O Fourth avenue west. 



NOTICE 



I BOX WOOD 
■ BOLTS 

We want to buy for cash, ElS^t- 
foot Bolts In all kinds of soft and 
hard woods. Write ua or call on 
•il PKKIOR BOX COHP.VNY, 
Suutli Sup«rlor, WIji. 



CITY BRIEFSl 

Siterliiis (4uaUt> Prlntlnic. 

Thwing-Sliewart Co. Both phones. 111. 

m . 

Dr. H. Browa. 

Diseases of stomaeJi and intestines, 
424-4 25 New Jorsey. building. 

* 

ATortfaland Prtnttrr. 

Good printing. Call Zenith 494. 

Jcwiak RTew Yrar'ii. 

Special serviees in observance of the 
Jewish new year will be held at Temple 
Elmanuel. Seventh avenue east and Sec- 
ond street, Wednesday evening at 
7:30 o'clock and Thursday morning at 
10 o'clock. Rabbi Lefkovits will speak 
tomorrow evening on "Remember" and 
on Thursday morning on "The Flag 
of Faith. ■■ 



M.4KE MAYOR 
GAYNOR MAD 

Questions By Aldermen Prob- 
ing New York Graft Irri- 
tate His Honor. 



Cnrran Says He 
Executive for 



Will Sue 
Mali- 



cious Libel. 



SPECIAL THIS WEEK $Q-25 



40-lacb School Trunk— 



L»9 



THE TRUNK FACTORY 



OF DULUTH 



NORTHERN TRUNK CO. 

228 West First St 



TMIKS, BAGS AND CASES 

Prices Most Reasonable. 



Motor Partlen for lalaad Lake Ian. 

All bridges on Rice Lake road com- 
pleted. Run out for chicken dinner. 
Zenith 1»9»-X. 



Gnardlaa Is Named. 

John Saarinen. who petitioned the 
district court to lie allowed to act as 
guardian for John Lei. a minor, aged 
18, v.-as appointed yesterday by an or- 
der from Judge Dlbell. As guardian. 
Saarinen Is authorized to prosecute a 
pcri^onal Injury action against Mc- 
Le.id & Smith, contractors, with whom 
Lei was formerly employed. 

O. D. H. S. Card Party. 

At Kalamazoo hall Wednesday evening, 

— • 

Far Yoiir Pleaaiare. 

The fall fabric show on the third 
floor of the George A. Gray Co.. L»u- 
luth, Minn. 



upon this -tfVeft|oiv, but I can at l*ast, 
give myselT th^pteasure Ot expressing 
my own unbeMatlng opinions in the 
matter." » il 



EUROPEAN 
HOT SPRINGS 
AT HOME 



Plarnnirht Here. - 

George Broadhurst of New YoiTt. one 
of the leading playwrights of the coun- 
try, an author of "Bought and Paid 
For." showing this week at the Ly- 
ceum, is In the city for the day. 

m — 

BlK 8a%lBar for Clsar Smoker*. 

Clear Havana cigars at wholesale by 
the box, 10c cigars for 6c. Barthe- 
Martin company, wholesale grocers. 

• 



Why 
away f 



1,1 1 

a PI' 



«-\'^p 1 time and money to go 
• me to a health resort? 
iva all the healing ad- 
s I > 1 1. Baden. Trench 
-;s Hot Springs or 
:• bath treatments 
in Duluth — at the 
Vapor Bath and 
. We have all the 
-It electrical and other 
1 the care and skill of 
■• ' rit and experienced 
ite rooms for ladies 
anu t-xpi"-;--:: -f.i ia^ly attendant. 

WK BO MOT CLAIM TO BE MIR- 
A€IiK WCIRKKRS, but we can and do 
give you in this institution the treat- 
y>, .. , ., that will put you in sound 
'I condition, just as quickly and 
J ..^; Ljj elteictlvelv as you would get 
at any of the world famed health re- 
Borts. 

If you are HVS noWN. 
If there la STIKKXKSS or SORE- 
B'ESS In any of your muscles — 
If you have RHEL'JIATIS.M— 
If vou hav© IWDIOE.ITIO.'V. CONSTI- 
PATION or any such troubles these 

EUROPEAN MINERAL 
BATH TREATMENTS 

will rt- Ml ti> perfect health. 

"'''■■■ ;,i.-s ;•• Mleratt? — based en- 

•n tlie rendered. 

*, . .lo not i — <^--^'a any testimonials 
but we can refer you to hundreds of 
people in Duluth and surrounding 
towns who have been greatly b-nefited 
and Ci:«KD BV OUR TREATMENT!^ 

A vl.«>it to our institution la request- 
ed — no charge for consultation 

EUROPEAI MINERAL VAPOR 
BATH & MASSAfiE PARLORS 

17 and 10 EAHT Sl'PERIOR STREET 
(Second Floor). 
Ffaoae. MeIr«Mse, 31ft3. Duluth. MIna. 



I PERSONAL I 

„»H-, "•./*il"'^**^ *^f Hibbing is a guest 
at the McKay. 

. ^/i ^^;.^- ^,«""S of Fergus Falls is 
in the city today. 

O. O. Christie is here from I.><land. 

T. C. Mahon of Grand K3pid.s ar- 
rived last night. 

C. H. Dickinson of Grand Rapids is 
at the Spalding. 

P. C. Bryant is down from Eveleth. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Avery of Cass 
Lake are at the Lenox and were met 
In town by Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Avery 
of Fairbury. Neb. 

H. E. Clifton is down from Port 
Arthur, Ont. 

P. R. Paine arrived from Grand 
Marais last evening. 

W. J. Stevenson of Duluth, assistant 
attorney general of Minnesota, came 
up from St. Paul this morning. 

William Sauntry of Stillwater Is at 
the Holland. 

J. R. Wyllle Is down from Virginia. 

J. A. Hickey left today for a trip 
down the lakes to Chicago. He will re- 
turn in two weeks. 

Ray Phillips and Arthur McMillan 
have returned to Northfleld. Minn., to 
resume their work at Carleton college. 



New York, S.pt. 10. — William J. Gay- 
m^i", mayor of New York, took the wit- 
ness stand at the city hall this after- 
noon and was sworn in by Alderman 
Curran to tt>stlfy before the alder- 
tn.inic committee appointed to Investi- 
gate graft In the police department. 

The questioning did not please his 
honor, and he lost his temper com- 
pletely before it had gone very far. 

•'The time for handling Mayor Gay- 
iior with kid gl jved Is past," said 
Alderman Curran, chairman of the 
uldermanlc committee. before the 
hearing today. "If Mayor Gaynor is not 
on hand at this afternoon's session ot 
the conimittee he will be served with 
a subpoena, and if he falLs to respond 
1 favor going int^o the courts to com- 
pel him to answer." 

Alderman Curran's statement fol- 
lowed on the heels of Mayor Gaynor's 
refu.sal yesterday to confer with him 
regarding tlie committee's procedure. 
Will Sue Gayaor For I.lbel. 

Mr. Cuiran repeated his declaration 
today that ho had Instructed his coun- 
sel to bring suit for libel against 
Mayor Gaynor. charging the mayor 
with having made "malicious false 
statements" about hira. 

Alderman Hamilton, member of the 
committee, said: 

•1 indorse every word Alderman Cur- 
ran has said. The mayor has trifled 
with ua long enough." 

Mayor Gaynor's letter to Alderman 
Curran said in part: 

•I have called attention to the miser- 
able grafting carried on by the board 
of aldermen in respect to licensing 
news stands and the like throughout 
the city. ^ ^. 

"I do not see how you can expect the 
police to be honest when they see on 
every hand that even the aldermen of 
the cltv are taking graft personally. 
or enabling corrupt go-betweens to do 
so. I cannot ally myself with you In 
any effort to Investigate the conduct 
of any official or any department of 
the city government. My attenti'm has 
also been called to tbe fact that you 
have of late several times published 
sta^tementa with regard to your visits 
to this office which are Vv>ry far from 
being truthful. . ^' . 

•If the committee wants any facts of 
me, let it subpoena me or notify m« 
to attend, and I will do so and give 
such facts. Beyond that I shall not 

go." 

No System, Mayor Says. 

"We are anxlouij to know," said Mr. 
Buckner, counsel for the committee, 
at the outset today, "how the mayor 
keeps in touch with conditions in the 
police department." 

••Mainly by letter from the commis- 
sioner." the mayor replied. "Sometimes 
he talk.s with me." 

"Is there no special way in which 
you keep advised of conditions? Have 
you no special system?" 

"No, no system, except what I hear 
through the commissioner." 

"Have you had any system of re- 
ports for ascertaining general condi- 
tions In the city for any week or 
anv month?" 

•Oh, yes," said the mayor, wearily, 
have hands and legs and ea 
feet." ^ , 

•'But you have no way of learning 
conditions except through the commis- 
sioner?" insl.sted Mr. Buckner. 

"Oh. take It that way if you want 
to." replied the mayor. 

Mr. Buckner pursued this line 
questioning until the mayor lost 
temper. 

Made Htm Madder. 

"I came here to help throw light 
and give vou facts." he exclaimed 
testily. "I «"!iall withdraw as a witness 
if yoii do not ask me pertinent ques- 
tions as to whether the police depart- 
ment has failed to enforce the law ' 

Further questioning made the mayor 
still madder. . , ^ 

•I decline to answer, he cried when 
asked "If his sy.stem was defective. ' 
•'Ask me about facta and I will an- 
swer." , , 

As the questioning continued the 
mavor broke Into a tirade against New 
York newspapers and sensationalists. 

"I have been brought here under 
false pretenses," lie shouted. '•! shall 
withdraw If this line of questioning is 
pursued." , . , ^, 

"Do you consider my asking these 
questions Impertinent?' asked Mr. 
Buckner, gently. 

To this Mayor Gaynor murmured an 
un Intelligible reply. 

• 

A Pleasurable Event. 

See the prettiest sllk.«i, the richest 
woolens for women's wear — exclu.sive 
novelties galore. Fall fabric show, 
third floor. George A. Gray Coompany. 

WILSOiTBFOR 
DEVELOPMENT 



NOTICE ! 



mys^ iiiiLiiirg^ 

All members of the 

Naval Militia, First and 

Second Division, and 

Staff will meet at the 

Armory tonight to re- 
ceive instructions pre- 
paratory to the trip to 
New York. All officers 
and men must be pres- 
ent. 

GUY A. EATON, 

Commander M. N. M. 
Commandant. 



ST. PAUL PEOPLE 
HURT IN WRECK 



Erie, Pa., Sept. 10. — Train No. 6 on 
the New York, Chicago & St. Louis 
railroad was wrecked one mile east of 
Erie this afternoon at 2 o'clock by 
spreading rails. One person was killed 
and eighteen, many of them passen- 
gers, were injured. 

The train left Erie on time and was 
speeding along at its usual rate when 
tlie engine left the track." Passengers 
were piled one upon tlie other, many 
of them sustaining slight injuries, but 
a few beitvg seriously hurt. 

Among tae Injured were: R. F. Walk- 
er. St. Paul. Minn.; Mrs. G. N. Walker. 
St. Paul, Mls^ Louise Nor.th, North- 
east. Pa. 



GIRLSWANTED 

50 or 100 glrla to wrap Boimie Bat- 



ter Bjtcs. NATIONAL CANDY CO.. 



1733 WcHt Superior street. 



PENNSYLVANIA'S KEY 

WOkKEKS MAY STRIKE 



Philadelphia, Sept. 10. — Correspond- 
ence wade {tublic by the Pennsylvania 
Railroad conjpany here ^liows that its 
telegfaph operators ea<?t of Pittsburg 
and KrkP httve voted t& stMke unless 
demands for Increase*! pay and other 
conditions are granted. The men want 
an increase in wages of 10 per cent, 
two days oft a month, and a uniform 
schedule at working conditions. 

OfrtcialiiT of tire Order of Railroad 
Telegraphers claim that 2,800 oper- 
ators employed on the lines east of 
Pittsburg are members of the organi- 
zation. 



SCHEDULE 
OFOASSES 

Winter Program at the Y. M. 

C A. Gymnasium Is 

Announced. 

The winter schedule of classes for 
the Y. M. C. A. gymnasium was an- 
nounced today by Secretary A. B. 
Wegener. 

The winter season will begin Oct. 1, 
and about the same schedule as was In 
vogue last year will be followed. 

The noon class will resume work, 
meeting every day at 12 o'clock. On 
Mondays an<l Thursdays Indoor base- 
ball will be featured and on the otlier 
days, volley ball will be played. 

The afternoon classes at 4:30 and 
5:30 will be continued. Th« former 
will be held every day and volley ball 
will bo featured. The latter will bo 
hold on Monday.s. Wednesdays and 
Fridays and basketball will be played. 
The evening classes will be held Mon- 
days Wednesdays and Fridays and ap- 
paratus work and competitive games 
will be on the program. 

The boxing, fencing and wrestling 
classes will be continuea. James Bar- 
ry has been engaged as boxing Instruc- 
tor, and W. L'Estrange will be the 
fencing Instructor. 

Tuesday night will be reserved for 
tlio weekly pop. Thursday the gym- 
nasium will be used for games in the 
Indoor baseball league, and .Saturday 
the basket ball teams will have the 
floor. ,,, . .^„ 

Handball tournaments will be fea- 
tured this year, and a new court may 
be added. Instruction will also be 
given in swimmin g and m li fe saving. 

TWO KlilED IN 
WRECK IN FOG 



Pittsburg. Pa., Sept. 10.— Two per- 
sons were killed and six others In- 
jured when a switch engine running 
light collided with the first section pf 
Pennsvlvania railroad passenger train 
No. 21, near Derry. Pa., early today. 
The dead: ..^ 

JAMES QUICK, flagman, Altoona, 

Pa 

j. E. ZAIRD, engineer, switch en- 
gine; Whitney, Pa. , , „ ^, 

E S. Tiemeyer and Lee Meyer of 
Cincinnati, were among the Injured 
who also included Mrs. P. RansoU of 

^"^Tlf"' train had left Pittsburg on 
time and wa« traveling at high speed 
when it ran upon the light engine in 

the fog. 

. • ■ — 

May Be BhII Players. 

Cincinnati, Ohio, Sept. 10— It is be- 
lieved here that E. S. Tiemeyer and 
Lee Meyer, injured in the wreck at 
Derry Pa., are well known ball play- 
ers Tiemeyer a few years ago played 
third base for the Cincinnati national 
league team and later went to the 
New York Americans. From there he 
drifted to the St. Paul American as- 
sociation club and now la with the 
Trenton, N. J., team. . 

Meyer was a former well known 
amateur player of this city. 

STEAM ENGINEERS 

MEETING AT ST. PAUL 



St. Paul. Minn., Sept. 10.— ^Special to 
The Herald.) — Delegates from Cali- 
fornia and from Michigan 1 nthe bien- 
nial convention of the International 
Union of Steam Engineers are rival* as 
to whether the next convention shall 
be held at .San Francisco or Detroit. 



'I 
and 



of 

his 



whf:v is TnouBi.K with 

EM:« TKICAL M.\< IIINEKY OH 
Ai*I*A»tATI S, Call Melrowe, 33. 

Mieike Electrical Works 

Rear 314 and 316 West FIrNt Street. 

We are equipped to repair and 
rewind Motors. Dynamos and Con- 
trolling Devi -es^ 



Opportunities 
Come 

to everyone, and they 
generally require a cash 
payment, small or large. 

What will you 
do when your op- 
portunity comes? 
Arc you preparing 
for it now? 

Many — very many — 
are preparing for oppor- 
tunity at this bank. 

[N orthern 
N ational Rank 

Alworth Buiiding 




Sends Letter lo Upper Mis- 
sissippi Association Meet- 
ing at Burlington. 

Burlington, Iowa, Sept. 10.— The 
eleventh annual convention of the 
Upper Mississippi Valley Improvement 
association opened here today with 
delegates In attendance from Iowa, 
Missouri, Illinois, Wisconsin and Min- 
nesota present, with P'ormer Congress- 
man Thomas Hodge of Burlington In 
the chair. 

A letter from Woodrow Wilson, 
praising and Indorsing the work of 
the association, was a feature of the 
morning s'-ssion. 

(iovernor Wilson's letter, which was 
addressed to Col. John T. Martin of 
St. Louis, a delegate to the convention, 
was In part as follows: 

"It would give me pleasure to be 
present and to expre.ss my «>ntire sym- 
pathy with projijfts that look toward 
the opening up and the systematic con- 
nection of our great water courses and 
their preparation for navigation on a 
great scale. 

"It undoubtedly has become neces- 
sary that we should reconsider our 
whole transportation problem. In view 
of the developments which are sure 
to follow Immediately upon the open- 
ing of the Panama canal; not only 
this, but we have become aware in 
recent years that our transportation 
facilities are not equal to the great 
demands made upon them by the enor- 
mous njovements of trade within the 
lountry. Our trade must have open 
ways. Our water courses must be 
linked and where necessary, deepened. 
We must broaden and multiply the 
channels of our commerce. 

"I could not say anything to the 
congress that could not be better said 
by mea who have become experts 



\. 



Planning for the Children 



Naturally you are interested in your children's welfare and 
wish to do the best you can for them. 

You are determined to provide them with a good education— 
don't forget that education doesn't simply consist of "book learn- 
ing." Teach them self-denial and thrift. 

If you want them to succeed in life — to avoid unhappiness and 
misery — don't bring them up in habits of wastefulness and extrava- 
gance. Teach them that the abuse of money will not only work 
harm to themselves, but works harm to others as well. 

It is a good plan to open Savings Accounts in their names and 
encourage them to make deposits themselves when occasion offers. 

We pay 3 per cent Compound Interest. 

Accounts opened for $1 or over. 

AMERICAN EXCHANGE NATIONAL BANK 



./ 



[just the Picture 



for a Wedding, Birthday 
or Christmas Present 




A set of Blx pictures (postal card size), rcpf senting the six greatest 
moments of a girl's life, are entitled "The Propo.sal," 'The Trousseau," ''The 
Wedding" '*The Honeymoon," their first evening in their own home, "Their 
New Love" by Harrison Fisher, framed under cutout openings in a ripple 
brown mat with a 1-lnch walnut brown moulding: size of glass. 8x29 Inch- 
es- price f2.2S; express charges paid to any place In tlie United States. A 
set of six postal cards of the above pictures mailed for aoct postage paid. 
I carry a large line of sheet and framed pictures from 5c np, and a nice 
line of Japanese paintings. 

A. M. jBRIST, Picture Store and Frame Shop 

tM MKSABA AVRIVTE NORTH. VIltiilMA. MlKJi. 



^> 



Store Opens 8:00 a. m., Closes 6 p.m., Saturdays 10:30 p. m. 





"Correct Dress for Women 





e Tin^e ^ 



The 

of Autumn 
Spreads 

Each section of this 
establishment is be- 
decked in the habili- 
ment of a new sea- 
son. 



& 






Just 
Arrived 

A shipment of 
bags. The 
newest fall 

styles^ 

"Smallness" 

seems to be the 

keynote. $3 to 

$15 ore the 

prices. 



1 New things are being unboxed every hour. 

1[ We direct your attention to our nobby Tailored Suit 
models at $19.50. Made of fine Cheviot finished fabrics. 
Guaranteed linings. Coats 34 inches long and skirt o£ 
the new gored style. 

^ At $25.00 and $29.50 our suits can be surpassed no- 
where. Smart custom tailored styles as well as models 
that have a touch of "Chic Parisenne" Garments are 
shown in all tLe most approved colors for Fall, women's 
and misses' sizes and extra sizes for the lady hard to fit 






Coats at 

$25.00 and $29.50 

^ Women tell us they are the 
best we have ever shown at 
these prices. 

^ The new Limousine Coat, 
Swagger Motor Coats, Fifth 
Avenue Walking Coats, Chin- 
chilla Coats and many other 
styles. 

^ All the newest materials. 
Tailored perfectly. Exclusive 
styles. 



Junior 
Dresses 



•*: J 



^Just the thing for High 
School Girls. Fine Tailored 
Dresses that will stand wear; 
made in pretty styles that ap- 
peal to the young miss. Also 
plenty of Peter Thompson 
Suits in one-piece and two- 
piece styles. 



The New Waists are here in abundance. 



Autumn 
Hats 

were never 
prettier. There 
is something 
about a Gid- 
ding hat that 
makes it 

distinctive. 



f 




Pretty voiles with tucked 
front and back and em- 
broidered scalloped cen- 
ter. High Directoire 
collar with black tie — 

Long sleeves and turn- 
over cuffa — $8.75. 

^Another style in Voile 
with high neck and long 
sleeves — Irish insertion on 
front and cuffs. Tiny green 
buttons finish off pretty 
neck effect. Price, $5.00. 



? 



IV s the Dependability 

of the 



1840 




1912 



That makes it sought after; its tone quality makes it 
loved after years of possession ; its durability makes it 
a life-long companion! 

True worth has brought 
it to its present proud 
position and stamps it 
above all others as the 
Piano you should buy. 



Our long-time, small-payment 
plan makes posse.ssion easy. 
Liberal allowance on your old 
piano or organ. 




The Fisher New Small Grand is the Piano marvel of 
the age. Write for our catalogue and terms. 

HOWARD, FARWEU & CO. 

120 EAST SUPERIOR STREET. 



(Oldest Reliable Piano Dealers.) 



Wilbur J. Alien, Manjigcr. 



9 



-•^ 



For Quick Results Use Herald "Wants'* 




^ 



TBE GLASS BLOCK STOCK SALE CONTINUES 



EXTRA! EXTRA! 

FULL SIZED niGO ARM SEWING MACHINES, EACH, 95c 

95e 



Wednesday morning (store opens at 9 o'clock) 
we will sell 5 regular Sewing Machines guaran- 
teed to sew; all attachments; absolutely no re- 
strictions. PRICE, each 

THOMASSON FURNITURE CO 



ODD FELLOWS* BUILDING, LAKE AVENUE 




-A— 





THE DULUTH HERALD 



September 10, 1912. 




GLEANED 

ALONG THE 

POLICE 
RUN 



or Kd Jenkins anythlnif when they 
were arraJSfned n poJUe court tnis 
mornlnK Both of them freely ad- 
mU.ed "that they had been in .^'^'ore^ 
The court let them down with the 
minimum. |3 or^ three ^dayn. 

Will Franks, a driver of the Duluth 
Candy company, hud the llj?ament« ' [ 
hiH I'lr badly turn near F»fteent»» a\<- 
nm- cast on London rornl yefterday 

Sfternoon. He waa ^^"Kht . YA!^ wan 
hind wheel of the wagon which he waa 
drlvinK fell off. He waB remove«l lo 
hli home at 126 East First -tret-t in 
Fcfrd^H ambulance. An examination 
disclosed no broken bones. 



GRAIN REGEIPTS MAY PASS 
THEnlOO,000,000 MARK 






Johnston Westervelt will henceforth 
W more Itkely to realize that somebody 
besides himself has rights along the 
public highway. 

This morning he drew 120 and costs 
or thirty days In the county Jail after 
he had entered a plea of guilty to ob- 
structing the street car tracks. Judge 
Wiiidoio also handed him a 'piece of 
bis mind." 

The police reported that Westervelt 
bloik«d the street car tracks with his 
tewm from the ore docks almost to West 
iHilutli. At a couple of corners he drew 
asidf long enough to let a car pass and 
thin promptly got In the way again 
Willie he .jogged along at »»"**"» ^t^* 
several hundred people In the cars »e- 
hind him hiMl to suffer Their good na- 
ture was not improved bexause of the 
fact that It was dose to 6 o clock and 
they were in a hurry to get to their 
homes for the evening meal. 

Ci * f'ttcer Ed Jensen was on one 
of t and his patience finally col- 

laps ri the procession got as far 

(It t nal Iron works. He left the 

tar oi .. t -.led Westervelt under arrest, 
sending him to the police station. 

The court officer stated this morning 
that Westervelt said last night that he 
was a strike sympathizer and that he 
took that method of showing his sym- 
pathy. He denied it this morning, how- 
ever. ^ . I. 

Judge Windom asserted that he has 
frequently noticed that some drivers 
appear to be under the impression that 
they own the entire thoroughfare. He 
said that he has seen men deliberately 
steer their team between the tracks and 
held them to the inconvenience of scores 
of people in street cars behind them. 
He declared that there is too much of 
It done and that as far as the court 
Is concerned the practice would get 



all the discouragement that fines can 

impose. 

• • • 

Deputy Oame Warden Q. H. Huseby 
returned this morning from a trip 
through Pine and Aitkin counties. At 
I'okegama lake. In Pine county, he 
made several arrests of men violating 
the fishing laws. In Aitkin county he 
made two arrests for violating the 
game lawa One man was convicted of 
killing a deer and the other of buying 
it. The man who made the purchase 
wa sa Justice of the peace. Final dls- 
pcsition of the case has not been made. 
Deputy Huseby corroborates the state- 
ments of others familiar with condi- 
tions in the woods that game will be 
plentiful this fall. He declares that 
there are more birds and more big 
game than he has seen for years. 

• • • 

Ben Vail pleaded not guilty when he 
\*as arraigned in police court yester- 
day afternoon on a charge of keeping 
his saloon at 1 West Superior street 
open on Sunday. His trial was set for 
Thursday afternoon. 

• • • 

Joe Carroll paid a fine of $2.B0 In 
police court yesterday afternoon when 
he admitted that he was driving an 
unlicensed vehicle In violation of the 
wheelage tax ordinance. 

• • • 

Olof Bagge and Oscar Stevens said 
th?y were on the Northern Pacific 
tracks yesterday evening but claimed 
they were on their way down to the 
docks to look for a job. They de- 
nied that they were trying to board a 
freight train which was pulling out of 
the yards. The court gave them the 
benefit of the doubt and suspended 
sentence. 

• • • 

David Nelson pleaded guilty In police 
court this morning to having been 
drunk and disorderly. The police re- 
ported that he had created a dis- 
turbance on a street car. He got »5 
and costs or five days In the county 
jail. 

• • * 

Maud Imbleau thinks that the cop 
who took her in charge last night is 
the meanest man ever. 

"I was just going along the street 
looking for a friend when he came 
and took me." she said this morning. 
"I wasn't doing a thing." 

Judging from her appearance today, 
however, she must have been doing 
things before the policeman took her 
in charge. Her looks would lead any 
one to think that she had consuined 
greater (luantltles of intoxicating 
liquor than was good for her. She 
will be taken to police court this aft- 
ernoon. She wasn't sober enough to 
go along with the grist this morn- 
ing. 

Frankness didn't lose John Anderson 



M. W. A. NOTICE 

All member* of D»lutfc Camp 
■re re«iMe«leU X» ■Kead tbe fu- 
neral of our late ^^^*^^2\'J^^' 
drew KroKb. from Ol-on */"''- 
forU-N morKue. -MIH ^•'•'« ,»" *'^"* 
Mtrert, Wrdne»d«y, Sept. ll*»t ■« 
2 o'clock p. m. .„ „ , 

KDW. bOWK. CoMul, 
CHAS. SHOtiKAN. Clerk. 



Expected to 

Record Ma3e 

189798. 



the 



Hundreds of Cars Coming 
Daily — No Car Short- 
age Yet. 



PLAN nCHT 
ONJICKLES 

New York Veterans Will Op- 
pose Him as Head of 
G. A. R. 



Los Angeles. Cal., Sept 10.— This 
was Soldiers' Home day at the forty- 
sixth annual encampment of the Grand 
Army of the Republic. The principal 
events were an excursion to the na- 
tional soldiers' home at Sawtelle. and 
open house at Venice, a seashore re- 
sort near this city. 

The annual meeting of the army 
nurses and their memorial services, the 
convention of the ex-prisoners of war, 
followed by a campfire, a reception to 
the G. A. R. and allied organizations, 
tendered by the Sons of Veterans, the 
annual meeting of the Daughters of 
Veterans and an annual meeting of the 
National Council of Women's Rellet 
Corps and reunions of the Mississippi 
Ram Fleet and Marines and of the 
"Iron Brigade' were among the days 
events. 

Will Hc«r Trimble. 

At the semi-official opening of the en- 
campment, Commander-in-Chief Trim- 
ble tonight will deliver his address. 

Interest in the selection of the next 
commander-in-chief was revived today 
when it became known that the New 
York delegation had voted 38 to 3 not 
to support the candidacy of Gen. Dan- 
iel E. Sickles. Friends of Judge Al- 
bert B. Beers of Bridgeport, Conn., as- 
serted that practically no opposition 
now existed to the selection of their 
candidate. 



The receipts of wheat and all grains 
taken together on the Duluth market 
during the last /ew days have far sur- 
passed the predictions that the most 
optimistic were making a few weeks 
ago. 

Wet, chilly weather, which was a 
considerable handicap to the cutting 
and thrashing of the crops, especially 
wheat, has been succeeded by clear 
skies and a warm dry atmosphere 
reaching over the whole of the great 
grain-growing region of the North- 
west. This has been the general con- 
dition for several days and the al- 
ready declining wheat market has 
been going down still faster, for the 
last hope of the bulls, namely wet 
weather and early frosts, has disap- 
peared. Yet the European demand is 
very strong and that prevents the 
prices of the American cereals from 
going to pieces. This means good 
prices to the farmers of the Northwest 
on a tremendous harvest and that 
spells money in the pockets of the 
farmers and resulting prosperity to the 
cities with which the farmers trade. 

H. E. Emerson, chief deputy of the 
Duluth state grain inspection office, 
though very busy with the Immense 
amount of grain that Is being re- 
ceived at Duluth now. managed to find 
a few minutes today to express his 
views on the grain prospects of Du- 
luth during the coming crop year. "I 
feel assured," he said, "'that the grain 
received at Duluth during the crop 
year Just opening will be beyond all 
precedent, and will even surpass the 
banner year of 1897-'9&, when the re- 
ceipts were about 99,000,000 bu. How 
far beyond that total-they will go I 
cannot make an estirflate. Today the 
cars on track for Inspection at Duluth 
numbered 823. That is not by any 
means the largest number w« ever had 
In any one day, but It is a very large 
number, and it denotes an enormous 
movement. There have been days 
when we had In he neighborhood of 
1 200 or more, but the railroads can 
hardly handle more than 900 cars a 



day for any great number of suc- 
cessive days, under existing circum- 
stances. You see the railroads— and 
reasonably, too — want to avoid hauling 
empty cars in either direction. The 
cars that bring in the grain from the 
country haul back coal and the move- 
ment of the cars must be adjusted so 
as to accommodate that traffic as well 
as the grain tarfflc. If the cars were 
managed solely with reference to the 
hauling of grain. It would be possible 
to haul a vastly larger number of 
grain-loaded cars Into Duluth than is 
now the case. 

No Shortage let. 
"As yet there has been no shortage 
of cars. The railroad men foresaw 
the great demands that would be made 
on their e«julpment by the Immense 
grain crops, and they prepared for it. 
The problem of getting cars in and 
out of Duluth Is a much simpler one 
than that of gettlftg them »n and out 
of Minneapolis. A grain car at Duluth 
can usually make the "turn-around in 
fortv-eijrht hours, whereas in Minne- 
apons if frequently takes four or five 
davs It may be that we shall have 
a shortage of cars, but I have heard 
of no such complaints y^V-^ ^^^^.^ «» 
"I do not think the ^ovement of 
erain to Duluth has reached Its maxi- 
mum volume. A great deal of. the grain 
ihat we are now receiving is commg 
l?om The southwest through M»nneapo- 
i's. Most of our grain receipts now 
are from Minnesota and South Dako- 
ta farms. As yet, however, there has 
been little movement from North Da- 
kota. When the North Dako a move- 
ment begins to swell towards its maxi- 
mum volume, the movement from th« 
SouThwest will probably fall off as It 
usually does, but I think the \"crea»« 
in the North Dakota receipts will more 
than balance any decrease »" the re- 
ceipts from the Southwest. In other 
words 1 think the maximum volume 
^f grain receipts at Duluth this year 
is vet to be seen. , _,i_„ 

"Most of the gram that is coming 
to Duluth now is of very good qual- 
ity There is some wet wheat, which 
was cut and thrashed during the rainy 
weather, and of course that lowerb 
ITe grade, but we are now receiving 
iaBt^uaniitles of fine dry jvheat. Much 
wheat Is grading No. 1 hard. Barley 
is about the only grain the bulk of 
which has been greatly in ured bv the 
wet weather. A great deal or ine 
barle^was stained by the rains. You 
see the barley was tfie first crop to be 
cut' and ihrashed, and that was hand- 
led too early to escape the rains. 

•'We have thus far received but one 
car of flaxseed, but the quality of 
thit was very good. I think the flax- 
letd ""r^o'veme^if will be on In large 
volume about the middle of the pres- 

*"lt 'ls°"iorthy to note that the total 
number of cars of grain reported today 
2s having been received yesterday at 
Duluth was &08. whereas a year ago 
today the total of the reported re- 
ceipts was 306, and that, moreover, was 
for two days, Saturday and Sunday, 
whereas those reported today were for 
Monday alone. 



and a brother. 8. H. Brownlee of Min- 
neapolis. She had lived in Cloquet 
about ten years and were very well 
known. Funeral services will be held 
Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock at 
the Presbyterian church, Rev. C. W. 
Lowrle and Rev. F. C. Coolbaugh. D. 
D., officiating. The Urquharts former- 
ly lived at Ellsworth, Wis. 

« 

Baronean Ooc« Hnntlag. 
Menominee, Mich., Sept. 10.— Baro- 
ness De Palland of London, England, 
who Is visiting her mother, Mrs. S. 
Dugas, here, left today on a hunting 
trip for prairie chickens in the Dako- 
tas. She has as her guests, members 
of the family of Walter Scott An- 
drews of New York. 



NEW RATES ON 
BARLEY HELD UP 



Washington, Sept. 10.— Advances pro- 
posed m freight rates on whole barley 
between California, Nevada and Utah, 
and Minneapolis and other Eastern 
cities, were today suspended until Jan. 
7 to permit hearings before the In. 
terstate commerce commission. 





OWNERS ARE 
INDIGNANT 

East Third Street May Not 

Be Paved Tbis 

Year. 



Backslider 



from Wellville 



Coundl Refuses to Give 

Them the Pavement 

They Want 



to Dingbat "Town 



A Slide:- 



irom health to ill-health 



A great many people have tried the slide, who didn't know exactly what 
they would get in "Dingbat-Town." 

The coffee drinker is quite certain to get some kind of a "bat." It may be v\ 
stomach, liver, heart, bowels, eyes, kidneys or some other organ, for the bad 
effects of the caffeine in coffee, locate in a variety of different organs m dilter- 
ent people. 

Many persons who knew this some time ago quit coffee and commenced 
Postum. 

Then, because they found trouble in having Postum prepared suitably at 
hotels and elsewhere, they gave it up and went back to coffee, thmkmg, Now i 
am well and can stand it.'' 

So the^ became backsliders and when they slid into "Dingbat-Town," 
symptoms of the old troubles began to show again, they found it difficult lo 
return to Wellville. 

Now comes 

Instant Postum 

as one sure way to get back. 

Instant Postum is in' powder form— made from regular Px)stum and con- 
tains the same nourishing ingredients;— you simply stir a level teaspoonful into 
a cup of hot water and instantly have a perfect cup of Postum; it has a deli- 
cious mellow flavour and is free from the coffee drug, Caffeine. 

It can be made anywhere that hot water can be obtained ; in hotels, on the 
train, in the office— its high, rich quahty is constantly uniform. 

Tins holding enough for about 100 cups are sold for 50 cents by grocers. 
Smaller tins at 30 cents, make about 50 cups. 

Ordinary coffee costs about twice as much. 
A two cent stamp to cover postage will carry to you a 5-cup sample tin free. 

Made by Postum Cereal Co.. Ltd.. Pure Foq4 Factories. BatUe Creek, Mich. 



Property owners on East Third 
street between Fourteeo|h and Eigh- 
teenth avenues east are highly In- 
censed at the action of the council last 
evening in turning down the contract 
which had been awarded In accordance 
with their wishes. 

It is feared that the fiction of the 
council In refusing to appo-oVe the con- 
tract will prevent the work being done 
this yeaiN and properly owners are 
thoroughly Indignant. 

The board of public w«rk^s awarded 
the contract to the G^neral^Contract- 
Ing Company of Minneapolis for bitu- 
Ithic paving. This was do/ie in ac- 
cordance with the expressed wishes of 
the property owners on the .street, the 
board stating at the time that It was 
not In accordance wlttf^ts best judg- 

""T^Je city officials object % P»y»"%i*! 
royalty to Warren Bros, 'for tne'r , 

pavtng^ Under an afe^P«««"* it^ 
with the city clerk a yea? ago last 
March the city Is bound to pay the 
J*ompSnv*^%1.2f per -luare ^.-^jj ^^l 

\^. ^^^tl iTTa'lf Vh^e ^re-s^n^J a?^n- 

bids on that class of Pavlng. Ane 
handlcao of the agreement, they point 
Sut puts the other contractors at such 
a disadvantage that it Is "ext to im 
Dossible for them to enter into com 
Petition Some of the aldermen also 
Assert that the bltullthlc Pav^^"^|,Veet 
n/^.t suited to the grade on Thira sireei. 
But the property owners along the 
street maintain that it Is not the cour- 
cll's place to advance such argunients^ 
Thev claim that they are PaV'nS for 
?he pavement and should be al owed to 
lav whatever kind they select. The> 
ihosrbftullthlc by almost a "nan^,^ous 
vote, and they assert t^at it establisnes 
a very dangerous precedent for the 
council to override the wishep of the 
property owners and let paMng con 

''■^Thl dlllving'of (he work greatly ag- 
gravates niany of the property owners^ 
They do not hesitate to speak their 

mln^s in Slain terms, " « "^^ JtaiV. 
tlon is necessary It is almost ceriaii. 
that the street will not be improved 
iSrs year despite Its wretched condition 
In anv event It will likely be necessary 
to advertise for new bids, necessitating 
considerable delay. The ^^'"^^l^f >: 
thev are willing to pay for a pavement 
and have been for months, have decided 
on the kind they want, and they are 
iinable to get the street Improved thi.s 
year because o f the counci rs attitude. 

ROOSEVELT TALKS 
IN SEATTLE, WASH. 



Seattle. Wash.. Sept. 10.— Theodoro , 
Roosevelt was greeted by a large crowd 
when he arrived here tod;iy. Ho was 
met by a reception committee and thf | 
delegates to the Progr.-selvo state con- 
vention, who escorted the former presi- 
dent and his party to the Dreamland 
dancing hall. There Col. RooseveK 
made a speech, while the -"'^l^-fV^^.K^ 
the state convention proceeded to the 
state armory to ratify tie itominatljns 
made by Saturday's priHarl**. 

Col. Roosevelt was scheduled to ad- 



dress the convention this afternoon be- 
fore departing for Tacoma. 

DULUTH IS NOT 
GETTO JUSTICE 

Candidate for Railroad Com- 

missiooer Talks on Rate 

Situation. 

J. p. Rosenwald of Madison, candi- 
date for the Republican nomination for 
state railroad and warehouse commis- 
sioner for the six-year term, arrived in 
Duluth today and is working for his 
campaign. 

"Everybody knows there is some- 
thing wrong with the rate situation 
in this state." he said today. "Here is 
this great natural harbor here at Du- 
luth that was intended by nature to 
be the gateway to a great territory. 
We in our part of the state and the 
people all through Southern Minnesota 
have been willing to do busi- 
ness with Duluth for years, but we 
have been prevented from doing so by 
the rate condition. The present state 
railroad and warehouse commission has 
not taken proper steps to remedy that 
condition and there should be a 
change." 

Mr. Rosenwald has issued a progres- 
sive platform, which includes a demand 
for the physical valuation of railroads. 

WELL-KNOWN CLOQl ET 

WOMAN PASSES AWAY 



Cloquet Minn.. Sept. 10. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Mrs. Norman Urquhart 
died Sunday morning at her home on 
Eighth street, after a month's illness. 
She leaves a husband and one daughter, 
Miss Luclle Bell, two sisters, Mrs. H. 
M. Northrop and Mrs. Ckve Sturdivant. 



D. H.. Sept. 10. 1912. 




The nifty suit for young 
men of limited means. 

Constructed to give a max- 
imum of style and service at 
a minimum of expense. 

THIS COLUMBO SUIT 
has proven an instantaneous 
success because it deserves 
to be one, and because it is 
sold and backed by a store 
with a reputation. 

With it don one of our 
sassy soft hats at $2 and put 
on a pair of stylish Colum- 
bia $3.50 shoes. 

Then you'll be fixed for 
Fall. 




.laUingCs 
At Third Ave. West 




■aki 




i lberstein& 

Company 



ond 

L^aMished 

I870 



End of the SeasonValues 

Linen and Wask Frocks 

$3.75, $5, $9.50 

(Former values to $8.75, $19.50 and $35.) 

One hundred beautiful Dresses offered Wednesday 
at fractions of their former prices. All sizes all ma- 
terials, all colors and every dress as well selected as 
buying ability can select. 

Some Linen Suits $5 

(Formerly selling up to $29.50.) 

Choice of every remaining suit in Linen, Ratme or 
Corduroy at $5. — ^ 

Wask Skirts $1 and $1.50 

Many pretty models to select from at these prices, 
in Linene, Repp and Pretty Novelty Wash Fabrics, 

Some Wool Suits $10, Values to $50 

Just a handful, but every one a bargain and well 
suited for shopping or morning wear. Last chance 
at these at $10. ^ 



BUY NOW AT OUR 



Autumn Furnilure Sale 




CHINA CREAMERS AND 
Sl'GARS — These stts are as- 
sorted colors and paUejns; 
■raally aell at 91-10 
per pair — at our Au- 
tumn Sale only 

r DINNER SETS — We are offer- 
ing some wonderful bargains m 
French and German sets. Now is 
the time to buy 



39c 



You will find a fine line of solid Mahog- 
any Chairs and Rockers, also some very 
beautiful overstuffed pieces; also Old Eng- 
lish and Fumed Oak. 
Rockers like picture sell 
for $18 and $20; at our 
Autumn Sale, go at only. . . 

Chairs to match for only $8.76— and 
dozens of other pieces at similar reductions. 



$10.25 




Yoar 

Credit 

la G4»od« 



"XS3imm^ 



Complete 
Honae 
Faraiahera. 



There's Music in Your 
SoulNoWaytoGetOut 



DID you ever feel "I wish 1 could play the 
piano?" When you hear others who 
are so expert at the key board, remember 
that you are probably as musical as they, the 
only difference being that they have acquired 
the'faculty of expressing their feelings on the 
piano and you have not. ■■=' 

But that is no reason why you should never play. 
The technical knowledge you lack is substituted 
by the 

Pianola Piano 

The Standard Player-Piano 
of the World 

When you play the Pianola Piano and add your 
expression (which is marvelously easy to do) the 
performance becomes so humanized as to be indis- 
tinguishable from line hand-playing. 

Bear this in mind: Vou play the Pianola Piano — 
it does not play itself. You are the musician ; with- 
out you the Pianola Piano could not play a note. 



Smith & Allen Co., 



Successors to 
French & Bassett Music Dcpt. 



French & Bassett Bldff.. 
SOS WEST FIRST STREET. 








^Bli 




99m 



qMiii^fPa«lipi^fP 




Tuesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



September 10, 1912. 



WEST END 

HRRALD BRAlVCHi i 

neriBaii Olaaa. Maaaser, IhSS Wcat SapcHor 8tr««t. W 




FAREWELL RECEPTION. 



M<»inl»^rH of First Baptist Chnreh 
Huuai' Mr. and Mi's. Git'fin. 

Membera of th«» Central Baptist 
cliurch, Twentieth avoiiue west and 
I'--'* <«treet, entertained at a banauet 
1 -nlng In honor of Rev. and Mra. 

J, ii. Glffln. who win leave Oct. 1 for 
Chin 1 f,i ro8um« their work as mis- 

:tnri Fish, pastor of the 

IS toast master for the 

:. It talks b»;inK: given by 

JUt'siianifs J. M. Oiffin. Milton Fish. K. 

i: •■hur.htll. J. D. McPhail. Sadie 

■:rm Hut.hlnaon. Fred 

the M'-ssrsi. J. B. Dye, 

r. William Capen. Fred 

loaiah Wllde. Mr. Gittin 

; talk on the missionary 

.11 and was fallowed by 

vviinjc Cecil Omtland 

- FoUowlnjc the 

1 irial hour w.is en- 

■ ' '■'ora wef ■'- 

I .md sw' Id 

iIjU'S. The women 
( ! the banquet. 



MILL (ILEBItATE 

IHI U( H ANNIVERSARY 



of the 
•yterian 

■■'.■'!■ .-ireet. on 

■ "ci.'uer. 1873. 

pastor of the 
•teinoiiies Jiun- 



. Ho 

>n. 



T'.v 



on a silica pavement and have roiiueat- 
ed a readverttsinK of the bld.««. 

"The property owners insist on gret- 
tlng what they want," said Johr Moir. 
one of the residents on the avenue, yes- 
terday afternoon. Mr. Molr Is a meoi- 
ber of the committee apt>ointed by the 
property owners, the utlier members of 
which are; Alderman Wllliani Bernard, 
I'eter Grignon and David Carroll. 

Those behind the move to ehani^e the 
bids want the contract to be awarded 
before the ttrst of (X:tober. In this 
way the property owners expect to 
have the street flni.'thed by the time the 
cold weather sets in. The pavement 
will extend from Michigan street to 
Filth street, and will be twenty-four 
foet wide. The part between the curb 
and sidewalk will be parked. 



Markel Day. 



Tomorrow will be market day In the 
West end, and in all probability every 
stand will be taken. Farmers in this 
vicinity are as well pleased with the 
new public market as are the resi- 
dents of the West end, and each mar- 
ket day usually tlnds seven or eight 

fanners selllug produce and fruits. 

^ 



Sku^luiuiHarper. 



Miss Charlotte Sko^lund and Robert 
Orville Harper were married at 3:30 
o'clock ye.>jterday afternoon at the par- 
sonage of the First Swedish Baptist 
church, 2:; 12 West Third street. Rev. 
Swan»»y Nelson, pastor of the church. 
lead tiit^ -service. Mr. an*! Mr.s. Harper 
leit list evening fur a short wedding 
trip an.l will be at home after Oct. 1 
at 1305 West Third street. 



vk'x- 

. >...■ P'lS- 

itge of the 

. --_.-,. The first 

Ely and Robert 

the pre.9ent 
hurch about 
. a number 

■ m;Hl'*. n*>w 



all' I me 
ably en- 



•I in the 

' > 

. . . . , ;...,. .,.1- 

1 h*'l.i the first 

•i^i^ !■ liuliith. 



• lid his aucvessur, 

•:■.•. wh'i was here 

■ • ■ ')f their 

William 

, i;;d.T C. 

rby, 1'^ 
.3 years; 

irs: Kev. WUl- 

3 moiiths. and 

itj-uei, since August. 



Klo^h Funeral. 

The funeral of Andrew Klogh. 48 
y Id. 1725 New street, who died 

.^ .V at International Falls, and 

whose Ijody was brought here j»i?«ter- 
.lay. will l)e iielj at .' o'clock touiurtow 
■n from the Ol.'^on & Crawford 
king ruom.s. ill8 West First 
.street. Interment will be at Park Hill 
cemetery. 



Will Elect Officers. 

Officers for the year will be elected 
by the iiui! • • mk committee of the 
Epworth 1. if the Gra. e M. K. 

church, Tu .. .. .-..u-ond avenue vv.'^jt 
and Third street, at a .spK-.-ixi meeting 
to be held in 'h.> . hurch parlura tomor- 
row evenifi- ns for the social to 
hi« h.-hi Fi , jvening and for thu 
next Sunday will al.^o l>o 
• rh.*' meetin*; tomorrow, Th-.^ 
.« to be given ov.t 
t .» ill install it.s ot- 
<> one ut tlio features of llie 



Wll 



,L REAin ERTISE 

KiR PAVING BIDS 



r. 



fh» 



.r ihf f lilore on the part of 

■:■'' 1 ■.■>'!; Lie property 
■ : the board 
■n the pav- 

! be adver- 

i .. ....;. ;... ting of the 

ti'A nr>'»P>>rt- nti-ri,:.>rs Origin- I 

•nt with 

...:. ,i , ur , ; iit.ina as 
th^- board did r tain 

itions. The ■ : •..* of 

iilch bids were advertised 
only a crushed rock and 
The property owners 
iii.H last week and decided 



HNDS TRACE 
OF NORSEMEN 

Explorer StefaDsson Returns 

From Arctic With Story 

of Discovery. 

Tells of Apparent Descend- 
ants of Scandinavians Who 
Seltled Greenland. 



Keattle. Wash., Sept. 10. — Vllhjalmar 
St'»fans-4'.n, after spending more than 
four y !!-« in Arctic exploration, has 
rettirned to Seattle by steamer from 
Nonit\ >!*-<!ka, and told of his prob- 
aM.- ry of the descendajita of 

th iiiiavian colonists of Green- 

lat: . o were la.st heard of In 1412. 

aiil \>. h .. wh'Ti trade with Greenland 
was resumed in the seventeenth cen- 
tury, had disappeared. 

Stefansson and hta companion. Dr. 
R. M. Anderson of Forest City. lowai. 
made a valuable zoological and etff- 
nologlcal collection, whleli is now on 
the steam whaler Belvidere. with Dr. 
Anderson, and will arrive in San Fran- 
cisco the first week in November on 
the V. ' ' the American Mu.ieum of 
Natur ' ory in New York. Stefans- 

son wui •' for New York tonight. 

Stefansso .rta Dr. Anderson In 



an;:i.>o[l .llio 



r • than four years Stef- 
Anderson were together 



We.st End Briefn. 

Mr. and Mr.s. Divid Adams of 2314 
West Second street returned yesterday 
from a week's visit in the ffwin Cities. 

Dr. C. B. Green of l!»32 West Supe- 
rior street left yesterday for a week's 
outing at McGregor, Minn. 

Mrs. E. Gustafson of 2306 West 
Eighth street is expected home this 
w<ek from a tivo month.s' visit with 
relatives at Seattle. Wa.sh. 

Fritz I.indbloom of 1712 West Third 
street returned yesterday from Min- 
neapolis*, where he attended the state 
fair last week. 

Mrs. F. Bender of 1801 West First 
street has returned from a two weeks' 
visit at Stevens' Point, Wis. 

Carl Anderson of Minneapolis has 
returned to his home after spending 
the past week at the home of O. C 
Hetam, 2024 West Second street. 

Mr. and Mrs. Axel Erickson of 2232 
West Fourth street have returned from 
the state fair. 

Th 'ry committee of St. Peter's 

Epi.s hurch. Twenty-eighth ave- 

nue WH.>st atid First street, met in the 
church parlors last evening. 

The Christian Endeavor Society of 
the Second Presbyterian church. 1515 
West Superior street, held a business 
meeting in the church parlors last 
evening. 

A. L. Tetu of 2713 Huron street has 
returned from a two week-s" visit with 
relatives at St. Paul. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. W. D'Aoust of Carl- 
ton are the guests this week at the 
home of the former's sister. Mrs. Gil- 
bert E>'Aou.'st. 217 North Twenty-fourth 
avenue west. 



nine months only, as they could cover 
more ground by separating. 
Started la imn. 

Stefansson and Anderson went to the 
Arctic in 190H. by way of Winnipeg, 
Edmonton and down the Mackenzie 
river to its mouth. They were bound 
for Coronation gulf, a region marked 
in red on Canadian maps (uninhab- 
ited) and which they had been warned 
to avoid. Stefansson spent the first 
winter at the mouth of Cplville river, 
Alaska; the second at Cape Parry, the 
third on Coronation gulf and Victoria 
Land; the fourth at Cape Parry. 

On leaving the Arctic he made a 
leisurely journey alone with a «log 
team from Cape Parry to Point Bar- 
rows. 1,000 miles, visiting all the Es- 
kimo settlements along the coast. He 
left Parry March 22 and reached Point 
Barrows June 13. The expedition made 
Its headquarters for collecting at 
Bailey island, a resort of whaling ves- 
sels east from the Mackenzie river, 
and here the material gathered was 
placed on the Belvidere. It will not 
be unpiicked until it arrives at the big 
New York museum. 

Darrea Clrouad Orlszllea. 

The features of the collection are the 
skins, skulls and leg bones of ninet.sen 
barren ground grizzly bears reajJy for 
mounting. Only one barren ground 
grizzly is In any museum. It is sup- 
posed that bears of two species are in 
the collection. 

The barren ground grlxzly attains a 
weight of 700 pounds. It lives on the 
thick roots of an herb. At the ap- 
proach of winter the bear, which has 
taken on a four- inch layer of fat. bur- 
rows a hole in the river bank and per- 
mits Itself to be covered by snow. Ap- 
parently the bear hibernates without 
loss of energy, for In April, when It 
leaves its hole, the fat is still intact. 
However. In April and May there Is no 
food, and the bear grows thin before 
the herbs are obtainable In June. 

Of the so-called white Eskimos of 
Coronation gulf Stefansson said: 

"They were taller than the Greenland 
Eskimos, but not so tall as the Alaska 
Eskimos. They spoke Eskimo, though 
I thought I detected some Norse words, 
and they lived In the typical Eskimo 
way. I visited thirteen groups of these 
people, who number probably 2,000. 
Some of these groups or tribes had 
never come in contact with whites and 
had no tradition of them. 

Traditloan of Fraaklia. 

"Two tribes had traditions of the 
John Franklin expedition. An old man 



The City National Banlc 



OF DULUTH- 



IT IS SERVICE that counts most in your banking associa- 
tions. Whether in handling your checking or interest accounts, in 
issuing foreign drafts, letters of credit or certificates of deposit, in 
loans, in details affecting your commercial credit, or in the more in- 
timate matters of sound financial advice, the service rendered by 
this Bank is always prompt and effective. 

CAPITAL, $500,000 - SURPLUS, $225,000. 



WE INVITE YOUR ACCOUNT 



1 //i*»N»/ 



r 



w^ 



\wnwi 



^^^■^^ 




fX, 



f^ <3I 



:i 





,1 



The reputation of this store rests 
upon two things — the quality of 
the furniture and the service in 
selling it. By ''service" please 
understand that we mean assist- 
ing you in finding what you want at the price you want 
to pay. We look at the purchase exactly as you do, namely, 
an investment and therefore strive to make it profitable 
to you — it must yield a satisfactory return on 
the money spent as long as it remains in your 
possession. 





Generally when an appeal to 
economy is made folks overlook 
everything else but economy — 
quality is relegated to second 
place — price alone remains in 
the limelight and thought centers only on the cost. We 
make the appeal to economy on quality, not forgetting that 
gracefulness and beauty of line are also a necessary part^^i 
of the "quality" virtue. There are no manu- 
facturers' mistakes or rejects here. The furniture 
is useful, friendly, good. 



1 






•I 




As/de From This Great Display of Fine Home 
Furnishings, We Will Have Demonstrations of 
the Following Articles on Our Main Floor, From 

Now Until September 15th. 




3 



The Qwen Daven-O 

Most 
Perfect 

Bed 
Daven" 

port 
Made 

Simpler in operation than any other. 



Hoosier 
Kitchen 
Cabinet 

Woman*s Best 

Friend and 

Kitchen Help 






The Champion Coal and 
Gas Range 



Cole's 

Hot 

Blast 

Tfte 

Stove 

for Any 

Fuel. 

A Stove 

Built 
to Do a 
Stove's 

Duty. 



Ml 

Prices 




I 



^^ 



These, along with others, such as the Standard Sewing 
Machine, Vacuum Cleaners, Fireless Cookers, Steam Cookers 
and Electric Heating Appliances will be shown. 



^ 



yo^, 



v^. 






A HANDSOME FREE GIFT 

A SET OF TEN "SWISS" ALUMINUM UTENSILS will be given away Ali- 
SOLUTELY FREE to every person who buys a CHAMPION INTERCHANGE- 
ABLE GAS, COAL AND WOOD RANGE — (TWO-IN-ONE)— during the Spe- 
cial Demonstration at Our Store. 




M,aMta 



'^, 




h 




fM 




-m. 




<jai> 



'JQ.** ?««!?*. 



'»^«». «» ,-f>A 



> ' I 



,*>• 



in one tribe had seen Richardson In 
1868. and another man in another tribe 
had seen CoUinson In 1853. The thir- 
teenth tt-lbe had been visited by whal- 

"Between the country of the blonde 
Eskimos and the Mackenzie is a barren 
strip 300 miles wide, which is never 
crossed by Eskimos. The Eskimos 
west of the strip have no knowledge 
of Eskimos to the east. Those to the 
east know there are western Eskimos, 
but believe them to be savage canni- 
bals. 

"Musk or polar bear and seals are 
abundant and the blonde Eskimos live 
well. Many of them have eyes as blue 
as my own and very blonde eyebrows 
are the rule. A great many of the 
men have sandy or reddish beards. 
They have no tradition of their an- 
cestry. _ 

"On Victoria Land there are a nunj- 
ber of stone houses, but tne blonde 
Eskimos shun them, saying they were 
built by spirits who Inhabited the coun- 
try before men came. 

Scaodlaavlaa Stvn". 

"I was unable to gather statistics of 
blue eyes, for when the blue-eyed per- 
sons found I was seeking them they 
avoided me, not understanding what I 
wished. However, I took measure- 
ments of a large number of the males, 
and I found that facial Index was the 
same as that of the ^sklmp-Scandl- 
navUn half-bloods of Greenland and 

"''•^l'a%""n"otf oJThe tribe visited by 
Chief CoUinson In 1853. He wrote that 
it numbered 220 persons. There are 
now 230. aU In good health. 

•On the other hand. Dr. Richardson 
m 1848 found 2,000 Eskimos between 
the Mackenzie river and Bailey Island. 
These Eskimos have been in contact 
with whites and only forty persons 
survive and these are diseased. 
Lived Like EMklBi«Mi. 

Stefansson ascribes the successes of 
his expedition to the fact that he took 



nc food supply, but went Into the 
country with his riflp. He lived as 
the Eskimos did, much of the time 
among them. Eskimo women sewed 
his garments, but otherwise he needed 
no aid from Eskimos. 

Stefansson says that Hubert Darrell. 
an Englishman of good family, who 
disappeared while on the Arctic shores 
east of the Mackenzie river. Is dead. 

"In September. 1909, ' said he. "Dar- 
rell went to a whaling vessel that was 
wintering at Bailey Island. Darrell 
was quite alone and was pulling a sled. 
This way of traveling was not so fool- 
hardy as it seemed. A man alone in 
the Arctic Is in peril only when he is 
overtaken by accident or sickness. Then 
he is helpless and must perish. 

"On leaving the whaler, Darrell set 
out westward to Liverpool bay. where 
his camp was. Eskimos saw him 
when he went back to his camp, which 
was some distance from the Eskimo 
camp, but they did not see him when 
he left his camp, and they do not know 
in what direction he went. He told the 
Eskimos that he would return next 
year to buy furs. This was his pur- 
pose In exploring the coast — to learn 
of the trading possibilities. 
Writtas oa Tre«. 

••Darrell may have gone west along 
the coast, or south, up the Anderson 
river toward Port Good Hope. As it was 
knowTi he Intended to go to Dawson. I 
think he went west, toward McPher- 

"LASt winter an Eskimo from Bailey 
Island went up Anderson river and 



found a blazed tree with writing on 
the blaze. He told me what he had 
found and promised me tjiat next year 
he would cut down the tree and bring 
the section containing the writing to 
Bailey Island. I think the writing was 
that of an Indian and not of Darrell. 
The priests at Fort Good Hope have 
taught the Indians to write." 

RESUME WORK ON 
NEW CHURCH 

Christian Scientists Will Com- 
plete Structure Begun 
Last Spring. 

Work on the new church of the 
Christian Scientists at Ninth avenue 
east and First street, which was sus- 
pended last spring on account of a lack 
of funds, will be resumed some time 
this fall, according to a statement 
made today by Robert Rankin, chair- 
man of the building committee. Mr. 
Rankin remarked that all that was 
now delaying the progress of the struc- 



MOST ECONOMICAL SCOURING SOAP 



CLEANS 

SCOURS 

POLISHES 






SOLID CAKE -NO WASTE 






THE nRST NATIONAL BANKof DULUTH 

\%' SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES 

nf vifried *««• "nd r«»t. for •*f«-ke«plng of valuables, papers, jewelry, 
etc^ under owner'a abaoluto coatroL 
Largf vault for Storage of Packagea. 

SAFI-mUABLE-CONVENIKNT 

Inspection Invited. 
Vault open 9 a. m, to 5 p. m. Saturdays, 9 a. m. to 3 p. in. 



ture was the non-arrival of the build- 
ing materials from Chicago and other 
points. The other members of the 
building committee are: F. E. Burrell, 
John Larson. John Wesley Fee, R. M. 
White, B. C. Jones and J. E. Lund- 
mark. 

Mrs. DwIght E. Woodbrldge. who Is 
prominent in the activities of the con- 
gregation, remarked today that the 
completion of the church had been de- 
layed because the congregation was 
unwilling to go into debt for It. but 
there were now ample funds to re- 
sume operations. She said the pres- 
ent quarters of the church next to 
the place where the new building will 
stand, are entirely Inadequate for the 
needs of the congregation, which now 
numbers nearly 200 people. 

» 

Arrested for Bigaair. 

Bowbells, N. D., Sept. 10. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Otto Lupke, wanted in 
South Dakota on a charge of bigamy, 
was arrested by Sheriff Stelnhofer at 



the farm home of brothers residing 
near Larson. The man was taken to 
Woonsocket, S. D.. by Sheriff A. D. Mc- 
Ray of that city without requisition. 
Lupke. who is 52 years old. has been 
in this vicinity for some months, but 
has had no wife with him. 

aUAINT MONTENEGRIN 

WEDDING AT CUYUNA 



Cuyuna, Minn.. Sept. 10. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — A quaint Montenegrin 
wedding took place at Cuyuna last 
Thursday, when Schull Radulovlch was 
married to MlSs Ctoni Martin, Judge 
Ham officiating. 

The bride was uniquely dressed in a 
gown costing >300, which htui the 
Montenegrin style of makeup. The best 
man was dressed in his country's attire. 
Refreshments were served at the Mc- 
Donald hotel, where dancing was car- 
ried on and much merriment was had. 



m 



f THE UNION DENTISTS 




Investigate Us 
Examination Free 



guaranteed 10 



Find out that our 
prices are Just as 
i advertised: then In- 
quire about the qual- 
llty of our work. You 
I will save money, 
pain and time, by 
having up do your 

work. All work 

years. Call, telephone or write for appointments. 
NOTE XHEISE PRICEIS: 



eOLD CROWMS f2'."car t 
No better at any price, 

BRID6E WORK t!^U°' ^"**'''^ 

and quality has never 
been excelled 



$3.00 

ir weight, 

$3.00 



SUVER FiiLraas'"'"" "" 



t-^r at any 
price Id the city or elsewhere. 



WIULENNE PLATES 

$16.00 and 125.00 values, 
at (8.00 and 



50e 
$5.00 



We SpmIjiUm ta G«l« \m\mjm, G«ld uid Alnmlaum Plates. 

UNION PAINLESS DENTISTS 

Dr. Franklin Qraar * Co., Ownar*. 317 Waat Superior St.^ Duiutli 

Open from 8i80 a. m. to 7 p. m. SaaOaya, 10 to 1. 




I* 






V 




THE DULUTH HERALD 



September 10, 1912. 



• ^ 






DEAL ROUTE 
FOR HIGHWAY 

Si PaDl and Dolalh Rigbt-of- 

Way Is Awaiting Im- 

profements. 

Bridges Over Ravines Woaid 

Be the Most Costly 

Item. 



ami deliver spefchfs Incl 
McCormlck and United 8ta 
Poindexter. 

REPl BLi(\4\S ( ARRY" 
MAINE B\ PLIK^ALITY 



lulf Midlll ! titude »-vcrywlirrf. and while most of 

es senator thrm cluster about Jl-e ^ar barn, tu- 

t day. for It hai>ptn» to l>i- i>a> day. no 

I luud talk, -scab" calls or any form ol 

UioKmuo 18 indulged In. Six poluemen 

are on duty at the car tarn». but are 

hitTlng an easy time of It. 



OF ONLY H,557 VOTES 

(Continued from |iase 1.) 



DIPLOMAT JUMPS BAIL 

(Continued from page 1) 



A 

Nort 
t 

1 U I : 1 



i'.n?t!rrasH<?d 
If niailf 



,iti 



in 
on 



the old 



raul & Du- 



ision rcathed by en- 
c highway comrois- 



day. 

Windine alonj? the »hore of thc_Pt. 



n aiui Clocutet peo- 
ihe toad ycster- 



diFtrlct, and Frank E. Uuern»ey. Fourth 
dintriit. Hepubiican, were re-elected by 
Intreast'd nuijuritle««. and t'orrest Ctwod. 
win Kti'ubllcan. supidanied ConsreBS- 
xnvs.n i^Jiniuel W. llould. Democrat. In 
the Tliird district. The Democratic 
carulidatc in tti© SJecond district. Con- 
grt»*»man I' ^ McGllHcuddy. was re- 
elected. 

The new leRlslaturo will Mand on a 
Joint ballot »4 RepuMliuns and 78 
iVmocrats. with 10 disttriits yet to re- 
port. The state senate will be made up 
c»l 22 Kepublicans ;i n ^ D» mocratu, 
with one district n s-i.c The house 
will be composed of 7« Kepublicans and 
70 Democrats, with nine districts mlsb- 
InR. This majority will be sufficient 
to elect F'ormer Congressman Edwin C. 
E^urleigh of Augusta as United States 
senator in place of Senator Obadlah 
Gardiur. who was appointed to fill the 
var.f, V caused by the death of Senator 
William r Prye. Republican. 

rrealdentlal ^ote I ncertaln. 

Folitical obser\ers were in some 
doubt as to the effect of the Repub- 
lican victory and the attitude of the 
Progressive leaders regarding the na- 
tional electit-n in November. All of 
the Progressive leaders were actively 
Identified with the Republican party In 
yesterday's election. 







— I^*t tiM Klamp "l^liCj 
llnoii to rnibrol«l«^ ' 



% 



m Glass Block Store 



-^Wc make buttons to 
order— «ll bi****. 



1 

u 
a 
a 



1 



€ 1.' [ 1 -- 

Si bit 
n»>t 

grade all 



lies !■'•' 
be n 
Ft 



V 
Wrii 

b<>:,tr' 
t ■ - 

as .- 
taken 



road ninsf through a 

between Fond du 

The . ■■ ■ • 1 .- 

iind rt- 

Thfe ■ • t. ; *-"' '■-'■" 

which y the greal- 

' - . ;;es, are deep- 

-ed to become 

- ci'iiuty people are 

« the road Improved 

i-sist in the work, 

le to be met with 

I nt-if are six of f5i^>rn. 

deep at»d from 

^ ff w of therr. l 

- down and the 

ts would be pos- 

The road would 

to l>e on level 

Hfficul- 

.. Id thus 



the w.: 



that the improve- 

1 cost 170.000. 

. d du Lac to 

ii by llie route followed by the 

""I'e miles, with only one and 

lies in St. Louis county. The 

' utid the road under the El- 

. of the county 

;<1 St. Louis coun- 

■ . • ■• - - : • p 

t 
( I Ti^'ii i . . 1 ', ' vi t. n 

. y initiative is 



Those m!in went over the road yes- 

f. ■ ■ ■ ■ : -t at T--: -■- ■'•■ ' ^v- 1--' 



f Great 



P'' 
TI 



for a ): 



ii... 

tcr- 

luth a: 

Bta: 
A - 
In 

coi; 



r;d du Lac was com- 



Taf( Mneh Plcaned. 

Feverlv. Mass.. Sept. 10. — President 
Taft WIS grtatly pleased with the Re- 
publiiaii victory In Maine. It wa.n the 
best lolitical news, the president s 
friends said today, that he had lieard 
i^ince he entered the White H. vi-e 

The president was so inter. -ti'l in 
the bulletins that he remained up until 
an early hour this morning to re- 
ceive returns. He was particularly 
cheerful when he learned that the 
Ma ne !.. >;islatuie will be Kepublic- 
an on jcir:t Fallot, assuring his party 
of another vote in the United stales 

senate. , _ , 

Having read the latest returns and 
breakfasted today, the president start- 
ed for Myopia and the golf links. 
Wbole Family stayed l>. 

Mrs Tafi and the Taft children were 
Just as happy over the news as was 
the president. Mrs. Taft did not retire 
until a late hour, while Robert and 
Charles, the Taft boys, stayed up with 
their father. 

Although the president had no state- 
ment to make about the Maine result, 
his friends here were not so reticent. 
They found much cheer in it and Were 
sanguine of the effect in other states. 
According to their view, the result 
will serve to keep in line many Re- 
publican." who were wavering toward 
the Progressives. 

It will Le an example, they say. to 
the doubtful ones of what can be ac- 
complished where a solid front la pre- 
sented to the Democrats. Some of 
the presidents advisers went so far as 
to sav the outcome in Maine would 
■ .-.'"back into the Rep^jMcan ranks 
■- leaders and many "f the rank 
ana liSe who have descried It for the 
new party. 



►' was 



a I it would he a 

r,t '.".'f-t.- r. The 

1 as 

: en- 



th* 



m 



tlve, ami k is thou- 
■oon place 
highway < 
petition I. 
The pa: 
y e != f •-' rd ;■■' ," 



proposeii new ro»»d. 

pr»rt f'f the road lies 

pie iri that 

- the Initia- 

■■ will 



gl.'iCr:. 

Dill nth 






«tatc 
ij. the form of a 
L^lwell law. 
•1 went i'.er the road 
.^d; Geor.i;- W. Cooley. 
tf e state highway com- 
n Mullen. assi.«!lant en- 
• "va. secretary of the 
al club; Judjre Will- 
iam a'. Cant Htid Mr. Thomas, a land- 
s. apf scardner. of Duluth: also the 
f,.l'. ' : Cloquet citiiens: R. M. vv ev- 
erl C. L. Dixon. J. E. Lynea. C. 

J Jr., C. P. Osborne. County 

At- Diesen of Carlton county; P. 

fi . .,, .t, editor and owner of the 
Cioquet linr Iviiot. C J. Sr hlenk and 
H E. Hornby, and the following 
Carlton: J. E. Green Martin Cain, 
A. Watkins and H. Oldenberg. 



Statement By Pbllbrook. 

Waterville. Me., Sept. 10. — Chairman 
Warren C. Phil brook of the Republican 
slate committee gave out the follow- 
ing statement early today regaruing 
, tie election in this state: 
p,„ ; 'My prophecy of a comfortable mar- 
"" 1 gin has been realized. We have elect- 
' i ed a governor, three congre.ssmen and 
■^ a majority of both houses of the leg- 
islature. We shall elect Former Con- 
gressman Burleigh to the United States 
Benat« and the entire control of the 
state government for the next two 
years wi:i Le in the hands of the Re- 
publican is." 



SYMPATHIZERS OF 

STRIKERS HIRL STONES 

AT STREET CARS 



(Continued from page 1.) 



of 



F. 



HOT TIMK JSJVISCOXSIN 

(Continued from page 1.) 



he announces himself m favor of the 
Progressive party, the Taft supporters 
will get busy in framing plans to de- 
feat him. and should he announce him- 
self in support of the nominee of the 
Republican national convention, the 
Roosevelt crowd will surely place a 
state ticket in the field. „„,,..„= 

The plan of the state ProgressUes 
for tomorrow's convention as^ now for- 
mulated. Is for the calling of the con- 
vention to order at 1 o clock by Pro- 
visional State Chairman Baker, to be 
followed by a motion that the tempor- 
ary organization be made permanent 
at once and that Wheeler P. Bloodgood 
be elected chairman of the convention 
The program calls for delivery of 
the keynote speech by Mr. Blood- 
good, and this part of the program un- 
doubtedly will b^ '-arried out. 
Will Hear JoiiBHon. 
flovern"' *f*'-im W. Johnson of Cali- 
fornia ' - mate of Col. Roose- 
velt on t lonal Progressive tick- 
et is "cl. : to make two addresses 
at* the c .... .lion. one In the afteT- 
noon and the principal effort at the 
evening session. Others who are ex- 
pected to be here for the convention 



IS YOUR CHILD'S 
TONfiMATED? 

1! Cross, Feverish or 

Stomach Sour, It Means 

Waste-Clogged Bowels. 



Children dearly love to take de- 
licious "Syrup of Figs" and nothing 
else cleans and regulates their tender 
little stomacha, liver and 30 feet of 
bowels so promptly and thoroughly. 

Children get bilious and constipated 
Just like 'grown-ups. Then they get 
sick, the tongue is coated, stomach 
sour, breath bad; they don't eat or 
rest well: they become feverish, cross, 
irritable and don't want to play. Lis- 
ten Mothers— for your child's sake 
don't force the little one to swallow 
nauseating castor oil. violent calomel 
or harsh irrifants like Cathartic pills. 
A teaspoonful of Syrup of Figs will 
have your child smiling and happy 
again in Just a few hours. Syrup of 
Figs will gently clean, sweeten and 
regulate the stomach, make the liver 
active and move on and out of the 
bowels all the constipated matter, the 
■our bile, the foul, dogged-up waste 
and poisons, without causing cramps 
or griping. 

With Syrup of Fi.gs you are not 
drugging or injuring your children. 
Being composed entirely of luscious 
flgs, senna and aromatics it cannot be 
harmful. Full directions for children 
of all ages and for grown-ups plainly 
printed on the package. 

Ask your druggist for the full name 
"Syrup of Figs and Elixir of Senna" 
prepared by the California Fig Syrup 
Co. This is the delicious tasting, 
genuine old reliable. Refuse anything 
•Ise offered. 



the mob, and says that he was throw 
ing things at the car. 

When the police arrived they sought 
to disperse the crowd. Then the riot 
began and Patrolman Fallon was struck 
in the mouth wilii a club by a boy 
Timed Charles Rivers. The youngster 
was afterward turned over to his par- 
t-.ww but the older disturbers were 
gathered in as fast as possible and 
uumped into the patrol wagon and 
taken to the police headquarters. 
Plead tiollty. 
The men who were arrested last 
night entered pleas of guilty to un- 
lawful assemblage when they wete ar- 
raigned In police court this morning. 
Andrew Peterson, who led a rush to 
take a boy away from a policeman, 
eot lao and costs or thirty days in the 
county JalL 

fcam Hood, who the police charac- 
terized as a trouble maker, got $10 
and costs or ten days in the county 
jail. The others each got |5 and costs 
or three days in the county jail. They 
gave their names as Magnus Carlson, 
i Andy Olson, Jens Stepness, Ole John- 
I son. Louis Olson. William Rembjor. 
Hans Dahi, Philip Carlson and Alfred 
Ha gen. 

The court read ail of them a severe 
lecture. Judge W"lndom told them that 
If they are brought in again on similar 
charges they would be In danger of 
getting thirty days in the county Jail 
without the option of a fine. 

On the way to the police station 
several of those who had been arrested 
relieved their pockets of stones and 
other missiles which they had gathered. 
These were found in the bottom of the 
patrol wagon when it reached head- 
Quarters. It was impossible to deter- 
mine who had been carrying them. Had 
the court been able to learn the own- 
ers' identity they would have received 
more severe sentences. 

Will Hold Parade. 
To refute the statement made by 
Manager Warren that not more than 
sixty men are on strike the strikers 
have determined upon a parade to be 
beld at 5 o'clock this afternoon. They 
will gather at Eighth avenue west and 
Superior s-treet and march to Third 
avenue east, then back again on Supe- 
rior street, going to Woodman hall at 
Twenty-first avenue west and First 
street There a meeting will be held. 
There are not many cars running to- 
day and service on all lines is slow. 
Manager Warren says, however, that 
the only real hardship has been dur- 
ing rush hours, but that that will be 
reuiedied by tomorrow for he has 
enough "students" to operate all of the 
regular and special cars on hand now 
and will have them broken in before 
the day is out. A number of men were 
brought yesterday from the Twin 
Cities and put to work and thirty ar- 
rived from Chicago this morning and 
were taken to the car barns at once. 
A number of men have been at the 
car barns applying for the Jobs that 
are open. When one of the strike 
leaders heard, this morning, that men 
had arrived from Chicago, lie laughed 
and said: 

"They are the regulars; they are 
Just the ones we want to see arrive, 
for there will be no fares turned in to 
the street railway offices when they 
get to work" 

Strikers Meet. 
The strikers held a meeting last 
evening at Sloan's hall. Twentieth ave. 
nue west, and were addressed by a 
number of speakers, chief among whom 
was W R. McBwen. who advised peace- 
ful methods ar»d gave assurances of 
the support of the citizens so long as 
no violence develops. Following the 
public meeting, at which »32 was con- 
tributed for the support "' **!« f^'f* 
ers. a secret meeting was held. At this. 
It is asserted, ninety-four men were 
recorded as on strike; and it Is asserted 
that six more Joined this morning, pull- 
ing their cars Into the barns and quit- 
ting because of the seeming general 
sympathy with the strikers. The strik. 
ers are now awaiting the arrival this 
evening of their international secre- 
tarv. K. Orr of Detroit, through whom 
theV will trv to have conferences with 
Manager Warren of the street railway 
comviany. 
The strikers maintain a peaceful at- 



er Jefferson shortly after its arrival 
here Fi idav. The McVioker girl had 
been enlnifled by her brt>ther to the 
tare of u stewartless on the vessel, 
with Instructions to remain aboard 
until Saturday, whtn she was to have 
sailed f»>r Scotland on a ticket pur- 
chased by her father. 

The couple were located at a fash- 
Icnable Hrv>adway hotel, where they 
had registered a«< H. K. Nolan and 
wife, and the girl broke down and told 
the detectives she had met Nolan 
aboard the vessel and at his sugges- 
tion she got a positii>n in New \ ui K 
and had changed her mind about go- , 
mg back to Scotland, and K«»ne with 
htm. Nolan had nothing to say to the 
dfetectivts and was released on Jl.ooo 
each ball for appearance in court to- 

DiMKppeared From C®"r*. 

At the op.'iing of the Tombs court 
today Sumner Gerard, who had l^ui- 
nished the cash bail, appeared for No- 
lan and asked for a postponement ot 
the arraignment for two weeks and a 
continuance of the 11.000 bail 1 he 
court allowed a postponement for one 
week, but before hxing the amount 
of the bail ordered the assistant dis- 
trict attorney to prepare a formal 
complaint. While the complaint was 
being drafted (lerard left the court- 
room, taking with him Nolan, who had 
been waiting in the corridor outside. 
Ten minutes later the assij^tant dis- 
trict attorney appeared with the com- 
plaint and a search was made tor 
Nolan and Gtrard. Not finding either, 
the court ordered the cash bail for- 
feited and fixed the amount of the 
bond for Nolans appearance, bept. 17, 
at |;:.60O. 

Eloped Wltk .4nother Man. 
During the proceedings the Mc- 
Vicker girl wept copiously, and lie- 
came hysterical when told that her 
brother, William McVlcker of New- 
port News, would be requef^ted to ap- 
pear here In the proceedings. She 
to!d the probation officer she had re- 
pented and wanted to go back home. 
She said that she had been secretly 
married in Newport News last August 
to James Foster, watchman at a New- 
port News garage, and had repented 
that also. 

An hour after Nolan's bail had been 
declared forfeited detectives told Mag- 
istrate Murphy they had found Nolan 
in Attorney Gerard s office. 

•'Well, where is he?" demanded the 
court. 

•Why. Mr. Gerard said the case had 
been put over for a week and the same 
bail continued," one of the detectives 
replied. . , ., 
•Get out and arrest Nolan on sight. 
ordered the magistrate, "and bring him 
before me this afternoon." 
^ 

Did Xot Report for Job. 

Washington. Sept. 10.— Harry E. No- 
lan, the young diplomat arrested In 
New York charged with abduction, was 
confirmed by the senate as secretary 
of legation at Panama <sx\ Aug. ^2. 

Nolan, who was born here but who 
was appointed from Illinois, had passed 
the examinations necessary to his ap- 
pointment and was ordered to report 
for instructions. He failed to do so. 
and has not communicated with the 
state department. The government will 
take no action until the courts pass 
upon the case. 

la Yale Graduate. 

Chicago, Sept. 10.— J'hn R. Nolan, 
who lives in Chicago, said he expected 
to hear frcm his son. 

•'.My .«on took the examination for 
the consular service four weeks ago 
and was appointed to Panama because 
he is a good linguist." said Mr. Nolan. 

'"He graduated from Yale in 1S9< and 
decided to be a scholar rather than go 
Into business. I don't believe he is m 
any serious trouble" 

HEAR MONEY^PLAN LAUDED 



(Continued from page 1.) 

stone. Commenting on the favorable 
action on the Aldrlch suggestion taken 
by the convention at New Orleans last 
year he urged the delegates to con 
tinue their efforts to secure its adoption 

by congress. ,^ , . ., v . <♦„ 

•The association should "stand by its 
guns." In this important matter in the 
fullest sense of the word." said Presi- 
dent Livingstone, "and should continue 
to support the bill as previously rec- 
ommended, and again go on record as 
favoring its adoption." r^^.^^s* 

The convention brought to Detroit 
between two and three thousand dele- 
gates from the United States. Its ter- 
ritories and Canada. 

An address by Robert W. Bonynge 
of Denver, member of the national 
monetary commission, closed the morn- 
ing session. Mr. Bonynge discussed 
"Banking and Currency Reform" and 
said in part; 

Our banking and currency system Is 
universally recognized as thoroughly 
unsound The defects in the existing 



**The Shopping Center ofDuluth 



The 




.abies Reign the Store This Week 

Xfthe Third Floor is suprTnie and undisputed. Such a jolly good time as they are having 



• — Their rulcrsi 

would do anv ero^n-iip crood to sec. ■ ^a 4.^ iUt. fnilpct thk carni- 

-Scores of fond mothers have come with "the pride of their heart" and have enjoyed ♦» ^l^^^ '"""^XVe/rts 

val planned for them-BABY WEEK. Attractive displays of the many thmgs ^^ '^h are d^^/J '° ^^^^ 

and the daintiest, cleverest apparel and accessories that appeal so strongly to fond mothers have been arrangea 

to make the event informative as well as enjoyable. 

$25 in Prizes for the Babies 

—To add interest to the event, and in appreciation of the favor that the many little 
"Lordships" and "Ladyships" bestow upon the store by their presence, a series ot 
ht prize contests has been arranged and $25 in six handsome prizes will be 
The events are divided into three classes of two prizes each — 

Class A. For babies up to 6 months old. 

Class B. For babies up to 1 year old. 

Class C. For babies up to 18 months old. 
-A cordial invitation is extended to all babies, and useful souvenirs will be given to all itp to 3 
years of age. A pair of handsome TOLEDO ELECTRIC scales has been .^ec^red and the 
accurate weight will be given to every infant upoi a dainty weight slip, which m itself is a pretty 

-Other' department.s throughout the various floors of the store that carry things for BABY are 
making special displays and the mother who has a little one to buy or plan for will find it very 
advantageous to do so during this BABY WEEK. 



pri 
awarded. 



weig 





system that must be remedied no mat- 
ter which party is charged with the 
responsibility of framing the legisla- 
tion are: Our unscientific treatment of 
bank reserve:-, the rigidity of our en- 
tire credit system and the lack of co- 
operation between our Independent 

banks. „ _ 

Present System Bad. 

"Our present reserve system restricts 
the loaning power of banks at times 
when ret^erves should be freely ustd 
and credit liberally extended to solv-ent 
business men, and thereby Intensifies. 
If it does not actually produce, panics. 
Our scattered reserves are wholly in- 
effective for use in emergencies. Our 
bank notes do not fluctuate In response 
to business needs. Even the commer- 
cial paper held by the banks Is not a 
truly liquid assets with us. Each sep- 
arate bank in times of stres.^ is con- 
cerned only In strengthening Its re- 
serves. The sole method available for 
that purpose Is the calling of loans. 
The portion of the reserves held In the 
vaults of our thousands of Independ- 
ent banks Is for all practical purposes 
a dead asset. Indeed, rigidity stamps 
Itself upon our entire credit organiza- 
tion. „ ^ 
Only Local Bank*. 
'•We have only local banks. They 
furnish banking faculties to their own 
communities. They are Indispensable. 

"As It was found necessary to or- 
ganize the federal government to guard 
our national Interests and to legislate 
on those subjects affecting us as a na- 
tion so we must have some national 
federation of the banks for national 
financial purposes. The independence of 
the units must be absolutely preserved. 
The powers given to tne federation of 
the banks must be strictly limited to 
those that are national In character 
The form of organization must be su 
as to Insure Its operation in the 1 
terests of and as a support to all legit 
mate business, and must be whol 
free from sectlcnal, political or selfish 
financial control. 

• When thus organized It must be 
empowered to act as custodian for the 
reserves of the banks, to rediscount 
their short time commercial paper, to 
provide a safe and sound bank note 
currencv that will automatically adjust 



FREE Distribution 

During Baby Week of the 

WondeYful V^ Pia£ei; 

No Pins "^y special arrangement with the 

M R ff e owners of the Patent, we are able to 
ANo DUttons gj^,^ absolutely free to every mother 
a complete Pattern for making the perfect-fitting 
Vanta Diaper— uses no piffS>^no buttons, has eictra 
thicknesses where needed, but without the harmful 
bulkiness of ordinary diaper which makes baby bow 
legged. 

. — Vanta Diaper is fast- 
ened by three tape bows; 
one at the waist, and one 
at each knee. Se^>a loop 
Dn each stockipf/^nd the 
tape that f^istens the 
diaper at the'l^nee may 
be slipped tli^ough it, 
thus holding tfte Stocking securely, without a pin. 
—Vanta Diaj^'r is as simple and easy to make as the 
ordinary diaper. The Free Pattern shows you how. 
—The quantitv o§ these Free Vanta Diaper Patterns 
alloted to us l§^:4imited— but while they last, one will 
be given abstrhttely free to every mother who will 
come in and ask for it. Come at once— to be sure of 
g-ettine vour Pattern before our supply is exhausted. 

gCLllUg ^ V. w* a. ov X, ,Babi/t hop, Third Floor) 




AWord About Toledo Scales 



—Through the courtesy of Mr. E. M. Welch, the sales 
agent of the Toledo Computing Sales Co., we are 
weighing babies on a handsome pair of gold-finished 
TOLEDO ELECTRIC scales. These scales operate 
without springs and are always reliable — not even do 
they vary with the weather conditions, but always 
give honest weight. They are much used by grocers 
and weigh the various articles as accurately as they 
will the babies here this week. 

—The scales in themselves are an interesting exhibit 
and are open to inspection to all visitors. 

We Are Ready to Tailor Your 
Fall Suit or Coat to Measure 

— Our designer has just returned from the fashion 
metropolis, conversant with every new mode. 
— We are prepared to give you the very latest ideas 
in designing, to give you the very highest grade of 
tailoring and to furnish you the most favored ma- 
terials at a price so reasonable as to astonish you. 

— Glass Block tailored-to-measure suits and coats are 
guaranteed — 

— To have the best Skinner linings. 
— To be hand-tailored throughout. 
— To fit perfectly, and to give absolute satisfaction. 
— Complete stocks of the very newest suitings and 
coatings for Fall and Winter are ready for your se- 
lection. Our prices for making, including all neces- 
sary materials are — 

Suits, $35, $37.50, $40 and $42.50. 
Coats, $35, $37.50, $40 and $42.50. 

lDre8$ Goods Salon, Second Floor) 

''Dolly Madison*' School Caps 

— A big lot of these popular "Dolly Madison" school 
caps has just arrived and will be ready for sale 
Wednesday. They are in a new shape and made of 
felt with velvet brim, come in all colors, for misses 
and children, usually retailing at 75c and $1, but spe- 
cial Wednesday at 60c. 

— Complete lines of corduroy and plush caps suitable 
for school or auto wear, priced at $1.75 to $2.50. 

( Milliner 1/ Salon, Second Floor) 





^m 



Itself to the cm slant changes in busi- 
ness requlremerts. to act as the gov- 
ern'.ient"s fi'^cal agent and to represent 
us in all national and all international 
financial affairs. 

The Aid rich Plan. 
"A plan to accomplish these pur- 
poses has been before the countr> for 
nearlv a year. It n contained in the 
unanimous report made to congress by 
the national monetary commission rec- 
on^mendlng the establishmet of the Na- 
tional Reserve association. 

••some objections hare been urged to 

the plan of the Proposed organisation 

and the machinery provided for its 

^ operation. If there are defects in the 

»"<=h ^[an they should b« «reeiflcally polnt- 

*"• ed out and suggestions offered for 

•^^'- their correction. Mere denunciation of 

«"y I proposed measures ^^'^^^.'u VImJ 

some subst tute is not at all heiptui. 

U^ believed that the more the plan 

of the monetary commission is studied 

and anriyzed, the more it will grow In 

favor But whether it does or not, the 

problem of ^ monetary reform Remains 




THE RED CROSS RAT 
ANO MOUSE EMBALM- 
ER ANO NON-PO SON- 
OUS INSECT EXTER- 
MINATOR. 

Clears out all rats, 
mice, roaches, bed- 
bugs, etc. Does the 
work Immediately. 
Absolutely guaran- 
teed. For sale at 
Grochau's Drug Store. Fourth ave- 
nue west ana First street: Max 
Wirth laWest Superior street: Lion 
Drug Co.. 2030 West Superior street: 
.Smith & Smith, 101 West Superior 
street 



with us. A solution for It 

Tound. We will be unworthy of our 

inheritanc e If we fail in this effort. 

NICARAGUAi^: 
QU1ETIN6 pOWN 

Admiral Sutherland Makes 
Report to the Navy 
Departmert.J 

Washington. Sept. 10.— The revolu- 
tion In NMcaragua is on the wan/, ac- 
cording to advices from Rt^r-Adm.ral 
boulherland today to tb* nAvy depart- 



ment. The admiral reported that the 
railroad is now completely in the hands 
of the American landing forces, and 
that the uprising has dwindled to the 
proportions of "the usual Central 
American revolution." 

The turbulence appears to have sub- 
sided in proportion to the rapidity with 
which the American marines and blue- 
jackets restored traffic on the railroad 
line. The road soon will be In opera- 
tion from Corinto Granada, the south- 
ern terminus, where there has been 
much suffering among the starving 
people. 

ALASKA-YUKON 
BOUNDS MARKED 

BroDze Monoments Set Every 

Three Miles Along 

the Line. 

Dawson, T. T., Sept. 10.— The inter- 
national boundary survey party which 
has been marking the line between 
Alaska and Yukon territory, arrived 
here yesterday, having completed the 
task of surveying the 142nd meridian 
from the Pacific to the Arctic ocean. 

At the north end of the line a 
bronze monument was placed. Just out 
of reach of the highest waves, and 
smaller monuments were set every 
three miles along the line. Geologists 
accompanied the expedition and made a 
complete survey. 

S^ll GlDMenB Plaatn. 

Battle Lake. Minn., Sept. 10.— Thorn.^ 
brothers, owners of a big farm twelve 
miles from this city, have sold their 



ginseng plants, the largest number on 
any farm in the United States, to H. 
A. Gilbertson of Fergus Falls, who will 
take possession this fall. Heavy taxa- 
tion is the reason assigned by the for- 
mer owners for the sale. 

UNABLE TO SPEAK 

AT LIND BANQUET 



Andrew Nelson, who was invited to 
speak at a testimonial banquet to be 
given Former Governor John Lind at 



Minneapolis tomorrow evening, has 
found it necessary to decline. Mr. Nel- 
son must leave tomorrow morning for 
Grand Marais on legal business that 
could not be put off. 

Duluth is expected to be represnted 
at the banquet, which hais been ar- 
ranged by the Wilson organization of 
Hennepin county in compliment to the 
former governor. Mr. Lind recently 
returned from a trip abroad and will 
now take up active work on behalf 'A 
Governor Wilson in Minnesota. His 
speech at the banquet tomorrow night 
is expected to be the keynote of the 
Wilson campaign In this state. 



BOWELS SLUGGISH, STOMACH SOUR, 
GASSY, UPSET? CASCA RETS GREAT! 

That awful sourness, belching of acid and foul gases; that pain In the pit 
of the stomach, the heartburn, nervousness, nausea, bloating after eating, feel- 
ing of fullness, dizziness and sick headache, means your stomach is full of 
Bour bile ^your liver is torpid — your bowels constipated. It isn't your stom- 
ach's fault — It Isn't indigestion — it's biliousness and constipation. 

Try Cascareta; they Immediately sweeten the stomach, remove the sour, 
undigested and fermenting food and foul gases; take the excess bile from the 
liver and carry off the constipated waste matter from the bowels. TTten your 
stomach trouble is ended. A Cascaret tonight straightens you out by morning. 




10 Cents. N«^w gripe or ndcsn. 

•CASCARETS WORK WHILE YOU SLEEP.* 




e 



Tuesday* 



CHIFFONIERS 



Chiffonier— Made of imperial ciuar- 
Icicil oak: has 5 large roomy draw- 
ers—nicely finished a rich golden 
color— other stores get $10.00 for 
Uiis one — our price, 
special • 

Solid Oak Chiffonier— Not like cut 
— ;3 roomy drawers— French plate 
niJrn>r, beveled and shajied. This 

ra>o is worth at least 
f20 — our price 





$6.85 

ot like cut 

ench plate 

iai)ed. This 

$13.85 
MISSION BUFFET 



Elegant Buffet— exactly like 

4.ut__has two small drawers; 
one lined and padded for sil- 
verware; lar.oe drawer for 
linen, and the center space 
for dishes — genuine French 
bevel plate mirror. 10 by 32 
inches long— plate rack on 
top — nicely finished in_ Early 
English Oak- 
special at. . . . 




TALKS ABOUT 
THIRDPARTY 

Wilson Discusses Politics 

Before the New York 

Press Club. 



FORMER DULUTfflAN INHERITS 
LARGE FORTUNE IN CALIFORNIA 



$12.45 



GIMIARTS 



We have a number of Go 
CarB to close out at very 
t ■ i prices. Among them 
.uc litiiiy high grade AUwin 
a'ul Lloyd carts. 

SPECIAL 

t strutig folding cart 

V -idjn -table head and 

-, reclining back and 



Says Democrats Are Only 

Force United Enough to 

Go Ahead. 



New York. Sept. 10. — Governor Wood- 
row Wilson WDfked from early inorn- 
itiK' until late last night mapping out 
campaign plan.s at Democratic head- 
auart-^r.H and appealing to tlio voters 
of New York < ity in tiuee speeches. 

Over a big map, the Democratic can- 
didate di.Hcus.sed with ttie executive 
ofticers of tlie campaign speaking; in- 
vasions of debatable states. Then he 



T. B. McManu.s. a former Duluthlan 
and at one lime a member of the state 
board of gr*ln appeals. ha.«» fallen heir 
to an estate Uiat Is said to be worth 
approximately $1,000,000. 

Mr. McManus Inherited the , estate 
from hia 1>rother. a wealthy oil lami 
owner of Bak^rstteld, Cal. The brother 
was a bathelpr. ., 

Mr. McManua accompanied by hi.-j 
wife. left fwr Bakerstleld seve'/.^' 
montlus ago. but said nothing "'/"^ 
tortune he had Inherited, except to a 
tew Intimate friends. His son. T. vv. 
McManus and two daughters, left out 
recently for California. 



who never got a moment on the plat- 
who never have a<< eas to the 





l::c 
at • 



!" $3.95 



rtii>i>e 
-special 



NGER & 



the big west end 
•furniture house 




LSON 



19ih Ave. Wtjst 
and Superior St 



We Undersell Them All" 



WE STAND FOR HEALTH 




All DISEASES 

PECULIAR TO MEI 

CURED 





SPECIALISTS FOR 

MORE THAN 20 YEARS 

II DULUTH 



griin li: 



T . 1 r- I li 



Wliflt would a man profit If he could gain the whole world and could not 

■h? The reason why so many men are going around weak and 

of l.einij rol.u.st and vigorous lies in the wrong treatment they 

in know everything in his line, and the doctor la not 

. sifted than any other man. No doctor can know how 

■ di.>jea3e3 of men and women at the same time, he will 

V m II. both Wr have done BotbiaK el^e for the last twenty 

ih« city of Dulwth t*an cure MK!V alone. We have spent half of our 

... _...,!,, of mens diseases and naturally we are more fit to be 

•e of men than any other doctor who does not make a 

> . ..^ in^n alone. If you want to be helped and you wish to be 

turJi.illy invited to consult us free of charge. 

DOX'T GO TO NEWCOMIXCi DOCTORS 

...II .lon't know how Ions th»^y may tarry here. While we wish them 

in the treatment of women, we are sure that they can not 

ssful in the cure of men as we are. and as we have been 

rst twenty years. We guarantee any man a perfect cure of all 

may have. There are verv few questions a man is asked if he 

ruiti'-^ to our office, an X-Ray examination will show us the most deepseated 

troiib'ii,'.'4. 

ron.st;: and advice free and confidential to every man who seriously 

dtaire.-i to : .■ ■ -t-d. 

Cal! or write for our free Symptoms Blank and Instructive Book. 
Offl e hours. S to 9. Sunday. 10 to 1. 

PROGRESSIVE MEDICAL ASSOCIATION 

\0. 3 V%KST .HI I'KllIOR .STRKKT. Dl I.l'TH. MI!VN. 



motored to Union Square and analyzed 
before two big crowds tariff schedules, 
statistics Lind the principles of pro- 
tective policies. 

In the late afternoon he went to the 
residence of Chairman McOombs at 
Flushing. 1* I. The governor said Mr 
McOombs was slowly r-^covering. and 
thought he would be back In the cam- 
paign within three weeks. 

At the New York Tress club the gov- 
ernor delivered his principal address of 
the day. He was enthusiastically ap- 
plauded as he analyzed the three po- 
litical parties. 

•The trouble with the tariff, ' the 
governor said in this address, '"has 
been that it is one of the most colos- 
sal systems of deliberate patronage 
that has ever been conceived, and the 
main trouble Is that protection stops 
where patronage besr'ns." 

DtaeuMMed Third Party. 
Governor Wilson questioned the abil- 
ity of leaders of the Progressive party, 
if elected, to carry out any part of the 
policies of its platform. Much of the 
speech was devoted to an analysis ot 
the Progressive party plan.s, although 
he gave some attention to the record 
of the Republican party and predicted 
a victory for united Democracy. 
He said in part: 

"I have come here tonight for the 
purpose of discussing Just as far as 
possible, the situation, and I hope that 
in doing so I shall do injustice to no 
one. I am not one of those who believe 
that the right tactics in politics is to 
deprecate the men who are opposed to 
you and belittle and misrepresent the 
forces wltli which you have to contend, 
[t ought to be a frank, straightfor- 
ward and fair determination of what 
it Is we are to agree on and do. and 
how we are to do It in the great 
field of our common action. 
HIa Ofim A(tltn«le. 
My feeling about my own candidacy 
for the presidency Is that if 1 cannot 
be the people's spokesman. 1 dont 
want them to vote for me. I want to 
feel. If I am elected to the office of 
president, that I am speaking for pur- 
po.-ios and Impulses and judKments of 
i: • people of the United States. 

' I want to discuss the three parties 
now seeking your support. I know 
there are more than three parties In 
the United States, and It Is not out of 
any disrespect to the parties that have 
commanded only a small number of 
votes in the past that I leave them out 
of the reckoning for the present. 

•'Let* us consider, first, the Repub- 
lic in party. There Is a great deal of 
dlft'-rence between the Republican 
p.uty party and certain groups of 
gvnt'lemen who have been allowed to 
lead and direct the Republican party. 

■The Republican party, as repre- 
sented by those men. Is the v'ery PfjiV 
which has got us Into the difficulties 
we are now tryintr to get out of. 
stupidity Worwe Than Knavery. 
"Mark you. I atn not saying tiiat the 
le-aders of the party knew that they 
were doing us an evil or that they in- 
tended to do us an evil, l^of 'ny part, 
I am verv much more afraid of the 
man who "does a bad thing and does 
not know it is bad. than of the inan 
who does a bad thing and knows It l.^ 
b.id because I think that In public 
affairs stupidity is more 6&u^evou^ 
th m knavery, because it is harder to 

'^^^n^^ ^^el^U^^en. whatever may 
,.J. been H^ir^^ntenUo^n^s.^linked^the 



to be understood by the m 

finance, if only the masters of finance 

are consulted? 

Masteni of Finance. 

"The masters of finance ought to 
be consulted, because they are » P»" 
of the people of the United States 
but they ought to be consulted only 
In proportion as they are part of tne 
people of the United States. 

••There is a large body of R^P"»>- 
llcans now In open rebellion. Ana 
what Interests me about them ana 
draws me to them. Is that they ate n 
revolt because their conscience could 
not stand what was going on. That 
third party deserves your careful con- 
sideration when you are debating 
which party you are going ^^ syippoit 
1 would be ashamed of myself if I dia 
not realize and admit that some ot 
the sober and finer forces of this coun- 
try are now devoted to the promotion 
of this new movement and P^fty- 

'I have known the insurgent Ro- 
pubilcans a long time. They first begatt 
to creep Into that supposedly b;ick- 
ward state of New Jersey a gK'ff t 
mail V years ago. They then called 
U.em"^ the \ew idea Republicans., when 
the idea that what the HeP"l>"cans 
were do*ng at Washington was wrong 
was a new idea— a "^^ Idea among 
Republicans. It was rather an old 
Idea among Democrats. 

If Third I*nrty WIna. 

"If this new party is .P.'-f «';,7<\_**2 
the fifth of November will "be in a 
position to clear the decks and carry 
Sut the policy whch many noble gen 
tlemen have conce Wed that it was sin 
cerely bent upon.' The processes 
reform 
wlthl 

de*n*t!VhVt' wiVrbe hTs'sUuatl^on'.'^^ to^'he entTre Gogebic range. 



of 



rn In this country must take place k,an(js of dollars m its 
In the next four years. If theU^e opening of the Copp 
T of the third party is made presl- a great deal, not only to 1 



anybody suppose that he 
third party congre.ss behitjd hlm^ is 1 1 
not inevitable that in such even'^fj^o? 
will be in congress such a '"l^ture or 
riements and froups and coteries that 
the president cannot possibly get any 
program whatever P"t through? 

•Now suppose you had a house or 
rep?esentatfves tnixed like the present 
senate? I think we could all go fish- 
ing for the next two >•«*"• ,"""1^ in 
thf same time you had a leader in^ 
slstent upon certain policies. I thinK 
the air would be full of clamorous 
voices but the statute book would be 
very empty of fulfilled promises— not 
bIcausT U may be. nobody was trying 
to fulfill the promises, ^"f,,„'>^„C'*i^i-^® 
everybody was trying to fulfill a dif- 
ferent promise. 

Ita Central Propoanl. 

"But the most certain «"^Pe«J*"^ent to 
nrogress 1 have not spoken of. ine 
new party does not even propose to 




government v-,^ >... ■,",w\ i.i.^ Hnanpp^ 
the men who control the big nnances 
li.e men >vu They may have 

have 



beo'i- 
the 



if the United .States. 

done it innocently, or they may ji^^- 

done it corruptly. wUhout^^^afJectUi^^ 

argu.ment at all 



Provided you ad- 




selves 
liance. 



cannot escape 



"Here is 
palgn funds 
thousands 
men representing 
est. that has big 



Canpnlfim Fund*. 

the old question of cani- 
j- If I take hundreds of 
of" dollars from a Kro"P ^^ 
a particular Inter- 
stakes In a certain 
;;heduTe of the -tariff. I tt*'^ '^^"^ 
the knowledge that most of those 
Lertlemen will expect me not to forget 
fltelr Uvterest in that schedule and 
that they will take it as a Poln«- "^f 
implicit honor that I should see to it 
that they were not damaged by too 
greit a change In that schedule^ There 
fore. If I take their money I am bound 
to them by a sort of tacit pledge of 
honor! and if I desert them I change 
the virhole character of the govern- 

"^"The men I am Interested in are the 
men who never have their voices heard, 
who never got a line in the newspapers. 



have been done under the 
leadership of the regular RepubUcan 
leaders It proposes that the results of 
their mistakes'^ shall be l*"gallzed and 
made regular by being taken under the 
direct supervision of the government of 

"^^^i'jlreve^r' mav be the Philanthropic 
purpo.ses of certain parts of its pro- 
gram, the inevitable result of that par- 
ticular proposal will be to confirm by 
law the partnership ^ between g,reat 
trusts and the federal government. I 
do not say that this is what the leaders 
nf the new party expect or propose, but 
merefy tiTat that Is what will happen, 
what must happen under such a plan. 
A a to the Demoerata. 
"Then vou have only the Democratic 
narty left; and you wHl ask me how I 
can set up a claim for the Democratic 
narty Well. In the first p ace. It Is 
rtther a fln4 discipline to have been 
on the outside for sixteen years, 

"You have not entrusted the govern- 
ment of the United '^^ates to the Den- 
ocratic party because the I^emoc atlc 
nartv has been oppo.sed all these yeais 
o the things that the Republican 
leaders were doing. Is not that a 
statement of mere fact? Haven^t we 
been attacking them and opposing 
them and all these years, and propos- 
ing programs that once looked radical 
.and now look reasonable? We have 
not just begun being progressives. We 
have been * progressives for ,Blxteen 
vears. and we saw the year l^lf half a 
ireneration before It came. Are you 
lorng to give us no credit for vision.' 
Do Tou not think It counts, for some- 
thing to stay out In the cold on a con- 
viction for sixteen years? 

••The Democratic party Is now, per- 
hans for the Ilrst time In a Kenera- 
Uon united, solid and enthusiastic. 
And the Democratic party Is the only 
organlzV-d force by which you can set 



T. B. McMANUS. 

LARCFSHAFT 
IS TO BE SUNK 

Whiteside and La Rue Open- 
ing Mine at Presque 
ble River. 

Ironwood, Mich.. Sept. 10. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — The first carload of 
machinery for the new mining district 
of Gogebic county arrived at Marenlsco 
last week. A large shaft is to be sunk 
close to the east bank of Presque Isle 
river, to open up ore proved by dia- 
mond drills about two years ago. 
Messrs. Whiteside and La Rue of Du- 
luth have great confidence In the prop- 
erty and are showing their faith by 
the expenditure of hundreds of thou- 
- ■ development, 

s mine means 
Marenlsco, but 
._ ige. Other ex- 
ploring work is being done at State 
line in Vilas county, south of Waters- 
meet, and it is expected that the suc- 
cess of these explorations will bring 
several other companies into the 
Gogebic range in the hope of finding 
rich ore bodies. 

CONFERENCE 

OF WORKERS 

ii'i 

Y. M. C. A. Secretaries of 

Northern Minnesota Will 

Gather in Duluth. 

Secretaries of the Young Men's 
Christian associations of Northern 
Minnesota, together with other promi- 
nent Y. M. C. A. -workers from various 
parts of the state, including some of 
the state Y. M. C. A. officers, will hold 
a conterence tomorrow in the local 
Y. M. C. A. assembly hall. B. C. Wade, 
general secretary of the Duluth Y M.. 
C A., will preside over the meeting. 
Among those present will be: K. W 
Peck state secretary; R. C. Coftin and 
H W. Mixsell of the state committee; 
D T Lawrence of Brainerd: E. L. Lud- 
wig ■ W. B Hunt and V. E. Vieva of 
Two harbors; M. R. .Shelton and H. G. 
Bossuet of Proctor, and E. S. Davis of 
Cloquet. ^ „ 

The program is as follows: 
10 a m.. Devotional exercises, lead 
by H. W. Mixsell. _ 

10:30 to 11. ••.Suggestions From the 
Men and Religion Forward Movement 




The House That Guarantees Its 

M en's QtofMth 

Highly Tailored 

Suits 

In serges and diagonal 
weaves, worsteds and 
fancy mixtures. 

ns n8320 

Use Your Credit 

Pay as you earn, no extra charges, 
no interest, no red tape. 




HufnMiiKim-Tinnu 



Are most successful who ha»e their 
printing done by the 

LAIEPRIITilGCOMPAlY 

U0-1S2 West Mlcklf IB Sto«et 

Dulutti Phone. Melrose, 1604 

Special designs submitted for catalog covers, labels, etc. z«n"h Pi^o°e. orapd. 23e>,D 



CANDIDATES 



for Our Local Fields,^ Mr. Peck. 

11 to 11:30, general discussion. 
11:30. 'Membership Essentials, Prob- 
lems and Solutions," F. A. Hathaway. 

12 to 12:30, general discussion. 
12:30, lunch. . r. t> 
2 p m., ■•Our Association and Its Pe- 
culiar Problems;'" ten minutes for each 
discussion and ten minutes for gener- 
al discussion. Two Harbors, J. G Ha- 
maker; Brainerd, E. L. Ludwig; Proc- 
tor, M. R. Shelton; Cloquet, L. S. Da- 
vis; Duluth, E. D. Ranck. 

3:40. "How Can We as Secretaries 
and Associations be of Greater Serv- 
ice to Each Other." B. C. Wade 

4 -30, meeting in assmebly hall witri 
families of secretaries for social hour 
and games. . . , ,. 

5:30, dinner in private lunch room. 

It is possible that the gathering, in- 
stead of having dinner in the private 
lunch room at 5:30 p. m.. will go to 
Park Point and have lunch there. This 
will probably be done, if the weather 
is favorable. 

Arrangements for the gathering 
have been made by a special conimit- 
tee consisting of W. E. Lauterbach, 
J. G. Hamaker and M. R. Shelton. 

The meeting will take place on the 
twenty-fifth anniversary of the en- 
trance into Y. M. C. A. work of B. 
C. Wade, the Duluth general secre- 
tary. 

WILLIAM REDMOND TO 

MEET IRISH LEAGUE 

Philadelphia, Sept. 10. — Michael J. 
Ryan of this city, president of the 
United Irish League of America, has 
received a letter from John E. Red- 
mond, the Irish home rule leader, stat- 
tlng that his brother. William Red- 
mond, would sail from Ireland on 
Thursday of this week to attend the 
national convention of the league to be 
held In Philadelphia the latter part of 
this month and declaring that, so far 
as Great Britain is concerned, the 
battle for home rule has been won. 

"Our only embarrassment," he says, 
"is in the attitude taken up by a sec- 
tion of the people of Ulster." 

Continuing, he says: 

••This attitude will not, of course, 
prevent the passage of the .home rule 
bill and my own strong belief Is that, 
after that measure has become the 
law. with that strong common sense 
which characterizes Northern Irishmen, 



our present opponents will rapidly fall 
into line." 

MARRIED AT BESSEMER. 



Miss Hazel Frazer and F. C. Dick- 
inson of Tccumsek Wedded. 

Bessemer. Mich., Sept. 10.— (Special 
to The Herald.) — ^Miss Hazel Irene 
Frazer, daughter of Rev. and Mrs. 
Charles M. Frazer, pastor of Presby- 
terian church here and Frederick C. 
Dickinson of Tecumseh, Mich., were 
married at the Presbyterian manse in 
this city in the presence of the imme- 
diate members of the family. The 
ceremony was performed by the bride's 
father. The bride, who is the only 
dsughter of Rev. and Mrs. Frazer, is a 
graduate of Alma college and was 
teacher of German in the high school 
at Alpena. Mich., for the past two 
years. The groom is a prominent busi- 
ness man of Tecumseh. Mich. After 
the ceremony Mr. and Mrs. Dickinson 
left for Lake Gogebic, where they will 
spend their honeymoon. They will 
make their home at Tecumseh. Mich. 

BUSINESS MEN KILLED 

W HEN TRAIN HITS AUTO 

Kewburgh, N. Y., Sept. 10.— James 
Alva Terry, Wood Pitts and Grant 
Puff, business men of Montgomery, 
Orange county, were killed at Emblers 
Crossing on the W^all Kill Valley rail- 
road last night, when a passenger 
train struck the automobile in which 
they were riding. 

WINTER COMPLETES ITS 

W ATER WORKS SYSTEM 

Couderay, Wis., Sept. 10. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The village of Winter, 
near here, has Just completed its water 
works system, which has been under 
construction for the past six months. 
The plant is modern, with all latest 
improvements, including a 100.000-gal- 
lon steel tank on a 70-foot steel tower, 
with stf^am pump and a good supply 
of excellent water. The total cost ot 
the plant was nearly 110,000. 



Serious 



Kidney 
By an 




FULL 

•ET TEETH 



Gold Crowo, ] 
Bridge Work, \ $3 

per tooth j 

Gold Filiiogs, ^^ 

up from ^" 

Silver Fillings 50c 
Set Teeth $5 



The 



f proper care of tt<e teeth la Important in the con- ( MA HIGH 
• n of health. Mary serious dt.S'?aae3 are directly J SSiilSpS' 
e to decayel t^eth. Have our expert dentists ex- ( PRICESa 

i:xiiininatiwn Free. Ten-Year Guarautee. 



auuf: • your teeth often. 
Lady Alt«uii«nt. 



NEW 



IVIETHOD 

Dlt. II. 1. DltUW.\. Owner. 

25 ^VeHt Superior Strert. Over Boa Ton Bakery. Next to Staek'a. 

Jlunrs, 8:30 to 7. 



Strength and 
Activity In Old Age 

depend largely upon the care you take 
of yourself from middle age on — 
whether you conserve and protect your 
vital forces or weaken them through 
the neglect of the all-important func- 
tion of digestion, so common to those 
who are absorbed in their dally oc- 
cupations. 

Duffy's Pure 



Malt Whiskey 



P 



WTER5 jTnMUUtatum 



WHO RlOW HOW 



•EST WOMK. BETTER SERVICE 



PRIMTLPS*BfMOBPS 



PrvtMcBM lUf.. «lk kn. ««•( maA Sapcriar StreiL 




THE PALM ROOM 

At the SPA LPING 

MOST DELIGHTFUL AND LUXURIOUS 
RESTAUR.'VNT IN DULUTH. 




LOOD POISO 

PERMANENTLY CURED 



N 



Plmplca, rpoU on lb* fkln. totm In th« mouth. 
■le«n. falUnx liaU. bone pftlus. cAtarrah. eu., art 
■TQiDtoma. U«l«y» »r« d»n«eruu». Send at one* to 
Dr. Brown. 1»35 Arch ilieet. PhUadolphU. foi 
Brown's Blood Curo. Conflncing proof In a I2.M 
*>tUo— la«t« a month. Sold in Dulutb by Mai WUU, 
U W<at SuDsrlor street and hf all drucgiaU. 



Is the best possible aid to impaired di- 
gestion and a weak stomach. 

It is invaluable in stimulating the 
diReallve processes and regrulatlng the 
st.>mach, liver and kidneys. 

It is a sure remedy for overworked 
men and women. 

It stimulates, strengthens and 8U.stains 
the system: It builds 
and braces body 
and brain. 

Go to your near- 
est druggist, dealer 
or grocer to-day 
and get a large bot- 
tle for $1.00, and 
take It regularly as 
directed. 

BE SURE AND GET DUFFY'S 

Doctor's advice and medical book- 
let containing testimonials and rules 
for health free on application to 
Tkc Dally Malt Wklskcr Co^ Mochetlcr. N. T. 




vour government free. 
^ • -I was bred In a football college; I 
know that what wins is teamwork; 
and I wan to tell you that we 
have now got a Democratic team 
schooled in years of adversity that can 
hold toKether against any team that 
can be put in the field, and as com- 
pared with which some teams recently 
organized are only scrub te ams. 

MASONIC LODGES 
RESUME SESSIONS 



Masonic lodges of the city are re- 
suming fall work after the usual sum- 
mer period of Inactivity. 

Ionic lodge. No. 186 held its first 
fall meeting last evening at the Ma- 
sonic temple. The first degree was 
conferred Worshipful Master Warren 

''•pSt'lne^'olft'^No. 79, will hold Its 
first regular fall meetinjr next Monday 
evlnlng No degrees _ will be conferred 
regular business being the order of 

^''Fu^ofld*' lodge. No. 198, will meet at 
the West Duluth Masonic hall on 
Wednesday evening. Worshipful Maj- 
Jer Mason M. Forbes will confer the 

" Ke%^tone*Chapter, No. 20, Royal Arch 
M^^ons! will resume the fall work 
Wednesday evening A business meet- 
ing has been called by Carl ti. l^one- 

^'Duluth*ChalftVr. No. 59, R. A. M.. will 
confer a dbgrtl at the West Duluth 
^Tsonic hall on Wednesday. Sep^ 1 8 

Duluth Comraandery. No. 18, Knights 
Temolars. will meet this evening. The 
Red cross degree will be conferred at 

^'^The^'acKh Rite bodies have also 
resumed activity. Meetings are held 
every Thursday evening. 




Disease Treated 
Old - Fashioned Doctor 



S. B. HARTMAN. M. D. 

In 1860 I was practicing medicine 
in Millersvllle, Penn.sylvanla. a thriv- ^ ^ ^ ., 

Ing farming community. A prominent ^ wonders with him and I believe 
citizen of that locality called at my will with me." 



graduate of the Jefferson Medical Col- 
I lege at Philadelphia, and as one of the 
consulting physicians had been a pro- 
fessor in that college it seemed to me 
quite unlikely that I would be able to 
do any more than had been done, but 
I prescribed what seemed to be the 
best thing under the circumstances. 

He went away and in a week he re- 
turned saying he was no better, that 
he was still losing ground. He judged 
that he had taken the same medicine 
before. No doubt he had. But he 
wished me to prescribe again. I did so. 

This went on for about two months, 
the patient failing all the time, and I 
was becoming thoroughly disccj^raged 
with the case. 

One day the patient said to me, 
"Doctor, why don't you give me the 
medicine you gave my neighbor? We 
all thought he would die. but your 
medicine cured him. This was why I 
came to you. Why not give me the 
same medicine you gave him?" 

"But," I said, "your neighbor did 
not have kidney disease. It was a 
bowel complaint that I prescribed for 
in his case. I remember I gave him 
the Neutralizing Mixture that I make 
a great deal of use of in bowel dis- 
eases." 

"Well, I want some of the same 
medicine you gave him. It worked 

it 



Hot Cavsht Robbliitr Till. 

Hllisbom N. D., Sept. 10.— (Special 
to The Herald.)— Edwin Hoppus a 17- 
year-old Qrandln boy, is held In the 
county Jail here on the charge of rob- 
bing the money drawer at the Great 
Northern depot. Hoppus managed to 
reach the till through the t»cket win- 
dow when the agent was-in the ex- 
press room, but was captured before 
he was able to. extricate himself from 
the small opening. He had secured 
$9.40. 



office one day In a very feeble condi- 
tion. So much so he had to be assist- 
ed in alighting from his wagon. 

I found on questioning him that he 
had been afHicted for about two years. 
He had consulted various doctors, 
among them a specialist from Phila- 
delphia. They pronounced his disease 
to be Brighfs disease of the kidneys. 
He was gradually falling in strength, 
losing flesh rapidly, and altogether 
presented a very pitiable spectacle, 
the remnant of a once strong and hap- 
py man. 

I had been treating a neighbor of 
his successfully. This neighbor had 
highly recommended me and thus it 
was he had come to me. 

He told me that the doctors had 
practically given up his case as hope- 
less and he felt free to. consult any 
other physician. I hesitated to take 
the case, as I felt sure I could not do 
anything more than the other phy- 
sicians had done. I told him so, yet he 
insisted upon my prescribing. I was a 



"But." I said, "this is not a medi- 
cine for kidney disease." 

"Well, since you seem to be like the 
rest of the doctors, you cannot help 
me, why not try the medicine that 
helped my neighbor?" 

After some hesitation I concluded to 
give him a bottle of it. In ten days 
he returned. He at once began to be- 
rate me In no complimentary words, 
OQ yl n tf - 

"You knew very well this medicine 
would help me. You held it back 
merely to get more fees for treating 
me. From the first the medicine has 
helped me and I have made rapid 
improvement. If I could have had 
this medicine a year ago I should 
have been saved a great deal of ex- 
pense and loss of time." 

I replied that I was glad the medi- 
cine had helped him. I was somewhat 
confused by his brusque manner and 
rough speech. I gave him another 
bottle of medicine. Did not see him 
again for about three weeks. Once 



more he called at my office for an- 
other bottle of medicine, which was 
his la.st call. A month or so after- 
wards a neighbor of his called and got 
a bottle of the same medicine, saying 
that my patient was practically a well 
man, attending to his duties about his 
large farm. 

I had given him the Neutralizing 
Mixture which was a remedy that I 
had used before only for bowel dis- 
eases. The same remedy that has 
since been sold under the name of Pe- 
runa. I could not quite understand 
how it was that Peruna .should oper- 
ate so beneficially In such seemingly 
different diseases. I had not yet 
grasped the correct philosophy of dis- 
ease. I did not then clearly compre- 
hend that catarrh may affect the kid- 
neys as well as the bowels. Nothing of 
that sort was taught in the books in 
those days. It took me years before 
I clearly comprehended that catarrh 
was a disease liable to attack any or- 
gan of the body. 

Catarrh is a disease of the mucous 
membranes. The mucous membranes 
line every organ, duct and cavity in 
the body. Thus It is catarrh may set- 
tle anywhere where there is a mucous 
membrane. 

Peruna is my remedy for all these 
cases. I insist upon It, however, that 
Peruna Is not a cure-all. I use It for 
Just one disease, catarrh. But as ca- 
tarrh is liable to affect so many dif- 
ferent places, disturb so many differ- 
ent functions, derange so many differ- 
ent organs, it does seem to many peo- 
ple as if I regarded Peruna as a cure- 
all. 

The above narrative Is simply one of 
the many cases In my early practice 
that brought me to comprehend the 
wonderful efficacy of Peruna In euch a 
variety of diseases. The kidneys may 
be affected by other diseases than ca- 
tarrh, but the average case of kidney 
disease Is catarrh of the kidneys. All 
cases of Bright's disease begin with 
catarrh of the kidneys. This being 
true, and It also being true that Pe- 
runa Is a catarrh remedy, it follows 
that a great many cases of kidney dis- 
ease would be benefited by Peruna, 
Peruna Is for sale at all drug stores. 

SPECIAL NOTICE — ^Many persona are 
maWng Inquiries for the old-time Pe- 
runa. To such would say, this formula 
is now put out under the name of KA- 
TAR-NO, manufactured by KA-TAR- 
NO Company, Columbus, Ohio. Write 
them and they will be pleased to send 
you a free booklet. 



> 



I 




™e»W?^^»P"?W^ 



99WMW 




'\ 




HE DULUTH HERALD 



September 10, 1912. 






v-TOwiey, w . 1-'. juiiro, »««wu t-' »»iiii •"• 
and Mrs. R. 1». Hajuly, Mr. and Mi 
C R Uu8t and daughter. 'jHr. and Mi 
F c" Curtis and Mr. «ii«i/JvlrB. Georj 



and Mr. 



learn ll*** 
was '19. **■«' 

» ■ 



ctmpoped of the chairman, vice chalr- 
n'itn. Mrs A. A. Kt-rr and Miss Meekt-r. 
waa accepted and the report of thf 

, emmfiii ri«».e^«.— rules committee, Mrs. Arthur Marnep. 

, . It ?\1 ronK-eK^itio.ial! Mrs. J. L. Washburn and Mrs. M. H. 

I play at the •-^''^^•***;',. , t B^.j.iwin. wa« al«.o accepted. 

his evening. speaks ITi^^ i •s.hoil EfTli iency.' Ih" Mr>-t of the 

three subjects for the \>ai. will be 
i<ti'uled for two mentha ;imI .it the tlrst 
atudv meeting. Oct. U. -Viiss .I«an Puir- 
ier will speak on -Social t\niers and 
riHygroundsj" and outlines for the les- 
son ^*ill be mailed to members of the 
'wo wteks previous to the day 



LcarnlnK the English language after 
he was U years of age. Arthur Hart- 
eminent Hungarian vl«»llMist 

w l.v. .'. .1 
church th 

Kr^li^h wtrhout evf!i th 

fi;rvif:n .u/ '•■■lit. r.vr :, :■! 
• poke tlu- German 
ai * - " '■"■■' 



hint 



of a 



in th 

.li.-.n ^ 



!ie 



jilwa\ s 

United 

did not 



til 



I ' 



; 1!' r 



,1. ' — •;! ':;! iT'ter- 

of his 

■: Hy of 

ui't'i MaciHiwell. I>e 

UL.ud composers and 



M r. 



p 



Iv 
.11 play on 



M. Rowe will be leader of 
th' !ul mectii •.^. wliMi "School 

Htaii.i vvlll be the t>>iiv on this sub- 
ject to be t.!k»n up. Mrs. A. H Bur- 
quist will be the third leader with •Co- 
operation of the Hchocd and Home as 
her topic and the fourth meeting 
be given up to a lecture. 
The second two months 



will 



will be de- 



l' .V 



Klft to Mr. Hartiiumuj 
Dowell after her hus-i 
ii» a token of her esteem i 
and artist who had been 



one of the most 
MacDowell. which, ^^-^, to the study „f V.u- ,ity charter 
,., 1 ' with three study meetiiij,'s and a lec- 
, ture and the last two months of the 
■f t,\- hi^ ii'.<^tru- 1 ypar will be devoted to the study ol 
Mr'tl\r LUScrVot rVh 9 1 the city budget. , ,. wi 

cii.al n..i..u8cnpi , ^^^ ^^^^ membership is limited 

Ihirty-three. • 

T!.»- charter members are: 

-,' ^ J T Watson. Mrs. Arthur 

i:.,!ius. Mis. i:. A. Silbersleui. Mis. F. 

C" Eownian. Mrs. Julius Barnes. Mrs. M. 

K Baldwin. Mr.-'. A H Brci kiehurst. 

Mrs. Harriet Care>. M--- ,,'■ ^'~''i""P 

Carey, Mrs. P. L. I'. \ . si ^i>- »*■ \}- 

Kennedy, Miss Edna .Mt»'ker. Mrs O. 

V Oredson, Mrs. A. A. Hur<iui8t, Mrs. 

I 1 \Vn>hburn, Mrs. J. C. Swan, Miss 

;, •, Folner. Mrs. A. A. Kerr. Mrs. R. 

M Marble. Mrs E. L. Tuohy. Mrs. A. M. 

(.•oinriK. Mr.s H N. MacHarg. Mrs. Ir.-ne 

Buell. M: .-tenay I'inwlddie. Mrs. 

Hfurv A . Mrs. Harry W. Geller. 

Ml-. "r:iti:.-'ii Mrs. O. W. Rovve, Miss 

L' ila .-^p.;:!;?! ;inl -Miss Amy Oliver. 




TONIGHT 

ARTHUR HARTMANN 

Violin Recital 

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH at 8:15 




Tiikct-i Si.x 



SKELTON-SULLIVAN. 



ARTHUR HARTMANN. 



have bi. 
I,»owell ''wrucJi 
mark, the salt- 
"I ' *■ ■ 



J "^' ' - - ■ - ' ' well. 

for 
To a U lid 1. -t ■'""! five 
Mow ells pit- f- the only 
,♦-; ( r t hi'Sf liumbers, 
,': .^ for Mrs. Mac- 

.. .T fl,,, t--. fKtf) 



! I I 
1 



froi; 
anil 

a!:..i 

Unit. * - 
1 h-. 
and >.r.<r 

leans," 

■•l,>pe«« 
feet > . u 



(1 ii pro- 
'•1 i-T'-at en- 
IS not liked 



ha- '■ 

,th to the far South 

Bast to the far West 

iig this tour of the 

r.^ .,.-. u.uch as my first tour. 

. n l.dOO concerts In America 

.try much to play for Amer- 

the spirit of your audience af- 
r . .vu plaving?" he was a.sked 
, ,.ii. ,; in the affirmative. 

..,1 't doi-8. A musician 
, , L.iity and temper.ament of 

hi.s audi»-m.f iiiimed 
gram which is recel'. 
Ihusiasm by one audience 
at all by another. , , , , , ». ^ „„_ 

"What the general drink of the peo- 
ple is also affects their aPP.":'^^^^^^"/'^ 
tnuHlc The man who drmks beer is 
Swi'-.toTid and Ph>«>^'matic a„d Uke^a 
the philosophical and serious music. 

The wine drinking Pf «PJ?„^'"t^"}':^^ 
fiery and temperamental end express 
their like or dislike of what they near 

^t; -k^-a what temperance 

tieo, - .... -^k nothing but water 

flke bpst and with ready wit he re- 
plied. -Frob-ibly »«'\^J/"^*'",« hJklnd 
Water-lllv ' or something of the kind. 
T 1. .Hx do not know Just what to an- 

:? i-tT-nann's songs in English are 

' ' ■ ■•• all of th.. :-■■■ ■<• -ingers 

,nn-Heiiik. I'' ■; Oscar 

. l.arles \V. Clark ai.d many 

;d one Bong written by him 

^,^i ,-<, (it v\ ^^ !'• vears old will be out 

for Vh*' l"ir;-t litiie next season 

Mr. Hartmamis program 
will play at the concert 
at the ConKfegational - ^^ - 

under the management of i^rnest L.acn 
mund follows: 

Concerto ^^ 

(a> Allecro motto appasionato 

(M Andante. 

(c) Allegro multo vivace. 

la) Adauio firid allegro 

(b> Cradle Sui>P Arthur Hartmann 

U) Hravowr variations on the^ G 
st'ini.' alone, on a theme from Ros- 

Binis opera "Moise" Paganlnl 

Intermission. 

.Gcldmark 



Former Duluthians Will Wed at 
Panama. 

Mr. and Mrs Henry .>^kelton of St. 
Paul have sent out i'Mo uncements of 
the approaching m- of their 

daughter. Marie ! h to James 

Alexander Sullivan, which will take 
place Saturday, Sent. 21. at the Church 
of 8t. Ferdinand. Empire Canal Zone. 
Panama. They will be at home at Cu- 
lebra. Canal Zot ' • ima, after Oct 1. 

Both young ; are former ii><i- 

dents of Duluth anu well known here. 



AT COUNTRY CLUB. 



MARIE LASALLE RABINOFF. 

London. Sept. 10. — Marie Lasalle Ra- 
binoff. an American opera singer, ana 
the wife of Max Rabinoff. the Russian 
Impressario. died in a hcspital here to- 
day^ after an operation. 

yime. Rabinoff. Avho made her debut 
in Chicago in January of litH. and later 
surprised Boston opera goers w'lth a 
clear, sweet coloratura soprano, scoreu 
a Bucce.'^s in Berlin. Mr. Dippel discov- 
ered Mme iJabinoff, who was a Ne- 
braska girl. Her experience had been 
confined to the City of Mexico, the 
was successf'il there, as she was after- 
wards jn Chicago and Boston. 



Crowley. W. D. Jone»r-Mhm Erwin, Mr. 
Handy, Mr. and Mrs. 

"rs. 

rge 
K. Symonn and Mr. and Mrs. F. Win- 
ters of Kansas City 



Pupils' Recital. 

The pupils of the TanTs School of 
English will hold an opt-riing day re- 
cital at Foresters" hall tJils evening at 
8 '10 The musical numbers for the 
evening will be glvert by Miss Eleo- 
nore Kraft. Miss MiLt)el Fulton and 
Samuel Slonim. Thf program fol- 

Vlofin— "Souvenir de AVleiilawski". . 

'. W.' D. Haesche 

Eleonore Kraft. 
Selection— "The District ^-Sf-hcol".. . . 

. KL H. Chapin 

Haakon Lkrsen. 
Dialogue — "The Homeless Old Man" 

CHARACTEitS." 

Adam Fairbrother Swan Larson 

Mrs. Adam Fairbrother . . ■ 

Julia Carlson 

Asher ' i son ) Max Plotkln 

Thurston (son) Wllma Erickson 

Vocal — , ,. .. , . 

a "The Birth of Morn' Leonl 

b A Birthday". .Frederic H. Cowen 
c "li No one Ever Marries Me".. 

Lehmann 

Mabel Fulton. 

Selection — "Americanism" 

. Henry Cabot Lodge 

Evald Anderson. 

Reading— "Tlie Little Newsboy" 

Morris Litman. Jr. 

Vit.li,, — "Norsk Rhapsodi • 

Gustav Fr. Lange 

Eleonore Kraft. 

Dialogue — "A Pair of Gloves". .Vlckers 
CHARACTERS. 

Mr'' Althrop Lydla Auvenen 

Arthur Wellington Trombly 

Morris Litman 

Hoii Heriry Belalze . . . Magnus Hansen 

Roland Oliver Haakon Larsen 

Rtssie "Wilma Erlckson 

Vocal— "ill the Garden of My Heart"' 

Ball 

Samuel Slonim. 
Address — 

I K. Lewis. 
Vocal duet— "I Feel Thy Angel Spirit" 

Graben-Hoffmann 

' Miss Fulton and Mr. Slonim. 
Miss Ethel MoUtor and Miss Vio- 
let FUaaten. accompanists. 



Birthday Party. 

Miss Ruth Peterson of 321 First ave- 
nue east entertained a number of her 
friends at a birthday party yesterday 
afternoon at her home in celebration 
of her thirtenth birthday anniversary. 
The guests were: 

Misses — ^. ^ ..., 

Eva Nelson. Gladys Bergeson, 

Leona Gibson, (Uadys Merling. 

Lvdia Klatasku. June Peterson, 

Babe Peterson, .Ruth Gauss. 



A Monitor # Radiator! 



This Heater wiU 
put all the heat 
in your house- 
ana none of it 
up the chimney. 

The Monitor Radiator pro- 
duces twice as much heat from 
the same fuel as the next best 
stove on the market. 

A long inside draft makes 
the fire draw well and burns up 
all the gases before they are 
wasted up the chimney. 

You can heat your up.stairs 
by attaching pipes to the pat- 
> ent hot air flue at the back. 





Note the five 
front flues that 
radiate the heat 
directly into the 
room. 

1,683 square inches more 
heating surface than any other 
stove made. 

For small coal consumption 
this heater cannot be beaten. 

Call around and examine our 
display. 

Open an account. 

All sold on very Easy Pay- 
ments. 



\' 



1 

^ 



school will be a feature 
noon. Harry Ern.>-haw, 



of the after- 
composer of 



the song has dedicated it to the school 
children of the state and presented 
this school with a copy of his song. 



Church Meetings. 

The Ladies" Aid society of the First 
M. E. church will hold the first meet- 
ing of tiie new year tomorrow after- 
notn at the church parlors. A large 
attendance is requested. 
• • * 

The Ladies" Aid Society of the First 
Baptist chuich will hold an all day 
woik meeting in the parlors of the 
church tomorrow. A picnic lunch will 
be served at noon. 



$30.00 9x12 Special Ax- 
minster Rugs 

$27.50 8-3x10-6 Axmin 
ster Rugs. 



• • • • 



$4.75 36x72 inch Axminster 
Kugs .......I 

$3.25 27x60 inch Axminster 
Rugs ' 



Week 

$2. 95 

.$2, 



being 
like 



which he 
this evening 
church given 



.Mendelssohn 



. CorelH 



**' vl.'r IveK ian ' Cradle Song.' . Tor"Aulln 



it} Zephyr 

fal Barcarole . 
(b) 'To a Wild 



Hubay 
■ Tschaikowsky 

Rose" 

MacDowell-Hartmann 

(c> Aire Russes Wieniawskl 



STUDY CLASS. 



Mrs. Comstock and Mrs. Craig 
Luncheon Hostesses. 

Mrs. A. H. Comstock of 1320 East 
Superior street was hostess at a lunch- 
eon of sixteen covers today at the 
Northland Country club, i'lnk cosmos 
were the flowers u.sed In effectively 
decciratmg the table. 

Mrs. C. P. Craig will give a luncheon 
there tomorrow afternoon for fifteen 
and a number of dinner parties are 
being arranged for the regular weekly 
dinner dance there Thursday evening. 

AT SALTERSCHOOL. 

Parents Invited to Exhibit and 
to Meet Teachers. 

Parents of childrf !, at the C. C. .Sal- 
ter •'' »"■'■"' Sixteenth avtnue east and 
Loii: d and all ethers Interested 

are ..::..: to an indu.strlal and agri- 
cultural exhibit and parents' meeting 
to be held there Friday afternoon and 
cvenirm. 

VcKctables and flowers grown by 
the boys and girls of that school dur- 
intr the summer in the school garden 
fr at their home gardens; pious of 
furnituif or other articles designed 
and made by the boys and sewing, pre- 
serves and baking done by the girls of 
the school will be shown and during 
the afternoon and evening there will 
be speeches by prominent people of 
the city interested In the work in the 
schools along these lines. 

Ti?a will be served during the after- 
noon and evening. Mrs. T. J. Davis and 
Mr.«. (Jeorge S. Richards presiding. The 
teachers of the school and H. Sund. 
the principal of that building, will act 
as the reception committee and will 
meet the parents and others interested 
in the work in an effort toward mutual 
understanding In their work. 

Mothers and parents meetings will 
be held often during the year at this 
building and an effort will be made to 
have some interesting speaker at each 

All interested In this exhibit Friday 
are cordially invited to visit the school 
either afternoon or evening. 

The singing of the new song. Min- 
nesota," by the children of the entire 



OPENiNG DAY RECITAL 

— Given by — 

Tanis School of English 



lat 8.25 o'clock. Tuesday Evt-nins. 

I 10 All Dunils and friends are cor 



Sept. 

10. Ail pupils ' _ ■ 

dially Invited— corner Fourth 

and First street. Melrose, ii^i 
J NO. TANIS, Principal. 



avenue 



west 



BRIDGE HOSTESS. 



Ru^ Specials for This 

$19-75 
$17.50 

Our New Fall Stock of Ru^s 

Is fast arriving. Every day new pieces are being displayed. As in former years, 
you will find this department the headquarters in this city for rugs. 

You can supply y6ur needs, whatever they are, right here, at the fairest of prices. 
If you wish a rug of special size or color, let us figure on it with you^ 

Duntley Pneumatic Sweeper 

The Only Sweeper With Pneumatic Suction and Brush Combined. 
There is no noise— no vibration— the dust box can be easily 



of Port Arthur. 
B. E. La Londe 



Mrs. 



Card 



H. H. Myers Gives 
Party. 

Mrs. Henry H. Myers of 2505 East 
First street was hostess at a bridge 
party of seven tables this afternoon 
at her home. Flowers from the garden 
made nttr.T.ctlve bouquets through the 
rooms. The yellow note was used in 
the dining room and pink asters in the 
rest of the house. 



Civic Questions to Be Taken Up. 

with a charter role of thirty mem- 
bers the Civic Study class of the Wom- 
an's council was duly organized at the 
first business meeting yesterday after- 
noon at the library club room. The 
temporary officers appointed at a pre- 
liminary meeting were electe^d to office 
for th*- year. They are: Mrs. J. T. 
\\ thairman; Mrs. Arthur Barnes. 

f\: • chairman: Mrs. E. A. Silber- 

stttn. second vice chairman, and Mrs. 
F. C Bowman, secretary and treasurer. 
A report of the program committee. 



Week-End Party. 

The fo!lc>wing week-tnd party spent 
a few days at Dr. Lynams cottage at 
Gordon, Wis., chaperoned by Mrs. Au- 
gust Fitger: Miss Wilhclm-i?i Fitger. 
Miss Marlon Fitger. Miss ^^\S^J^^} 
\nneke. Miss Bausemer of St. Louis, 

Mo.. Tom Miller, Max Fre^'«;^\<t^r la 
Miles, Warren Jamar and Walker Ja- 

mar, Jr. 

^ — 

At Camp. 

Mrs. John Hennessy entertained at 
cards yesterday afternoon at Camp 
Lazv Lodge, Woodland. The card favors 
were won by Mrs. John Burk. Mrs. 
Lhn Fantare' and Mrs. C Rosborsky^ 
The other players were Mrs. Beatrice 
C. Kugler and Miss Arl ine Fantare. 

Luncheon. 

Mrs D C Rood was hostess at a 
nrettv" luncheon party this afternoon at 
her liome, 2526 East Second street. 

■ .1 ♦ — T 

Inn Guests. 

"Week-end guests at the Island Lake 
Inn. who motored out for dinner par- 
ties and the day there were: R. B. 
and daughters. Miss A. Jeroni- 
E Morrow, Mifs^E. Fuller, 
A. F. Butchard, C. A. 



Knox 

mus. Miss 

R. Brldgeman, 



A Skin cf Beauty i> • Joy Forev<r. 

DR. T. FELIX OOURAUD't 
Oriental Croam or 
Magical Baautlfier. 

R«movei T*n. P.miiles, Free*. 
les. Moth Patches Rash and 

Skia Dtecate*. »m \ c*«t7 

'fiM drtcction. It has ttood 

V «:.e i-a •? 64 ">**"■ »"<"•■" 
--')'S".irm!e»» •« tatie it tab* 
' ««ie It li properly Bide Ac- 
cep«no cwjolirrfal' of nmtlaj 
•«m«. Dr. L. A. S«)re ul4 
to» '»!/ of tha lauitoa <a 
litent: "At you adUj w«U 

■GOUKAUO-i CRFAM- «. 
, he l*Mt h»rin«ul of til tha 
rkkinir-! .r.tlfM." Fm »»1« 
b» kil drug^HM M'i F»ocv 
Goa^n Deile » »• tha United 
State*. Canada and 1^ uiope. 




S: 



<J 




By PEGGY PEABODY 



1> 

I 

4> 




JfHAHO 



One of the three ^reat 
FiaTios of the World 

SOLD BY THE 

Miles Music Co. 




100 Oak liall nidff. 

Melrose. 5590; Grand, 



;ji. 



Thrift Is a Lost Art in Certain 
Classes. 

Some educator said recently that 
thrift was no longer fashionable. 

No one will argue its popularity. I 
am sure, nor that it is anything but 

a lost art among 

classes who most 
need to husband 
their resources. 
There are in this 
country those who, 
for lack of thrift, 
through Ignorance, 
lire reduced to the 
rrtnk.s of the poor- 
e.«-t and the great 
middle class of 
Americans, whose 
members, many of 
Iheni. are all the 
lime veering to- 
wards poverty. 
Many. I find, believe that the prac- 
tice of thrift bespeaks meanness, if not 
poverty. The popular idea seems to 
be to impress one's neighbors and fool 
oneself into the conviction that one's 
money or one's earning capacity, or 
both, are inexhaustible. 

There is little too good for the aver- 
age family and nothing toward which 
their ambitions do not soar. Each 
year sees a new pace set and millions 
doing their best to follow it, unmind- 
ful of what the result may be. 

But if thrift is not the habit of the 
American people today, it is the one 
that gained many of our wealthiest 
citizens the ease they enjoy. If it Is 
t.ne that the middle class American 
houBewlfe la wont to sneer at, aa bo- 



«j|k 



neath her, then she should seek an 
example among women of ampler for- 
tune, who often practice thrift on a 
large scale in the conduct of their 
magnificent homes. With some the 
habit is inbred. Others, for all their 
affluence, have found that they can- 
not let things go at loose ends. 

Thrift may not be in the good 
graces of the average. Nevertheless, 
some of our most fashionable, some 
of our brainiest and some of our 
wealthiest women are thrifty In the 
extreme, comparing them with those 
who have the spending of anywhere 
from 11,000 to $6,000 annually. 

The middle class housewife and her 
.spouse are prodigal. Money Is con- 
stantly flowing out. The aim is show 
— to make as good an impression a.«^ 
the next family and to go them a bit 
better, if possible. 

There Is too little thought and time 
given to selection, too little to over- 
sight and practically none at all to 
the permanency of the things bought 
and paid for out of the money one 
can command. Most of us go on the 
premise that there is plenty more 
where the last came from. 

Still thrift is still exercised In this 
country. If you would be taught, 
learn your lesson from the foreign 
born and the native of the best stock 
and breeding. 

n Is not indicative of closeness or 
poverty, but of a proper regard for In- 
dustry and good management. 

Thrift, my dears, the finest woman 
in the world should not hesitate to 
cultivate and exercise to the best of 
Iher ability. 



Personal Mention. 

Mrs A. E. Shores, who has been vis- 
iting ner daughter, Mrs. A. E. Walker, 
of 2107 East First etret, left yester- 
day for Ashland. Wis., where she is 
actively interested in progressive mis- 
sionary work. 

« * * 

Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Upham and daugh- 
ter. Helen, left this morning on the 
steamer F. E. House for the East, 
where Miss Helen will enter Simmons 
Domestic Science school at Boston for 
the year. 

• • * 
Mrs. A. G. Seaman 

Ont., is visiting Mrs. 
of East Third street. 

• « * 

Burdette Pillsbury of 1524 Jefferson 
street has left for Ann Arbor. Mich., 
where he will enter the preparatory 
dtpartment of the Universtiy of Mich- 
igan. 

• • * 

Mrs E. J Leagher of 527 Fourth ave- 
nue east left yesterday afternoon for 
Hibbing to attend the funeral of her 
little nephew, Clarence Rinn. 
a • « 

Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Frost and daugh- 
ter. Jovce Phyllis, have returned from 
a two "weeks' visit in the Twin Cities. 
m * * 

Mrs. H Barcum and daughter, Miss 
Eva of 1714 Jefferson street, have re- 
turned from California, where the lat- 
ter has been visiting for some time. 
a • • 

Mrs. Kate M. Shuman of 2022 East 
Fourth street is entertaining Rev. and 
Mrs J. A. Stebbins of Northfleld. Minn., 
and' their daughter. Mrs. B. A. Shu- 
man of Buenos Ayies. where Mr. Shu- 
man is secretary of the Y. M. C A. of 

that country. 

a • * 

Miss Anna Quinn of Chicago, who has 
been visiting at the home of Mr. and 
Mrs John r. McGreevy of 1902 East 
First street for the past six weeks, has 
returned to her home. 

• • • 
John McGreevy, Jr.. and Royal Al- 

worth left yesterday in the Alworth 
yacht, Oneida, for a trip to Buffalo and 

other lake points. 

• • « 

Mr. and Mrs. E. D. Henderson of Sag- 
inaw. Mich., have returned to their 
home after a month's visit with their 
daughter, Mrs. H. D. Final, 505 Wood- 
land avenue. 

♦ • • 

Miss Helen Smith and Miss Chelsie 
Final left yesterday for Iowa City, 
Iowa, where they will attend the Iowa 
State university this year. 
a a • a 

Miss Mildred Prudden of 326 Thir- 
teenth avenue east left last evening 
for Indianapolis, Ind.. where she will 
take a course In kindergarten training 
at the teachers' college. 

* * * 

Mrs H. B. Detweiler of 1825 Ding- 
wall street has left for Milwaukee, 
where she will join Mr. Detweiler and 
make their home in that city, 
a • ♦ 

Miss Alma Thompson of 1031 West 
First street left this morning for a 
two weeks' -visit with relatives at 
Thief River Falls, JAinn. 
a a * 

Miss Dorothy Dowse returned this 
morning from Mackinac and Omena, 
Mich., where she has been visiting A^iss 
Lillian Shedd. 

m w w 

Miss 




There is no noise- — , , . . 

removed and emptied. Cleans 5 times as thoroughly as the 
common carpet sweeper. Weighs only 0->:t pounds. 
COMPLETES YOUR WORK IN ONE OPERATION. 



eiean^Up Sale Lace Qurta ins 



We have a large number of sample pairs of Lace Cur- 
tains left over from the past' season. These we w ish to 
close out at once regardless of cost. All the popular makes 
are included in this sale at just One-half of Regular Prices. 



50c 



$1.00 values to close, per 

pair, at • • • • 

$1.50 values to close, pet 
pair, at • • • • 

$2.50 value to close, ^g 9^ 

per pair, at %pM».^^^ 



$3.50 values to close, 
per pair, at 

$6.00 values to dose, 
per pair, at • • • 

$7.50 values to close, 
per pair, at 



$1.75 
$3.75 



Values up to $30 a Pair Will Be Sold at 'h 





GOOD 



Established 1887. 



First Street and Third Avenue West 




America, anu cvcij.."^-- •^..v.r 
creeted by ovations of capacity he 
It is doubtful If this country 

- aggregation 



oanv has appeared are to the effect 
t^ha7 Josepir F. Sheehan Americas 
ereatest tenor, and star of tins cele- 
brlfed organization, which will be 
heard at t!ie Lyceum theater Monday 
and Tuesday. Sept. 16 and 17, in U 
Trovatore" and "The Chimes of Nor- 
mandy/' is singing better than ever 

^''pr^ss^amf public unite in proclaim- 
Ing the Sheehan English Opera coni- 
pany the finest singing organization in 
America, and everywjiere U^ is^ bemg 

ever 
heard such a famous aggregation of 
stars in one organization as comprise 
the Sheehan English Opera company. 
a • • 

•\Song8 of fifty years ago.^ere not as 
trashy as those of today," said Miss 
Lillian Scarlett, who is appearing at 
the Orpheum this week In an act In 
which many of the old favorite songs 
are played on banjos, while the words 
are thrown on a large screen. 

••Compare, for example, such a song 
as 'Oh You Beautiful Doll' with a song 
like Silver Threads Among the Gold. 
One is cheap and trashy, both In words 
and music, while the other is a song 
that will live, and has lived for fifty 
vears. Some of the others we use are 
•When You and I Were Young. Mag- 



WTltten. Perhaps if some great revo- 
lution were taking place now. we 
w 

dons."' It would be almost worth a 
revolution to get rid of these atroci 
ties, wouldn't it?" 



vould get great songs instead of songs 
ibout 'Cullud babies' and 'beautiful 



VOTE MARKET 

IN GEORGIA? 



Madison, Ga., Sept. 10. — Indictments 
charging twelve men with buying and 
selling votes in the recent Democratic 
county primary have been returned by 
the Morgan county grand jury, and 



many additional indictments on the 
same charges are expected before the 
jury formally adjourns. 

The indictments resulted from an 
investigation of several days following 
charges by defeated candidates that 
successful contestants pooled their 
finances and bought votes through th» 
county. 

Deputies are serving warrants oa 
those indicted. 



Pine to Be Sold. 

Bemidji, Minn., Sept. 10. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Norway and white pine 
to the estimated amount of 10,000.000 
feet, lying in three tracts south of 
lower Red Lake near the Indian agen- 
cy, will be sold to the highest bidder* 
on Nov. 1 at noon in the office of tha 
superintendent of the Indian school 
at Red Lake. It is understood that aa 
effort will be made to have this timber 
sawed in Bemidji. 



a « 
Miss Marjorle Shipherd and 
Fritch of St. Louis, who have been vis- 
iting here, left this morning for a trip 
down the lakes. Miss Shipherd will 
resume her studies at Wells college 



resume 

for the year, and 

turn to her home 



MINER WANTS $10,202 FOR 

FREEZING BOTH HIS FEET 



I 



Miss Fritch will re- 



Enjoyable and Informative. 



fall fabrics 

in previous 

It. Take ele- 

Jloor. George A. 



The annual display of 
surpasses the best held 
years. You will enjoy 
vators to the third 
Gray company. 

r AMUSEMENTS | 

TONIGHT'S ATTRACTIONS. 



LYCPJUM — 'Bought and Paid For." 
ORPHEUM— Vaudeville. ' 

I « — -< 

Amn^^ement Notes. 

William A. Brady, Ltd.: enjoys the 
proud distinction of having produced 
two of the most wqnderrul dramatic 
successes ever offerAt In New York 
citv at one time, both of which are 
rapidly approaching Uieir 500th per- 
formance. -Wlien Bitnty Pulls the 
Strings" is one and tlie other is Geor.^e 
Broadhurst's comedy drama. ••Bought 
and I'ald For," which is now playing 
at the Lvceum with a cast embracing 
many stage celebrities, who have been 
Dlaving in the New York piroductlon. 
*^ • * * * • 

Reports from all over the country 
where the Sheehan English Opera com- 




Joe Nickcevlch blames his employers, 
the Malta Iron company, for the freez- 
ing of both of his feet while employed 
at the Malta mine last January, and 
today In district court is asking a jury 
to give him $10,202 damages. 

Nickcevlch says that he wag em- 
ployed at the Malta mine, near Sparta, 
as an underground miner, and that on 
the morning of Jan. 6 last he came to 
work dressed as such. 

The thermometer on that morning, 
he says, was hovering around 90 deg. 
bdoxv. 

Instead of going down Into the minp. 



as usual, he claims that he was d'rect- term calendar. 



ed by a foreman to help unload some 
mining timber, the work requiring him 
to stay on the surface. 

The foreman gave him a pair of mit- 
tens and told him that If he would 
'•step up lively" he would not freeze. 

His feet, he says, were covered with 
only a lh»n pair of rubber boots. The 
consequence was that after he had 
worked an hour and a half, both were 
badly frozen. ,. 

Nickcevlch claims that as a result 
of his Injuries he was incapacitated 
for work and sustained »10.202 dam- 

The case Is the first personal Injury 
action put on trial on the September 




MISS LILLIAN SCARLETT. 



Clock,' 'Old Dan 
and When Johnny 



their 
Civil 



cle • "Grandfather's 
Tucker.' 'Hilly Boy' 
Comes Marching Home. 

•Most of these songs had 
E-reatest popularity during the 
wan 'fhat was a time when the coun- 
try was Ktirrt-d to its depths, and it 
caused an awakening both in lltera- 
ui^ and in song writing. With some 
^uch great event to appeal to the pas- 
skms and sentiment of a nation. It is 
no wonder that some great songs were 



EXTRA BIG SPECIAL! 



$2.25 IRONING BOARDS, WITH STANDS, AT, Each, 48c 

Just 100 fine boards to go at this price. NO MORE, NO LESS ; 
boards that are positively selhng right pn Su- M^\^^^ 
perior street up to $2.25 each and worth it. BIG /IIKM^ 
exciter for this GREAT SALE— your choice of ^J\^^/ 
just 100 — each 

THOMASSON FURNITURE CO 



ODD FELLOWS' BUILDING, LAKE AVENUE. 




}* 



I 



mmSmOMt 



e 




Tuesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER. 

-ESTABLISHED APHIL 9. I«»3— 

PiibUshed overy evening except Sunday by 

THE HERALD COMPANY, 

Hermtd Bulldinsr. Opposite Postofnc© SqwT9, 
i22 and 424 West First St.. Duluth, MInft. 



Xkilirwl m mKma~clm» imVft at the P'Uuth ptwtofflce unUet IJw act of coa- 

fraii* 111 klarrtt 3. 1«T8. 



TKI.KPHONKS — Hell aad 'Zenllh. 

Buslneis OUke. 324. Editorial Kooins. 1126. 



OFFICIAL PAPER CITY OF DULUTH. 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES: 

<Bj mail imyablc in advance.) 

Dallj. :.v month I .35 Dally, six months. |2.pO 

Daily, throe months 1.00 Daily, one year *■»» 

J^tiliirilajr lirmld, «ae yejir. ^"SJ 

Wrrkij llemia, one year »•'»• 

ptmm iKin Miibio to TlM> Heraia wniptujr. OUv poat- 

•rSoa J. .._ : :.;,; iit4t« »nU count* 

BY CARRIER— CITY OR SUBURBS. 

Daily, one week * 3 - 

I>..iK- ..... T!) -nth .XX 

I- .r ^•^<* 

' T » favor OB th« rlrcuUtlon *TtrtBJnit by c»illi>g 3-». 
«. ; km'iMi any coiuptemt of iwtl<"<f. 

1 .. .: a*»i-ii.g Uw »tUc*a« ot Jour iMtfier changfU to •■re 

fcith the Hill mmi |je» atlJriiis«». 



Anybody in the Twin Cities who gets the notion into his 
head that it is a Twin City institution, devised and main- 
tained for the profit of the Twin Cities as railroad rates 
seem to have been in this state, and at the expense of 
the rest of the state, as the case also is with railroad 
rates, has a very foolish idea that it will be wiser to drop. 
Whether the fair is kept within a week or expanded 
to two weeks, it should be kept open day and night 
every day; and a proposal to close it in order to dnve 
its patrons into Twin City stores would accomplish noth- 
ing except possibly a demand from the rest of the state 
that if the fair is to be handled for the benefit of the 
Twin Cities, the Twin Cities shall assume the full bur- 
den of its support. 



THE BDi!L moos e and *T HE INTERESTS'* 

By SAVOYARD. 




Sunpo.so George VV. Perkins was i Hence a heap of people are led to be- 
chalnnan of the executive committee lievo that Mr. Perkins is Roosevelt s 

" supporter and Taft's enemy because of 



Ornlnr DemoiiHtrntioii. 

When you get real discouruKed about the progress of 
our tunes, spend half a day standing on a street corner and 
count the oldiashioned. high-wheel bicycle* that paaa. 



th- 



T 



lith Merald accepts advertising contracts with 

^n^rantee that tt has the largest cin.ula.tum 

>fr published In Minnesota outside I he Twin 

liue a.i an advertising medium la apparent. 



CAREFUL i 

'' ' -e bad friends of the striking street railway 

<: ' committed acts of violence in the West 

End i.lit lUs'llt. 

It li i.utc worthy that no strikers were seen in the 




I 
than the 
I; lame. 



!iercd. Most of the active ones were 

....... I. who let their sympathies outstrip their 

\ v-ilcnce in such cases comes from others 
irikers, but too often the strikers get the 



V capon of workers who are struggling 

<nditions is public sympathy; and noth- 

.■.:i-;kor tlum violent methods. 

y workers who are trying to better 

'nless have a good deal of public 

and their friends should strive 

; it and to gala more. 



Aftd Thst'N Ooing Some. 

Cn\ R,-, ;:at If a minimum wage law were 

f A would not put wages down to that 

I ^ . :xeV3 conception of hia knowledge of 

past, present and future Is suriasaed only by his eagerness 

of ex press lotn. 

REGISTER TONIGHT. 

Tht ,. laces will be open until nine o'clock to- 

night, and It IS your last chance to register for the pri- 
mary election without much inconvenience. Register to- 
night! 



A VERY SMALL CRUMB. 

In the fact that Maine elected a Republican state ad- 
ministration yesterday the Republican party finds the 
only crumb of comfort that has come its way in a long, 

long time. 

And a little analysis will show that there is very lit- 
tle nourishment for hope in this crumb. If it means 
anything, it means that Woodrow Wilson will get the 
electoral vote of Maine in November. 

By a combination of Republicans and Bull Moosers, 
formed to get control of the state offices, the Republic- 
an candidate for governor was elected by a margin of 
about 3.600 votes. 

This is against a Democratic plurality of 8,753 in 
1010, when Maine went Democratic for the first time 
since 1880, very largely on a local issue which is now 
practically settled, at least for the time. 

Three facts, all more important than the mere net 
result, must be considered: 

First, though the Republican plurility is 3.600, the 
average Republican plurality for forty years has been 

Second, yesterday's Democratic vote, upward of 07,- 
000, is the highest total gained by that party in Maine 
in the history of the state with the single exception of 
1910, when the revolt against prohibition swept the state 
overwhelmingly into the Democratic column. 

Third, now that the offices are gained the compact 
between the Old Guard Republicans and the Bull Moose 
Republicans is ended. There will be electoral tickets in 
the field representing both factions, and if the Demo- 
crats hold their September vote and Roosevelt gains 
forty per cent of the Republican vote, as he did in Ver- 
mont, Wilson will carry that state by this vote: Wilson, 
66,000; Taft, 43,200; Roosevelt, 28.800. Wilson will carry 
Maine if Roosevelt gets but ten per cent of the Republic- 
an vote. 

There is little nourishment to Republican hopes in a 
crumb of that composition. 



To What Baae Vmen. 

The real commercializer of art has been found at last. 
Becret service men accuse a Chicago artist of painting 
paper to loplc so much like $10 bills that he could buy 
things with it. _^___ 

THE PEOPLE'S CAMPAIGN FUND. 

The Wilson campaign committee yesterday made 
public its campaign fund receipts to date. 

It has received $175,000 from more than twelve 
thousand people. This is an average of less than fifteen 
dollars apiece, and there are several contributions 
amounting to a thousand to five thousand dollars each. 

This is good, particularly the low average. It shows 
that this campaign fund for a people's president is com- 
ing from the people. 

But It ii not good enough. It looks rosy for Wilson, 
but no campaign outcome is sure until the votes are 
counted. 

The Wilson fund ought to have at least a million dol- 
lars. This is a big country, and it is impossible to meet 
kgitimate expenses and conduct an adequate campaign 
on less. 

If tlie people do not finance this fund, it will not be 
financed. People who wish to participate in the making 
of a people's president should contribute according to 
their means to the campaign fund for Woodrow Wilson. 

The response to The Herald's appeal for funds for 
this splendid purpose has been good, but it can be made 
better. It should be made better. 

In a large degree the million needed to finance the 
Wilson campaign must come from those who can. only 
afford to give a dollar to five or ten dollars. 

It would be pleasing to see more of these contribut- 
ing to The Herald's Wilson campaign fund, which is 
HOW open. 



I.ant Call. 

Once more— HAVE YOU REGI.STERED? 



of the Democratic party in the political 
campaign of 1912. and his relations to 
big buHiness precisely what they are? 
What would the Bull Moose folk say? 
They would tell the people that Wood- 
row Wilson was shackled and power- 
less in the grasp of monopoly. They 
would ask, How is it possible for a 
partner of J. I'ierpont Morgan, a mag- 
nate of the Steel tru.st and of the 
Harvester trust, ^o bo sympathetic 
with the massL^H. Bid have a command 
In the campftiyn wliged in their behalt? 
Mr. Perkins is one of the leaders In 
the w^rld of finance, associated with 
such men as K. H. Gary, head of the 
St«»el trust, and Cyrus H. McCormlck. 
head of the Harvester trust. He is the 
man who subscribed $50,000 to Roose- 
velt's campaign In 1»04 and paid it 
with trust funds of a big life insurance 
company. He is a member of tlie 
finance committee of both the Steel 
trust and the Harvester trust. He Is 
the man who had the Interview with 
Herbert Knox Smith In September. 1907. 
and Mr. Smith wrote to the president, 
among other startling things, this 
passage: 

'•He (Mr. PerklniH concluded with 
great emphasis wltli the remark that if. 
after all the endeavors of this com- 
pany (the Harvester trust) and the 
other Morgan Interests to uphold the 
policy of the administration and to 
adopt their methods of modern pub- 
licltj'. this company was now to be at- 
tacked in a purely technical case, the 
Interests he represented were 'going to 
fighf." 

• • • 
Tt seems that at the moment that 
letter was penned the Roosevelt ad- 
ministration was getting ready to pros- 
ecute the Harvester trust as a monop- 
oly in restraint of trade as denounced 
in the Sherman anti-trust law, which 
It wan and Is. But when the president 
got this letter containing that threat 
the administration let the Harvester 
trust alone, and it continued to enjoy 
the protection of a robber tariff that 
enabled it to .sell its wares abroad 
cheaper than at home and to levy 
tribute on every farm. garden and 
flower bed In the Union, its sales 
amounting to over $100,000,000 a year 
and Its profits arl.slng therefrom being 
enormous and extortionate. 

And so this predatory concern was 
left unmolested to reap its rich h.arvests 
where the agricultural population of 
the republic had" planted and tilled. 
Some of the grejt wheat states, even 
more sorely liarrled by this trust than 
the corn and c!Ott<Mi states, clamored for 
relief, nnd the Tgft administration in- 
stituted proceedings to dissolve the 
trust. Roosevelt became a candidate 
for the Republi«an nominati<?n against 
Taft. and this Mr. Perkins was active 
In his behalf.v contributing lavi.«hly to 
his pre-convefttlon campaign fund, as 
did Mr. Munsey, who is the largest in- 
dividual stockholder In the Steol trust, 
which is the mother of the Harvester 
trust. Beaten in the convention, Mr. 
Roosevelt created a new party, and Mr. 
Perkins and Mr. Munsey are prominent 
members of It. Mr. Perkins chairman 
of the executive committee. It may 
be that the fact that Roosevelt failed 
to prosecute, and Taft did prosecute, 
the Harvester trust had no Influence 
on the action of these gentlemen In the 
political field; but this Is a wicked 
world we live In and very censorious. 



TWENT Y YEAR S AGO 

Taken From the Columns of The Herald of This Date. 1892. 



the affairs of the Harvester monopoly. 

• • • 

It looks as though a change had 
come over the spirit of Col. Rooseveifs 
manners. William R. Hearst cabled 
this to his papers from London: "Mr. 
Roosevelt should tell of the visits 
of Mr. Rogers and Mr. Archbold to him 
in Washington, of Mr. Sibley's activity 
in bringing about these meetings, of 
the "perlect understanding' that existed, 
and various other matters of interest 
and importance to the nation." 

One would have supposed that Col. 
Roosevelt would receive such innuendo 
like the Hyrcan tiger he So often is, 
that he would have denounced It as a 
lie, hurled Hearst Into the company of 
Bill Chandler. Ben Tillman, Joe Bailey. 
Boles Penrose. Archbold and the scores 
of others whom he put in the Anani- 
as club. Instead, he is gentle as a 
lamb, and In politest terms he be- 
iseeches Mr. Hearst to favor him with 
dates and things so that lie can look 
the matter up. 

The colonel is also very gentle with 
Secretary Knox, who happened to be 
there when the president penned the 
letter to Cortelyou which is become so 
opportune as an alibi, and it may be 
necessary for the senate to have Mr. 
Knox before it in order that the whole 
matter may be explained. 
♦ • • 
It was a long time coming, but the 
Hon. Alton B. Parker is a pretty thor- 
oughly vindicated man touching the 
cliarges he made in 1904 that the trusts 
were heavily financing Col. Roose- 
velt's campaign. And why shouldn t 
they? All they cared for was the pres- 
ervation of the tariff as they had writ 
it in the Dingley bill. That was the 
meat on which they had fed so glut- 
tonously and fatted so plethorically. 
They were putting up their money to 
continue in power the party that had 
conferred on them the privilege to tax 
their fellow-cltlzens for their private 
gain. They knew that Roosevelt would 
not disturb the tariff himself or allow 
anybody else to disturb it. They knew 
that Parker was the candidate of a 
party that was bent on the extirpation 
of all tariff taxation for private pur- 
poses. It was worth hundreds — per- 
liaps thousand.s — of millions to their 
class to preserve the tariff four years 
longer as they had fixed it. 

Harriman gave $250,000. He said 
that it bought 50,000 votes for Roose- 
velt. Archbold says he gave $150,000. 
How much the Steel tru.st, the Harves- 
ter trust, the Sugar trust, the leather 
trust, the Coal trust, the Beef trust, the 
Lumber trust, the Paper trust, the 
Wool tru.st and the other trusts gave 
nobody knows; but we do know they 
were all in the political game that 
year. We all know that the only way 
they can play politics is with boodle — 
•fat " We all know they were for the 
party of protection and "Great Moral 

Ideas." 

• « • 

And that Is why the tariff was not 
disturbed while Roosevelt was presi- 
dent. Take protection out of the tariff 
and these gentry will go out of politics 
and keep out of politics, and it is the 
one and only way to be rid of them 
every year a president or a congress is 
chosen. 



•♦♦Ignatius Donnelly spoke to a 
large audience In a tent at West Du- 
luth last evening. It was a character- 
istic speech In support of the People s 
party candidates. He was Introduced 
by A. McLean, who attempted a flight 
of oratory himself but got in so deep 
he had to swim. After Mr. Donnelly 
had concluded, A. C. Parsons, People s 
party candidate for congress, made a 
sliort address. 



♦••J. T. Condon of Duluth has been 
a member of the executive committee 
of the State Bill Posters' association. 



•♦•One of the largest real estate 
deals ever made in Duluth has Juat 
been closed. It Is the sale of the 
Phoenix block, corner of Superior 
street and Fourth avenue v/est, by 
Munger & Markell to the Massachu- 
settj Real Estate company. The con- 
sideration was 1225,000. The deal was 
negotiated by A. S. Wilson, who repre- 
sents the company in Duluth, end was 
closed by Porte W. Hewlns, the presi- 
dent, who has been here for several 
days. The Plioenlx building has 12t> 
feet of frontage and the land extends 
lack 145 feet. Including the postoffi^e 
building. The Massachusetts Real E-^- 
tate comp.any last June purchtsed the 
Fargusson block for $215,000. It also 



street and 2,000 feet on Fourth street 
between Third and Tenth avenue* 
east. On the latter property twelve 
houses have already been erected this 
summer and work started on four 
more. 

•••Con O'Nell, employed by the Du- 
luth Iron & Metal company, while en- 
gaged In cutting up the boilers of the 
burned steamer Winslow yesterday* 
was struck by a piece of flying rivet 
which entirely destroyed the sight of 
hi,s right eye. 



••♦Miss Josie Lundberg has gone to 
Minneapolis and St. Paul for a few- 
days. 

•♦♦Thomas S. Wood and wife, who 
have been visiting In Duluth for sev- 
eral weeks, have returned to Steu- 
benville, Ohio. 

•••Mr. and Mrs. Frank T. Combs of 
North St. Paul are spending *"®*^ 
honeymoon in Duluth and are guesw 
of W. M. Metcalf. 



owns the Langellier block on Second i school building 



•••Miss Grace Danforth has re- 
turned from Minneapolis to accept a 
position as assistant teacher In the 
kindergarten department at the hlgn 



RINGDAL FOR GOV ERNOR | 



MORE CONTRAST. 

"Jim" Smith, Democratic boss of New Jersey and rep- 
resentative in public life of the ugly things which an 
awakened people are striving manfully to cast off, is out 
for the United States senate. 

Governor Wilson, caring nothing for the fact that 
Smith is an important factor in his party in his home 
state, is out in a statement declaring against Smith and 
urging his defeat. 

Which is good citizenship and sound patriotism, even 
it it is not conducive to that very much overestimated 
and often mischievous thing, "party harmony." 

It is precisely what would be expected of Governor 
Wilson, and it shows exactly how much force there is 
to the ridiculous claims of Theodore Roosevelt that Wil- 
son was nominated by the "bosses." 

The incident is interesting in another way. It illus- 
trates the contrast between Roosevelt, who is always a 
•good party man" when the party is with him, and Wil- 
son, who sinks party considerations in the public in- 

terest. 

In Pennsylvania the Bull Moose leader is "Contract 
rill" Flinn, boss of Pittsburg. Roosevelt has received 
him with open arms. 

What is going on in Pennsylvania is that Bill Flinn 
IS using Roosevelt's name as a tool for the organization 
of a new political machine for revenue only. 

Says the Philadelphia Times, Munsey's newspaper 
and one of the strongest advocates of Roosevelt in the 
country: "It begins to appear that Roosevelt were need- 
ed in Pennsylvania to save the Washington party from 
becoming the plaything of politicians as consumed with 
the lust for power and as desirous of building up a ma- 
chine apart from and in defiance of the people as any of 
the old crowd under the leadership of Penrose. Wheth- 
er by inexcusable blundering or by the same star cham- 
ber conferences and double-dealing that have marked 
the Penrose organization, the Washington party in 
Pennsylvania is being traded for a mess of pottage — that 
mess being a state machine aiming at the absolute con- 
trol of all things political within the confines of the 

state." 

Wilson has attacked Smith. 

Will Roosevelt respond to the appeal from Pennsyl- 
vania and repudiate Boss Flinn and his methods? 

He will not. Flinn is for ME. 



THE OPEN COURT 



(RMilerg of The Herald are Invited to make free 
use of tills column to expreea their Ideas about tlie 
topics of general liUereat. but disctasloiia of nectartau 
rellalous jllfferences are barred, liettera aliould not 
excetd 300 \vords— Uie sborter the bett«r. They mu»l 
be written ou one side of the iiaper only, and Ihpy 
must be ac.onipanlcd In e\erv,ca*e by the name and 
address of the wrttec. Uiough'^yiese need not be pub- 
lintx'si. A »l«ned letter la always more effective, 
however. ) 

BRING THE 'SCPPIY 

T« THE DEMAND. 



Pretty Slow i;*'ork. 

An actress has got herself subpoenaed In the Rosenthal 
case, but up to date no press agent has had his particular 
star arrested on suspicion of being Gyp the Blood. 



The Gnne of IJfe. 

Kansas farmers are beginning to think Fate has loaded 
the dice against them. Home are being left without even 
fk horse apiece, 

A GOOD NOMINATION. 

Governor Wilson's praise of the nomination by the 
Bull Moosers of Oscar S. Straus for governor of New 
York is well bestowed— and its bestowal on the candi- 
date of an opposition party shows the breadth of the 
man who did it. 

Oscar S. Straus is a good man and a good citizen. 
His works for the public good are innumerable. "Sus- 
pender Jack," the Rough Rider who stampeded the con- 
vention for him, builded wiser than he knew. It puts 
the other parties in New York on their mettle in select- 
ing their governorship candidates, and that's always a 
great and good thing. 

Naturally. 

No wonder the Prohibition candidates are beginning to 
hump themselves, since the party has chosen the camel as 
Its official emblem. 

A PRETTY SCHEME. 

A move is being made in St. Paul to have the state 
fair board set aside a day each year as "Twin City Shop- 
ping Day," and to close the fair grounds on that day. 

Tins proposal is made by Twin City merchants on 
the ground that the merchants "spend considerable 
money advertising the fair," and that they ought to get 
more benefit out of it. 

If Twin City merchants spend money advertising the 
fair, nobody ever heard of it. The fair board does all 
the advertising, and pays for it. The Twin Cities not 
only do not contribute a dollar directly to the support 
of the fair, though it brings them crowds each year, but 
they do not patronize it anywhere near in proportion to 
the rest of the state. As we recall it, the smallest days 
in point of attendance this year were St. Paul day and 
Minneapolis day. 

The fair is not a Twin City institution, but a state 
institution. It is not necessary to shut its gates to force 
outside crowds into Twin City stores. It is not even 
necessary to hold it in the Twin Cities at all. _ 

The state supports it, and it is a state institution.J and then goe» back to bis buaUxess as chipper as evea 



PARCELS POST. 

Congressman Miller and the local newspaper advo- 
cate of the things for which the Taft-Penrose-Eberhart- 
Smith brand of statesmen stand for claim that credit for 
the enactment of a parcels post law is due to the Repub- 
licans in the house. 

The Republicans are in a small minority in the house, 
which is controlled overwhelmingly by the Democrats. 

The Republicans have been in complete control of 
the house during the many years when the fight for the 
parcels post was being waged ineffectually against the 
powerful opposition of the express companies. 

No parcels post was possible until the Republican 
power was broken and the house went Democratic. 

The Republicans might have passed a parcels post 
law any time these twenty years, and they would have 
been tumultuously applauded for it by the people. 

But they didn't, and there was no parcels post, and 
this nation remained the only civilized country on the 
globe without it, until the house became Democratic. 

Need anything more be said? 



To the Editor of The Herald: 

The splendid article which appeared 
In your valuable issue on Saturday 
evening certainly deserves some com- 
ment of those who wish for the wel- 

^Such an " article should certainly 
awaken the sleepers who have not yet 
realized they are living in Duluth. 

According to the rapid strides our 
citv is now making the present fa- 
cilities for home accomniodations will 
not meet the demands of hundMds of 
thousands of people who will soon pour 
into Duluth. , : ,_ ,„ 

Through the vast increase of trade in 
all branches our manufacturers are 
overcrowded with work, and with an 
abundance In view. 

According to my opinion, not one 
order .should be turned down through 
the scarcity o< men. There are hun- 
dreds and thousands of men who are 
skilled mechanics In the western part 
of England wrfio would rejoice at an 
opportunity 1|» come to Du'"th to 
make It thelrlionie and also to fill the 
position.s in rfrder to make good the 
orders instea<^ of turning the orders 
away Thi.s Daluth cannot afford to do. 

Also, I havi noticed a large list of 
domestics of a 1 kinds are wanted. All 
these can be tnied. and to the fullest 
of satlsfactloi* of all concerned. Such 
people of my choice would make ex- 
cellent citizen J. and in coming to Du- 
luth would re naln here. 

I am sorry o admit a large number 
of people in his country are not In 
one place long at a time; pretty much 
the butterfly fashion, here today and 
gone tomorrow. 

Every house and flat and room in 
Duluth can be filled with a good cla.ss 
of English people. Therefore I should 
certainly advise the business men of 
Duluth to send a Duluth representative 
to the western part of England to .se- 
cure the necessary help, and I am confi- 
dent such a method would prove a 
splendid success. 

I personally have some special busi- 
ness In London, Eng.. which must be 
attended to at my earliest convenience, 
when I hope to Interest considerable 
capital for the promotion t)f three or 
four worthy enterprises for Duluth. for 
next year. On this occasion I could 
also be of valuable service to our Du- 
luth manufacturers if desired, and pro- 
viding this proposition l.s accepted you 
may be sure something would be done 
for Duluth. ^^^P^^^^^^y/^Y^^'izEN. 

Duluth. Sept. 9. 



prised, then turned and started off on 
a brisk walk westward." 

Thus it would appear that there are 
"mashers" in the city; also that the 
masher chastised by the young woman 
"got his" right where the quoted police- 
man is supposed to stand, ready to de- 
fend modesty, protect decent women 
and arrest offensive, leering "Insects," 
as you have stamped them. Where was 
the policeman when this young woman 
was insulted? Where was the police- 
man when the young woman wa.s un- 
able to shake off the parasite without 
using force and striking a blow? 

The News Tribune story Is too thin. 
That women are not free from molesta- 
tion on the main street Is notorious; 
denials by the morning paper notwith- 
standing. 

Few women or young girls care to 
create a scene on the street. Few care 
to strike a "masher" in the face, al- 
though by doing it they would at once 
fix themselves in the esteem of all 
good men. Few women care to go to 
a policeman and make complaint, be- 
cause by that time the "masher" would 
be blocks away, and a crowd would 
collect to stare at the woman while she 
made her complaint. 

It seems necessary for a citizen to 
show the police how to cope with this 
nuisance. It w^ould be easy for say half 
a dozen plain-clothes men to scatter In 
the crowds, walk behind some pre- 
posse-ssing women and watch the loaf- 
ers in hallways, in front of cigar 
stores, saloons, shoe shining shops, and 
at street crossing-s. Meanwhile the 
regular police could order the ogle 
squad off the curb in front of the ten- 
cent store, and at other points on Su 



L.lkel7 to Win. 

St Peter Free Press: If our Repub- 
lican candidates for gubernatorial hon- 
ors do not have a care. Mr. Ringdal, 
their Democratic opponent, is likely to 
carry off the honors at the election. A 
friendly contest between the Repabllc- 
an rivals would be all right, but the 
vicious charges hurled at each other 
will not tend to tone down the atmos- 
phere after the primary. Better get 
together and bury personalities. 

In RlBgdaPs Favor. 

Fairmont Sentinel: P. M. Ringdal, 
candidate for the Democratic nomina- 
tion for governor, has published his 
platform. It is a rather lengthy docu- 
ment, but the principles embodied, as a 
rule, appear to be sound. — Princeton 

The' above springing from the brain 
of Bob Dunn, a political opponent, 
means a whole chapter In Mr. Ringdal s 
favor. 

HaH Had Wide Kxperlenee. 

Sandstone Tribune: The Democrats 
have two good candidates ^'^r ^ their 
party nomination for governor— the old 
stager. Hon. P. M. Ringdal and Prof. 
Andrlst of the state university. Mr. 
Ringdal has had a wide experience in 
state affairs, and as a member of the 
board of control for several years has 
been clo.sely allied with the business 
affairs of our state government. He 
is independent In thought and action 
and won't wear a collar if he should 
be chosen to head the Democratic ticket 
in this state. Prof. Andrlst seems to 
have the support also and will doubt- 
less poll a strong vote in his party 
primaries. His experience, however, is 
not so broad nor has it so well Quali- 
fied him for candidacy for the position 
he seeks as has Mr. Ringdal's. 

Gwut Platform. 

Hawley Herald: P. M. Ringdal, Dem- 
ocratic candidate for the governorship, 
has laid down the platform ori which 
he win seek the office, and it is truly 
a good one. containing all desired pro- 
gressive legislation. 

ProgrMuaive for MaiiT Y*"**; 

St Peter Herald: P. M. Ringdal, can- 
didate for the Democratic guberna- 
torial nomination, does not atutter in 
making his declaration of principles. 



perlor street; could quietly tip it off 
to some of the drivers of "for hire" 
to I automobiles to keep their remarks and 
smirks for their regular female asso- 
ciates. They could tell certain barbers 
that every woman who happens to 
glance Into their shop is not seeking 
a flirtation with the barber because of 
his wonderful beauty, and the same 
note could be sounded in the ear of 
certain fluffy-headed Greek shoe- 
shlnens. who apparently consider them- 
selves very fetching. 

W. BALDWIN. 
Duluth. Sept. ». 

• 

The Vermont Returns 



Ancient Standpatters. 

Editorial in the Clevdand Press. 



den' 



"MASHERS. 



M 



Now Hadley has given out a letter that doesn't say 
what the colonel said it did. Great Scott! Hasn't the man 
any Judgment at all? 

It's sort of rubbing It In— hard— when a malefactor of 
great wealth gets out of prison on the plea that he's dying. 



To the Editor of The Herald: 

The News Tribune, following a cus- 
tom — or a vice — Into which It has 
fallen, of denying everything The 
Herald says, yesterday denied the 
stories regarding Duluth's "mashing 
'squad." an^ then, showing further out- 
cropplngs of granite, dl.scounted its own 
denial. Starting with a two-column 
head In a box. It says: 

"Police say masher yarns are prac- 
tically fiction. Declare no woman who 
minds her business and does not in- 
vite attention Is In any danger of in- 
sult on Duluth streets — None of alleged 
"victims have made complaint." 

That Is the "head" of the Item. The 
body contains Interviews with un- 
named policemen, putting words Into 
the coppers' mouths that few. If any, 
Dollcemen. here or elsewhere, use. 

Then the last paragraph Is reserved 
to "kill" Its own story. The News 
Tribune goes on to prove Just what the 
Herald has said, as follows: 

"A slap In the face administered by 
a young womat^ I*8t evening took all 
the mashing out of a masher. The In- 
cident occurred on the corner of Lake 
avenue and Sujierldk' street. The young 
woman evidently was waiting for a 
car. She was uneseorted. 

"A young man. flashily dressed, ap- 
proached her with a smile and a suave 
•'Good evenlrtg. sweetheart." She 
turned her back to him. not answering. 
He then walked closer to her and took 
her arm. She turned around quickly 
and sent a left to the Jaw. 



Des Moines Capital (Taft Rep.): It 
was quite generally agreed that the 
Vermont election returns would be a 
very suggestive barometer of political 
conditions. If the idea still prevails 
now that the election has taken place, 
where are we at? 

If the Vermont performance should 
be repeated in the other states of the 
nation no other conclusion Is possible 
than that Woodrow Wilson will be the 
next president. 

The New York Press, which was op- 
posed to Taft's renomination, declares 
that the Vermont returns show Roose- 
velt out of the race so far as the No- 
vember election is concerned; that he 
ran third In the contest; that the 
heaviest third party guns were trained 
on the voters; that every Roosevelt 
vote In the state was brought to the 
polls, and that It Is ridiculous to ex- 
pect that there will be any change in 
his behalf In that conservative com- 
monwealth during the next six weeks. 

The Chicago Inter-Ocean makes an 
application of the Vermont figures to 
several other important states. What 
the Vermont returns actually show is 
that while the vote in that state was 
more than 20 per cent greater than It 
was In the presidential election of 1908. 
the Republican vote showed a decline 
of 33 per cent while the Democratic 
vote revealed an Increase of 75 per 

cent. ^, , i ,, ... 

If this means anything at all It 
means that the Roosevelt strength Is 
being recruited from the Republican 
ranks, while the Democratic party is 
solidifying Its own forces and making 
accretions which point to victory. 

. — • 

A Si^lendld ShowiBK. 

The Galveston News has Issued a 
handsome annual trade edition of six- 
ty-eight well crowded pages, in which 
it tells interestingly about the agricul- 
tural, commercial and Industrial de- 
velopment of Galveston, East Texas 
and the gulf coast country. It is an 
impressive showing, and the News con- 
veys it In an able and striking way by 
means of well written articles and 
good pictures. 

A N<»rtb Dakota Credllt. 

The Uevils Lake Journal Issued a 
special fall trade edition of thirty 
pages which Is about as fine a news- 
paper triumph as any community the 
size of Devils Lake has ever witnessed. 
It is well written, well printed and 
full of good advertising. The prosperity 
reflects and ttie enterprise It dls- 



•°The" mMher Vtood a°''moment sur- plays are exceedingly IntereaUnff, 



You're still a standpatter, are you? 
Rather proud of it, too? „„„„ 

Perhaps you don't know the company 
you are in as shown by the record of 
the standpatters, beginning back a few 
thousand years. "«'«»• Ji^'^'t '8= . _ 

Who would not hearken to Noah, a 
preacher of righteousness, and were 
all drowned In the flood? The stand- 

^*Wh"' refused to let the children of 
Israel go up out of the land ot Lgypt? 
The standpatters. ii^„„. 

Who had Daniel cast Into the lions 

n? The standpatters. 

Who rejected the teachings of Jesus 
when "the common people heard Him 
gladly"? The standpatters. 

Who compelled Galileo to recant his 
declaration that the earth revolved? 
The standpatters. 

WTio put Columbus in Prlso" after he 
had discovered a new world? The 

''Whr"?te'r the globe had been clr- 
cumnavigated. still insisted that It was 
Hat? The standpatters. 

Who believed it was right to hang 
persons for witchcraft? The standpat- 

'^Who decried the Introduction of the 
sewing machine, the cotton gin, the 
self-binder and other labor-saving In- 
ventions? The standpatters. 

Who North as well as South, op- 
posed the abolition of slavery? The 

''wfrobTe'cted to the adoption of 
standard time? The sta"f Pa"eis. 

WTio opposed the building of the 
Panama canal? The standpatters. 

Who have continually fought aU 
legislation In the interest of the peo- 
ple? The standpatters 
'^ WTio have always believed that a 
public trust meant private graft? The 

''i1-t''yOu'stlll a standpatter? If you 
are it Is time for you to heed the in- 
function? ••Come ou(from among them, 
and be ye sep arate." 

Skat and Poker. 

New York Times: We have profound 
admiration and respect for any human 
being who is so richly equipped. Intel- 
lectually as to be able to acquire a 
passabe working knowledge of the 
card game called skat. But when our 
^tllow-townsman, Herman Rldder, de- 
ctarel that skat is destined to "crowd 
out America's national game of Poker 
we protest Prolonged and patient 
service in the game of auction bridge 
with the new count might qualify one 
to enter the preparatory classes of a 
skat university. But a mastery of skat 
can only he obtained by a lifetime of 
patient endeavor. ^ ., . 

Poker players are born, not maae. a 
man may excel in that pursuit while 
constitutionally unable to comprehend 
a guckl nullo, determine the compara- 
tive value of a wenzel and an unter- 
bube or tell the difference between a 
frage and a tourne. In poker a simple 
couple of three-spots Is as good as a 
quartet of aces until the call. In 
skat the most dazzling array of cards 
one might hold would be valueless if 
one had not mastered a few thousand 
rules and learned strange /erms 
enough to All a sizable volume of small 
print. , 

RooMvelt and tlie ''*'^f^f •"• Mr 
New York World: When Mr. 
Roosevelt tells his audiences that 1 
don't mind the newspapers attacking 
me editorially, but Jbey ought to be 
compelled to tell the truth In the 
news pages," the newspapers print it 
bSr every newspaper knows that it is 
a falsehood. , _ 

The World has never known a cam- 
oalKn that was more fairly and gen- 
erously reported by the newspapers of 
all parties. Democratic, Republican 
and Progressive. As for Mr. Roose- 
velt he receives more space In the 
news columns of the newspapers than 
either President Taft or Governor 
Wilson and eometlmes he receives 



Mr. Ringdal has been a progressive for 
so many years that the memory of man 
runneth not to the contrary, and he is 
thoroughly in sympathy with present- 
day thought. 

Good Record. 

Waseca Herald: The record of P. M. 
Ringdal In the service of the state !• 
the strongest guarantee that he will 
make a splendid governor if elected. 
His honesty, ability and experience In 
affairs of state make him an Ideal man. 
for the office. 

Practical Man. 

Winona Independent: The Indepen- 
dent takes great pleasure in recom- 
mending the nomination of Peter M. 
Ringdal for governor on the Demo- 
cratic ticket in Minnesota. Mr. Ringdal 
is a true and tried democratic Demo- 
crat and has had years of ^experience 
in statecraft as a member of the state 
board of control and as a member of 
the state railroad and v^arehouse com- 
mission before it was changed to an 
elective body. Mr. Ringdal has high 
ideals, but Is not merely an Idealist 
He is intensely practical and thorough- 
Iv conscientious. If nominated, he will 
have more than a mere chance for 
election. He will, as a matter of fact, 
have the good will of all friends of 
good government. 

Familiar With Conditions. 

Wabasha Herald; Hon. P. M. Ring- 
dal, candidate for the Democratic nom- 
ination for governor, and his platform 
of principles are receiving much favor- 
able comment from the country press 
and elsewhere. He has a record in the 
public service of the state, having 
served in the legislature as a n^^mber 
of the state railroad and warehouse 
commission, and is now a member of 
the state board of control, to which 
position he was appointed by the late 
Governor Johnson. In all these places 
he has made good, being clean, busi- 
nesslike and aggressive in all his deal- 
ings. No candidate for the office or 
governor of the state is more familiar 
with the conditions throughout the 
state, knows the needs of her pooplo 
better than he. and If elected governor 
will fill that important office with 
credit to himself and the state of 
Minnesota. The Democratic party will 
do well to select him aa its candidate 
for governor. 



more space than both of them com- 
bined. , ^ -. 

We are surprised that Roosevelt 
newspapers like the New York Globe, 
the New York Mail, the Philadelphia 
North American, the Chicago Tribune 
and the Kansas City Star remain 
silent in the face of Mr. Roosevelt's 
slanders upon their own profession. 
They know that he is not telling the 
truth. They know that his charges 
are a libel upon a vast army of con- 
scientious newspaper workers who are 
reporting the campaign with the ut- 
most possible accuracy. They know 
that these charges are made by Mr. 
Roosevelt merely in the hope of being 
able to blackmail the newspapers into 
giving him still more space, yet they 
tolerate his shameless mendacity. 

Is it possible that Progressive Jour- 
nalism is so hypnotized by Roosevelt 
demagogism that it has forgotten even 
its own self-respect? 



The Promise 



: 



Gen. viii, 22: While the earth 
remaineth, seedtime and harvest, 
and cold and heat, and summer 
and winter, and day and night 
shall not cease. 

■ s 

HIh Claim to Fame. 

Cleveland Plain Dealer: Tl'.? crowd 
stood around in refpectful silence. 

"What's going on?" Inquired a rude 
stranger from the ruffianly W^est. 

"Hu.sh" said the New Yorker. "Not 
so loud. There's a 13.000,000 baby 
asleep in that house." 

The rude stranger stared at the 
palatial home. Then he staled at the 
crowd. 

After which he let out a ye:i that 
must have shaken Liberty on her 
down-the-bay pedestal. 

Up came a big policeman. 

"Who are you?" he demanded. 

"Me?" cried the ruffian. "Why. Pra 
th' feller that woke up the |3,000,00» 
babyl" 

And taking the policeman's arm he 
gayly strode away. 



% THEATER 



MATINEES 

10c& 



Niahte. I0«. 2Se. 
SOe ud 73e. 



THIS WEEK'S BILL 

QUS WEINBERQ 

la "Mem Licbeben" 

HOWARD 

LA PETITE MIGNOM 

CLAUDIUS a SCARLETT 

RONAIR a WARD 

THE TWO ALFREDS 

AERIAL SHERWOOOS 

WORLD EVENTS 
The Orpheum Ordieetrm. 



LYCEUM I 



TONIGHT 

AND ALL WEEK. 



WILLIAM A. BRADY (LTD.) Pmnta 
AMERICA'S BIG PLAY 

BOUGHT AND 
PAID FOR 

BY GEORGE BROAOHURST 

MatliMM. WedneMlay Md Saturday. 
Ni*iit»— 2Se t» $1.50; Matlaet— 2>« f >I.Oa. 



COMING— 8HEEHAN OPERA CO. 



. «,..•&. 



■pmranBiffllll I "W, 



^ 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 



'» 



€ 



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....aiiiiiiiiliiiiiiilllliliiiiiiii;,. 



Tuesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



September 10, 1012. 







-V 



THE WILSON CAMPAIGN FUND 









0FLIE" 




ii iFyii 

IT 




SUBSCRIPTIONS RECEIVED AT THE HERALD OFFICE, DULUTH 



S roil A I'KOI'LKS » 

Z I'RKSIMK'^l- * 

« Th* folio**!"!* eoBtrlbutlomii «a « 

Z I- ii'»Mtmii»»tt«. Jr., Dulutb »lOO * 

I V. V, %%.-«'«». Uuliith 100 * 

St. T. Illldwoii. Dululh •>« ♦ 

» i|irr«>il J««iue«, l»ulmU s« * 

£ rrt-ilt-ric W. I'alne. Ouluth. 50 ^ 

» Mnreiw U Faj . llulutli 5« * 

ll» llnrrla Ilennelt. Uuliith -^ » 

Nl rr«-d I.. UjHii, Uululh -•» * 

« W. J. >orlh. lluluth 1«» * 

li v^'Jiu t tarlstle, Uuliith 10 J 

II < iinrlcn K. lli»nr. Dulutb... 10 * 

m I ruiik Jortlaa, Dulutti 10 j^ 

m « iiMricst .1. H*'Ct«r. Oululh,. tO ♦ 

ir rmuk >laku\>!tkl. Uuluth. . 10^ 

K i:. A. TrMMinaii. Uuluth 1« » 

H JwhB B«iycr, Duluth « * 

III. P. t urreu. i>uluth O* 

%%llllnni MUler. Dulutb »* 

H <;cMrse Xftl". Dulutb » * 

* Jiibu A >lacDonrll. Uuluth.. S 9 

« fred J. ViKiK. Dulutb 5 # 

Hf II. 11. S«lra«B, Blwablk. .. »* 

fC. S. t hri.<«toflrer.'.on. IlibblsK » * 

91 Ilriiii«'tt, Duluth f* 

f%%. S. %> iok-». Duluth 1 * 

M. J. Ubitr. liMon. Win 1 « 

H LiiuiM llrnnett. Dulutb 1 * 

^ Ireil >l«MMl>. Wiirri.ad. Minn J f 

•ft,, n. I- liiistenbrrn. Dulutb... l » 

* L. \1. lIuMtley. timud HapUl*. I J 

« Total *'***'^ ^ 



Muvli niotjey Ls needed for t»ie Wil- 
son campaign fund. 

A dispatch to Tho Herald, published 
last evening, showed that $17&.000 has 
hecn suhacribed to «late. 

A groat iK'tional litinpaltirn cannot V>e 
conducted on Ifsn than $1.»»00.000. 

Hvidently the progressive filizens of 
the United States*. w!io want to see 
Woodrow Wil.son elect.! president, 
mu.'it awaken to their re.spon3il)ility. 

Governor Wilson ha.s entered upon a 
campaign for the righta of the people. 
I!t< nuiat look to the plain people for 
the money with which to finance his 
campaign. UnlesB the people respond 
to hii! appeal, the committee will be 
unable to carry out it.s campaign plan.4. 

An analy.>i9 of the dijipatch published 
last evening showed the extent to 
which the men ol average mean.s are 
contributing. . ,, . .,, , 

The sum of |175.00() was contributed 
by about l-'.oao people, or an ay^'''^**'' 
of less than $15 for each contributor. 
TIte eontributioni) of $1,000 and over 
a-gregated $4»,000. and there were 
eilnen such .submriptions. The re- 
maining ll,9S9 people, who contribut- 
ed 1126.000, gave an average of little 
more than $10 each. , , ^. , ,. ^ 

''''■" $1 and $5 .subscription.^ of the 
■ who can afford no more will 
........ up the bulk ot the Wilson cam- 
paign fund T^ 1 #^- 

U is a ' Teuplo'-s Campaign Fund for 



a People'.s President," 

No nKin who is Interested In the 
campaign and wants to see t''*? K^Y* 
ernment reHtore-l to the people »'|«>u»« 
fail to cmtribute his mite toward tne 
funil whuh is to finance the campaign 
that will bring that result about. 

Tho Northwest in which The Herald 
circulates is thoroughly progre-s.sive. 
It .should contribute Its part towarU 
conducting tho campaign in which it is 
interested. 

The man who can afford to send no 
more than $1. .should contribute that 
amount. , ,- 

The man who can afford to send $». 
should .send that amount. 

Kvcry man who wants to see Wood- 
row Wil.son elected should contribute 
what he can. , 

There will be no extravagance in tne 
Wilson campaign. Kvery dollar will 
be expended for legitimate purpo.sj-.s 
'and for the best results Full pub- 
licity will be given receipts and ex- 
penditures. . ^ , .1. .,» !. 

K A. Tessman of Duluth sent a 
che.k for $10 to The Herald today. 

t'untributions received by The Her- 
ald will be acknowledged by publlca- 
tion in The Herald. The lists will be 
sent to the Democratic national com- 
mittee and every contributor will re- 
ceive a handsomely engraved receipt, 
suitable for framing. ..„.^. ^„ p..,„ 

Mail contributions to ''VVILson Cam- 
paign Fund. Herald Office. Duluth, 

Minn." ^ ,. . ^ tuo. 

Now i.s the time to contribute. The 
campaign Is on. and the money la 
needed. 



Minnesota politics 

Administration Is Frightened By Evidence of In- 
crease of Progressive Strength— State Employes 
Hustling for Their Jobs— Gordon, Lee and 
Young Issue Joint Letter Urging Use of Second 
I Choice— Lind to Deliver Keyn ote Speech. 



01 fl 



pl'. 

th. 

i; 
Th 

gr- 
vf 
of 
f»l- 



■Ul.i 

■ by 
If an 
. hf»f'n 



Tl" 



Now, howevei'. 



their supporters against each other. 
The machine is badly frightened. 

• • • 
L. C. Spooner i.s being given scant 

attention In political apecul.vtion. and 
his strength is an unknown quantity. 
He has made a vigorous personal cam- 
paign and has had some friends work- 
ing for him. His failure to take side* 
in the fight on the state machine has 
been an element of weakness. He has 
declared for a business administration, 
but has neglected to attack the- influ- 
ences which have made the state ex- 
travagant. Spooner and his friends be- 
lieve that he has made good progress, 
and that his vote at the primary may 
be a surprise to some of the people 
who have given him little considera- 
tion in speculating on the result. 

• « • 
Martin Falk arrived in Duluth yes- 
terday and will remain for a day or 
two. He says he has started out «>« a 
whirlwind campaign and he thinks he 
has as good a chance as any of the can- 
didates. He distributed about 100.000 
copies of his platform at the state fair. 
Mr Falk will leave In a day or two 
for the southern part of the state to 
wind up his campaign. 

• • • .1. 
The second choice will figure In the 

contest for three nominations on the 
Republican ticket. There are six can- 
didates for governor, five for congress- 
man-at-large and three for secretary 
of state, there are three candidates 
for the Democratic nomination for the 
railroad and warehouse commission tor 
the si.x-year term and the second 
choice will count there. In all other 
cases only two candidates are in the 
fiell and the second choice will hot 
count. 

In St. Louis county, the second 
choice will figure in the contest for 
the following nominations on the Re- 
publican tbket: register of deed.s. 
three candidates: sheriff, three candi- 
date.<j; coroner, four candidates; county 
eommi.'i.sioner. Fifth district, five candi- 
■' s; county commissioner. Seventh 
:ict, five candidates; legislature, 
, hoice They were con- ; Cla.ss 2. I^'orty-ninth district, four can- 
th<- m'u!fipli<lty of can- 1 didafes. The only nomination for 
t sentiment which there are three candidates on 
the Democratic ticket Is that for 
county commissioner In the Fifth dis- 
trict. 

• * • 

•C. F. Mahnke of Moose Lake, who is 

a candidate for the Republican nomi- 

,H luuai i^v<^..^.,.^ nation for the house in the t»"y-»f,^: 

•thart. but have ond district, has started o"^ on his 

final trip over the district. Mr. Mahnke 

is in a three-cornered contest with P. 



Tho tami>^ii*;n for the Republican 
nomuiation for governor has started 
In on the final week with much less 
c Mce and correspondingly re- 

i.vv.- . activity on the part of the ad- 
ministration, and an intelligent com- 
bination of Interests on the part of the 
proeresslvea. 

<; . ion, Lee and Young have sent out 
a joint letter urging voters to cast a 
lir!«t and second choice ballot for gov- 
ernor The progressives have been 
,.r .M- to get together on any other 
n but they are united in sup- 
1 the ,«iecond choice and are now 

,1 t' f'ir respective supporters to 

,u>' ^< s.-.ond choice ballot for some 
other progressive. „„,,„„. the ad- 

The tide has turned against the a<i- 
minlstratlon. Governor Eberhart has 
abandoned the last of his three wont h 

and h.j.-* started on a personal campaign 

of the Twin Cities*. 

OH slnspectors. boiler Inspectors. 

tfalrv and food Inspectors and other ai- 

aairy ai a ^^^ a,im,ni.stration have been 

i to hustle r... il.eir jobs. 

Tu. .Minneapolis Journal ye.sterday 

rui.iisiied in fac simile letters showing 

t i-nuty oil Inspectors In Ouy A. 

^ department have been 

•u lic.ed- for campaign ^ontrlbutiona. 

The indications that the ae.ond 
choice will be ^'^tensively used have 
thrown a scare into the Lbernari 

"f (Tiff ' 1^''* *^ »_ 

If 60 per cent of the voters of the 
_.,. .._. ti.. ^f., ond choice on gov- 
"' v.: 11 1.0 beaten. 

,,. <■■:,■ .state is against 

...• ire maeiiine and 

, ::. -rents nui.9t be 

■ ility to poll a big 

,. . . ..;h votes to give a 

nominaituu in a split field If 

1 , holce w.'te not used. 

-» will be used. 
. ,; ; . with the pro- 
.;n has been tliat th 
I educated to the u.- 
hoice. They were con 



TEDDY HAS 
BUSY DAY 

Progressive Nominee Talks 

to Men and Women at 

Spokane. 



I on any one 
at would have 



e.s have been sparring 
sizing up the various 
i.tes and endeavoring to make 
ir minds as to the most available 



»,M,v, ......< the indications are 

that voters understand that the second 
€hol< •• is a sure weapon for the oefeat 
of the ma. hine. Gordon. Lee and 
Y, ur:4 !' . ^ •" urging the voters to 

,%. ih choice. The efforts of 

the adminiistiation workers *"<* n«^a- 

napfT.-* to mi-slead the voters Into be- 

■ X that a second choice vote could 

AQ the chances of the first choice 

iiave been unsucce.ssful. 

Two weeks ago the Eberhart people 
we tain that Eberharfs renomin- 

at s asaured. They thought that 

the •-1,19 would not use the second 
choice and that the .split field would 
allow ilie governor to slip through 
with a nomination on a minority vote. 
The indications now are that what 
was mi.-jtaken for apathy by some can- 
didates was merely retirement for re- 
flection. The voters are alive to thetr 
opportunity to smash the machine and 
they intend to do so by intelligent use 
of the second choice. 

The Eberhart people are using every 
means to pull the governor through. 
Kvery state appointee will be a po- 
litical worker this week, as they near 



H. McGarVy "of Walker and FT. Per- 
singer of Cloquet. The Moose Lake 
man is optimistic over his chances, al- 
though McGarry and Thomas Bruse- 
gaard of Hill City have formed a com- 
bination on the issue of the sale of the 
Virginia bonds held by the state. The 
fight In the Fifty-.second Is the warm- 
est In years. Brusegaard has filed 
against C H. Warner of Aitkin, who 
was first thought to have a clear fleld^ 
Bru.-4egaard claims that Warner was 
against the sale of the Virginia bonds 
and holds that every Northern Minne- 
sota representative should work foi 
the sale of the bonds In order that the 
funds may be available for oans to 
towns and^chool di.stricts in the state^ 
McGarry takes the same attitude as 
Brisegaard and the ^omb^ination is a 
formidable one Mahnke J. f » "°«ii^^e 
pressed himself on tlie subjeLt since 
the combination against hlrn and 
Warner was formed. Mahnke and Mc 
Garry are both popular and the contest 
between them Is worth watching. 

The contest *n. the 'second division 



Utical worker this week, as they near- The contest in tne seconu "'^•='7' 
ly al have been at all times^ Money Lf ^^^ Forty-ninth district »« /" HeaW 
*'.,. '._ ' .v.-«.«., ir,tn the fitrht. The ...^ n««r«H«ntative John A. Heaiy 



Criticizes Commerce Court 

as Very Great Step 

Backward. 



Spokane. Wash.. Sept. 10.— When 
Col. Roosevelt entered his private car 
last night to continue westward on his 
Journey from the Atlantic to the Pa- 
cific he turned to look back at the city 
from the vantage point of the observa- 
tion platform, and remarked: 

"By George! Spokane has given me 
what I might call a middling lively 
day." 

The colonel made four speeches, at- 
tended a breakfast, a luncheon and a 
dinner, talked politics with the Pro- 
gressive leaders and headed a parade 
through the city. 

In his speeches, Col. Roosevelt gave 
his views on woman suffrage, defended 
minimum wage scales, assailed the po- 
sition of the Democratic party and 
talked of the tariff, the courts. t'v» 
high cost of living and the farnif^rs. 
He said little of the Republican party, 
on the ground that "he never dis- 
cus-sed dead folks." 

'Met the Women. 

Col. Roosevelt gave most of the aft- 
ernoon to the women of Spokane. A 
meeting exclusively for women was 
held in the Auditorium and another 
theater was engaged for an overfiow 
meeting. 

Col. Roosevelt said he had not been 
induced to take up the cause of woman 
suffrage by women who devoted their 
time to advocating It. but by what he 
had learned from women whom he had 
consulted In regard to other matters. 

At a noon day meeting of business 
men. the colonel discussed the party's 
proposals regarding control of the 

'i think in recent years a very great 
backward s-tep was taken," he said, 
"by tlie creation of the so-called com- 
merce court. The creation of that 
court came pretty near undoing the 
good we had succeeded in having got- 
ten done" 

i'rItieUed Wllnon'ii Critlclann. 

Woodrow Wilsons crltici.'3m of the 
Progressive minimum wage plank was 
characterized by Col. Roosevelt in a 
speech here as "purely academic" 

"It is an objection of the schoolroom 
and It will not have any weight with 
anyone who knows what life actually 
is." said Mr. Roosevelt. 

"He states." continued the colonel, 
"that he is utterly against this plank 
for various reasons, among them be- 
cause he thinks employers. If such a 
law were enacted, would reduce the 
wages of their employes to the mini- 
mum prescribed by law. Such a fear 
is utterly groundless " 

Mr. Roosevelt said he believed Gov- 
ernor Wilson was sincere, but would 
be misled by ideas laid down by po- 
litical economists. 

« 

J. W. Bn'nn Nominated. 

Seattle. Wash.. Sept. 10. — Complete 
returns show J. W. Bryan defeated 
John E Ballalne for the nomination as 
congressman-at- large by a majority of 
1.200 votes. 



win be thrown Into the fight. The 
Kberhart papers will continue to pound 
the second choice. Efforts will be made 
to turn the progressive candidates and 



Some Sensible Advice 

on Womanly Beauty 



Healthy hair adds much to woman- 
ly beauty, and it Is such an easy mat- 
ter to have a glorious mass of ovely 
hair that the dull, "strinugy ' k'nd l^ 
Inexcu-nable. A tea.'<poonful canthrox 
dissolved in a cup hot water removes 
every particle of dust, dandruff and 
excess oil. and after rinsing, the hair 
dries quickly and evenly. Canthrox 
shampoos promote hair-health and in- 
sure a wealth of lu.strous, even-colored 
young-looking hair. 

Remove tan and freckles and keep 
the skin clear, velvety and attractive 
for the social season by dally applying 
a lotion prepared by stirring two tea- 
spoonfuls of glycerine into one-half 
pint witch hazel (or hot water) then 
adding four ounces spurmax. This 
lotion la used Instead of face powder 
and though Invisible, tones the skin to 
a beautiful, natural color while curing 
tan. sunburn, freckles, surface blem- 
ishes and the oily, shiny appearance 
of the face, so often due to perspira- 
tion. 



LLT 



Vou7/ Do Better at Kelly s^ 





Values That You Cannot Afford to Ignore 

Our Easy Payment Plan Is for YOU 




Solid Oak 
Chiffonier 

A chiffonier is a very 
practical piece of fur- 
niture, as it takes up 
but little room and 
will hold a lot of 
clothing. You have 
an opportunity to pur- 
chase one this week 
at a very small cost. 
It is made of solid 
oak, finished a rich 
golden color; has five 
large, roomy drawers 
with wood knobs and 
a genuine French 
bevel plate mirror. It 
is a good value at 
$12.00. Kelly's ^Q 
special price V •^ 



SEE 

Kellys 

3-Room 

Outfit 




Solid Oak 
Dresser 

Do you need an extra 
dresser? If so, see this 
great value. It is made 
of selected oak, put to- 
gether to last. Finished 
a rich golden color. 
The drawers are large 
and roomy and fitted 
will wooden knobs. 
There is a 
French bevel 
mirror on top, set in 
a strong, rigid frame. 
A dresser that is easily 
worth $12.50, at Kelly's 
special price ^Q ^fl 



large 
plate 





Anottier Great Mattress Special New Brass Beds at Special Prices 



Another lot of those wonderful Felt Mattresses has just ar- 
rived They are full size, weigh 45 pounds and each mattress 
is filled with pure sanitary cotton felt; guaranteed to be non- 
absorbent and vermin proof. Covered with art ticking with 
a large roll edge, round corners. A real sanitary mattress 
worth $8.50. Kelly' s_special 
price for this ^ 

week..., 




Just received a solid carload of brass beds. 

All the season's newest designs and finishes 

are here. It w^ill more than pay you to see 

this exhibit. The new Bungalow Beds are 

making a great hit. Special for this week, 

full size brass bed, 

satin finish with 

heavy 2-inch posts 

in head and foot 

pieces; large, easy 

rolling casters and 

extra heavy side 

rails. A great value 

at Kelly's special price 

of 



• •••«• 




JFumed Oak Magazine Stand 



Genuine Steel Stewart Range 




Take no chances when you 
buy a range. Be sure and 
get one that you know has 
made good. Stewart ranges 
have been used by the peo- 
ple of Duluth for the past 
25 years and there are 
more of them in use today 
at the Head of the Lakes 
than all other makes 
combined. We are of- 
fering you a genuine 
Stewart range with 
polished steel body; large 
fire box with duplex grates 
for burning wood or coal. 
Oven is made in two parts 
so it won't warp. Full 
nickel trimmings. Guaran- 
teed a perfect baker and 
economical in the use of 
fuel. Kelly's jjO-l 7^ 
special price . . . V^l** ■ •^ 



Your Credit Is Good 



You will find here a 
complete line of 
Fumed oak furni- 
ture in the Arts 
and Crafts design, for the deti, 
living and dining room, and it 
costs no more than the othei 
kinds. Special for this week. 
The magazine stand shown here 
has three large shelves, just 
right for the Ladies' Home 
Journal, the Saturday Evening 
Post or for music. It is made 
of solid oak in a rich fumed 
finish. Well worth $4.50. Kelly's 
special price, while ^^ QC 
they last ^^•VO 

Sulkies Reduced 

$1.75 Marathon Sulky — Has 
padded seat, easy running, 
rubber tired wheels, mud 
guards. Finished bright red 
with black running Qfi|* 

gear. Special v v^ 

$5.50 Folding Sulky— The kind 
you can fold at a moment's no- 
tice; has good springs, padded 
seat, arms and back. Tan up- 
holstering. Body finished dark 
g«en. Special «3 25 
at • ^•^ 







ing Representative John A. Healy 
and D. T Collins of HlDbing and Mg- 
vert .S. t>ahl and Axel K ^^^•««" "I 
Virginia are the contestants. All nave 
contented themsfcU'es with per.sonal 
campaigns and no great issues have 
been raised. The contest has settled 
into a question of personal fitness, with 
honors about even at present. 

The speech to be given by John 
I ind at the testimonial banquet to be 
tendered him at Minneapolis tomorrow 
evening will be the key-note for the 
Wilson campaign in Minnesota. Mr 
l.ind is an enthusiastic supporter of 
the New Jersey governor and can see 
nothing but triumph ahead for the 
Democratic cause. ^ ^ 

Aaeistant Attorney General William 
, "^Stev^naon " •^"«« to Duluth thU 
rnnrnine to register, and returned to 
St Pau! this afternoon. Mr. .Stevenson 
?ut in a word for his chief with a few 
^f his friends, but he says th.- attor- 
nlv^en^rars staff has little time for 
campatSnlng on account of the ru.sh of 
^M^^k in the office. Mr. .Stevenson is 
the only Northern Minnesota man in 
the office of Attorney General Smith 
and his friends are anxiou.s to see Mr^ 
Smith renomlnat-d. The advantage of 
having a man familiar wth Northern 
Minnesota conditions and the interests 
of Northern Minnesota people In the 
office of the attorney general Is noi 
nna tn be overlooked, thev s,ay. 
one to be "q^qj^q^ ^ MCCARTHY. 



Rivals Her Daughter 
in Youthful Beauty 



(From Social Rrgii>ter.< 
A well-known society matron whose 
youthful beauty Is .so well preserved 
that she is regarded as her daughter's 
rival In this respect — though she does 
not pose as su<!h — attributes her girlish 
complexion chiefly to two things. She 

says: .. ^ » • ^ 

"I am convinced that creams, by 
overloading the skin anj pores, tend 
to age the complexion. Mercolized wax 
has just the opposite effect. It keeps 
the pores clean, permitting them to 
bre.athe. and removes dead particles of 
cuticle which are constantly appearing 
and whirh give the complexion that 
faded look. Whenever my skin begins 
to get the least bit off-color. I go to 
my druggist's for an ounce of mer- 
colized wax. l apply this nightly, like 
cold cream, for a week or so. washing 
it off mornings. This is what keeps 
my complexion so fresh, white and vel- 
vety. 

"The absence of wrinkles and flab- 
blness I owe to the use of a simple 
fare bath prepared by dls.solvlng onf> 
ounce of powdered saxolite In a half 
pint witch hazel. This keeps the skin 
•light' and firm." 



AUSTIN WILL 
EXPLAIN STAND 

Member of Imperial Council 
Will Talk to Sa- 
maritans. 

Z. H Austin, grand good .Samaritan 
for the Minnesota Modern Samaritans. 
In an address to the membership of 
the local branches of the order this 
evening, will discuss some of the Is- 
sues in the recent squabble between the 
factions In the Imperial council and 
slate his position In the matter. 

Mr. Austin, throughout the contro- 
versy, has been allied with the Chris- 
tie faction. Besides discu.'^sing the Im- 
perial council affair Mr Austin will 
take up the matter of rates and Insur- 
ance. Mr. Ausliu was *«»»?<■»"' ^""'J- 
ml.s.sloner of Insurance during Gover- 
nor Llnd'8 term of ^^aice. „,„»,» 

This was to have lieen ladles night 
Plans were char>«;ed, however, so that 
men could attend the meeting. Good 
Samaritan James ,Ket^ey will preside. 

TAFT MEN APPEAL IN 

KAN.SA8 BALLOT CASE 

Denver. Colc.'seft^ \^,-^t? Vl^ff^ 
from the decisions of United .States 
Judge .Sanborn, which was against the 
Taf t supnorters jn Kansa.s. who .sought 
to keep the names pf the Roosevelt 
electors oft the ballasts In that sUte. 



has been perfected. The case will be 
heard by the United States circuit 
court of appeals here during the week. 
Judge Sanborn last week decided 
against the Taft supporters when they 
requested an injunction to enjoin 
Charles Sessions, secretary of state of 
Kansas, from certifying the names of 
the eight Roosevelt electors to the 
various county clerks to be listed on 
the November ballots as Republicans. 



'MADE IN PITTSBURG" 

TRAIN IS ON TOUR 



Pittsburg, Pa., Sept. 10. — At mid- 
night last night an all-steel train, 
known as the "Made-ln-Plttsburg" 
train, left this city on a trip of about 
5.000 miles Into eighteen states and 
thirty-six cities in the middle. North 
and Southwest, carrying exhibits of 
Ideal manufacturers under the aus- 
pices of the Pittsburg chamber of com- 
merce. Over 100 business men are 
m^ing the trip, which will last eigh- 
teen days. 

Four sixty-foot steel baggage cars 
will be used en route as exhibition 
halls and moving picture theaters to 
sliow the industrial side of Pittsburg. 
In addition a four-page newspaper 
will be published on the train every 

^Toledo. Ohio and Detroit. Mich., will 
be visited today. 

BELTRAMI (OUNTY TO 

HOLD FAIR THIS WEEK 



be. so far as practicable, on display at 

^'^One^'of the big amusement features 
will be automobile races under the 
personal supervisio n of Chad Jewett. 

FOR HEADACHE 



Bemldji. Minn.. Sept. 10.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — The Beltrami county fair 
of 1912 will be held in Bemidjl on 
Wednesday, Thursday and Friday of 
this week. Wednesday will be entry 
day and the fair will be In full swing 
on the next two days. The prize win- 
ning state fair Beltrami exhibit will 



Take Horaford'H Acid Phosphate 

Especially recnnimende.l for relief of headache 
caused by summer heat, brain fag or Ured uerTea. 

B0\ INE TUBERCULOSIS 

EXPERT IS INFECTED 

Chicago. Sept. 10.— Dr. Bertram E. 
Sherman, chief of Chicago's food In- 
spection bureau and recognized as an 
expert on bovine tuberculosis, has be- 
come a victim of his duties. He is a 
patient at a sanitarium suffering from 
the white plague. It is believed he con- 
tracted the disease by examining 
cattle. 

OHIO CONVICT KILLED BY 
ELECTRIC LIGHT CURRENT 

Columbus, Ohio, Sept. 10.— Sitting on 
the edge of his bed in the Ohio peni- 
tentiary. George Steece. committed for 
three years from Stark county, elec- 
trocuted himself when he attempted to 
turn oft the electric light In his cell. 
His bare feet came In contact with the 
railing of the bed of a prisoner In 
the bunk below him as he touched the 
brass of the light socket. He died In- 
stantly. Prison authorities declare that 
only 120 volts could have passed 
through hla body. 

. « ■ 

Hill Notiflrd. 

Fond du Lac, Wis.. Sept. 10. — Charles 
Hill of Rosendale was formally noti- 
fied here last night of his nomination 
for governor on the Prohibition ticket. 
The ceremony was held In the court- 
hou.'^e and was attended by several 
thousand persons. 



ESCAPES ON EVE OF TRIAL. 



H. T. McCann, Charged With Mop- 
der, Missing From Detroit JaiL 

Fergus Falls. Minn.. Sept. 10 —Word 
was received here that H. T. McCann. 
who Is charged with murder and was 
about to be tried, escaped from the Jail 
at Detroit, Becker county, and all trace 
of him has been lost. McCann was 
given some liberty by Deputy SherifC 
Larson and took advantage of It. Thl« 
Is the second escape from the Detroit 
Jail in a f'^w weeks. Charles Carlson, 
charged with boxcar robbery, having? 
walked out through an unlocked door 
about two weeks ago. 



i\ 



TRUSTEE'S SALE 



The stock of general merchandise, 
consisting of dry goods, clothing, hats, 
shoes, gents' furnishings, etc.. which in- 
ventories $5,875.29: also store furniture 
and fixtures which include a $250 Na- 
tional Cash Register, shevling. show 
cases, gas lighting plant, etc.. amount- 
ing to $532.25; book accounts of $1.- 
635.20, all In the estate of Erlck Kos- 
key bankrupt, Aurora, Minn., will ba 
offered for sale to the highest bidder 
for cash, on Tuesday. Septemt>er 17th, 
at 12 o'clock noon, at the store build- 
ing formerly occupied by the above 
named bankrupt at Auroras Minn. 

The stock can be inspected by apply- 
ing to the State Bank of Aurora, and 
the Inventory at the office of the Trus- 
tee No. 630 Manhattan Building. Du- 
luth. The estate will be sold subject 
to the approval of the Court and the 
Trustee reserves the right to reject 
any or all bids. 
DUIiUTH JOBBERS* CREDIT BUREAU, 

INC., TRUSTEE IN BANKRUPTCr. 




10 





Tuesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



September 10, 1012. 



JUSTICE FOR 
SPURNED WIFE 

Finds Hasband Who Deserted 

Her in Finland Many 

Years Ago. 

Court Orders Him to Sup- 
port Her or Go to 
Jail. 



STRIKING STREET CAR MEN - 

CONGREGATED AT CAR BARNS 



EVERYBODY'S DOING IL WHAT? 

WALKING TO AND FROM WORK 



■ted twfiity -three 

u but two 

to come to 

! wlio was 

!. John 

■.: Ai. a St, ' 

nth ftT 
. ;i 1 it- vi go to 

• • w-iienen, 63 

sf iiior 

1 faith- 

1 ft yes- 
mg out 
After 
.. - irt de- 
an (1 made an 
siirpoi t her 

• ■! -.vhlch 

iiHtiiiirter In 

with an Kast- 

■■■.-.lanil. 1 

,..;> of 

, she testi- 

. Juhn Kel- 

, ...;ni a resident 

•r 1S89. Bhe 
to sro to 



I'T'l. t 



'1' sifi'iii 



' -v. she 
. ;-. ai- 

• ■■r srv- 

:(i other 

iiers, she ! 



• to 

! r urn 
trip. 

n.s that 
' hing to 
of her I 
.ti- nmiti- 



MAY MAN A 
BATTLESHIP 

Duiuth Naval Militia Will 

Have Cbance to Show 

Training. 



' ' ' -.rvfs with mem- 

1 I, ikes squadron 

from t»iiv r pcrts. may man a battie- 

«' ■■ • '^' yt-\v York naval review 

> . ■ e Oct. 1. 

: ir,. the reserves 
•■ r battleship in 
■ •..;> I I r>:, nt may 

■ -I-'- '^ '■'. • li as 
local boys," said 

;,aval miMtia this 

^ t what Ihf-v ;:f"d | 
They \vi".',a make I 

h't'l ti. . -ning 

t tne instriic- 

'. \'--'tk will be 

:is (-in 

■ s will 

.irtraent 

.the lo- 

.1 month 

liiili that the 

be forced to 

It trit'y are tailed on 

it-y know of navy tao- 

* v York naval review i.« one 

■ *«< of the yettr and the 

congratulating them- 

i=. , ■ ' •• ''• set in on it. 

I it all members 

"♦' .. itn hand for the 

-ht that the number who 
.. If determined and instruc- 
1 1, v I ; s a '^ 1 t h f trip given. 

URCES EMPLOYERS 
TO BE CAUTIOUS 

Miss Poirier Calls Attention 

to Law on Child 

Labor. 

Ti.iluth inir>lo%»i< should be on their 

uons of the child 

*' Miss Jean 

• for. 

-.i..i. i the age of 

had the required 

.tf. have applied to 

'.f.; ly for permits to 

w. It is illegal 
.lire a child un- 
to work more than 

■ she said. "ThiH 

■ te gt:ri<t;ihy understood in Du- 

■ ■ • • -f the 

child 

1 Wfre now work- 

ftnd were also em- 




Everybody'8 doing it WTial? "Walk- 
ing home and walking to work. 

Walking clubs are epringing up In 
all parts of the city, not necessarily 
out of sympathy for the men, but be- 
causing catching a car is a gamble. 

One club, organized since the strike 

of the street car men, starts at Twen- 
tieth avenue east each morning and 



the members are picked up all along 
the way to Third avenue west. The 
club looks like a Jury at the latter 
mentioned point. There it disbands, 
the members going in different direc- 
tions in the downtown district. 

Only one club has been heard of at 
I.Ake8ide. Five men plan to walk in 
dally while the strike lasts, starting at 
7 o'clock. The distance is five rniles 
and the five don't peem able to stir 



much enthusiasm in others, although If" 
is hoped that the club will grow. 

A club of school teachers starts trorm 
Fifteenth avenue east every mo">ln^ 
at 7:30. They are all emP^oy*^^?! 
centrally located schools. This club ha» 
grown from three to seven since Mon- 
day morning. . . ^,^_ _^ 

Woodland hasn't been heard \fO%,*» 
yet. Duluth Heights has a club. TOe 
county road is used in bringlDfif tn* 
members over the hill-top. 

It is in the West end that the larg- 
est clubs are formed. There the 8tre«| 
car men have many sympathizers anw 
they are all walking. ^«-» 

The theaters feel the car strike n>o^ 
than any other business, for "ler 
walking to and from work, few peopi* 
care to walk to the theater also. 



■I! Jill.. ■U>H!ll. 



THE STORE THAT SELLS WOOLTEX 



DKKSS 
FORMS 
Will help you 
dross lM'tf<»r — 
n.'^k at our Pat- 
tern Oept. 




PAID POLITICAL 
ADVERTISEMENT. 

Inserted by the St. Louis County 
Republican committee. Amount to 
be paid, flOOO. 



CITIZENS 

OF DULUTH 

IF YOU WANT TO VOTE 

AT THE PRIMARY 

ELECTION, 

YOU MUST REGISTER 

TONIGHT ! 

POLLS OPEN TILL 9 O'CLOCK. 



"CRO-O-OL WAR" IS OVER; 
SAMARITANS BURY HATCHET 



The "Cro-o-ol war" Is over In the 
imperial council of the Modern Samar- 
itans, both factions involved making 
concessions; tiiat is, it is all settled 
except that the validity- of the July 
meeting of the imperial council, which 
Judge H. A. Dancer, in district court. 
Said was not legal, will I't tested in 
anirt upon stipulation confining the 
ttst to the vallaity of the meeting and 
nothing else. The reason for this Is 
that it will establish the validity of 
certain constitutional amendments 
adopted at that meeting and to which 
there was some objection. ^ , ^ ^, 

The agreement was reached shortly 
after noon today and was signed by 
<) F Collier, A. E. McManus, W. A. 
Hicktn and H. J. Achenback for the 
< lique known as the Collier-McManus- 



Hicken faction; and by John Christie 
Z. H. Austin, Don E. McLennan, 
John G. Ross, C. E. Bomback and 
A. G. McKnight for that voterie 
known as the Christie-Austin faction. 
Bv its terms O. F. Collier surrenders 
the Imperial treapurership to C. E. 
Bomback, and his place on the execu- 
tive board to Don E McLennan; W. A. 
Hlcken remains a member of the Im- 
perial council and in the office of Im- 
perial treasurer: A. E. McManus re- 
tains his membership In the Imperial 
council and his position as Imperial 
general counsel of the order: and at- 
tornev's fees are granted to the Col- 
ller-McManus-Hicken faction provided 
the Rtatje insurance department ap- 
proves; and a few other things. The 
contestants profess that in burying 
the hatchet they have not marked the 
place of its Interment. 






k«««'«/t^«'«'%t^»'»«^^ 



OBITUARY 



Kmll Kriila. the noted Cz* i h po^t, 
diet! at I'tague, Austria, Sept. 9. Emil 
Bohusch Frida. who wrote under the 
pen name of Jarostav Vriehllcky, was 
born at Laun, Bohemia, In 1853. He 
wrote many epic poems and books on 
Bohemian history and mythology. In 
addition he composed twenty dramas 
and made numerous translations into 
the Caeth language of the world's best 
literature. 



DULUTH TEACHER KILLED 
IN AUTOMOBILE ACODENT 



A. W, Terrell. 85 years old, minister 
plenipotentiary to Turkey during the 
first Cleveland administration, died 
Buddenlv at Mineral Wells, Tex., Sept. 
9 During the Civil war he refused to 
take the oath of allegiance to the Con- 
federacy, yet attained the rank of 
brigadier general in the Confederate 
aimy. Later he Joined Maximilian's 
force in Mexico and served with dis- 
tinction In the army of that leader. 



|>4- 



.vn if the law. she 
I.S liable to a fine of 



POLICEMEN GET 
FEDERAL MEDALS 

New York Men Rewarded 

for Saying Woman's 

Life in 1909. 

Washington. Sept. 10.— Medals of 
honor were awarded by .Secretary Mac- 
Veagh todav to Patrolman Dennis 
O'Meara and Elmer J. Kelley of the 

New YiTk poliK- d»:-F';irtment, for gal- 
lantrv in ie«.uiiiK a young woman 
who Jumped into the Hudson river 
from the pier at Battery Park. 
|.l„J«. 190»- 



A PLEASANT 
SMILE 

Yon will vvrar m pleaitnnt Mmllc nml 
be a rrtined UMikioK perMon If you Mrn«| 
your Malt tit im to be Fr«'Ofh llry 
<'l('anrtl. No matter hovv rich the ral»- 
rlcM or how elaborate the Karmeat. it*« 
dour the way yon like it. Troy l.aun- 
derinic Compaay. Leadem in CleanlfnfSM, 
2:: Kant i^nperlor Htreet. Both phonen, 
237. Onr WaRonn Paitn Every Door. 



Miss Kate E. Welsh, a teacher in the 
Jefferson school, was killed in an au- 
tomobile accident at Anaconda, Mont., 
last evening. 

The information was received In a 
telegram to her uncle, Patrick Donn, 
this morning. No particulars were 

*'' Miss Welsh left Duluth at the close 
of school last June for a visit in the 
W»8t. She had Just returned from an 
Alaskan trip and was visiting her sis- 



ter, Mrs. John GunnersOn, at Anaconda, 
when the accident occurred. She w.-'.s 
to have returned to Duluth to rc«?uint- 
her work In the Jefferson school »n 
October. _ , , 

Miss Welsh had taught in the Duluth 
schools for a number of years and was 
well known. She cam*- here originally 
from L'Anse, Mich. Besides the sister 
at Anaconda, a brother, Thomas Welsh, 
lives at Bemldjl. Disposition of the 
body has not yet been arranged for. but 
It will probably be taken to L'Anse for 
burial. 



J 50 BABIES HAVE BEEN ENTERED 

IN THE GLASS BLOCK SHOW 



ITALIAN FLfcfcT HAS 

ATTACKED SCALAXUOVA 



London, Sept. 10. — The Italian fleet 

has bombarded Scalanuova. a seaport 

in the vicinltyof Smyrna, Asiatic Tur- 
key, according to a dispatch received In 
London today by a news agency. 

• 

nednea Kleet OITIcera. 

Charleston, S. C, Sept. 10.— Elec- 
tions this afternoon constituted the 
feature Of todays program of the 
great council of the improved Order 
of Redmen. Carl Foster of Bridge- 
port, Conn., will be advanced to the 
office of great incohonee, succeeding 
George B. Griggs of Houston, Texx 
James H. Rogers of New York and 
Thomas H. Jeffries, Chicago, are can- 
didates for great Junior sagamore. 



About 150 babies have been guests 
at the baby show at the Glass Block 
store yesterday and today and have 
been weighed and taken their places 
in the contest for the prizes which 
will be awarded some time next week. 
The show will continue all of this 
week and all tables under 1« months 
of age are eligit>le for entry. 

This has been somewhat of an Inno- 
vation in shop displays and has proven 
of interest to mothers of babies and 
shoppers in general. The third floor 
of the shop with its dainty display of 
al kinds of articles for the little tots 
has been visited by a large number 
of guests. , , 1. .. 

The regular store lahy shop 
where they keep everything needed 
for the little tots under i years of 
aee with Its display of dainty cloth- 
ing robes. baby's sweaters, cap.«. 
hoods, bootees, baskets, toilet articles, 
etc., and the celluloid novelties for 
baby's basket and new toys held the 

Here the styles do not change much 
but a new garment which they were 
showing was a warm sleeping bag 



made of blanket flannel, made like a 
red riding-hood cape, only closed 
across the bottom like a bag and but- 
toned up to the chin leaving only 
space for the face outside. 

A miniature tea party for attractive- 
ly dressed dolls, new toys and the 
booth for entry In the contest were 
all prettily decorated in blue and 
white with streamers of crepe paper. 

The babies are weighed and classi- 
fied and their names taken in the baby 
register and a dainty little celludoid 
pin and needle book tied with pink or 
blue ribbon is given as a souvenir. 

The clas.«ification is as follows:: 
Class A, babies under 6 months old; 
Class B, babies from 6 months to 1 
year old; and Class C, babies from one 
year to 18 months old. Two prizes 
"will be given in each class, one to the 
heaviest and one to the lightest ba- 
bies entered. An embroidered dress 
will be given to the winners In Class 
A; a sleeping bag to the- winners In 
Class B, and the prizes lor Class C. 
are corduroy coats, with an aggregate 
value of 125. ' 

The event has crea.t€d unusual In- 
terest and will probalbly draw large 
crowds during the rest of the week. 



Guns 

"hi i. uo"w«T surum st. oulutkhw* |* Qp KCDl 



HARDWARE CO. 





Soccessor <o Gray-Tallaat Co. 

113-115-117-119 WEST SUPERIOR STREET, DULUTH. MINN. 



D. M. C. 

CROCHET 

Is here in all 
niunlKTS at Art 
Dept., Tblrd 
Floor. 



New O21 — Our Ani^ual 

Fall Fabric Show 

Floor— Tomorrow and All Week. 

No efforts are made to sell ! The display is simply for your 
pleasure — it is authentically informative as to correct cloths 
and colorings for fall and winter wear! 

A Premiere Display of Silken Stuffs 

Gathered from the best looms of the Old World and 
the Newl Exclusive novelties galore. You will be in- 

fterested in the following — the like of which you'll 
not see elsewhere ! 




Escalier Velvets 
New Costume Pile Velvets 
Velvet Broche 
Metal Print Chiffons 
Embroidered Chiffons 
Precious Metal Broches 
High Art Warp Prints 
Bordered Ombre Chiffons 



Juay Printed Radiums 
Boucle Bengalines 
Chameleon Bengalines 
Composition Print Chiffons 
Bordered Taffetas 
Charmeusc 
Peau de Souris 
Spangled Robes 



New Crepe Meteors 

Duluth*s Supreme Collection of 
Suitings, Coatings, Dress Goods 

See for yourself these elegant materials — note well their 
richness of weave and coloring— see what charming individual- 
ity in dress is possible even at moderate outlay if you choose 
your materials here. 

New Coatings 

Two-toned Cheviots 

Wool Corduroys 

New Triple Twill Diagonals 

Silk and Wool Tailored Cloths 



Wool Velours 
Paradise Cloths 
Fringed Flounce Effects 
Fancy Chinchillas 
Embroidered Serges 



LACES REIGN ! 

The Women of This Region Are Fortunate in Having at Hand 
This Superb Collection of the Newest and Daintiest Patterns in 

Shadow Laces Venise Laces 

Chantilly Laces Macrame Laces 
Maline Laces Cluny Laces 

Bohemian Laces Normandy Laces 
Torchon Laces 

Miles and miles of beautiful effects in 
galloons, edges, flouncings and allovers. 
Some of them light as shadow^s; others 
heavy and swagger as can be. Choose 
which you will. You will find what you 
wish here. 

Among the most prominent of the newer 
styles are the Bohemian laces, which we 
show in many of the newest and most ef- 
fective patterns for the coming season's 
styles. 
The lighter weight Venise is also very popular, and is often used for the entire 
gown; sometimes partially draped with chiffon. 

Sec the window display of Venise lace in the lighter and mednim weights. 
See the seven photographs of handsomely gowned women shown in the arcade 
window. They are snap shots taken at t:)e Auteuil Races and indicate the vogue 
for laces now sweeping over the Old World. 

Here Are Four Big Specials in Laces 




Spedal Sale of Exquisite 
Laces 

All linen torchon laces— fine, nar- 
row patterns, and also the wider 
heavier ones — edges and in- ^^ 
sertions to match— from Ij/^ ^^^ 
to 4 inches wide. Regular 8c and 
10c vahics special for the Opening 
Sale at 5c a yard. 

lOc for 25c Normandy 
Val Laces 

A special lot of Normandy Val. 
Lates — edges and insertions in 
matching patterns averaging from 
1 f\f^ 1J4 to 5 inches wide. The 
1 VC values average about 25c 
a yard — some of them up to 35c a 
yard— Special at 10c a yard. 



19c for 50c Linen 
Cluny Laces 

All linen cluny laces — insertions 
and edges to match in widths aver- 
aging from 1 inch to 4 t Qfs 
inches. Handsome pat- * ^S^ 
terns — very desirable — a special 
purchase up to 50c a yard in value 
— choice at 19c a yard. 

25c for 50c Cluny ,Venise, 
Ratine and Macrame Laces 

A miscellaneous collection of odd 
pieces and varying lengths in laces 
ranging from 1]/^ to 6 inches wide, 
OCT^ including laces selling 
^*^^ regularly at up to 50c a 
yard. A most opportune offer at 
25c a yard. 



-WE ALSO OFFER- 





35c 18-Inch Flouncings and Corset Cover Embroideries for 25c 

A large variety of choice patterns on fine cambric and splendid Swisses. Also a choice lot 
#^ W0 of embroidered galloons regularly 35c — special for this sale at 25c a yard.^ ^ 
JL ^Qour buyer picked up this lot while in New York— she says it's the best|^ ji* 
■^ '•^^she ever offered for the money ! Get your share 

15c for 25c Embroidery Flouncings 59c for 75c 2?-inch Emb. Flouncings 

Mandsome cambric embroideries — a fine loom, Small and medium patterns in fine Swisses — Also a 

I (J well worked. Very desirable patterns in splendid lot of allovers in small patterns iCQo 

1 <JC 13-inch flouncings — regularly 25c — spe- suitable for waists and yokes. Regular 75c ^^w 

cial at 15c the yard. quality; special at 59c a yard. 



iftMB 



rik 



f 






--*•€ 



-■*: 



'i 






Tuesday, 



J HE DULUTH HERALD 



September 10. 1912. 



11 



1 NEWS OF THE NORTHWEST | 



mtA 



SHERIFF IS 
IN TROUBLE 

Criminal Prosecution Started 

for Allowing Prisoner 

to Escape. 

Clerk of Court and Deputy 

Sheriff Charged With 

Extortion. 



infant child. <>«capod ^,^^l}]Jl^^^^^\y^ 

which came down the chimney Btiu. K 
r pair of andirons and hurled them 
acnfJJ the room, burying them In the 
nlaater The Irons passed but * lew 
Indies from Mra. Ferguson. 

MANY MISHAPS 
TO THRASHERS 

II ■ 

Workmen Get Clothes En- 
tangled in Machinery and 
Several Injured. 



CroBse. the mcr. lii y YeachlnR 95 
3 o'clock this afternoon. Hchoola were 
closed for the day at noon, and near- 
Iv all outdoor labor was abandoned. 
There were two prostrations. 



To 

St Paul 
ral of Kalph 



. Minn.. WpflO-TI 
,lph Dufrt'awT'hompi 



one dozen automobiles left here today, 
laden with officials of the road and 
Canadian and American officials. 
Luncheon will be served at Pembina. N 
I)., and at that place the officials will 
be transferred to the first Amoricau 
cars to take part In the relay system 
by which the party is to travel the en- 
tire length of the road. 

youngIboy flees jail. 

Lad Pries Twooty-Five Bricks 
Loose in Aberdeen Prison. 

•Aberdeen. 8. D.. Sept. 10.— Earl Kelly, 
a IG-year-old lad confined In the Juve- 
nile department of the county Jail, 
awaiting to be sent to the state In- 
dustrial school at Plankln_ton.^_escaped 



N D.. Sept. 10.— (Special to 
) —Criminal prosecution has 
by the state's attorney of 
Bowman county against Sheriff J. J- 
Moore of Bottineau county, the charge 



Bowman. 
The r ' 

been ' ^ - 



Kindred. N. D.. Sept. lO.— While 

(backing up the engine to line the 
separator. Ammund Hcragaard met 
.with an accident which will no doubt 
disable him for the balance of the 
fall. It seems that he was In the habit 
of reversing his lever after backing 
up. but owing to having his mmd at- 
tracted to other parts 



from the Jail by prying »"''«« A'^^i'A^ a 
In the 16-lnch wall of the Jail wiin a 
burner disconnected from a K^« J*'*. ^fA' 
this manner the lad loosened abov» 
twenty-five bricks In the wall, squeeze 
trJu^h'the =vperture and leaped fro 
the storm shod of the Ja»>. .,a,"«^^ 



Peal. 

The fiine- 
son, vice 
president of the NorlUweatern Klec- 
trie Kqulpment cortfpaity. St Paul and 
[.resident of the Mt'meapoll.s Klectrlc 
Equipment compairy Wtn be held fiom 
the residence of his brother. I- . B. 
Thompson, here. The pall bearers will 
be members of the two houses. Mr. 
Thompson was well known through- 
out the Northwest. 

_ • 

Face Badly Torn. 
WlUlston. N. !>., Sept. 10.— (Special 
to The Herald.) — Thomas Uean. a farm- 
er had the flesh torn loose from the 
entire left side of his face when the 
seat on the bullrake. which he was 
driving, gave way. tl»e horses taking 
fright at the jolt and throwing him 
forward so that his face was scraped 
by the Jagged timber which had sup- 
ported the seat. 

s 



of 



the work, 
neglected to pull ih-^ lever. VVh^n he 
again started the engine. Instead ot 
going forward, as ne expected, it 
started backward and he nulckly re- 
versed but the friction clutch s'^PP®^ 



i„c, tKat .-.f allowinfr a prisoner to and hla leg was caught be^tweenttie 
"L.'*^"Laben* woods! w^anted ___for engine and^the feed board of the sepa- 



l>ei ._ 

escape. Laben .. "^ . - ~ . „„,.a.-^\ 

Krami Mrceny and who escaped several 
mont > the prisoner for whose 

:J1 ,. servitude the prosecut- 

li,g orta r will attempt to hold the 
sheriff responsible In criminal pro- 

" a (Mcrk of Court J. A. Guide- 

man :in(t a former deputy f^erlff. A. M. 
Anderson, another criminal prosecution 

haa l»een commenced by tj»« «*,^.^*i,,Unc 
torney. the charge against them bolng 

extortion. The acts ^""JPi*'"^^.^^ %lt 
alleged to have been done by the de 
fendanta in connection with an ai 

Ifcged bllud-plgglns i-;*«f: ^^..^tv oftl- 

n-i.,>.^ ,-, .tj isjiinst the couni> wui 

' ' a great deal of ex- 

.. political circles and 

-a" of producing sensational 

t3 All parties are well 

ughout the southwestern 

^: Lhe state. 



ralor. breaking the f'"**"®^^, ji''"tovJ 
the lower limb about four nches abo\e 

the ankle. 



nd was internally Injurea. "'» '"J"* 
>s were dressed and »'e Is Improving, 
ut it will bo some daya before he will 



ltno\'. 

secti... 



TORNADO DOES 
$78,000 DAMAGE 

Sweeps Through North Da- 
kota County— No Lives 
Lost. 



Clothes Tora From Body. 

LIdgerwooa. N. D.. b--pt. , l'^-—*!®^ 
Ceroll living about t«" , "V.l «!i whlU 
of this city, was severely »nJ"^«*^^A"t 
wofking oii a thrashing "^ffhiiie that 
was in operation. He was tending the 
reparator and while «n«^^f«*l,, *\iV,t 
work, his clothing was Ulerally torn 
from his body. ,^ 

He suffered a 'rfcture of live ribs 
and was Internally injured. His injur 

bu. .. 

be able to work. 

— ■ II. 'm " ■-' 

Gets lato PMon Rod. 

Cando. N. D.. S^P^.^J.^r^^m 
thr whine on the John Moylan larm 
rJ4^ Baier had Vhat may bf regard- 
id as a miraculous escape from being 
fnstantly killed. Baker discovered that 
one of the bolts on hla fens'i}® ^f.^ 
loose and stepped out on the si'le rail 
to tighten it in some way his clothing 
bealmc clught in the r>l«ton whe^ and 
boiler. The only thing that P^ev entea 
hl3 being whlrlcd_around to Instant 



six. chll- 
of Lake 



n. Mrs." Rudolph Ueux of Hubbell. 
* Jerry. William and Edward of 
,.»♦ Th»r« nlan are One brother 



was that he 



was too large 



I'evils Lake 
erty v..." 
was il 
swept t 



1 ue 
near I- 

i 

in " 

Kest 

of the 
f cuaddii 



N. D., Sept 10.— Prop- 

at approximately |78,000 

,1 in a tornado which 

I four townships in Kam- 

ate yesterday. No lives 



^^.^^^,»,^ its destruction 

ling southwest In 

,; .'. tjster. the heaviest 

t of fanners whose grain 

I The Lutheran church. 

.Atiahip. one of the lar- 

in th.; farming sections 

was picked up from Its 

ud carried some distance. 



ShVs^calirto'br drawn' in. As It was 
?h/'ilst"^n rod. reyolvlng_260 times a 



him and 



minute, continued sti king 

tearing his clothing until nothing re 

mained but rags and shreds. 

HEAVmiWAGE 
DONE BY STORM 

Baildings at International 

Falls and Fort Frances 

Wrecked. 



about 

zed 

m 

tiy 

beneath the hole, to the ground. 

His whereabouts have not yet been 
as^e^taCd. although the ""'^ials from 
surrounding towns have been notified 
to be on the loo kout for him. 

HAS sTi™ri>rDULUTH. 

Mrs. Flora Moressette, Old Resident 
of Calumet, Passes Away. 

Calumet. Mich.. Sept. 10.— Mrs. Flora 
Moressette of the Hecla location, who 
died Thursday afternoon, was burled 
yesterday from St. Anne's church. The 
deceased was 69 years of age and Is 
survived by the following 
dren: Mrs. Jerry Durand 
Linden 

Calumet There also are one 
and two sisters. Louis Durand and Mis 
Charles Trudell of Calumet and Mrs. 
Lenrux of Duluth. The deceased was 
an old resident of C alumet 

MEN HAVE CLOSE CALL. ^ 

Kenosha Residents Are Thrown in 
River When Launch Overturns. 

Grand Rapld.s. Wis.. Sept. 10.— Three 
Nekoosa re.sidents. Joe Gazeley. Ben 
Wheeler and O. D. Billings, had a nar- 
row escape from drowning while cross- 
ing the Wisconsin river In a gasoline 
launch. The trip across was made 
safely, but on the return, when the 
party had left the west bank for the 
east bank the engine stopped not 
far from the dam. The launch struck 
a cable and overturned, the men clung 
to the cable and their shouts for help 
were heard by people on the 8»otf. 
and they were rescued from their peril- 
ous position. 

motorcyilist'hit by 
auto and badly hurt 

Fond du Lac. Wis.. Sept. 10.— In a 
collision on Sunday between a motor 
cycle ridden by George Dledrlch. 17 
years old. and an automobile driven by 
W L. Schroeder of Winneconna the 
automobile passed over Dledrich drag- 
ging the victim thirty feet Dledrich 
sustained a deep gash «" hl«, JL^^/,^^".'^ 
a compound fracture of his leg and is 
believed to be fa tally Inju red. 

COUNTY INSTIIIITETO 

BE HELD IN CALUMET 



MlCHlCiAN MAN IS LET 

OFF ON BIOAMY CHARGE 



A!.' 



T!oi:s;htr.n. Mich.. Sept 10. — August 

..,.,. sjed with bigamy, was 

■•• Judg>» O'Brien ami aft- 

utlns attnriiey explained 

to the court, he wa-") fre-jd. 

t.> the pros.-cutlng attorne:,'. 

AhoU iuarrid a woman «n California 

and lat-r without 8«i".» ,*^,7"»';„Sn 
#,,.... a divorce married again 

l^ \ and brought hla .second 

wife 10 Hancock where he went under 

*hp, n«m<» of Albert Manner. The court 

• ■ Ahola had not com- 

in Michigan, the 

1. -.diction and Ahola 



International Falls. Minn.. Sept. 10.— 
A cyclone and electrical storm Sunday 
night did damage In this vicinity esti- 
mated at $100,000. The plate glass win- 
dows In many of the stores here were 
blown in. 




•was r 



JUI K- 



Calumet. Mich.. Sept. 10.— WlUtom H. 
Bath, county commissioner of sf^noo'^ 
and L. L. Wright, state superintendent 
of public Instruction, will meet In tno 
near future to shape plans for the an- 
nual Houghton County Teacher.s n- 
Ktltuto. The oftlcer.s of the associa- 
tion at their last meeting changed 
the time of meeting from Octobor to 
January, this move being actuated by 
a desire not to have two Institutes 
the same month, the Upper Peninsula 
Educational as.soclatlon holding its an- 
nual sessions In Dctober. ■, . a 
1 . 1 .♦ ♦T.T'hi.Sfball nark was The plan most likely to be adopter 
^'nftl^^ r t ^s^leVS- No lives ! fo^the'^jtnuary Institute will be nlgtjt 
l^irVnqt r •■ V' i^anyone Injured. sessions in Hancock and Calumet a- 
Llghtn ng stua: the off ice of the I though the Institute proper 

FrVsfFrarK-e.. Times at Fort Fyinces , held m Caluniet_^ 

and set Are to the b'.'; ,«nU The if nu 4 1 I VltVWAQ 

it together with all • tents. Iht H|0|{\LL MAN » AS 



will be 



MRlim ESCAPE FROM 

BOLT OF LIGHTNING 

RiuU Ste. Marie, Mich.. Sept, 10. — 
Ituring a severe electrical storm late 
yesterday Mrs. A L. Ferguson, wlft- ot 
prominent merchant here, and her 




Minnesota Briefs 



Red \\'ling — Rev. William Kuether. 
who has been visiting Red Wing 
friends for a few weeks past, left to- 
day lor Marinette. Wl.s.. where he has 
accepted the pastorate ot" a German 
Lutheran church near that city. Mr. 
Kuether la a graduate of Concordia 
seminary. .Springfield. 111. 

Fergus Falls — Miss Aline V. Johnson 
of Oene.seo. 111., has been engaged as 
an Instructor In the Northwestern col- 
lege in this city, and will succeed Miss 
Amelia Hoorn in the department of 
English and as preceptress of the la- 
dle's' dormitory. She is a graduate of 
the University of Wisconsin. 

Mankato— .L. H. Hunt arrived in Se- 
attle Friday with the remains of his 
wife, who died at Wrangle, Alaska, a 
week ago. The funeral was held in 
Seattle Saturday. F. W. Hunt of this 
city was present, he having reached 
Seattle on Thursday. 

Baudette— 'During a heavy electric 
storm. Peter King, an employe at the 
boom four or tlve miles up river, was 
struck by lightning and rendered un- 
conscious. He soon recovered and Is 
none the worse for his experience. Bob 
Ferris, who was standing near by. was 
knocked to his knees by the shock, but 
was not Injured. 

Winona — Rev. G. H. Chant for the 
past two years pastor of the Wesley 
Methodist church of this city, will not 
return to the work next year. He pro- 
poses to take a supernumerary rela- 
tion with the Minnesota conference the 
comtng year and to go to Saskatche- 
wan, Can., for th© benefit of his 
health, but while there will do some 

studying. , 

International Falls— Capt L. W. Wil- 
son i§ making a trip through North- 
western Canada. Mrs. Wilson is visit- 
ing at the homo of her parents In West 
Duluth. 

Hastings— Mrs. Maria Latto. widow 
of Kudolph Latto. pioneer, and well- 
known banker of Hastings, died Satur- 
day after a brief Illness at the ad- 
vanced age of 82 years. 

Caledonia — With a high wind blow- 
ing Saturday, sparks from a thrashinif 
engine set fire, burning up several 
stacks of grain on the farm belonging 
to William Schultz. The crop was 
partly insured. 

Winona — Dr. Ernest B. Hoaga. re- 
cently of the University of California 
and now affiliated with the Minnesota 
state board of health, has begun his 
year's work among the Minnesota 
.schools. He is an advocate of medical 
inspc'tlon in the schools. He will bo 
in Winona several days. 

Janesville — John Jewison, a farmer 
living a few miles from this place, was 
struck by an auto Friday and had both 
legs crushed, one of them so badly 
that It was found nece.ssary to ampu- 
tate it. The accident happened at the 
garage of K. T. piieaonne. 

Ovvatonna — Anton Marik. charged 
with the brutal ntucder of his own 
baby. In the sight •<}t lUs wife, when 
arraigned In the dlstriot court refused 
to make a plea, preserving the air of 
Injured Innocence and helpless ignor- 
ance which had been his since the ar- 
rest. The court entered a plea of not 
guilty for him and remanded him to 
the county jail to await the fall term 
of court. 

Albert Lea — iWhile hunting near 
Hayward Saturday, Claud Kaplan, aged 
19, accidentally fired two charges of 
shot into his father. E. L. Kaplan, pro- 
prietor of a sporting goods store in 
Albert Lea. Three shots entered Kap- 
lan's face, one going directly into tlie 
point of his nose, one into his chin and 
one penetrating his right cheek. The 
second charge was fired low and en- 
tered his legs. Kaplan was taken to 
the Naeve hospital, where the shot was 
removed. His injuries were found to 
be not fatal. 




make you Bilious 

We go to Bohemia for hops; one of our partners 
selects the barley; water is brought from rock 1400 
feet under the ground. 

Not only is Schlitz— every drop of it— filtered through 
white wood pulp, but even the air in which it 
is cooled is filtered. 

Before it is offered to you it is aged for 
months in glass enameled tanks. It will not, it 
cannot cause biliousness. It will not ferment 
in your stomach. 

Light starts decay even in pure beer, 
glass gives the best protection against light. 
Brown Bottle protects Schlitz purity from the 
brewery to your glass. 

More and more people every year are demanding 
Schlitz. Why don't you demand this pure beer? 



Dark 

The 



See that crown or cork 
is branded ''Schlitzr 



r nones ^Qrand 358 

Jos. Schlitz Brewing Cix 
351 St. Croix Ave., Duluth 



HIT BY AN ENGINE 



a 



MRS.GREATON'S 
AWFUL 
EXPERIENCE 

During Change of Life—How 
Lydia E. Pinkham's Vege- 
table Compound Made 
Her a WeU Woman. 

Natick, Mass. -"I cannot express 
^hat I went through during the change 
.Mn of life before I tried 
Lydia E. Pinkham'a 
Vegetable Com- 
pound. I was in such 
a nervous condition 
I could not keep stilL 
My limbs were cold, 
I had creepy sensa- 
tions, and I could not 
sleep nights. 1 waa 



with the change of wind, the damage 
\va3 slight.^ 

EARLYlEmER 
IS SUMMONED 

CapL Erick Abramson, Old 

Resident of Copper 

Country, Dies. 

Calumet, Mich.. Sept. 10.— Capt Erlck 
Abramson (Klttl). one of the oldest 
settlers In the Copper country, passed 
away at his home on Pine street last 
Friday night after an extended Illness 
with dropsy. Mr. Abramson became lU 
about Christmas last year and went to 
AMoria: Or., to visit his son. Jphn.^nd 




Mohall. N. P.. Sept. 10 — WhUe cross- 
ing the traclcs at the depot at Mln^H 
to take the train home. Deputy Sheriff 
Adolph Soren.son of this city was 
struck by a Great Northern switch en- 
sine and sustained Injuries that hav-e 
since confined him to the house, al- 
though after being knocked down by 
the locomotive he was able to proceed 
on his Journey . 

MRS. LA"F()METTE taxes 
THE STl MF FOR SUFFRAGE 

Madison. Wis.. Sept 10.— Mrs. Robert 
M La Follette and Mrs. Glendower 
Evans of Boston left for Rice Lake 
yesterday to begin a 10-day speaking 
tour in the Jnt.-rests of woman suf- 
fracc Mrs. La Follette will speak at 
Rice Lake this afternoon. Mrs. Evans 
Is a millionaire philanthropist w^io Is 
greatly Interested In woman suffrage 
and other movements. 

• 

Hot at I.« rroiM»e. 
La Crosse. Wis.. Sept. 10— Yesterday 
was the hottest day of the year in La 






««/»«/»«/»#««%»»«%»0'0/M 



yNisconsin Briefs 





The Beer ^ 
That Made Milwaukee Famous 



n hopes of "benefiting his health. This 
rip failed of its purpose, however and 



condition 



physicians that I also 
had a tumor. I read 
one day of the wonderful cures made by 
Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Com- 
pound and decided to try it, and it has 
made me a ^ell woman. My neighbors 
and friends declare it has worked a mir- 
acle for me. Lydia E. Pinkham's Vege- 
table Compound is worth its weight in 
gold for women during this perodof life. 
If it will help others you may publish my 
letter. "—Mrs. Marion Sweet Grea- 
TON, No. 1 Jeflferson St., Natick, Mass. 
Change of Life is one of the most 
critical periods of a woman's existence. 
Women everywhere should remember 
that there is no other remedy known to 
80 successfully carry women through 
this trying period as Lydia E. Pinkham's 
Vegetable Compound. 

If yon want special advice write to 
Lydia £. Pinkham Medicine Co. (confi- 
dential) Lynn, Mass. lour letter will 
1>e opened, read and answered by a 
irojaaa and held ia strict conildeiice« 



1 

trip 

he returned in even worse 
than when he left For the last nine 
wet-ks. Capt Abramson had been con- 
fined to his bed. a„„.«..„ 
The deceased was born in Sweden 
on July 11. 1S53. When a mere lad 
he came to the Copper country and 
worked at the Calumet & Hecla and 
Osceola, and Tamarack mlne-s. rising to 
the rank of mining captain. Later he 
retired and entered the saloon business 
in Red Jacket He was known to al- 
most every man. woman and child In 
e,T,«U^f Tr>\A hv two i the village and had a wide acqualnt- 
hnaliy Wia ny^ woj _^^^^^ ^^^ other parts of the county. 

Capt Abramson was the owner of con- 
slderab e real estate on Pine street and 
In other parts of the village. 

Besides hla wife, five sons. Frank 
of Duluth. Edward and Richard of 
Evelcth, Minn.. John of Astoria. Or., 
and Samuel of Superior, two daughters. 
Mrs Sophie Opland of Duluth and Mrs. 
Mary Gaffney of Escanaba survive. He 
also leaves two brothers. Henry of 
the Ruppe store force and William of 
Calumet ^ 

MAYOR SWEETIS NEW 

BULL MOOSE CANDIDATE 

Fargo N. D.. Sept. 10. — Mayor W. D. 
Sweet of Fargo waa last night choson 
by the Progresalve state central com- 
mittee as the nominee for governor 
in the place of Dr. Creegan. who was 
founi to be Ineligible. He Is opposed 
by Congressman L. B. Hanna. Re^pub- 
llcan nominee, and Frank O. Ilell- 
strom. Democratic nomi nee. 

MERIDLiN lIKiHWAY GETS 

ITS OFFICIAL BAPTISM 



Winnipeg. Man.. Sept 10 — The Meri- 
dian highway which extends from 
\. innipeg to aalve.<»ton, Tex., is recelv 
lag its official baptism. * 



GRANDMBERS 
USEDJAGE TEA 

To Darken the Hair and Re° 

store fira; and Faded Hair 

to Its Natoral Color. 

ft Is easier to preserve the color or 
the hair than to restore It. although it 
is possible to do both. Our grand- 
mothers understood the secret They 
made a "sage tea." and their dark, 
glossy hair long after middle life was 
due to this fact. Our mothers have 
gray hairs before they are fifty, but 
they are beginning to appreciate the 
wl.sdom of our grandmothers in using 
"sage tea" for their hair and are fast 
following suit 

The present generation has the ad- 
vantage of the past in that it can get 
a ready-to-use preparation called 
Wyeth's Sage and Sulphur Hair Rem- 
edy. As a scalp tonic and color re- 
storer this preparation is vastly su- 
perior to the ordinary ".sage tea" made 
by our grandmothers. 

The growth and beauty of the hair 
depends on a healthy condition of the 
scalp. Wyeth's Sage and Sulphur Hair 
Remedy quickly kills the dandruff 
germs which rob the hair of its life, 
color and lustre, makes the scalp clean 
and healthy, gives the hair strength, 
color and beauty, and makes it grow. 
Get a 60 cent bottle from your 
druggist today. He will give your 
money back If you are not .satisfied 
after a fair trial 



A strlns of 



Grand Rapids — Mick Ernser returned 
from work con.«<lderabiy under the in- 
fluence of liQUor and seized a knife 
and stabbed his wife in the wrist. 
Ernser was arrested. It is expected 
that she will recover. 

Dodgevllle — An Iowa qounty associa- 
tion of rural carriers was organized 
last week with the following officers; 
President W. G. Gairs of Mineral 
Point; vice president, T. S. Comor. 
Highland; secretary-treasurer, John 
Griffiths. Dodgevllle. 

Kenosha — Rensentlng the claim of 
the water commission that the manu- 
facturers have been taking water with- 
out paying for it. the manufacturers 
at a meeting ordered the commission 
to hire an inspector to look Into the 
proposition of leakage with the un- 
derstanding that the cost of such in- 
spection was to bo paid by the factory 
men. The charge of the stealing of 
water has been made for several years. 
Racine — Ernest Bartolla. aged AH. 
who weighed more than 300 pounds, 
was found dead in bed. He leaves a 
widow and family In Oshkosh. 

Appleton — A large barn, 40 by 80 
feet and granary, 24 by 34 feet be- 
longing to Louis J. Farchow of Free- 
dom, were destroyed by fire, entailing 
a loss of from $3,000 to |4.000, with but 
little insurance. 

Kenosha — The home of Mayor Dan O. 
Head was converted into a temporary 
hospital when five of his children were 
stricken with ptomaine poisoning. It Is 
thought that the poi.soning came from 
the use of milk. 

Janesville— Hugh Waggoner, found 
guilty of receiving stolen goods, was 
sentenced to six months" imprisonment 
In the county Jail. Waggoner was al- 
leged to have received a watch stolen 
from Robert Denser. 

Grand Rapids — Mr.s. Solomon Merrltt 
of Plttsvllle committed suicide at the 
Commercial hotel by taking a dose of 
strychnine concealed in a chocolate 
drop. The Merritts were married six 
weeks ago and shortly afterward it is 
alleged that Mr. Merrltt became sus- 
picious of his wife. He started an in- 
vestigation and suicide followed. 

Kenosha — Marlnius Iverson, aged 45, 
a contractor, died suddenly at his 
heme here from acute dilation of the 
heart Iverson was a native of Den- 
mark. He had been In the contracting 
business in Kenosha for more than fif- 
teen years. . ,,^ ^ ^. 

La Crosse— Pleading guilty to the 
charge of making a brutal assault 
upon Mrs. Elizabeth Rampden. a widow 
of 86 years of a^e. Jack Bartle. a bach- 
elor, aged 40. was sentenced to fifteen 
years In the state penitentiary at Wau- 
pun by Judge E. C. Hlgbiee. upon plead- 
ing guilty to the .charge In 
court 



will be used this winter for the get- 
ting out of timber on the Messner and 
Morrison lands between the Copper 
Range main line and Lake Superior. 

Calumet — G. R. Pascoe of Seattle, 
Wash., and Mrs. Maud Anderson of 
Terre Haute, Ind., were married Aug. 
2 at Santa Ana, Orange county, Cal. 
Mr Pascoe, who is now a stock and 
bond broker at Seattle, is a former 
Calumet boy. . r^ ,, 

Hancock — William Brown of Cellna. 
Ohio, Timothy Brown of Ironwood. 
and Mr and Mrs. James Sullivan of 
Butte. Mont, are visiting at the home 
of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Brown of 

Franklin. ^ ,, n -r, r^ j» 

Houghton — Mr. and Mrs. R. R. Good- 
ell of Houghton and Mr. and Mrs. Irv- 
ine J Sturgis of Boston have returned 
from a month's visit in Europe. Mr. 
and Mrs. Goodell are in New York on 
their way home to Houghton. 

Negaunee— Peter BOneno and Frank 
Para experienced miners who have 
made this city their home for many 
years left last week for Alaska where 
they have been promised employment 
Mrs Boneno accompanied them as far 
as Bessemer where she will visit with 
her brother before Joining her hus- 

Marquette — In the death of Mrs. Ma- 
thilda Hodgklns Saturday morning, 
one of the oldest and best beloved^ 
women of Marquette passed away. To 
number of people she was 



her death leaves a vacancy that will i unusually prolific this year, 
always be felt Mrs. Hodgkins is sur- county has hopes of landin 
vived by three sons. Gilbert and Will- 
lam Hodgklns of Marquette, and Har- 
vey Hodgkins of Escanaba, and two 
daughters, Mrs. A. M. Adams of Mar- 
quette and Mrs. Ella McKenzle of the 
Soo 

Houghton — Dr. R. B. Harkness and 
family are planning to leave for New 
York this week. From that port they 
will sail shortly for Europe where 
they will spend about a year. Dr. 
Harkness will spend the time doing 
post graduate work In the hospitals 
of Berlin and Vienna. 

Hancock — Robert P. Dunstan, alder- 
from the First ward, has pur- 
John 



a large 
known as 



"Grandma" Hodgklns, and 



POSLAM REAL 
FIRST AID WHEN 
THE SKIN AILS 



man — ^ , 

chased the 160-acre farm of 
Marx, located near the county infir- 
mary The purchase includes the 
buildings on the land, horses, chick- 
ens farm implements and everything 
that goes to make a complete outfit 
The purchase amount was $10.00*. 

Houghton— Dr. J. W. Clark, who has 
been a member of the Calumet & 
Hecla staff of physicians and surgeons 
for the past twelve years, has re- 
signed his position, to take effect Oct 
15 and will move to Chicago, where 
he will engage in private practice. 

Calumet — The Calumet high school 
is today without a doubt far the larg- 
est Institution of learning in the Up- 
per Peninsula, while it also has the 
distinction of holding down third place 
In the state list of high schools. This 
year the local school made the largest 
Increase in numbers in its history. The 
total enrollment at present Is 820, and 
It Is expected to reach 1,000 In Feb- 

"^"Haiicock— Richard Hodge. 26 years 
of age, a former resident of Hancock, 
died a few days ago at Rochester. 
Minn., following an operation. He 



and Barnes 
g in the list 



ty has nopes 
of prize winners. 

Sioux Falls. S. D— Walter Corklns, 
while assisting a thrashing crew on a 
farm in Faulk county, was perhaps 
fatally hurt when a cook car fell upon 
him. He was repairing a broken wheel 
when the accident happened and was 
underneath the car. It was some time 
before he could be released, and when 
rescued was in an unconscious condi- 
tion. He was internally Injured. 

Stanton, N. D. — Mercer county last 
year hauled its exhibit to the industrial 
exposition, thirty-ttve miles overl.'ind. 
m a lumber wagon, to ship it into Bis- 
marck, and landed fourth prize. This 
year the completion of the Stanton 
branch of the Northern Pacific has re- 
moved that difficulty, and with better 
transportation facilities Majestic Mer- 
cer expects to be one of the honor 
counties again in 1912. 

Bottineau. N. D. — H. M. Trent Anton 
Lallum, R. H. Woods and Obert Iverson. 
who went to the state fish hatchery to 
secure two wagon loads of fish for 
stocking Lake Metigoshe, made the trip 
successfully and turned about 2.300 
adult perch into Metigoshe lake. 

Fargo. N. D. — While trying to clean 
soiled clothing with gasoline. Jay. the 
12-year-old son of John H. Murray of 
Thirteenth street was seriously burned 
when the clothing took fire. A match, 
lighted by his companion, set fire to 
the clothes, and the boy was badly 
burned before his mother smothered 
the flames by wrapping him in a blan- 
ket 

Ellendale. N. D.— Harold, tha 11- 
month-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Emll 
Durheim, residing a few miles south ot 
town, met with painful burns. Mra^ 
Durheim was maklnK jelly, and had 



ccntly returned, and then 
Rochester for treatment 



went to 



i,^/0%/%/^/^'^^^/®/9/% 



Dcikota Briefs 



Houghton — The 
constructing a log 

I Its main line at T 
to the northwest. It »», i"»"'""». "J 1 "/•"V' Mi»w York City. 
„«* „»v-. *, „v». ^^^ —, pressni fet 9, i-mil« extension, •nd'btrwt, N«W XotK WV. 



Any abrasion of the skin, cut, boil, 
blister, rash or open sore spot, is dan- 
gerous as a possible source of infec- 
tion leading to serious skin disease, 
and should be treated promptly with 
Poslam, the antiseptic healing remedy. 
Poslam readily shows its power to 
kill germ life by stopping all itching 
and causing the trouble to disappear. 
Poslam acts in this manner in any 
skin disorder, including all eczemas, 
acne, salt rheum, p.soriasis, skin-scale, 
seven-year itch, barbers' itch, and 
similar diseases. Minor affections, such 
as pimples, rashes, hives, etc., are 
quickly driven away. 

POSLAM SOAP keeps the skin se- 
cure against disease, improves Its col- 
or and texture, sCothes tender skin, 
makes complexions clear, hands soft 
The best shampoo for dandruff. 

The Lyceum Pharmacy, W. A. Ab- 

bett'.s. Holmberg's tin Superior) and 

all druggists sell Poslam (price, 60 

A>pnr Range I.? -„*g) and Poslam Soap (price, 25 

•^fe^J ''*'^'*' l^^W"^ cent) For free samples, write to the 

^'^'%r'pirnne"d at Emergency Laboratories. 32 West 25th 



circuit 



I Peninsu9i Brief s | 



left Hancock four years ago but re- | nued a quart jar when the bottom 

. .. .- broke out, the hot fiuld striking the 

baby on the side of the face and 

arms. ^ ^. , m 

Mi not N. D. — Norman Sutherland, 
aged 24'. eon of Rev. J. M. Sutherland, 
formerly pastor of the Congregational 
church here, employed by P. B. Tracy 
as llnotyper on the Mlnot Dally Optic, 
was found dead In his bed Saturdar 
morning in his room at' the residence 
of J. Beaudry, foreman of the Optic 
composing room. 

Milnor, N. D. — J. Anderson, working 
about a thTashlng machine near here, 
had his clothing caught in a pulley. 
He escaped with only serious bruises, 
his clothlnc: being torn from his body. 



Sioux Falls. S. D.— Ellis Southorton, 
a member of a thrashing crew working 
In Jerauld county, was seriously in- 
jured while pitching bundles into a 
separator. His pitchfork became en- 
tangled m the rapidly moving belting, 
was torn from his hand and hurled 
against him with lightning force, strik- 
ing him in the stomach. It was oiITj' 
two weeks ago that he was kicked by 
a horse and badly hurt 

Fargo. N. D. — The twenty-ninth an- 
nual convention of the North Dakota 
Baptist association will be held In 
Fargo Sept 17 to 20. In connection 
with It will be held the annual meet- 
ing of the State Baptist Ministerial 
union and the North Dakota Woman's 
Missionary association. Fargo Baptists 
are busy making arrangements for the 
meeting, and an attendance of several 
hundred delegates Is expected. 

Valley City. N. D.— At a recent meet- 
ing of the Valley City Commercial club 
Secretary Otto Zetterberg was instruct- 
ed to purchase a booth at the North 
Dakota industrial exposition at Bis- 
marck for Barnes county s display. 
Crops In the Sheyenne valley have been 



$100 Reward, $100 

The readers of tbl« paper will be pleiiod ♦• 
learn that tbere Is at l?ast one dreaded •il»<*»J 
tb«t solenee has been able to cure in «•»»« 
•tagoa. and that la Catarrh. Hall a Catarrh Cure 
Is the only poaltlTc euro now known to th? meO- 
loal fraternity. Catarrh belnu a cinatltut tonal 
dlaeaaa, requfrea a coastltuttonal treatment. 
Halla Catarrh Cure Is taken internally. aotln| 
directly npon the blood and macou.'* aurfaces ot 
the syatem, thereby destroying the foundattoa 
cf the dUease. and glrlag the patient strcnBta 
by bulldlnK up the cooatltutlon and asalstlnf ni^ 
tura In dolnjr «ta work. The proprietors haTj 
«o much faith In Itf curative powers that tb«f 
offer One Hundred Dollars for any enso that W 
falU to cure. Send for lUt of testlmoulaU. 
Address F. J. CHENEY * CO.. Toledo. O, 
Bold by all Drugglsta, Tic. \ 

Tske Uall'a Famllz PiUa tot coastlpatlM* i^ 



- i... 




WHOLESALE HOUSES 
AND MANUFACTURERS 

OF DULUTH, MINNESOTA 

^[^"Reliable Up-to-Date Concerns Who Do a 
Strictly Jobbing and Manufacturing Business. 



ASBESTOS. 
A. H. Krieger Co. 



BAKERS. 
Crescent Bakery Co. 



BLANK BOOKS. LOOSE LEAF 

DEVICES AND RULINa 

Wendlandt Brothers Co. 



FOUNDERS and MACHINISTS. 

Clyde IVon Works. 

Marine Iron Works and 

Peter Crignon's Shipyard. 

National Iron Company. 



FURNITURE. 
DeWitt-Seitz Co. 



BOILERS AND MACHINERY. 
Dututh Boiler Work*. 



BREWERS. 

Duluth Brewing & Malting Co. 
Fiigcr Brewing Co. 

BUILDERS' SUPPLIES. 
Paine & Nixon Co. 



BUTTER AND ICE CREAM. 
Bridgeman- Russell Co. 



COAL AND COKE. 

Zenith Furnace Co. 



COMMISSION AND PRODUCE. 
Ciilbertson Brothers Co. 
Fitxsimmons-Palmer Co. 



CONFECTIONERY. 

Duluth Candy Co. 

John Wahl Candy Co. 

National Candy Co. 



DRUGS. 
Leithhead Drug Co. 



DRY GOODS. 
F. A. Patrick & Co. 



FLOUR, FEED AND HAY. 
H. F. Davis & Co. 



FOREST PRODUCTS. 
Duluth Log Co. 



GLASS — ART. PLATE. WIN- 
DOW. 

Sl Germahi Brothers. 



GROCERS. 

Gowan-Peyton-Congdon Co. 

Rust-Parker-Martin Co. 

Stone-Ordean-Wells Co. 

Wright-Clarkson Mercantile Co. 



HARDWARE. 

Kelley-How- Thomson Co. 

Marshall- Wells Hardware Co. 



CONTRAa IS 
TURNEDDOWN 

Council Refuses to Approve 

East Third Street 

Award. 



HARNESS MANUFACTURERS. 
Schulze Brothers Co. 



MEN'S FURNISHINGS. 

Christ ensen-Mendenhall- 
Graham Co. 



PAPER. 

Duluth Paper & Stationery Ca 

Martin F. Falk Paper Co. 

Peyton Paper Co. 



PLUMBING & HEATING SUP- 
PLIES. 

Duluth Plumbing Supplies Ca 



SHOE MANUFACTURERS. 
Northern Shoe Co. 



Aldermen Hold Pavement Is 

Too Expensive and 

Unsuitable. 



ex-soldif:us wrangle 
0\ er word to teddy 



Atlantic City. N. J., Sept. 10.— Durlnp 

t:i. Ml-; t) i.^meBs suasion of the Span- 

i~ \ I. V' u-ran»* encampment there 

debate over a motion to 

. : aions to Col. Theodore 

itooaeveJt. llie encampment had given 



instructions to send greetings to 
President Taft as the head of the na- 
tion and to Governor Woodrow Wilson 
as the head of the state government, 
and a motion was made to Include Col. 
Roosevelt. This amendment provoked a 
half hour's wrangle which was ended 
by tne adoption of another motion to 
taule the Roosevelt amendment until 
after permanent organization of the 
convention had been effected. 




9 00 Drops 




ALCOHOL 3 PER crST. 

AVegetabklVeparationforAs- 
similailiig iheFbodamfRWula 
ling (Jie Siomachs andBowusof 



Infants /Chiidren 









Promotes DigestionJCkcifil 
ness and Rsst.ContaliisneiiHr 
Opiiini.Morphine norMiacraL 
NOTNARCOTICr 



JtiSama* 
AmSeti* 

HinaStnt'' 
WArnr* 
tmTkfW. 



CtSTORIA 

For Infants a nd Childr en. 

The Kind You Have 
Always Bought 

Bears the 
Signature 
of 



Aperfecr Remedy forConsflp*- 
tion . Sour Storoach-Diarrtioea 
Worras.Convulsioi\s.Fwfislt 
ness aiulLoss OF Sl££P. 

I^Sinule Signature of 
NEW YORK. 



At b months o\^ ^^ 
J5DOSES-33CENTS 



^^IheFoodu 




The city council last evening refused 
to approve the contract for paving 
East Third street between Fourteenth 
and Eighteenth avenues with bituUthic 
paving. The vote was 8 to 7. 

Two weeks ago the board of pub- 
lic works awarded the contract to the 
General Contracting company of Min- 
neapolis. "When it came up to the 
council the matter was laid over two 
weeks, coming up again last niglit. 

Alderman Curren declared that he is 

opiio.«ed to the use of the paving on a 

street which has a grade. He ex- 
plained that part of Third street has a 
grade of 6 per cent. He asserted fur- 
ther that he could not see any sense 
in paying |2,800 more for a name, as- 
serting that there is practically no illf- 
ftrence between bituUthic and bitu- 
minous. 

City Engineer John Wilson rook 
about the sanie position. He told of 
the technical difference between bitu- 
Uthic and bituminous and stated that 
he did not think that the city had a 
fair agreement with Warren Bros. 

Attorney Bert Fesler. former city at- 
torney, stated that the agreement 
which Warren Bros, has with Duluth 
is practically the same agreement as 
that company lias with about lOO other 
cities in the country. 

Attorney E. M. Morgan appeared 
for the municipal affairs committee of 
the Commercial club to urge the coun- 
cil to approve the contract for bitu- 
Uthic. He declared that that material 
Is favored by the property owners and 
that they should be allowed to have 
their wishes recognized. 

Alderman Curren criticized the posi- 
tion of the Commercial club. He de- 
clared that it looked to him that pay- 
ing 12.800 more for a pavement to an 
outside concern was "Doing It To Du- 
luth" and not "Doing It For Duluth." 

Alderman Hogan said that he favored 
approving the contract as the majority 
of the property owners had expressed 
themselves In favor of the contract as 
awarded by the board of public works. 
« • • 

The council approved the contract 
which was awarded to Hugh Steele for 
the Park Point sewer. The sewer will 
extend from Thirty-eighth street to 
the canal. The bid is about |22,000. 

• • * 

The improvement of Twenty-seventh 
avenue west was ordered readvertised. 
This was done so that a combined 
cement curb and gutter can be in- 
cluded in the specifications. 

• • • 

The Duluth Universal Milling com- 
pany asked that some improvement be 
made upon the roid which leads from 
their mill to the central part of the 
city. They said that the heavy travel 
warrants some attention. The com- 
pany asserted that it does not ask the 
city to pavu. the thoroughfare, but to 
make it passable with crushed rock or 
other material. 



MINNESOTANS 
TEU EXPENSES 

Only Few Reports on Pri- 
mary Funds Reach 
Washington. 

(Frvm The Htrald Wuiiinttoa Bureau.) 

Washington. Sept. 10. — Although the 

primary campaign expense accounts of 

Minnesota candidates for the senate 

and house should have been mailed not 

later than last .Saturday, only a few 
have reached here. Senator Nelson 
spent 1140.20; Representative Ham- 
mond, $20.25; Representative Lindberg. 
121.40; Representative Davis, |204.90, 
and >Villlam H. Eustis of Minneapo- 
lis, running as congrcssman-at-large, 
150. 



Exact Copy of Wrapper. 



Thirty Years 

CASTORIA 

THB CBMTAUN aOM^AMT. MCW V*ll« OITV. 



NORRIS SAYS HE 
IS FOR ROOSEVELT 

Declares Nobody Seriously 
Bdieves Taft Was Hon- 
estly Nominated. 

Lincoln. Neb., Sept. 10. — Congress- 
man George W. Norrls, candidate for 
senator on the RepuWican ticket, has 
given out a statement in which he de- 
clareK that, wMle still a Republican, 
he will support Roosevelt for the presi- 
dency. His statement in part is as fol- 
lows: 

•'No one seriously believes Mr. Taft 
was the honest and lawful nominee of 
the Chicago convention. No one seri- 
ously can doubt that his pretended 
nomination was obtained by political 



theft. The men who perpetrated this 
fraud privately admit it, and justify 
themselves on the ground it was the 
only way they had of defeating the 
nomination of Roosevelt." 

MRS. WiiifMORE 
TO WORK FOR TAFT 

Denver Woman Director of 

Women's Bureau in 

the West 

Chicago, Sept 10. — David W. Mulvane 
of Kansas, director of the Western 
headquarters of the national Republic- 
an committee, has announced the ap- 
pointment of Mrs. J. D. Whltmore of 
Denver as director of the women's bu- 
reau of the Western section of the Taft 
campaign. Mrs. Whltmore will have 
charge of the organization of women's 
clubs Jn Colorado, Idaho, Utah and Wy- 
oming. 

The Western headqu.arters of the Re- 
publican congressional campaign com- 
mittee were opened at the Auditorium 
yesterday. Congressman William B. 
McKlnley of Illinois is in charge of 
the campaign as chairman of the com- 
mittee named to handle it. There will 
be three offices, one in New York, one in 
Philadelphia, and the third here. 
IMarMtaalPM Uatew. 

^Governor Thomas Jl. Marshall of In- 
diana. Democratic nominee for vice 
president, will s{>eak at Kansas City, 
Kan., on the afternoon of Sept. 16; in 
St. Josenh. Mo., that night; and in 
Hannibal. Sept. 17. On Sept. 25 he is 
scheduled to speak at Grand Rapids. 
Mich., and he may be there on the 
preecding day to speak at the state 
convention. 



ADMITS HE HIT 
"BUGS" RAYMOND 

^^— ^i^— ^M*M» 

Fred Cigranz of Chicago Ar- 
rested for Former Pitch- 
er's Death. 

Chicago, Sept. 10.— Fred Cigranz, 23 
years old, was arrested yesterday and 
confessed to having assaulted Arthur 
L, Raymond, former pitcher of the New 
York Nationals, on Sunday, Sept. 1, at a 
ball game. 

He said Raymond was a spectator 
at the ball game and that some one 
threw a piece of rock which struck 
the once famous' pitcher in the face. 
Raymond picked up the missile and 
struck Cigranz with it, and in the fight 
that followed Raymond was knocked 
down and kicked on the head a number 
of times. 

Cigranz said he had no Idea that 
Raymond was seriously injured. He 
told the police he had known the pitch- 
er fifteen years. 

While Cigranz was being taken to a 
police station the funeral cortege of 
Raymond passed and the prisoner broke 
down and wept as he told the story of 
the assault. 

SOCIAL CENTER 
EXPERT COMING 

E. J. Ward Will Lecture in 

Duluth Sept. 20 

and 21. 

E. J. Ward, head of the department 
fo social service of the University of 
Wisconsin, will lecture in Duluth on 
municipal development subjects Friday 
and Saturday, Sept. 20 and 21. 

Mr. Ward will come here in response 
to an invitation of the Duluth board 
of public welfare of which \iv. Robert 
Yost is chairman. 

The first address will be delivered 
to the members of the public welfare 
board at a meeting of that organiza- 
tion to be held Sept. 20. On the fol- 
lowing evening he will lecture at the 
Central high school assembly hall, the 
affair being open to the public. 

Mr. Ward formerly had charge of 
the civic center work at Rochester, 
N. Y. 



RECHUITS SCARCE. ^ 



"Smx-f re«nilt« are nearce. 

At <ke I'alted States Navy re- 
cmltlnK officr, poMtofflce building, 
thtnsra are dnll thene day*. 

According to OfTlcer E. BcniMin, 
who U la charge, (here la too 
much other mork to attract the 
attention of the yoanft man. 

Oiriccr BenMon declarca that the 
9|( na^-y Innurcii the applicant a ^ 
^ Ntcady Job If he la accepted and % 
In the Ions >'nn a more proStable 
one than outalde. 

After the harveat aeaaon la 
over. Officer DenHon expccta to 
take In many new recrultM. 

WILSON WIIJi BE IN 

DETROIT ON SEPT. 19. 



New York, Sept. 10.— Acting Chair- 
man McAdoo of the Democratic na- 
tional committee has announced that 
Governor Wilson will speak at Detroit 
on Sept. 19 instead of Milwaukee, as 
previously planned. Milwaukee, he said, 
would be visited later in the campaign. 
The governor's engagement to speak 
at Scranton on Sept. 19, Mr. McAdoo 
added, had been changed to Sept. 23 
because of the change in date for no- 
tifying tne Pennsylvania state nom- 
inees. 




' » -•., 



'Viiiiiiiggk^ 



NOT REVENGE 
BUTJUSnCE 

Five Candidates for State 

Offices Not Deserving of 

Support Here. 

Record of Young, Lee, Thorpe, 

Rosenwald and Canfieid 

on Tonnage Tax. 



To the Editor of the Herald: 

There are five candidates for state 
office who are seeking votes in this 
section at the Republican primary 
Sept. 17 who ought not to get a single 
vote in Northeastern Minnesota. 

Have we forgotten the winter of 
1909, when a tonnage tax bill threat- 
ened us which would have taken for 
state purpose a prodigious proportion 
of the taxes on the iron mines, and 
which by its manifestation of injustice 
might have headed off the steel plant? 
Do you remember what state of mind 
this community was In when the bill 

passed the house and then the senate, 
argument anil pleading alike being 
wasted against the solid wall of sec- 
tional prejudice which pushed the 



measure through both houses? Do you 
remember what a panic swept over the 
community when the bill went through 
the legislature, and what a wave of 
relief when the late Governor Johnson 
vetoed this infamous proposal? 

Did you ever itch to get your hands 
on some of the men responsible for 
tills peril? 

Not for revenge. I wouldn't counsel 
that, for it is an unholy motive. 

But just to show aspiring statesmen 
that they can't beat this section over 
the head in order to get votes In 
Southern Minnesota, and later on come 
up here and get our votes. 

Weil, we have a chance now to get 
our fingers on five of these members, 
who are now asking votes in St. Louis 
county. These men, and the parts they 
played, are as follows: 

Edward T. Young, now a candidate for 
the Republican nomination for gov- 
ernor, who was attorney general at 
that time, who drew the Bjorge ton- 
nage tax bills, and who provided 
Bjorge with the arguments he used in 
behalf of his proposal. 

William E. Lee, now a candidate for 
the Republican nomination for gov- 
ernor, who was in St. Paul at the time, 
who was asked to use his influence 
to help us with the state senator from 
his district, who refused to do so, and 
who was suspected of using his influ- 
ence against us, since his senator had 
promised to vote against the bill and 
after his talk with Lee voted for it. 

L. O. Thorpe, now a candidate for 
congreesrnan-at-large, who was a 
member of the senate and who strong- 
ly supipcrteu and voted for the tonnage 
tax bill. 

John F. Rosenwald, now a candidate 
for railroad commissioner, who was a 
member of the house and made a 
speech for and voted in favor of the 
tonnage tax bill. 

E. H. Canfieid, now a candidate for 
railroad commissioner, who was a 
member of the senate and supported 
and voted for the tonnage tax bill. 

If -these men, after what they did to 
us, can get votes in St. Louis county, it 
will be giving notice to peanut poli- 
ticians all through the state that it 
is safe to make political capital for 
themselves at the expense of fct, Louis 
county, because the people of this 



county have short memories and soon 
forgive. 

For my part, when I go to the polls 
next Tuesday I shall keep these men 
in mind, and not one of them shall get 
my vote. 

ONE WHO WAS THEREL 
Duluth, Sept. 9. 

DEER'SEEN NEARliilNOT. 



Two Fleet-Footed Animals Seen 
About Four Miles Got. 

Minot. N. D., Sept. 10.— While exer- 
cising their dogs and getting In trim 
for the hunting season, Purl Woodbury 
and Spero Manson were surprised by 
coming upon two full grown deer near 

the Johnson farm, four miles from this 
city, last evening. The men and dogs 
were mounting a hill when they were 
suddenly confronted by the deer. Both 
men and animals were surprised for 
the moment as all stood still and 
looked at each other, then like a flash 
the deer turned and were off into 
a clump of bushes. The dogs gave 
chase but were soon outdistanced. Sev- 
eral other parties have seen deer in 
this vicinity lately and it is believed 
that there are quite a few of them In 
this section. When Ed Butterwick, 
now secretary to Congressman Helge- 
son, lived on his claim near Burlington, 
a few months ago, he used to see deer 
nearly every morning. 

♦ 

If you have never read every ad !n 
any one issue of this newspaper, try 
the experiment. You'll be glad you 
read this suggestion. 



MOST ECONOMICAL SCOURING SOAP 






CLEANS 

SCOURS 

POLISHES 



SOLID CAKE -^ NO WASTE 



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The Old 
Oaken Bucket 

Filled to the brim 
with cold, clear purity 
— no such water now- 
adays. 

Bring back the old 
days with a glass of 



rtni 



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ms^ 







It makes one think of everything that s 
pure and wholesome and deUghtfuL 
BrightrsparkHng, teeming with palate 
joy — its your soda fountain 

old oaken bucket. 

Delicious— R^efresHin^ 
TKirst-Quenching' 



I Whenever 
you see an 
Arrow think 
of Coca-Cola, 



Demand the Genuine — Refuse Substitutes 
THE COCA-COLA CO. 

' ATLANTA, GA. 

Our new booklet, telling 
of Coca-Cola vindica- 
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the asking. 
6 




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18 



SPORTING NEWS 




THE DAY 




TEN EYCK MAY 
MEET HACKEH 

Doluth Coach May Accept 

ChalleDge of Baodette 

MiD. 



If Jam.-- ' 
T>ti!»)th »■ 

i 1 1 r i ■ ' ■ 

hi* Site nam re 



n Kyik. coach of th» 

,h. nnda that he can 

■ . :■ ' I fast clip ov«r 

;.• he will affix 

to articlea for a acull- 

I Jamea Hackett. ro- 

. Baiidette for the Am- 



' .trh hA* b^en much 

tiltuul ~>t ui t•'^^^^js circles and a Rreat 

n»:»nv *rt» anxious to see the former 

t into the profeaalonal 

<h to give old Jim 



r, 



■ I': 

It int 

f<-.' 



It rlasa Ten Eyck. like 
ii.^ family, waa a star. 

m is a» to hin ability 

.iiUi* out of hia Joints and 

id t>e at>le to do the three- 

fa»l enough ttrae to make 

< Aa there Is to be a l*i(>0 

1? • If .H I ■!i»«8 the great- 

•nt. 

libout. an ef- 
• ti> have it staged 
. ,: - IJaudotte. 



AMERICA DID 

NOT COMPETE 

French Driver Makes Easy 
Work of Winning Gor- 
don Bennett Trophy. 



day. 



1 



t : 

1 

I 

1 



:' ■ 1 :' ■ • won the 

. ..,-..::'< ':'-.i:p yester- 

..f France. 

'Line, to )k 
U'jrduii ■■ " 
■lit a <• 

rose 1 1 'i.u 

• cup was 

irn i^nsland lai't 

• only Americart 

. I iM'i withdrawn from 

t . t!i» last hour, took a 

' ■ Jt iiied" record, and 



i;.. 



:, i.;,.-- ' '-'ih of America 
their >ion of the 

• iL ... outset by say- 

•ed this country had 
, i.,.- oL" tt chance." 

time i'«r completing the 
n;'(»r tlifi 4H-r!\\l^ co'irso. 

1) nunute.^. 

•:'.■« nj ilea a • ■ ' ■■ 

- two I''r"ti -hmen, 

III a Deperduaaln. 

» in I hour. 13 

':ids, and Andre 



Wrvf li' 1 IV -iiot monoplane, who 
(..,,,. I. .VI. i;t -i making twenty-thr -o 
ri'T.-y laps, because of on.!{ine 

neat made an easy Job of It. 
H^ , < before any of lua competitors 
w.'re out. he aalled around the pylons 
Ukf « awmllow. attaining in soma of 
thi* laps almost two miles a niinul»v 
He th»*n rested in his hangar while 
the Americ.in ■ • • 'nta withdraw 
rtHil while M.ij - Keber. chalr- 

m-m of the conte.st >mmtttee of t«>e 
Aerocluh of America shook his head, 
saving the speed ^et by th* French- 
man waa too great to be met by any 
m.«.-hine driven on this side of the At- 
lantic. . 
The only semblance of a neck ana 
neck race came hours after Vedrlnes 
had alighted. Frey and Prevost 
a.<icended and Frey was aoon overtaken 
bv Prevost. who started two minuten 
later At the fourteenth lap Prevost 
had left Frey far behind and at the 
time was only 32 seconds behind the 
time made by Vedrlnv>s. While stead- 
llv outdistancing Frey. he lost on the 
French champion until at the twenlV- 
thlrd lap he was 73 seconds behind 
Vedrlne.*. That practically assured the 
trophy to Vedrlnes. 

WEATHERWS 
FINE FOR RACING 

Hair Raising Finishes Fea- 
ture Opening of Grand Cir- 
cuit at Syracuse. 

.>^yMcu.-ie. N. Y.. Sept. 10— Ideal 
weither conditions, a large attendance 
and hair-raising flniahea marked the 
first day's meeting of thf grand circuit 
races at the New York state fair yes- 
terday. 

The m*H>ting will continue through 
Frlvlay. The feature was the Conway 
3»j.kf' Longworth B. captured the first 
h. It after a du«»l in the stretch with 
S,.:Mh Ann I'at.h. Th^■ -s- r,nd h^-at 
1 fiuud th." tw:. t-',id»*r.s in > s:::-iing con- 
1 teat with the black - ni>.l to the 

wire m 2:0«Vi. the time of tiie 

day. Sarah Ann P.ii u "id little dltri- 
culty in winning the next two heats 
and the race. 

Baron Aberdeen was easily the best 
' of the held in the 2.15 trot, winning in 
straight heats. ^ ^ _ ^ 

Tha 2:12 pace developed the first 
seven events of the 1312 grand cir- 
cuit It ren ■ • *" - H.-ssi« Bee t«j 
win the ra, ^''^" vr ,:*'' 

taken the tii>. • t^^ and ^,}u 

Tempi'? the next tw). The fifth, sixth 
and seventh heats w^re hotly contest, 
ed but Bessie Bee had the speed and 
endurance and led Nellie Temple to the 
wire In each by narrow margins. 

The Kah-noo-no stake waa easy for 
Axworthy. 



MAINSTAY OF THE INFIELD 
OF THE WASHINGTON TEAM 



L 




HARRIS AT HEAD OF 

HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETICS 



GANDIL 
Of Washington. 
• Thick Candll the first baseman of the Washington Nattonal-s. at one time 
^ , ii^ . : ^.» Uhif^. Hn\ Charlie Murphy of the Cubs wanted Oandll. but for 
stme^re'ison lilei r, c me to erms with the Montreal management. Gandll 
hITnr*^tically made the VVashington team. He has not only made good as a 
Selde'r bu his Jatting has been a big factor in the success of the Nationals. 



The Central high school students yes- 
terday reorganized thoir athletic as- 
sociation for the ensuing season and 
elected the following officers: Presi- 
dent. Kenneth Harris; vice president, 
Mark Crassweller; secretary, Arthur 
Wasgatt; treasurer. Dan Brown; ser- 
geants-at-arms. Paul Flynn and Ted 
Flury; mascot. Arthur Kelley. Fifty 
young fellows handed in their names 
as candidates for the football team 



ADAMS TEAM WILL 
ELECT CAPTAIN 

"Bill" Stevens Likely to Head 
West End Eleven 



and the first practice was Bet for thl.s 
afternoon. 

As no arrangements for grounds has 
yet been made, the president will at- 
tempt to make arrangements with the 
Adams team for use of Athletic park. 
under le*se for the season to the 
Adam3 team. For the first part of prac- 
tice, owing to the lack of a coach 
former stars of the high school team 
will serve. It Is hoped to make ar- 
rangements for a regular coach In a 
short time- 



and then to the mat. Hogan struggled 
to his feet, but a series or similar Jaw 
punches again toppled him over. Twice 
more the performance was repeated 
and only the timely clang of tlie gong 
saved Hogan from defeat. 

Burns tiled to end it in the fourth 
round, but Hogan weathered the gale 
and opened a deep gish over Burns 
left ear and all but closed his left eye. 
Hogan gradually took on strength and 
conltjence and administered much pun- 
ishment to Burns. 

The tenth round saw the end With 
both figliters bleeding profuseLv. 
Burns met his opponent with a vi:ious 
I.-ff upper. ;L;t. Quick as a fl-isu he 
' l-is right thrice to the jaw, 
• ,i;aii .hopped to the floor. Toe 
fightinsr spirit, however, was still alive. 
He struggled to his feet at the count 
but the rest was easy tor Burns who 
planted a Bolid finlslilng P""^-'* t^ ^^"« 
chin and Hogan craslied to the mat ana 
waa counted out. 



run Into the left field bleachers. 

Scores: « tr TT. 

First game — K. H. Ha 

Brooklyn 10 0—1 6 

New York 000 20 000 x— 2 6 2 

Batteries — Rucker anff Miller; Tes- 
reau and Wilson. Umpires— Klem and 

^^'^^ ^ RHP 

Second game — "• t±. n^- 

Brooklyn 2—2 7 1 

New York 5 2 x— 7 13 4 

Batteries — Curtis, Ragon and Er- 

win Matl:ewson and Wilson and 

Hartley. Umpires — Klem and Orth. 



This Year. 



AMERICAN ASSOCIATION 



AMERICAN LEAGUE 



HOTEL HOLLAND 



EUROPEAN 



Model of Fireproof 
Construction 



A Masrniflccnt Structure-Equipment 
the Best in the Northwest. 



BUSINESS MKN'S NOONDAY 
LUNCHEON SERVED DAILY I 



Standing of the Teams. 




THENEWST.LOUIS 

ENTIRELY EUnOPEAJf 

This hotel offers czeeptloaal 
■dvaataKe* <» *>** tonrlst mnl 
traveler. Dine In the Uood- 
ImmA CmU, » strtklaiely beau- 
llful decorated retreat. Serv- 
ice a la Carte. After the the- 
ater supper apeclaltlca* Ex> 
cellctit music. 

Club Breakfasta. 

Uuslaeas 31 en'* LnneheoB. 
J. A. HICKEY. Maaager. 



r 



Low Fall 

COLONIST 
FARES 

Northwest 

Tickets on sale daily Sept. 25 
to Oct. 10 



from St. Paul, Minne- 
af>o!i.=;, Duluth and 
Superior to many 
ruana points. 

from St. Paul. Minne- 
ap'is, Duluth and 
Sup.r-.-.r. to nearly aU 

points in Idaho, Washington, Oregon 

and British Columbia. 

Proiiortionalely low fares from other points. 
Two Colonist Tra>-s— comforuble accom- 
■nodatioas — liberal stopover pnvueges. 

Round Trip 
HomeseekersTickets 

On sale frat and third Tuesdays of each 
m.i'.'h to points UI Minnesota, North 
iJikota. Mont.ina. Idaho. Washington, 
(fregon and British Columbia. Liberal 
■topovers. Pinal return Umit 25 days. 
Take advantage of low faros via 

Great Northern 
Railway 

Wrtta. call or telephone for fr«e Colonist 

Folder; gives delaila you 

rtaqulre. 



RITCHIE SURE 
TO MEET MANDOL 

Biily NoldD Has Signed Con- 
tract Calling for Fight 
in October. 

San Francisco, Sept. 10— Billy Nolan, 
man lifer of Wiilie Ritchie, returned 
fnjm Los Angeles yesterday, exhibiting 
a contract confirming the report that 
the San Francl.soo lightweight had been 
signed to light Jm Mandol of New Or- 
leans. The-contraot la signed by Harry 
V. Coleman, Mandol's manager. The 
lightweights are to meet In the third or 
f« urth w-eek in (>v:tobt»r. either in New 
Oiieana or in Memphis. 

hoganbeSen by 
frankie burns 

Contest Characterized By 

Great Gameness on Part 

of Defeated Fighter. 

.Sin Francisco, Cal., .Sept. 10. — In a 
contest characteriiied by great game- 
ness on the part of the defeated man. 
Frankie Burns of uakland eliminated 
•'One Round" Hogan of San Francisco 
as a lightweight possibility by knock- 
ing him out in the tenth round of their 
fight yesterday. A» early aa the third 
round Burns proved himself Hogan's 
master, sending him to the mat four 
times In this round. 

A grudge of long standing waa 
settled by the fight. The hatred that 
existed was shown when force was 
necessary to send the belligerents to 
their corners on one or two occasions 
after the gong h.id «nded a round. 

The con*t»<!f was one of the bloodiest 

evet I in a local arena and 

th« 'f Hogan in the face of a 

r ■ uf fd,oe punches was its chief 

Burns took command as early as the 
third rotind. when a rignt cross caught 
Hogan on the point of the chin and 
sent him reeling against the ropes. 



Boston .... 
Philadelphia 
Washington 
Chl'^ ii< J . . . 
Detroit . . . . 
Cleveland . . 
New York . 
Ht. Louis ■ • • 



Won. 

sa 

Ifi 
!'. . .7!l 

rtr> 

til 

57 

4« 

45 



Lost. 
39 
52 
54 
65 
Ti 
74 
S3 
8i 



Pet. 

.709 
.600 
.594 
.500 
.459 
.435 
.357 
.346 



G«me« Today. 

Washington at Cleveland. 
Philadelphia at Detroit. 
New York at 9t. Louis. 
Boston at Chicago. 

<;aBaeM Yesterday. 

No games were scheduled yesterday. 



NATIONAL LEAGUE 



Standing of the Teams. 



Won. 

»1 

81 

77 

65 

6:i 

55 

49 

39 



Lost. 
39 
48 
53 
67 
68 
76 
«l 
S>0 



Pet. 
.700 
.6i8 
.592 
.48« 
.453 
.3*^5 
.332 
.302 



New York 

Chicago ' 

Pittsburg 

Cincinnati .... 
Philadelphia . . 

St. Louis 

Brooklyn 

Boston _ 

Game'* Today. 

Pitt»burg at Philadelphia. 
Cincinnati at Brooklyn. 
Chicago at Boston 
St. Louis at New York. 

<;ameM Yesterday. 

New York. 2; Brooklyn. 1. 
New York. 7; Brook lyn. ^. 

GIANTS WIN A DOUBLE 

BILL FROM BROOKLYN 

New York. Sept. 10.— New York won 
a double header from Brooklyn 2 to 1, 
and 7 to 2. The first game was a pitch- 
ers' battle between Teareau and Ruck- 
er. Tesreau allowed only one hit in 
the nrst seven innings and that drove 
n Brooklyn's only /""■ ^.P''^'^^ ^^ 
ftlled the bases with three hits In the 
eighth but could not get over the 
tvlng run. New York 'won In the 
fourth on hits by Doyle. Becker and 
Murray and daring base stealing. Wil- 
son practically won the second game 
for New York in the first Inning when, 
with two men on bases, he hit a home 



Standing of tho Teams. 

Won. Lost. Pet. 

Minneapolis 9? 56 .639 

Columbus 95 60 .613 

Toledo »0 «5 -SS^ 

Kansas City 77 77 .500 

Milwaukee 74 79 .485 

St. Paul 73 85 -J^a 

Louisville 60 «« -3^^ 

Indianapolis 52 104 .33j 

GameN Today. 

Kansas City at St. Paul. 
Milwaukee at Minneapolis. 

Gfliaea Yeitterday. 

Minneapolis, 11: Milwaukee, 8. 
St. Paul, 2; Kansas City, 1. 
Louisville, 6; Columbus, 5. 

MILLERS HIT HARD 

AND BEAT MILWAUKEE 

-" 
Minneapolis, Minn., Sept. 1». — Minne- 
apolis hit three Milwaukee pitchers 
hard and won the game. 11 to 2. To- 
day Milwaukee plays the last game of 
the season on the local ground^. Score: 

Minneapolis . . .3 3 2 2 i x— 1111 6 

Milwaukee 1 p 1 0— 2 5 1 

Batteries — Patterson and Owens and 
Allen; Nicholson, Marlon, Cutting and 
Block and Hughes. Umpire — Chill. 

KAWS DROP FfJURTH GAME 

OF SERIES TO SAINTS 



At a meeting of the Adams Athletic 
aasoclatlon this evening at the club 
rooms, a captain for the coming foot- 
ball season will be elected, a coach 
selected and a partial schedule drawn 

up. 

"Bill" Stevens will probably be 
elected captain. An attempt will be 
made to have Chauncey Colton coach 
the eleven. The association has a 
lease on Athletic park for the foot- 
ball season and all the games will be 
played there. The men will also use 
the field for practice. 

Prospects for a winning team were 
never belter with the Adams. They 
were champions last year and they ex- 
pect to repeat. 

Several out-of-town games have al- 
ready been arranged. The first game 
will probably be played In about two 
weeks. About thirty-flve men have 
announced their intention of getting 
out to make a try for places on the 
team. 



The winner was decided on the last 
green, in the final match of the day, 
in which H. B. Lee, Yale, won from 
J W Gillette, Williams, by a score of 
one up, 19 holes. Today Yale will play 
Penn.sylvania and Harvard will oppose 
Princeton. 

Auto Racing at Paris. 

Le Mains, France, Sept. 10— J^e sec- 
ond grand prix of France for light au- 
tomobiles, arranged by the Auto club 
of the Sarthe. was won by Zuccarelli, 
driving a Lion Peugeot car. The win- 
ner finished the distance of 648 kilo- 
meters (402.4 miles) In 6 hours. 12 min- 
utes. 25 1-5 seconds. The Sarthe cup 
for heavy cars was won by Goux. driv- 
ing a Peugeot machine, the same dis- 
tance In 5 hours. 31 minutes, 50 3-6 
seconds. There were no American en- 
tries. 



Many hardware dealers were among Its 
customers, as the company handled 
window and plate glass as well as 
lumber. To some of these hardware 
men who were good customers, the 
company also sold lumber, he declared, 
and the association, through Its secre- 
tary. .\. L. Porter, objected to this, and 
the break resulted. 

Lettem In Evldeaoe. 

A number of letters written by Mr. 
Porter to retail dealers and other lum- 
ber manufacturers' organizations were 
offered in evidence. 

Mr. Biles te.stifled that letters were 
sent to all members of associations who 
were customers of his firm. i\a a re- 
sult, its business was then turned to 
contractors and other consumers. 

John M. D. Purdy of Minneapolis, 
who appeared as counsel for the re- 
tailers, sought to show that informa- 
tion about these transactions was sent 
only to such members as requested it 

U. S. NAVY NEARLY GOOO 

MEN SHORT OF NORMAL 

Washington. Sept. 10. — With the en- 
listed fore© of the navy nearly 6.000 
men below Its normal strength, the 
navy department has begun an active 
campaign to. get recruits for the fight- 
ing ships. The total enlisted force li» 
now 46,766, or 5.634 leas than required 
by law. One of the chief causes for 
the falling off was the long delay by 
congress in passing the naval appro- 
priation bill, but this was complicated 
by the heavy demand for men on farms 
In the Middle Weat^ 

INTERNATIONAL MINE 

CONFERENCE SEPT. 14. 



DOUBLE HEADER 
NEXT SUNDAY 

Adams and Fitweil Teams 

Will Meet at Athletic 

Park. 

The Adams and Pltwell baseball 
teams will meet In a double-header at 
Athletic park Sunday afternoon. The 
games. It Is claimed, will settle the 
city championship. 

Schmirler will pitch for the Adams 
and Talbot for the Fitwells. Both 
teams have good records, haying won 
a majority of their games and there is 
a great deal of Interest In the Sunday 
meeting, which will probably be the 
last baseball bill of the seasori. 

The first game will be called at -J 



St. Paul, Minn.. Sept. 10. — St. Paul de- 
feated Kansas City in the fourth game 
of the series here. McKechnle featured 
at the bat, getting a home run and two 
singles In four times to bat. Score: 

R H E 

St. Paul 100000001—2' 7' i 

KaJisas City 0100 000 0—1 5 2 

Batt>Mies — Gardner and Casey: Riley 
and O'Connor. Umpires — Connolly and 
Irwin. 



p. m. 



BASEBALL PENNANT 

IS IN DISPUTE 



rtED «. Hint 

lliitora rauMCtr Afiit 



C^f, 



0^ 



e'"' 



fmrMma-PaciAe international Expo- 
sition, San Franciaco, 1915 

lOOCl 



Friedman Bros, set 

the pace in style and quality, 
their fall suits and coats hit 
the top notch in made-to- 
order clothes. 

Fabric, finish, cut and fit 
to suit your individual taste. 

English novelties, blues, 
grays, browns ^^ Q /T' 
tans,etc %3kJ 

Top Coats— foreign fabric 
used with Skin- $ Q p^ 
ner's silk lining. - - ^3 O 




Tiei 



" TAILORS TO /MWVlJi. 
PRMSY MHt • J^i C/C/# 

3t9 WEST SO^EIUOR. STmBfit 
BACK SHOP ON PREMISES 



DAVID FULTZ. 

David Fults, the former big league 
atar who has been chosen president of 
the new baseball mutual protective as- 
sociation, is quietly working organizing 
the association. The main object of 
this organization Is to protect the 
rights of major league players. It U 
in' no sense a union but It Is being 
furmed so as to enable the players to 
meet the magnates on something like 
equal ternus in case of disputes. Mr. 
Fultz Is now a practicing attorney in 
New York. 



LOUISVILLE WINS LAST 

GAME WITH COLUMBUS 

Louisville, Ky., Sept. 10. — Louisville 
tied the last game of the series with 
Columbus in the ninth and won out In 
the eleventh, 6 to 5. Heavy batting of 
the locul.s was the feature. Catcher 
Smith was put out in the sl$th Inning 
for disputing a decision /ftf Umpire An- 
derson. Score: R. H. E. 
Louisville . . .0 2 <» S On— 6 12 
Columbus ...00000050i)0 — 5 7 2 

Batteries — Fucik. Madd©x, ' Valland- 
Ingham and Pearce: Bpuck, Packard 
and Smith and Murphy. Umpires — An- 
derson and Ft^rguson. 

AMERICAN TEAM 
IS SELECTED 

Riflemen Will Compete at 
Ottowa for Palma Na- 
tional Trophy. 

Rifle Range. Sea Girt, N. J., Sept. 10. 
— The United States rifle team to com- 
pete at Ottawa, Canada, next Satur- 
day for the Palma national trophy, 
has been selected, and left late yester- 
day for Ottawa. Lieut. Col. W. 
Brookhart, Iowa, is captain of the 
team, 'and Capt. S. E. Mummay of 
Iowa is team aajutant. The other 
members of the team and their high 
scores at the conclusion of the try- 
cuts today are: 

Sergeant F. H. Kean, Massachusetts. 
595; Capt. E. W. Eddy, Ohio. 587: Capt. 
K K Ca.sey. Pennsylvania, 585; Lieut. 
Raloh Alderman, District of Columbia, 
577;" Major W. B. Martin. New Jersey, 
57C: George W. Chesley, Connecticut, 
.-575; Lieut. Col. William A. Towes, 
New Jersey, 573; Sergeant E. K. Kne- 
bel. New York, 573; Sergeant H. F. 
Teal, Alabama, 573; Capt. G. C. Duff. 
Te^as 573; J. W. Hessian. Connecticut, 
57.3. and J. i-L Keogh, Massachusetts. 

'df the twelve members Of the party, 
other than the team officers, eight w 11 
be selected as shooting member.s. tv^o 
as alternates and two as coaches. 
• 

Postponed GailifS. 

New York, Sept. 10— rTha N*^'»"*' 
league headquarters gavC out the fol- 
lowing complete list of.pat^s set for 
playing postponed gamrfs^ 
^At Boston, Sept.. 1*. t^^o with St. 
Louis; Sept. 18. two with P»"sburg 

At Brooklyn, Sept. ti. two with 

''^i't'Ne'w York, Sept. 215, (open) with 
Boston; Sept. 26. two w^^h Boston. 
At Philadelphia. Sept. 21. two with 

Pittsburg. Sept. 25. (open) with St. 

^At'chlcago. Sept. 26. t«[0„y'*»» Cln- 
rlnnati; Sept. 27. two with Olncinnati; 
Oct. 2, (open) with Plttaburg. 



The Gustafsons have defeated the 
MadLsons by a score of 11 to 3 and 
as.sert that they have the Duluth-Su- 
perlor pennant c.ncned. This team will 
play one more game, that being next 
Sunday. The Gustafson-Madison match 
settled the matter of the champion- 
Sunday's game may be between the 
Emeralds and the Gustaf.sons. The 
Emeralds, who defeated the Madison A. 
C team on Sunday by a score of 14 
to 11 lav claim to equal title to the 
Duluth-Siiperior championship with the 
Gustafsons. 

Sox Pitcher Sold. 

Chicago. Sept. 10.— Pitcher Oscar Pe- 
ters of the Chicago American league 
club has been sold to the Sacramento 
club of the Pacific Coast league. 

Yale Win*s af Golf. 

Manchester, Vt. Sept. 10.— Yale golf- 
ers won the opening contest in the 
seventeenth annual Inter-collegiate golf 
championship yesterday defeating the 
Williams college team 5 points to 4. 
Yale won two of the three two-men 
team matches, and split even with their 
opponents In the six singles matches. 



THE "DENTIST 

PRIZE FIGHTER" 



Lang Oiiipoints BronsoB. 

Winnipeg, Man.. Sept. Ip— Hil"ard 
Lang. Canadian welterweight cham- 
pion outpointed Ray Bronson of Indi- 
anapolis III a 12-round bout last night. 
Lang had greater speed than his oppo- 
nent and his footwork was decidedly 
better. Bronson had Lang bleed ng 
from the ear In the third round, but 
after this Lang had a clear advantage 
fn almost every round. Bronson was 
bleeding freely from the mouth toward 
the end of the bout. 

-• • 

Armstro'ig Meets Nelson. 

Cleveland, Ohio, 'Sept 10.— J. J- Arm- 
strong of Minneapoll-s. western inter- 
collegiate champion, was scheduled to 
me 't in singles at the Ohio state tennis 
tournament H. Nelson, the Concord, N. 
H., expert, today. 

Reds R?iease Infielder. 

Cincinnati. Sept. 10— James Esmond, 
an infielder, was released by the Cm- 
crnnati Nationals to the Montreal c^ub 
of the International league. He will 
report to Montreal at once. 

OVER 30,000TN 
CHINA DROWNED 

Typhoon, Torrential Rains 

and High Tides Bring 

Floods. 

Shanghai, .Sept. 10.— Immense lo.ss of 
life is reported In mall advices just re- 
ceived from Wen Chow, In the province 
of Che Kiang. Chinese estimates give 
the death roll between 30.000 and 40,000 
as the result of a typhoon, combined 
with torrential rains and high tides 
which occurred Aug. 29. Great floods 
followed and the Upper Wen Chow 
river overflowed a vast area. The 
town of T.sing Tien, forty miles north- 
west of Wen Chow, was overwhelmed 
and 10,00*' of the inhabitants were 
drowned. Various other towns and 
villages were destroyed and the prefec- 
ture at Chu Chow, an important mis- 
sicnary station, was washed away. 

RUINED BY THE 
LUMBER DEALERS 

President of Portland, Or., 

Company Testifies at 

Trust Hearing. 

Portland. Or.. Sept. 10.— A. F. Biles, 
president of the Central Door & Lum- 
ber Company of Portland, testified In 
the government's lumber inquiry that 
the business of his company with retail 
lumber yards in Oregon, Washington 
and Idaho, practically was ruined by 
the action of the Western Retail Lum- 
bermen's association. 

Previous to 1910, he said the company 
enjoyed a good business and worked 
on the policy of protecting retailers. 
However, differences arose as to what 
dealers would be protected, he said. 



i'lttaburg. Pa., Sept. 10. — An official 
international mine experiment confer- 
ence will be held in this city from 
Sept. 14 to 23. Invitations which were 
sent out by Secretary of .State Knox 
at the request of Secretary of the In- 
terior Fisher have been accepted by 
Great Britain. France, Germany and 
Belgium. The object of the conference 
is to establish a universal standard 
of tests regulating explosives and 

fuses used In mines. 

» 

Unless you are wiiltng that people 
shall CHANCE to come to your store, 
you must advertise. 



DULUTH, SOUTH SHORE k 
ATLAHTIC RAILWAY 



THE 

SOUTH 
SHORE^ 



-LOW- 

EXCURSION RATES 

— FROM — 

DULUTH, MINN, and SUPERIOR, WIS. 

—TO — 

EASTERN DESTINATIONS 



Annual Fall Excursions 

to Points on D. & C. N. Co. 

Cheboygan . . ., $12.50 

Alpena »2.50 

Port Huron 12.50 

Detroit 12.30 

Toledo n.OO 

Cleveland l*-00 

Buffalo 1*50 

Tickets on sale Sept. 8th, 11th, 
15th and 17th. Final return limit 
tickets sold 8th, and 11th October 
4th. On tickets sold 15th and 17th. 
October 11th from Detroit. From 
other points East one day earlier. 

Short limit summer tourist 
fares on sale every day to Sapt. 33. 
Limit 60 days. 




Toronto, Ont . . , 
Hamilton, Ont . . 
Buffalo, X. Y . . , . 
Albany, N. Y . . • . 
Montreal. Que . 
Quebec, Que . . . . 
Huston, Mass . . . 
New York, N. Y 



<•••••■• 



".-^o.eo 

30.00 
33.00 
40,10 
36.00 
40.00 
41.60 
43.00 



Round trip summer tourist fare^ 
on sale every day to Sept. 20. 
Limit Oct. 31. 1912. 

Toronto $Sj.50 

Hamilton 35.50 

Buffalo 35.50 

.Alimuy ^S. 10 

Montreal ?"»?!? 

Quebec 52.35 

Boston 50.00 

New York 50.50 

Liberal stop-overa. 

Proportionately low excursion 
fares to all points east. 

This conipany operates its own 
sleeping cars. Large double berths 
— individual berth lights. Dining 
car attached to through trains. 

Correspondence pertaining to 
fares, routes, time schedules, etc., 
respectfully solicited. Write freely. 

W. T. WIIiKE. C, P. & T. A., 430 

Spalding Hotel Block. 

JAMES MANEY, G. P. A-, Dulutii, 
Minn. 



LOOK FOR 
THE RED 



WHEN BUYINO 

RfflZ OR PISTOL 

CARTRIDGES 

IT MEANS ^*1 



LEACH CROSS. 

When Leach Cross Isn't knocking the 
tooth of some fellow-pugilist down his 
throat, he Is carpentering the teeth of 
the general public. Therefore he Is al- 
ways spoken of as the "dentist prize 
fighter" The other members of his 
chosen profession resent his Identifica- 
tion with It and are protesting to the 
papers that, in Justice to the other den. 
ti.sts Cross ought to be de.scribed as a 
prize fighter and not as a "dentist 
prize fighter." 



Rifle and 
istol Cartridges. 

It is plain to understand why Winchester cartridges, 
generally speaking, shoot better than other makes. It 
has to do with the reputation of Winchester rifles. 
You see, Winchester cartridges adapted to Winchester 
rifles are made to get the best possible results out of 
them. As the same equipment, organization and system 
are employed in making all Winchester cartridges, it 
naturally follows that Winchester cartridges do the best 
shooting in all firearms. Winchester cartridges are 
made for all calibers and makes of rifles, revolvers and 
pistols and are sold everywhere. They always satisfy. 

Be Sure To Ask For The Red ^ Brand. 



rfty 



1 



pf 



ipi 



m 



H 



Tuesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



Scptcrriber 10, 1012.* 




i#»«#9'*m'»« a«« •««ii«%«'»«^««'»«%»«%««««««««s%6«%%«««'%«««%%»«'%t<««'»%«««/%%*%»««#«%fM^ 



ON THE IRON RANGES 

SUiaDE AT 
CHISHOLM 

George Weed Shoots Him* 

self in Alley Behind 

SbaDDon's Barn. 




rh'K*!. 



\\. 



.-, j.t I( - - iSinH-ial to 

ne Weed, aO years 

C.e at 3:30 oclock 

' iriK iiitnself In tlie 

8l.aiuion« livtry barn 

.^ r Johnscm revolver, lie 

.\j\: « iitrff.i hi8 head 

, ivuil death was 

• ■ ■if. 

(roin iJririk Is s 

;hr. ciiiis,- <.f the - ■ ■.. 

ml WHS ii 

oil of Chl»- 

vrii tnii'i«'.VtMl In tht» 

^.,.v«*ral months. Tlie 

■,...■ t.' A- iuaiui, Wib.. 



RANGE MINISTERS 
EXPRESS REGRET 



s. It. 10. — (Special to 

1 h€ lianKe Ministerial 

, t here yestenlay with a 

:,, .1 W ii. Imvitii 

U(i .111 iiitt-it biing: im- 
r.lc Union of the t'a- 

esolution was unanl- 
v r leriKthy discussion: 
r the Kan|;e Minis- 

.. 1. hears with repret of 
:.>n of a Kang-e Sunday 
tiiin at a recent Sunihiy 
held at Two Har- 
' This will not meet 
:, have been under 
e time by this as- 
.1 continue our ef- 
iization of such an 
ly school workeis 
;.t i/> the ranges and 
real ranKc iTiteifsts 
• iie Vitrii'iis ctiurclus 
t ntH." 

: s appointed to form- 

h an orKanistatlon 

- iif the association 

. rs from all the t?un- 

ftw days, to take ac- 

. Tt.. St Lnui.S ( I'Utlty 

->-<i and the 

;f ieial.s. the 

• others relat- 

. , u (J. As these 

. futile it was aijreed 

movement should be 

il reli|;ious bodies 

1 the enforcement 

latiun to this matter. 



frequented by deer. They were fined 
|I0 and » osfs each. Tw© Kuns and 
four deer hounds were confiHcated by 
the warden and sent \o the state game 
and llah connninBion. 

Jn t!ie oaso of other arrests made in 
the Fari.;»l lountry southeast 

of !:ve!eth. . i Ui Vinenzio, John 

.Mari?voro<sa. Lapranzl Paprl and Uko 
luniisijon were caught with a lar^e 
sack full cf jiartnd^es, robins and 
song birds, also p few fiwls and hawks. 
Their fines and losis amounted to 
$1!).70 each, or J7,v.hO in ill. Tlieir 
guns. bird.s and all hunting i>arar>l er- 
halia were all t^eized l>y tlie wurilen. 

TROLLEYsTlAY NOT 
RUN UNTIL 1913 



and is expected here either today or 
tomorrow. 

The sudden death of Mrs. Ohrlsten- 
s<:n, nee Anna Hanson, has last a 
gloom over the whole city. She was 
ev'.eeditij'iy pojuilnr and lived here for 
ir.any yekn previous to her marriage 
to Mr. Chrlstenson jifter which she 
mcvtd \\\""t. ^V^lle living here she 
acted as t ity librarian for several 
years and later worked In the auditor's 
offlee. Mrs. I'hristenson has two 
brothers and one sister living here, 
Himmon Hsnson, Hans Hanson and Mrs. 
r>. o. Larson. 



; 1 1(1)1 



Hibl'iiii,'. .Minn., .^ei t. 10. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Wlien Wiil cars le gtv- 
InK repular .«ervi«e on the new range 
trolley line betwten liitiiiiK and Gil- 
bert ? 

Thi.H i.s- the <i»estion which the peo- 
ple of e>tr> ;^ \\ II vn tlie laiiK'- inter- 
. . i m the ntw line are unking, and 
,1 tliere is ti" I'ttinlte information. 

I'lticers of the tiinimny and all its 
repr€.«'entali\e.s .n fact are non-coin- 
mtttal and there is a disposition in 
many (juarters to believe that thete 
will be no regular service until well 
along in li)13. 

Tlie summer has presented a good 
many obstacles t*> the construction of 
the line. Theie have been long 
stretches of rauiy weather, the labor 
situation has Iten bad, and despite the 
fact that steel is now being put down 
in Hihbing and Virginia and at sev- 
eral other place.H alonji I'-i' liiic. there 
still remains to be ilone a vety f;reat 
deal of work befon- tt.eie will be 
street car service between llibbing 
and Gilbert. 



Tranttf erred to Webb Mine. 

Chiffiiolin, .Minn., .'^ei.t. 10.— (Special 
to The Herald.) — Mike Sullivan, who 
lias been connected with the Shenanuo 
liere in the tlerical department. 
. . e»i transferred to the Webh 
niine in Hibbing and is taking charge 
of some of the surface work. If this 
work appeals to him, he will be trans- 
ferred there permanently and given 
charge of the surface work at that 
miie. 



I.ld on at Mire. 

Hibblng. Minn.. Sept. 10— The lid has 
been applied to the saloons in the vil- 
lage ( f .Mice, and they are now closed 
at ; 1 I Jii. and all d.'iy Sunday, and 
il it, >.i\ 111 out that infraction.*; of the 
state iujuor laws will not be per- 
mitted. 



Notice of Thanks. 

It Is our desire to heartily thank all 
those of our friends and neighbors at 
the Higgins location and elsewhere, 
who, by the of.'er of services, the giv- 
ing of flowers or in any other way. 
afsirted us and showed kindness and 
sympathy during the illness and at the 
time of the death of our little son, 
Thomas William Hedlcan. 

MK. A.Vl. .MRS. PAT HEDICAN. 



MOVING PICTURES 
OF IRON BUSINESS 



Hibbing, Minn.. Sept. 10. — (Special to 
Tlie Herald.) — The Oliver club gives a 
novel entertainment for its !:iH!,tK rs 
this evening, when for the lust lime 
on the range will be shown the mov- 
ing pictures of the iron mining and 
.uteel manufacturing business, recently 
authorized by the officers of the 
Inited States Steel corporation. 

The views show scenes in the log- 
ging and timber department, stripping 
and open pit mining, transportation and 
Lietliods of handling ore ut the docks 
and scenes in the chemical department 
and .shops of the Oliver Iron .Mining-' 
coniiiuny in Hibbing. The pictures of 
the mining and stripping were taken 
at the Hull-Hust mine near Hibbing, 
and the views of th< transportation of 
i>re and tlie docks were made at i>u- 
luth. 

RAILS 4KE LAID 



l"l ll*v 



WANT MORE FUNDS 
FOR THEIR ROADS 



1! 



tv: ; 
j.-. r 



thtTC i 

the bi 
tak* ti 
.1 , r 



.Mmn.. Sept. 10. — (Special to 
.1 1— Residents of the Beat 
re much interested in the 
iKtitlon to be considered 
: a 1 .♦ f ting of the county com- 
ers of Itasca county at Grand 
providing for the anne.\atlon 
tiuisKip of I'arpenter of unor- j 
•. WK>5 €2-23 and 62-24. The 
IS (]. :^!red that further] 
f. a. a i. able for road im- 1 
r.d for other reasons of a 
It will be opposed, but] 
» ly signed petition before 
tfKlng that the step be 

Wilkle went to Grand Rapids 

appear before the board 

r. Mr. Wilkie came In 

: ...1 River country last night 

t» that the farmers are now 

their grain crops and that 

will begin in about ten days 

.. t eks more. 



.\nd Poles Elected for Electric 
Road Through Mountain Iron. 

Mountain lion, Minn.. Sept. 10. — 
(Special to The Herald.)— The raii.s are 
now laid and the poles erected for the 
Mesaba Electric railway through this 
village. 

Mr. ani Mrs. Charles .Tackman and 
Mr. and Mrs. N. E.. Eilcrtson were vis- 
itors at the state fair and the Twin 
Cities last week. ^ _ , ^ 

Henry Munch is attending high 
school here. Another teacher has been 
added to the school faculty In the 
person of Miss Mabel McCarthy from 
Coleraine. as the kindergarten was too 
much for one. there being an attend- 
ance of over forty pupils. 

LOADlXtUmE'XfNEW 

STATK MLNE NEAR BIHL 

Hibbing. Minn.. Sept. 10. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Ore is being loaded at 
a new state mine In 17. S8-19 in the Buhl 
<listrict operated t y A. R. Coa:*^.". The 
property ts a small proposltiun and 
drifting is now in progress froni the 
shaft. 



LAST CHANCE 
TO REGISTER 



Voters Must Get Names on 

Books to Vote at 

Primaries. 



GUNS AND HOUNDS 
ARE CONFISCATED 



Virginia, Minn.. Sept. 10. — .(Special to 
The Herald.)— Game Warden G. E. 
Wood had six culprits before the mu- 
Bicipal court here yesterday, charged 
with violations of the game laws. All 
entered pleas of guilty, and the aggre- 
gate ftnei, all of which were paid. 
amounted to over $100. Joe Rozenkl 
and John t>rahenich, arrested near 
Lofh take, south of Biwabik, were 
caught hunting with dogs in a country 



YouNg 

MOTHE 




GOOD S( ORES MADE BY 

COMPANY M. MARKSMEN 



Hibbing, Minn., S'ept. 10. — (.Special to 
The Herald.) — i'ompany .M. marksmen 
spent yesterday at the rifle range near 
Alice and some of the best scores of 
the season were made at the 8P0-yard 
targets. Sergeant Nelson got 47 out of 
a possible TO and Lieut. Eewis and 
Private Johnson 45, 
dall got 41. There 
wind and the light 
not as satisfactory 

been, so that the scores are considered 
among the best of the season. 



while Lieut. Cran- 
was a three-point 
at the raJige was 
as it mlglit have 



No young woman, m the joy of 
coming motherhood, should neglect 
to prepare her system for the physi- 
cal ordeal she is to undergo. The 
Lealth of both herself and the coming 
child depends largely upon the caie 
she bestows upon herself during the 
waiting months. Mother's Friend 
prepares the expectant mother's sys- 
tem for the coming event, and Its use 
makes her comfortable during all the 
term. II works with and for nature, 
and by gradually expanding all tis- 
sues, muscles and tendons, involved, 
and keeping the breasts in good con- 
dition, brings the woman to the crisis 
In splendid physical condition. The 
baby, too, is more apt to be perfect and 
strong where the mother has thug 
prepared herself for nature's supreme 
function. No better advice could ba 
given a young expectant mother than 
that she us3 Mother's Friend; it is a 
medicine that lu^s proven its value 
in tbousands of 
cases. Mother's 
Friend is sold at 
drug stores. 
Write for free 
book for expect- 
ant mothers which contains much 
valuable information, and many sug- 
gestions of a helpful nature. 
IBADFIEU) RECUUTOR CO., Atlsat*. Cm. 




RIEND 



CHISHOLM PLANS TO 

STRAl(iHTK.\ OUT STREET 

Chlsholm. Minn.. Sept. 10. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — Village Attorney 
Harry Austin and Hecorder D. C. 
Hackett made a thirty-mile drive into 
the Crooked Lake country yesterday in 
the interest of the village. The object 
of their mission was to get personal 
service on Henry Kannas, who lives 
there and who. together with his 
brother, owns lot 3 In block 1, of the 
original plat of Chlsholm, which lot is 
among some that the village author- 
ities have decided to condemn for 
street purposes. The lot, together 
with one other, now blocks Central 
avenue at the north end. and as soon 
as the village has acquired title, the 
street will be opened up and the pres- 
ent method of having to go around to 
First avenue In order to get over froin 
Chestnut street to Walnut street will 
be avoided, thus saving a very steep 
climb on First avenue. 



T<'<l,i> is the last opportunity to reg- 
ister for tlie primaries. 

The polls opened at 6 o'clock this 
morning and will remain open until 9 
o'clock tonight, giving all plenty of 
time to get their namts (n the books. 

Under Ifie new corrupt practices act. 
it is necessary to register in order to 
vole at the primaries. If this is not 
Goiie the vi>ter who wishes to e.xcr- 
cite his franchise must file an affidavit 
attested by two property owners. This 
led tape can be avoided by registering 
today. 

Nearly 4. ('00 voters registered at the 
first registration day last week but 
that is only about one-third of the 
tot;.l votes of the city It was consid- 
ered an excellent showing, however. 
In view of the newness of the corrupt 
practices act. 

HOLD Primaries 

IN WASHINGTON 



Seattle, Wash . Sept. 10. — Fair weath- 
er throughout the state greeted the Re- 
publican, Democratic and Socialist pri- 
maries today. State, congressional, 
legislative and county tickets will be 
nominated. 

The governorship and the Seattle and 
Tacoma congressional seats practical- 
ly are uncontested, Governor Marion E. 
Hay will be renominated, as will Rep- 
resentative William E. Humphrey of 
.Seattle. 

In the Second congressional district 
Representative Stanton Warburton 
went over to the I'rogresslve party 
and yielded the field to Albert John- 
son of Hoquiam. 

Two women are Republican candi- 
dates for public land commissioner. 
Mrs Tamblin's name appears en the 
ballot as "M. H. TambUn." She has 
e.xpressed disappointment that the 
name was not printed Maud H. Tamb- 
Un, fearing L»etda Maybllnn, whose 
name appears in full, may gel the 
women's vote. 

There are seven Democratic candi- 
dates for the gubernatorial nomina- 
tion. 

NO LEPER colony" " 

UN THE CAMPUS 



May Br Aaotber Ciame. 

Hihbing. Minn.. Sept. 10.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— The defeat of the Hib- 
bing baseball team by Biwabik Is the 
talk of all the fans on the range, and 
there is a prospect that another game 
mav be arranged between the two 
teams at Virginia next Sunday for a 
j.iirse of 1200 and the winner to take 
all the gate receipts. 

*. , — - 

Hibblafc Boy Die«. 

Eveleth. Minn., Sept. 10. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Harry, the 15-year-old 
son of Charles Wahlman, died Sunday 
evening at his home, .'Ui; Adams ave- 
nue, after a lingering Illness. The 
funeral will be beld this afternoon 
from the residence. Rev. B. r>. Hans- 
come of the M. E. church will officiate. 

TWO HARBORS MOURNS 



Death of Mi-s. Christ Christenson 
Casts Gloom Over City. 

Two Harbors. Minn., Sept. 10. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.)— Mrs. Christ 
ChrlstenBon. aged 34 years, died here 
Sunday at 2 p. m. at the home of her 
mother, Mrs. H. Hanson, Second ave- 
nue. Mrs. Chrlstenson came here 
about a month ago from her home In 
Oakland, Cal., to spend the summer 
months with her mother. Besides her 
husband, she leaves an infant son. born 
last Saturday night. Her husband, who 
is an engineer on the Southern Pacific 
railway, 1ms beeD wired of her death 





MALT AND HOP TONlCi 

iSfon^ cfrop 
a nQfp Yo 

>1*0LO«(LV BV 
THCO "HAMM BRTWING- CO 

9T »*AUi .MIMA* 






I (Mficial map of the weather I 




FORECAST Tri-I. 7 P 

\\ EnM:«<i».\v 

Fur I>ii:utli, Kiifxrioi and vicinity, 
liirliidiiiK tlie Mrraha aiiit V«rmiUon 
lion langcb: (ieiurallj 'air weather 
ti'iiiglit and Wf iliiMMlay : ('(Kiln lo- 
■iltilil ; liitlit tu tuuilerate iiurtlie:!; 
Wiixis. 

EXPLANATORY NOTES 

OI»«r\atioiu takcD at 8 a. m., Mwoty-Cllh meridian time. • Air pressure rcJuced to aea level. hot^Ry (cootinuoiu liDcs) pesa througti (loiDta of equal ail prenure. koranivs (dotted liseii 

)«&.<. through point* of equal temperature; drawn only for tero, frcennp 00°, ard, lOO" Q cliar; ^ |)iirtly c!oi;:lyr'# cloudy; R rain; S enow; M report amiog. Aircwt fly with 

(In nmil Ki:>i flgurea, leaipen.tur«; ^ecplld, prctipiUiliua ol .01 iu<h or mere for pasi 24 tours, third, niiiiiaam T.xd viiotity. •' • • 



FAjR 




The lightning 
flashed and the 
thunder rolled last 
night, but there 
was no lain. and 
Duluth awoke this 
morning to anoth- 
er beautiful Sep- 
tember day. Surely 
September is the 
month of months in 
Duluth. More fair 
weather is predict- 
ed for tonight and 
tomorrow. 

Beautiful weather prevailed a year 
ago today. 

The sipn tose this morning at 5:39 
and It .will set at 6:31 this evening, 
giving ^welve hours and fifty-two min- 
utes of fuiilight. 

Mr. Richardson makes the following 
(Oinment <»n weather conditions: 

"Temperatures of 90 deg. or higher 
prevailed .Monday in the Mississippi, 
Ohio and Lower Missouri valleys, the 
Southwfc.Htern Lake region and most of 
the Southerti states. Cool weather is 
the rule this morning in the Rocky 
mountains and Northwestern districts. 
Frosts occurred last night in Idaho. 
Northern Mor.tana, Southern Utah and 
Southern Colorado. Showers fell Mon- 
day or last night over Northern Utah 
Colorado. Wyoming, Kansas, Nebraska, 
South Dakota, Iowa, Minnesota. West- 
ern Wisconsin. Ontario, Northern Mich- 
igan and East Gulf states. Tampa, 
Fla., reporting G.02 inche.»^. At the 
Head of the Lakes mostly fair weath- 
er is indiiated for the ensuing thirty- 
six hours." 



Minneapolis, Minn., Sept. 10. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald/) — Regents of the 
University of Minnesota today rejected 
the proposition of the slate board of 
health to establish a leper colony on 
the campus. President Vincent's bul- 
letin, issued at the close of the meet- 
ing, said that although the board de- 

j sired medical students to be able to 
give the greatest aid to humanity, it 

' considered the leper colony undesir- 
able. 



<ieneral Forrcastn. 

Chicago. Sept. 10. — Forecasts for 
twenty-four hqurs, ending at 7 p. m. 
Wednesday: 

Upper Michigan — Showers this aft- 
ernooflj fair an^ cooler tonight and 
WedneRdS^-,'*^" 

WlsconBin— Cooler and generally fair 
tonight and Wednesday. 

Minnesota — Fair and cooler tonight; 
light frpat Ia ..northwest portion; Wed- 
nesday fair, cooler in southeast por- 
tion. 

Iowa — Showers this afternoon or to- 
night, cooler; Wednesday fair, cooler 
in central an* eastern portions. 

North Dakota — Fair tonight with 



MARINE I 

RETURN TO 
THEIR WORK 



Allouez Ore Dock Laborers 

Kcf^^ the Company's 

Offer. 



frust, cooler in east and central por- 
tions; Wednesday fair, warmer in ex- 
treme west portion. 

South I'akota — Fair tonight and 
Wednesday; cooler tonight. 

Montana — Fair tonight with frost; 
slightly warmer in central and west 
portion; Wednesday fair and warmer. 

Upper Lakes — Moderate sonthwe.'^ter- 
ly shifting to northwesterly winds. 
Thunder showers tonight or Wednes- 
day on Lakes Michigan and Huron and 
probably fair weather on Lake Su- 
perior. 

» 

The Tempera* ureM. 

Following were the highest temper- 
atures for twenty-four hours and the 
lowest for twelve, ending at 7 a. m. 
today: 



* 


High. Low. 1 


High. Low. 




.. M 


72 
6(1 
68 


Milnatihee .... 


,112 


72 






.Miiiiicdbta .... 




44 


Atlaiitir rity. 


...90 


Mo<lena 


.60 


34 


Italtiniore .... 


. . .!»0 


70 


MiiiitEoineo' 


.90 


74 


Kattarorcl . . . 


...70 


40 


Montreal 


.08 


56 


I^lMiiarck .... 


. ..Tl 


46 


Moerhead 


76 


48 


Hrjse 


...72 


'4e 


New Orleaiis . . 


..94 


78 


I<(n>1nn 


...80 


60 


New Y. rk ... 


84 


64 


ItiifTaln 


. . .80 


Til 


Ni rth riatle . . 


.78 


60 


Calfiar; 


...i.i 


40 


Okialiouia 


.90 


74 


riiarlefton . .. 


...80 


7G 


tlinalia 


.92 


68 


Cliii-aco 


...&0 


74 


Parry Sound . . 


.78 


62 


Cotjci rdia 




68 


Phofiiix 


.86 


.^8 


<'<iri)ii« Clirieti 


...88 


78 


I'l«ne 


..78 


58 


IVrntr 


...62 




P;ttiiburg 


.86 


(•-'; 


Dh> .Molne« . . 


...t* 


68 


Poit Arthur ... 




:)8 


Iif\llii t.aKe . 


...72 


44 


PonlaiHl. Or .. 


.6«! 


64 


l>o<liie 


. .CO 


<>{> 


I'riiire Albert.. 


.62 


44 


■ •uhtiiitie 


...\)i 


72 


QuAin>elle 


.J8 


:-tH 


DULUTH .... 


...78 


86 


lialtU'h 


.88 


66 


iMruiigo 


. ..f.2 


3i 


Haiilil (my ... 


.70 


52 


Kastiwrt 


...66 


50 


l!ofltl)i:rg 


.74 


48 


l."<lu;i>iiton . . . . 


...50 


44 


R08"«Jl 


.9:1 




F.sra)ial>« 


...80 


6H 


St. I.ouia 


.92 


74 


Calvedlon .... 


...88 


80 


St. Taul 


.90 


66 


('.rami Korta . 




4G 


Salt Lake City. 


.r.8 


48 


(;raiitl Haven 


...88 


TO 


San I)iego .... 


.72 


60 


Green May . . . 


..90 


72 


San FraiHiSC-o. 


.80 


60 


HattciKS 


...{■4 


7C 


Sault Ste. Marie. 72 


64 


llatre 


...68 


Hfi 


S<attl« 


.60 


52 


lit lena 


...64 


42 


S'lieridan 


.52 


4«f 






64 

S4 


Shre^eixMl .... 
Slotix City . . . 


.94 
.84 


74 


Jhiroii 


...82 


64 


Jackiii iiville 


...82 


7C 


Sp" Kane 


..70 


46 


Kaiulcoiv . .. . 


..70 


44 


Kprii gtleld. Mo 




72 


Kaiisa."* <'ity . 


. . .IKS 


74 


Swift Current.. 


.66 


42 


Kiiiy^ille . ' . 


...92 


66 


T«riii>a 


..80 


70 


lA Crosse . . . 




68 


Toledo 


..92 


72 


Ix)uiwine .-• 


...96 


7ir 


Valentine 




52 


Madison 


. . . ya 


70 


Washington 


.92 


64 


Mamii«t«e . . 
Mtdlr'iie Hal 


...8« 
...72 


64 


Wichita . • .. 




72 


42 


\VilU*tou 


.66 


SC 


Memphis ... 


...92 


74 


WinnemiKca 


..68 


H4 






80 
44 


WiniufHIt 

Tellowbtone . . . 


..'i4 
.50 


50 


Miles City . 


68 


■ • 



HER CONDITION 
QUITECRITICAL 

Suffered From Terrible Train of 
Symptoms. Thinks Fatal Out- 
come Was Avoided by 
Timely Use of Cardui. 



The strike at the Allouez ore docks 
of the Great Northern Railroad com- 
pany wae settled late yesterday after- 
noon on terms suggested by the com- 
pany. 

The men were given an Increase of 
20 cents. They had asked 25 cents. 
They at first refused to compromise on 
the offer ma.de by the company, but at 
a meeting held late in the afternoon, 
at which were present several officials 
of the company, they decided to ac- 
cept. 

Under the new scale the men will 
receive $2.46 for day work and $2.70 
for night work. The previous scale 
was $2.25 and $::.50. The men will re- 
ceive 30 cents an hour for overtime 
day work and 32 cent.s for overtime 
Sundays and nights. 

There were 400 men on strike. They 
returned to work this morning. 

strikeIpset 
ore trade 



The strike of laborers on the Allouez 
docks of the Great Northern road has 
held the boats back to a large extent. 
At least tirenty boats are waiting to 
be loaded J^nd more are arriving every 
hour. 

The strilt** coming as it did upon the 
heels ot tb« Labor day lull, put a 
severe ci imp in the ore branch of lake 
shipplnfT S<^eral boats have unloaded 
coal and »Sne t>ack down the lakes 
light, rathej than wait an Indefinite 
lime to-be \^ded. 

The boats in the harbor last Satur- 
day were transferred to the Duluth. 
Mlssabe' & Northern docks and they 
got away with a delay of but a few 
hours. Tie.. boatB which arrived later 
were detained longer. 

Early <thi» mronlng ten boats were 
at anchor opposite the boat club. One 
by one Vhey were ordered to the docks 
to loadiaftfT it was known that the 
men liad really gone back to work. 

The strike cost shippers and boat 
owners a lot of money, .lust at this 
time, when, shipping was at its height, 
quick dispatch meant a great deal to 
them. 

The boatii are badly bunched at thia 



end of the lakes as a result of the 
strike. It will be a week before they 
are again running regularly. 
Grain Rate HoldM V9- 

The grain rate still hold.s good at 
2V4 cents. A boat was chartered for 
Buffalo yesterday at this figure. Ves- 
stlmen look for a raise of >4 cent be- 
fore the present month is much older. 

The grain movement has not been 
as heavv as it was thought it would 
be. Up" until a few days ago it was 
not arriving at Duluth as fast as it 
should. This was because the wet 
weather of the latter part of August 
held back tiie cars. It is now coming 
in to the local port very fast — in fact 
It is predicted that all records will be 
broken. 

There is not much talk of charters 
for winter storage. Boat owners are 
holding out for 4 cents. It is under- 
stood tliat they have been offered 3% 
cents. . . ^ 

It was announced this morning that 
tonnage for 1.000,000 bushels of flax 
has been chartered. 

The ore rate has been steady at 
50 cents since its jump of 10 cents 
last Friday. The recent delay as a 
result of the Allouez trouble may in- 
crease the demand for ore tonnage 
and may result in a further increase in 
rates. 

^' — 

Saiilt Pjissages. 

Sault Ste. Marie. Mich., SepL 10. — 
(Special to The Herald.) — Up: Byers, 
Hill, noon, Monday; Gary, 12:30 p. m. ; 
Wells, Sawyer, Tuxbury, Redfern, E. 
L. Wallace, Robinson, 1; Morgan. 1:30; 
Gilchrist, Nevada, 2; Sierra. 2:30; Fil- 
bert, Westmout, 8; Edenborn. 4; Will- 
iam Livingston, 5; Harvester, Davock, 
Norwav, 5:30; Gilbert, Jenny, Perkins. 
6:30; Ontario, 7; Steam, 7:80; Panay, 
8; Polynesia, J. E. Upson. 8:30; Turret 
Court, 9:30; Jay Morse, 10:30; WilUan.- 
son, midnight; Seliwood, Minnekahta, 1 
a. m., Tuesday; Andaste, 1:30; Kotcher, 
Selwyn Eddv, Colonel, 2; Samuel Morse. 
2:30; George Peavey. Elba, Omega, 
Australia, 3: J. J. Brown. 4; Fairbairn, 
Magna. Ohl, 5; Wilpen. 6:30; Houghton, 
Nasmvth, 9; Minnesota; Kiemons, Bryn 
MawT, 10; Wainwright. Nyanza, 11; 
Emperor, Bangor, 11:30. 

Down: Anna Minch, noon, Monday; 
Alberta. 1:30 p. m.: Nellson, Maida, 
Reed. 2:30; Goulder. Schiller, 4; Schoon- 
maker. 5; Squire, 6: Gates, 7:30; N> e, 
Sonora, Oliver, 8; Renown, Kalaska, 
Fryer, 9:30; McDougal, 10:30; Hecker. 
Sahara, 11; Riddle, midnight: Rees, 
12 30 a. m., Tuesday; North Lake, 6: 
Empress, Midland, 6:30; J. T. Hutchin- 
son, 7:30; Manola. HoUey, 8. 

Detroit Passages. 

Detroit. Mich., Sept. 10. — (Special to 
The Heral*) — Up: Rochester, 1 p. m. 
Monday; Atlantis. 3: Haskell, Notting- 
ham, 3:10; Saranac, 3:<0; Ireland, 5:30: 
Conestoga, 5:4.^; Chili. Runnels, Joseph 
Wood, 6; Richardson 9:50: Olcott, 10:20; 
Lehigh, 10:30: Alf Mitchell, 10:40; Steel 



Out of Sorts? 

Lots of discomfort — the 
blues — and many serious 
sicknesses you will avoid if 
you keep your bowels, liver 
and stomach in good work- 
ing order by timely use of 

BEECHAMS 
PILLS 

• lab«SMl0fc*2Sc* 



King, 11: Arcadian, 11:50: Lehigh, mid- 
night; Empress, Fort William, 12:20 
a. m. Tuesday; Stackhouse, 12:30; 
Prince Rupert, 12:40;; old Livingstone, 
12:50; Cole, 1:30; Watson, 1:25; Sulfna, 
2:30; Lange-11 and barges, 3:30; Argo 
and barge, 4:10; Alf Marshall, 4::J0; 
Brazil, Henry Rogers, 4:50; Calcito, 
5:40: Prentice and barge. 6; McKinney, 
C:15; A. S. Upson, 7; Neebing, 7:10; 
Wyandotte, 7:15: Bope, 8:10; Coralla, 
Thomas, &:30; C. L. Hutchinson, 10. 

Down: M. A. Bradley, M. Taylor, 
Oscoda. Tilden, Filer, 11:40 a, m. Mon- 
day; IshpemIng, 1 p. m. ; Ashley, 1:50; 
E. E. Thompson, 2:05; McCullough. 3; 
Milwaukee, 3:15; A. A. Augustus, 5:20; 
A. E. Stewart, 5:40; Paris, 4; Vail, 4:-.J0; 
D. R. Hanna, 4:25; Yuma, 5; Orion, 
7:10; Plummer, 9:10; Centurion. 10:40; 
Odanah, 11; Advance, 11:50; Pentlind, 
12:50 a. m. Tuesday; Midland King. 1; 
Champlain, 2:30; Manchester, 3:15; 
Angeline, 4:40; Western Star, 4:50; 
Dunn, 6:40; Ogdensburg. 6:50; Cowle, 
8:20: Sinaloa, 9:30; W. S. Mack. 9:40; 
Corrunna, 10; Crawford, 11; Price, 
11:30; Conemaugh, 11:50. 

PorToTDnluth. 

Arrivals — Saunders, H. M. Hanna, Jr., 
Garrettson, Holden, Truesdale, J. S. 
Dunham, Hemlock. Pendennis White, 
coal: Hoover and Mason. Walker, M^,^ro, 
Charles Hebard, J. J. Sullivan, Coulhy, 
Tomlinson, light for ore; Mohawk, mer- 
chandise; Yosemlte, light, for grain. 

Departures — Cornell. W. H. Wolf, W. 
P Snvder, S. J. Murphy, Morrell, L. R. 
Davidson, L. C. Hanna, Cort, Manda, 
Hubbard, 137, Ellwood, Roman, ore; G. 
A. Tomllnson. L. C. Smith, Nettleton, 
Jones, light: Northern Queen, mer- 
chandise; Corsica, grain; Tionesta, pas- 
sengers and merchandise. 

rebelsFake 
secret move 



Washington, Sept. 10. — More dis- 
quieting reports of the situation on 
the Arizona border continued today to 
reach the war department. Mexican 
rebels were said to be gathering in the 
vicinity of Cananea, preparing for a 
long and forced march. Forces and 
supplies were being concentrated. 

Although every effort is being made 

to learn the objective point of the 

most formidable expedition since Or- 
ozco's force was scattered, no satis- 
factory explanation has been found. 
Scouts report a force of close to 400 
well-armed rebels opposite Quitman, 
Tex., while 1,500 more are reported 
encamped ten miles to the rear. 

Gen. Salazar still remains at Gaba- 
lonez, and is being closely watched by 
the American patrol to prevent threat- 
ened raids 

Driven From OJlnaea. 

Mexican rebels, under Gen. Salazar, 
who began late yesterday a concerted 
attack on the town of Ojlnaga, oppo- 
site Presidio, Tex., were driven off by 
the federals and now are retreating 
southwesterly in the direction of San 
Bernardino, according to a dispatch 
received at the war department from 
Gen. E. Z. Steever at El Paso. 



Columbia, 'S. C— In a letter 
from this city, Miss Carrie Meetze 
says : "I was a perfect wreck, from 
sickness. I had pains in my right 
side, weak, fainting spells, dizzi- 
ness, then numb and cold feelings. 

At times, my feet were so swol- 
len, I could not walk a step. 

I also had backache, headache^ 
was nervous, appetite good at 
times, more often not, and my kid- 
neys troubled me. 

A friend advised me t o give 
Cardui, the woman's tonic, a trial- 
I did so, and from the very first 
it helped me. 

At the end of tv/o months, the 
swelling in my feet had gone 
down, and I was relieved from all 
the pains. 

I continued taking Cardui, and 
now I do almost all my house- 
work. 

I am willing for you to publish 
what I write, for the good of other 
women, for I am sure that Cardui 
saved me from the grave." 

The symptoms described in the 
above letter are proof that this 
lady was sufTering from womanly 
trouble, and her cure shows that 
she took the right medicine for 
her trouble, namely: Cardui, the 
woman's tonic. 

If you suffer as she did, do as 
she did, take Cardui, and it will 
surely do for you what it did for 
her. Why not? 

N. B. — Write «ot Ladies' Advisory 
Dept.. Chattanooga Medici-;re Co., Phat- 
tganooga. Tenn., for $>peclal laNfnio. 
tloBM. and 64-page book, "Home Treat- 
ment for Women," sent in plain wrap- 
per, on request. 




."^flla the Latest .Stylfs In 
Shoes t" Tou iliifrt tiom the 
faitorj' »t a $&v.iie t.' yru of 
at Uasl }1.0C uii rrer; pair. 

See oi;r n-inUoir — "wliere U»e 
bi<i8 fl.T •• 

317 Wert Superior Street. 



Soldlern Delayed. 

Fort Riley, Kan., Sept. 10. — Because 
of delay In obtaining transportation 
facilities, the Thirteenth United States 
cavalry, ordered to start for the Mex- 
ican border tomorrow, probably will 
not entrain before Fr.^ay or Saturday, 
officers said today. Preparations for 
departure so far as troops and equip- 
ment are concerned, practically are 
complete. The regiment will move In 
three squadrons. Once the cars are 
provided not more than a half day 
will be required for entralnment. 



QUARANTINE 
BREACH CHARGED 

Ward Line Steamer Is Said 

to Have Violated Port 

Orders. 

W'ashington, Sept. 10. — Acting At- 
torney General Harr today instructe<3 
United States Attorney Wise at New 
York to investigate the alleged break- 
ing of quarantine of the Ward liner 
Havana, due in New York today. The 
public health service alleges the ship 
left Havana port after a bill of healm 
had been refused by the authorities^ 
owing to the bubonic plague situation- 



RALPH QUITS 

DRAINAGE JOR 



St. Paul, Minn., Sept. 10.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — George A. Ralph, state 
drainage engineer, has resigned to take 
effect Jan. 1. His resignation is dated 
then in order that he may finish sev- 
eral reports for the next legislature. 

Offers of other positions and con- 
tinued attacks by the legislature and 
others are the reasons assigned for bi» 
resignation. 



Would CroMH Statm. 

City of Mexico, Mex., Sept. 10. — A 
Fecrct session of the Mexican senate 
last night granted the request of Presi- 
dent Madero for authorization to ask 
the United States government to per- 
mit the transportation of troops 
througli American territory. It is 
planned to send a column of troops 
via El Paso, Tex., and Douglas, Ariz.. 
into the state of .Sonora, where sev- 
eral bands of rebels are operating. 

TroopH Can Rater ITnltrd States. 

Washington, Sept. 10. — Permission for 
1.200 Mexican federal troops to pass 
through the United States from El Paso 
into Chihuahua and Sonora to attack 
the fleeing rebels, was today granted 
to the Madero government by the state 
department. The arms of the troops 
will be carried as baggage. When the 
movement is to begin is not known. 



SIXn-DAY UMIT 
ON LEGISLATURE 



Little Rock. Ark., Sept. 10. — Meaget 
additional returns today from the gen- 
eral state election In Arkansas yester- 
day Indicate that only one constitu- 
tional amendment submitted to the peo- 
ple for ratification received enough 
votes to Insure Its passage. This is 
the proposal to limit legislative ses- 
sions to sixty days. State-wide prohibi- 
tion and the so-called "grandfather's 
clause" amendments are believed to 
have failed. 

The L"»emocratlc state ticket, headed 
by Congressman J. T. Robinson, candi- 
date for governor, is known to have 
been elected by an overwhelming ma- 
jority, although the returns are far 
from' complete. 



HOW I MADE 
MY HAIR GROW 

Woman With Marrelonsly Beantlfnft 

Hnlr Given Simple Home Pret^riy- 

tlou Whteh She 1 ned With Most 

Remarkable Reanlta. 

I was greatly troubled with dandruff 
and falling hair. 1 tried many adver- 
tised hair preparations and various pre- 
scriptions, but they all signally failed; 
many of them made my hair, greasy so- 
It was impossible to comb it or do It 
up properly. I think that many of the 
things I tried were positively Injurious- 
and from my own experience 1 cannot 
too strongly caution you against using 
preparations containing wood alcohol 
and other poisonous substances. I be- 
lieve they Injure the roots of the hair- 
After mv long list of failures, I finally 
found a simple prescription which I 
can unhesitatingly state Is beyond 
doubt the most wonderful thing for the- 
hair I have ever seen. Many of my 
friends have also used it, and obtained 
wonderful effects therefrom. It not 
onlv is a wonderful stimulant to the 
irrowth of the hair and for restoring 
crav hair to its natural color, but it is- 
enually good for removing dandruff, 
living the hair life and brilliancy, etc.. 
and for the purpose of keeping the 
scalp in first-class condition. It also 
makes the hair easier to comb and ar- 
range in nice form. 1 have a friend 
who used It two months and durlngr 
that time it has not only stopped the 
falling of his hair and wonderfully In- 
creased Its growth, but U practically re- 
stored all of his hair to Its natural 
color. You can obtain the Ingredient* 
for making this wonderful preparation 
from almost any druggist. The pre- 
scription Is as follows: 

Bay Rum. 6 oz. ; Menthol Crystals, H 
drachm; l>avona de Composee', 2 oz. ir 
vou like it perfumed add a few drops of 
To-Kalon Perfume, which mixes per- 
fectly with the other ingredients. This^ 
however. Is not necessary. 

Apply night and morning; rub thor- 
oughly into the scalp. 

Go to your druggist and ask for an> 
eight ounce bottle containing six 
ounces of Bay Rum; alec one-half 
drachm of Menthol Crystals, and a. 
two-ounce bottle of Lavona de Com- 
posee". Mix the Ingredients yourself at 
your own home. Add the Menthol Crys- 
tals to the Bay Rum and then pour in 
the I-.avona de Composee' and add 
the To-Kalon Perfume. Let It stand 
on«-balC hour ana It is ready for use. 



tdte- 



tn*ia 



-♦. 




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THE D U L 1/ 1" H HERALD 



September 10, 1912. 



15 



1 






,%t^»#«^»%*%#»%»^%**«^^*^«^«'«'*^**'*'**^| 



I WEST DULVTH | 

• HKBALD BRANCH OFFUK9: j[ 

S 4 S30 WTtfc 6Ttk AT*. W. J. J. Mor««. 31«S. North 0«tr.l Av* j ^ 

vli»lte«l ^v^th r.-Uttves at VViniuiK-K tut- 
several Uaya. »., , i _ t»~.. 

AicorditiK to Mra. Ny ai»d.'r. Rev 
Mr Nylaiiaer will not taki« charge »t 
the pastorate upon hl« return, but ex- 
pec ti to move with hia family to a 
warmer climate. He waa c«>m|>elled to 
ttivf up the work here on account of 
his health He has received several 
o.Uls durlncr hla absence and wUl 
probably accept one of these upon nU 
return. 



o' Our 
church. 



LECTURE ON 
HOMECROFT 



C E Roe to Give Illustrated 

Talk at Children's 

Exhibit 



the past two weeks with his relatlveo 
at Fund du U^'' , 

Th<5 VouiiiS IV'Ople 8 Socieij 
Savior 8 NorweKi an 1-uthtran 
F.ftv-sevonth avenue we.^t and ^^''*Y "* 
street, will meet In the church parlora 

this evening. . v.%r»h 

Mlsa Ida Llndtfr.n of 319 North 

Fiity-elghth uv.tui.^ ^^'*'^!■'■^"Vyu with 
terday from a three months visit with 
relatives in Sw.'d.'n. „,,»,, K».-tv- 

Mlss Mae Colilm* of 119 North Ftv- 
sivth avt-nue weHt ha.s r.-turiied f i om a 
short visit with ndatlvoa at \ Irglnia 

MiH. Robert Trag.r of New 
haa rt'turned ft Mm a w.-ek a 



Duluth 
visit at 



e E Koe. secretary of the Duluth 
llooirci-i»ti aa»«t-'lation. wUl gtve a 
on lecture Thursday evening 
.:st annual Industrial and agrl- 
coUural exhibit to be conducted by the 
children of Ely school Thursday and 
Friday t>t this week. 

ui Will use the forty-five plc- 
: the Duluth gardens 
>wn at the St. 



which 

,„,. „. _.. L.ouia county 

at the state fair last week. 
*»». Ho,3 will also lecture on Kardeii- 
Ing and homecroft work in this play. 
Following the lecu ''.tr. Hoe as- 

sisted by W. B. ^ 11 a'\** I'- "■ 



tu 
\\ 
1. 1 

ilr. 



•n Judise in- t^ricultural ex- 
iward the prizes. 
*'u« fair and exhibit are 
inpleted by Harold G. 
il of the school. M*u- 
uork. sewing. garden 
.:., ..;.,J poultry are to be on ex- 
lul it -luring the fair. The «-^h"'»J-5" ''' 
t* <•-»... ,1 are making all of the en- 
lU also arrange their stands. 
wlii. h ar# to receive prizes* 
M'sdames T. F. Olsen. 
id I J. Burnalde will 
the domestic science 



i. 

1 

li 
i. 
1 



Eiter Funeral. 

The funeral of Corwin W. Eiler. 18 
years old. son of A. W. Kller of Proc- 
tor, who dle«i yesterday morning after 
a short illness, will be held at noon 
tomorrow from the residence at Proc- 
tor and at 2 o'clock from the Flr^t 
Norwegian Lutheran church, .Sixth 
avenue east and Fifth street. Inter- 
ment win be at Forest Hill ceme- 
tery. ^ 

Socialists Speak. 

David M Robertson, candidate for 
lieutenant governor on the Sooiatiat 
ticket, and Morris Kaplan, candidate 
for congress from the Eighth district. 
spoke last evening In front of the 
Proctor Y. M. C. A. A large crowd 
heard the speakers who explained their 
platforms and also spoke in behalf of 

Debs and Seidel. 

. ...«_ 

Shed? Burn. 

Fire destroyed two sheds n-ar the 
residence of Rev. Gideon Nylander, 6102 
Highland street, yesterday afternoon. 
The flremen labored under dift" icultle.-*. 
as the house Is several blocks up the 
hill, but the blaze wa.s prevented from 
spreading to the residence. The loss 
is about 12.^0. The family was not at 
home and it i^ thought the tire was 
caused by children playing with 
matcbea 



Owatonna. Minneapolis and ht. Paul. 

Rev. 11. A. .stouBhton of the West 
Duluth H.iptlst church. Fifty-ninth ave- 
nue W.St and tJrand. started a series or 
inspiration meetings last «ve"'"«„,. _ 

The .Ml.sses iJrace and Nelhe Ander- 
son of KD North .Sixty-third avenue 
w.-st entertained the Qu.-en l''«»her 
Circle of the Asbury M. E. church at 
their home last evening. , -^ i .w 

Watch repairing. Hurst. West Duluth. 



REPORT OF THE CONDITION 

^OF THE— 
NORTHERN NATIONAL BANK 



CARNEGIE 



LOTS IN »M 

NEW STEEL CITY 

WILL ABfMCE 20% II PRICE BY SEPTEMBER 15 

The contract for grading streets in Central Division has been let; 
work bcRin" SoiiV 10 and will be finshed by November l5th this year. 

vln. "ho u^^ wise, will invest in Carnegie property. It will mean 
"easy street"' for^you in a few years. 

GREkT NORTHERN LAND CO., 

600 and 601 T<^rrey Building^ DULUTH. MINN. 



OF DULUTH. 



At Duluth In the .State of Minnesota, 

At the Close of Bustneaa, 

September 4th, 1912. 



t 
I 

¥ 
,iVl 
act 



and 






Silver Wedding. 



APPEAL MADE 

FOR FARMERS 



Tl.i* mornins plans lor the opening 

•■■auth public market next 

ning were made by the 

::!mut>t- of the West Duluth 

I club. 

^ of West Duluth are re- 

, the members of the com- 

t . ittend the opening of the 

.1 to purchase their vege- 

a the farmers. During the 

i * r>nco will be held 

u, i market days de- 

> p.! tue luture. The farmers 

given their choice of the days 

, . , t > It' ijk, a. l{ 

.V Pond.' one of the members of 
market committee 



VV 
the 



ivaiK 

stands 



stated this 
mornlns that the fence facing Ramsey 
, « obstructing the market place 
"v noved this- week and a side- 

lut from the street to the 
In this way the market place 
- ~ibl© to every one passing the 
; to residents in the vicinity 
,n ....,, -.ixth and Fifty-seventh ave- 
nues .Small stands are to be^ bum 
around the large stand for the display 
of the produce. . ^ ,. , 

'^'■' morning one of the farmers u\ • 
> tside of the city, being cm- 

1, 'o come into th^" city, took s.jiue 

i>rcduc* along and le" his »«" \" 
charge at the stand while he went 
about his business. He returned about 
11 o'clock and. to his surprise found 
that everything hid been 8»l^- .^(^1" 
though this is not the regular market 
day. the popularity of the market l-s 
again evidenced by the quick sale of 
the produce. __^______ 

SEPT. 28 WILL 
BE FARMERS' DAY 

For the first time in the city's his- 
tory. Its residents will celebrate Farm- 
«.r8' day Saturday. Sept. 28. with a pro- 
gram of *,'ames and entertainments 
lasting from early morning until late 
at 



Mr. and Mrs. Charles Lowe of 1019 
North Fifty-sixth avenue east enter- 
tained a number of their friends last 
evening in honor of their silver wed- 
ding anniversary. The rooms were 
decorated with asters and nastur- 
tiums. Covers were laid for fifteen. 
* — - 

Hunter Returns. 

George M. Biasing of 232 Central 
a\.nue la the first hunter to return. 
He broutfht with him 26 birds. Eighty 
birds were shot by himself and two 
friends of Grand Rapids, Minn. The 
party spent two davs n«^ar Crookston 
and found game plentiful. 
--^ 

Heavy Registration. 

The registration up to noon today 
was tiuite heavy and gives promise of 
a heavy registration for the day. T»\o 
polls will be open up to 9 o'clock this 
evening. 

West Duluth Briefs. 

Clifford Stowell of 220 North Fifty- 
fourth avenue west, will leave tpino^' 
rowr for Minneapolis, where he will at- 
tend the university this y/ar ., -v. 

Miss Louise Hablg of 1312 >o"» 
Fifty-eighth avenue west hai! returned 
ftom a week's visit In the Twin Cities. 

Mr. and .Mrs. Andrew Stroupp of t ond 
du Lac have left for Elkton. S. D., 
where they will make their future 
home. . _ , . ., , 

Miss Celia Durfee of Fond du Lac has 
returned from a two weeks' visit with 
her father at Ashland. Wis. 

David Engbloom of Port Arthur left 
for his horn*' yesterday after spending 



RESOUHlCES. 

Loans and discounts |1,315.42«.97 

U. S. bond* to secure circu- 
lation 

Other bonds to secure pos- 

tal savings I^-^JOO 

Premiums on U. S. bonds.. '' ^^"" •'" 

Bonds, securities, etc.. 

Banking house, furniture 

and fixtures :■•,•' 

Due from nutlonal banks 

(not reserve agents) .... 
Due from state and private 

banks and bankers, trust 

companies and savings 

banlis 

ChecKS and other cash 

items • • • 

Exchanges for clearing 

house • 

Notes of other national 

banks 

Fractional paper currency, 

nickels and cents 

Lawful Money Reserve m 

Bank. vU.: ^ ,., ^^ 

Specie |lll.oau.90 

Legal-tender ^ 

notea 21,.7o.OO 



250.000.00 



3.500,00 
80.457.80 

34,50«.00 

66.770.37 

68.093.41 




133.320.90 



WHEN you want to buy shoes 
at a moderate price— shoes 
that are finished and fit the 
feet nice— if you want somethinj 
nobby. I'll tell you where to get 
them-at STEWART'S-and they 
will cerUinly wear. 



Redemption fund with U. 9. 
treasurer (5 per cent of 
circulation) 

Total tVes"'''"""'^^"''"'^ 

Capital stock 'pa'ld^n^.^.^^.» 250.000.00 

Surplus fund • 

Undivided profits, less ex- 
penses and taxes paid... 

National bank notes out- 
standing ■»:'■■; 

Due to other national 
banks • .••■;■ 

Due to state and prlvata 
lianks and bankers 

Dividends unpaid ■••••.••; 

Individual deposits subject 
to check • • • • • • 

Time certificates of de- 
posit 

Certified checks ••••••••• 

Cashier's checks outstand- 
ing j' ■ ■ ■ "il" " ■ ' 

Postal saving deposits 



ONLY TWO 
HOUSES LEFT 

Fine new six-room houses, with 
concrete foundation and basement, 
hardwood floors throughout, city 
water, bath, gas and electric light, 
at 822 Ninth avenue east, for small 
cash payment and balance with your 
rent money. 



CRO 

The city built to a plan. 

ADDRESS 

Chas. S. Roulo, Agt., Crosby, Minn. 

— OR— 

Geo. H. Crosby, Duluth, Minn. 



G. T. 

Knutson 

of Duluth, 



10,000 people coming to Crosby in 
the next five years. 



EBY & GRIDLEY, 

SOS Palladia DiilldlnK. 



12.500.00 



60.000.00 

19,521.56 

238,000.00 

43,816.06 

41.025.02 
S6.00 

1,397.939.42 

167,620.67 
212.00 

2.977.18 
1.600.00 



• Total 



• «••••< 



.J2,222.797.91 



State of Minnesota, County of St. Louis 
Y'^^j "W. Lyder, Cashier of the 



i „. X. Lyder, 
above named bank, do solemnly swear 
that the above statement Is true, to the 
iTe'^t of my knowledge ^n^J^^^Ut 

Cashier, 

Correct — Attest: 

T . ) H NO. W I LLI A MS. 
FRANCIS W. SULLIV.A.N. 

L. S. LOEB. .^, . ^_ 

Directors. 





«7,50O— Buvs an elegant nine-room 
house, situated on East end cor- 
ner hot water heat, fireplace, 
quarter-sawed oak finish, all mod- 
ern and convenient, A snap ^at 
this price. -"- 

84,300— For fine new six-room bun- 
galow at Lakeside, hot water heat, 
large fireplace, beamed ceilings, 
laundry tufts; porch 36 feet long. 
Can be bought on monthly pay- 

aio.ooo— Buys a dandy house on Last 
Second street; lot 75x140 feet, nine 
rooms, hot water heat, large sun 
parlor; everything modern; large 
garage; beautiful trees and shrub- 
beryrpropertv worth fully 113.00«. 4-8 

LITTLE & NOLTE CO. 

ExehanKe Balldla 



LOANS 

Any amount of money on hand at 
5, ol'i: and 6 per cent. 

INSURANCE and BONDS 

We can furnish all kinds of bonds 
on short notice. Fire and automo- 
bile insurance our specialty, can 
on us for rates before you take out 

^ Sonie^good bargains In real estate. 

COOIEY & UNDERHILL GO. 

209, ::10 and 211 Exchange Bldg. 
Both r bones. 228. 





Suhporlbed and sworn to before mo 
this 10th day of September, 1912. 
this lum "*>^j^,j,HUR HOWELL. 

Notary Public. 
St. Louis County, Minn. 



Applicatioi 



SSc 



Freestone Alberta Peaches. 

Mas^o^i Q iikrt ' FrulV Jars: doz . . . • 50e 
Best Cooking Apples, per peck. -XSc 
It pays to buy your groceries 
wholesale from 

THOS. FOUBISTER CASH GROCERY CO. 

51527 Gil AX O A V EN IK. 




^ mds'wtuTf ?e7eived by the Board of 

Water & Light Commissioners. Sept. 

,h the plan is being taken "P .^^f,, at 4 P. M., for laying water and 

..._.i' .. «-.». i^..i..th and -^y'-jn^ains in several streets and ave- 



hy i. . -.sidents of West Duluth and 
the arrangements are in charge ot tne 
ii'lmbeA It the West Duluth Commer- 
«-lal club, a representative Duiuin gain 
«tngl.^ expected to take part in the 
festivities for the day. The date for 
Jhe af air was decided on last evening 
It a meeting of the executive commit- 
tee the members of which are: L- .v 
Barnt's P. H. Martin. J. J- Frey. Emil 
Zauft! Charles Kauppi. William Langs- 
low and W. A. Pond. 

Invitations will be sent to all the 
fa- tlvlng in the Yi<-'inity of Duluth. 

Tl ; be requested to bring wagon 

lo . produce and fruits, which will 

t>,^ on sale early in the morning. 

Fuuov^ UK the sale at the new market 
place, which was opened ^f^^.fl^^^.l 
Tiiornlng. the farmers and their hosts 
will gather at Fairmont park for the 
remainder of the day. The farmers will 
be asked to bring their families along 

°At Fairmont park a program and 
races will be featured. In the evening 
dancing will be enjoyed at the pavilion. 
Hefreshmenta will be served during the 
day and the farmers will be the 8u^ft» 
«f honor at a picnic spread the latter 
part of the after noon. 

DEGREE TEAM WILL 

GIVE BANQUET 



St. Louis County, jviinn. ,1 ingS ailQ na.1.5 

'^;'il"n!f.;,.S.oy-.!rgrr'c'.SSay"Jr.M3. Ijand October 1st 



""specifications can be obtained at the 

•'"rccompany^'bld'wlth certified check 
equal to 10 per cent ^' jJ'J-^gp.^ 

Manager. 
D. H.. Sept. 10. 11. 1912. D 294. 

nRAILROADllMlTTABLEST 

DEirfHTMissABTi^^ 

EKJ< RAILWAY. 

Offlcat 4M Went Superior St. 

'Phone. MO. . 



REPORT OF THE CONDITION OF 
THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

OF DULUTH. 

At Duluth. in the State of Minnesota. 
At ^"^j."\'he Close of Business. 
September 4, 1912. 

Loans and df^^.^^^'^'l S.030.433.90 
Overdrafts, secured and 

unsecured •.•••.• 4.im.*4 

U. S. bonds to secure U. S. 

deposits 

Other bonds to secure 



Now being received for dwell- 
gs and flats for September 



Jebn A. Stephenson ft Co. 



Wolvin Bldg. 



A GOOD BARGAIN 



For sale or Tradc-lOO-foot corner 
_ semi-business. with thiee 
houses bringing In good rentals 
Location, northeast comer Ssecond 
street and Sixth avenue west- 
sure to be good business Property^ 
can be bought at only •1«*,P" 
front foot, or will make a ta.^ov- 
Tb^e trade for $7,000 equity. Can 
leave $9,000 on property at 5 per 
cent. This is a rare chance to get 
a valuable piece of property 
Great location for an apartment 
building. 
CASH ON HAND FOR LOANS. 

STRYKER, WANLEY & BUCK 



same, by mortgage, pledge or other- 
wise, and to do any act or thing In any 
manner connected with or deemed ad- 
visable in the conduct of any business 
herein recited, or that may be "♦^ces- 
sary or advisable to accomplish or pro- 
mote the same. The principal place of 
transacting said business shall be in 
the State of Minnesota, and the general 
office shall be In the City "' 1>"1""^' 
in said State, but the corporation may 
also transact business and execute any 
and all of the powera.hereln mentioned 
outside of the State of Minnesota, 
wherever its Interests or business oper- 
ations may require or render it ad- 

^ Article 3. The period of duration 
of the corporation shall be thirty years 
from and aft.-r September 1st. ^^li. 

article 4. The names and P'^^.®" 
of residence of the persons forming th^s 
corporation are as follows: 
Eagling. F. A. Kemp. Carl A 
and John Heltmann, all 

Minnesota. _ ^„„f nf 

ARTICLE r>. The government or 
said corporation shall be vested in a 
board of four directors, and the annual 
meeting, at which said board shall be 
elected? shall be held on the second 
Wednesday of September, each year 
in the City of Duluth. Minnesota. The 
said board shall elect the following 
oflricers of the corporation-^ President, 
vice president, secretary and treasurer 
the same person may be secretary and 
treasurer. The incorporators above 
named shall compose the first bc^ard of 
directors of the corporation, and snau 
act until their successors are elected 
and have qualified. 

ARTICLE 6. The amount of the 
capital stock of the corporation shall 
be Fifty Thousand ($50,000.00) do.lars 
divided Into Five Hundred shares of 
the par value of One Hundred ($100.00) 
Dollars each. One-half of this amount 
shall be common stock and one-hair 
preferred stock. The holders of such 
preferred stock shall receive a fixed 
yearly dividend of .seven per cent per 
annum, payable annually on the second 
W>dn»-sday of September each year 
before any dividend shall be set apart 
or paid on the common stock, but tne 
holders of such preferred stock sh:Ul 
not be entitled to any other or further 
dividend, and shall have no voting 
power on any question. All of said 
capital stock shall be paid on call of 
the board of directors, and in such 
manner as said board may determine. 

ARTICLE 7. The highest amount of 
indebtedness or liability to which the 
corporation shall at any time be sub- 
ject is Seventy-five Thousand ($7j.- 
000.00) Dollars. 

In witness whereof, we have here- 
unto subscribed our names this -Jth 
day of August. ^912. ^^^^^^^^ 

F. A. KEMP. 

CARL A. KNUTSON. 

JOHN HEITMANN. 
In Presence of: 
W. H. GURNEE. 
SARAH WINER^ 

State of Minnesota. County of St. Louis 

—S3 

On this 29th day of August. 1912. be- 
fore me. a Notary Public withm and 
for said County, personally appeared 
Cr T. Eagling, 3^. A. Kemp, Carl A. 
Knutson and John Heitmann, to me 
known to be the persons described in 
and who subscribed and executed the 
foregoing Certificate of iJ^<'-OVl>ortiUou 
and acknowledged the same as their 
free act and deed^ ^ qURNEE. 

Notary Public, 
St. Louis Co., Minn. 
(Notarial Seal. St. Louis County. Minn.) 
My commission expires Oct. 5. iJio. 

of 



this sixth day of September. 1912. 
A. L, AGATIN. 
A. O. RABIDEAU. 
A. J. McLENNAN. 



State of Minnesota,* County of St. Louis 

OH 

On this 6th day of September. 1912, 
before me. a Notary Public within and 
for said County, personally appeared 
A. L. Agatin, A. J. McLennan and A. O, 
ilabideau, to me known to be the per- 
sons described in and who executed the 
for«»going Instrument, and severally 
acknowledged that they executed the 
same as their free act and deed. 
CHARLES S. SLACK. 

Notary Public, 
St. Louis County, Minn. 
(Notarial Seal. St. Louis Co., Minn.) 
My commission expires July li. 19H». 

State of Minnesota. Department of 
State. . .^^. 

I hereby certify that the within in- 
strument was filed for record in this 
office on the 7th day of September. 
A D. 1912. at 10 o'clock A. M.. and was 
duly recorded in Book V-3 of Incor- 
porations, on page 763. ^^^,,-^„, 
JULIUS A. .SCHMAHL, 

Secretary of Stata. 



190203. „ 

OFFICE OF REGISTER OF DEEDS. 
State of Minnesota, County of St. Louis 

I hereby certify that the within In- 
strument was filed in this pfifice Toil- 
record Sept. 9. 1912. at 11:30 A. M. and 
was duly recorded In Book la <-i Misc., 

P^^' ''• M. C. PALMER. 

Register of DeedSt 
By THOS. CLARlv. 

Deputy. 



SHERIFF'S EXECUTION SALE— 

Under and by virtue of an Execution 
issued out of and under the seal 'J f 
the District Court of the State of Min- 
nesota, in and for the Eleventh Ju- 
dicial District and County oi St. Louis, 
uijon a judgment duly rendered in the 



150.000.00 



Lease. 



Arrive. 



f UlbbloB. ChtohoUn. VlrglnU. Ef9-] 



•S.M9M 



•7.IO»a 



1 tMountu Iron, tsp«rt», TBlwabUi 1 
( UtbtiiiX. ChiahoUn, 8h»n)n l 
i (Buhl). VIrfluU. E»«l«l>. h»l0.3lsn 

I ••.SIM 



(Bubl) 

Coleralne. 

Vlrglnta. Coott Ilalner. fott 

rr»nc«. Port Arthur. B«u- 

dette. WarTO»a. Winnipeg. 

*— D ally, t— Ual'y eXL'rpt Sunday. 

Cafe. Observation Car, Mesa ba Range 
Points. Solid Vestibuled Train. Modern 
Sleepers through to Winnipeg. 



her bonus lo »^v."v« 

postal savings ijiflirsg 

Bonds, securities, etc..... 421.844.99 
Banking house, furniture 

and fixtures ■ • • 

.Other real estate owned.. 
Due from national banks 

(not reserve agents)... 
Due from state and pri- 
vate banks and bankers 

trust companies and 

savings banks 

Due frorn approved re- .„- 37 

serve agents • 1.7 J0,6 J7 . - / 

Checks and other casH 

Items ;•■■,■■■ 

Exchanges for clearing 

""S^'^'^'^'^'"^'-*^"*- m.240.00 
Fractional paper currency, 

• nickels and cents 

Lawful Money Reserve In 

SpfcMe''. .'^'.^.■.•1641.539.20 
Legal-tender 

notes 57.973.00 



THE DILLIH & IRON RA^GE 
RAILROAD COMPANY. 



DULUTH— 



«.' Ely. Aurora. BlwabUt Mc-Jt ^-WP" ' '.O*"" 
Kialey. Sp»ri*. Kv.leU.. UU-l'ILIO^iiillslO. 



bert ana Virginia. 



The dfs;re>^ t^am of Old Hickory 
camp *■' ''>5-'J. Modern Woodmen, will 
licld '»nd annual banquet tomor- 

row ev-tiiug at th»" Great Eastern hall. 

^^Ar?IngemenTrhave been made for Kntf. Bi.«. Two Hartor^ Tow- 
170 plates and a large delegation of 
Woodmen from Duluth. Superior and 
the range towns is expected. -Xddress- 
«a will be given during the evening by 
the officers of the camp. Mayor Mc- 
Cuen County Attorney John Norton. 
Assistant County Attorney Warran E. 
Greene and Dr. John Clark. L. A. 
Barnes will give the address of wel- 
come and Capt. C. C. Salter will make 
the dosing remarks. Capt. J. C Quade 
will sound taps. 



175.000.00 
62.000.00 

741.391.48 



237.402.96 



5.820.96 
51.811.18 



2.235.46 



FOR RENT 



in West end; 
only $20 per 



Seven-room hoas#. 
modern conveniences 
month. 

LOCKER-QmHUE CO. 

417 Lons^fe Building. 



FIRE INSURANCE 

We guarantee prompt adjustment, 
careful attention. reliable com- 
panies. "!«> ■ 

IHEELER AGENCY 



W 



?.aS .-Vlworth Buildin>: 
■W« Wiitt Fir* Inturance RigM." 



Homes on Easy Terms 

«200 cash. 4106 West Fourth street. 

eight rooms; lot 2oxl32: oai- 

.ance of $1,300 payable $25.00 per 

month. 
S500 cash. 1021 Ninth avenue east. 

eight rooms and bath, small barn, 

balance of $2,300 payable $25 per 

month. 
S450 Fine lot on Lake avenue 

south, six blocks fromr bridge. 

Easy terms. 

Pnlford, How & Co., 

6OO Alworth BulldlnK. 



State of Minnesota, Department 

State 

i hereby certify that the within In- 
strument was filed for record in this 
ottlce on the 30th day of August, A. D. 
1912 at 1'^% o'clock A. M., and was 
duly recorded in Book V-3 of Incorpo- 
rations, on page 739. „^„-,.„t 
JULIUS A. SCHM.\HL. 

Secretary of State. 

OFFICE OF REGISTER OF DEEDS. 
State of Minnesota. County of St. Louis 

I~hereby certify that the within in- 
strument was filed in this ottUe for 
record Aug. 31. 1912, at 8:30 A. M., and 
was duly recorded in Book 15 of Misc., 

P^^* '^^- M. C. PALMER, 

Register of Deeds. 
By THOS. CLARK. 

Deputy. 
D H.. Sept. 9-10. 1912. 



Municipal Court, of the city of Clo- 
auet. St. Louis County, Minnesota, on 
the 12th day of March, 1912. in an ac- 
tion therein, wherein John t . Ryan 
was Plaintiff and W. H. Peterson and 
Bessie A. Peterson, Defendants. in 
favor of said Plaintiff and against said 
defendants for the sum of one hun- 
dred ninety-four and sixty-elght-hun- 
dreths ($194.68) dollars, a transcript of 
which said judgment was thereafter 
and upon the 8th day of Augu.st.lJ12. 
duly filed and docketed in the ofnce of 
the Clerk of said District Court in and 
for St. Louis County, Minnesota, which 
said execution has to me, as Sheriff 
of said St. Louis County, been duly 
directed and delivered. I have levied 
upon and will sell at Public Auction 
to the highest cash bidder, at the Sher- 
iffs Office in the Court House, in the 
City of Duluth. in said County of SL 
Louis, on Tuesday, .he 2nd day of No- 
vember, 1912, at ten o'clock in the fore- 
noon of that day, all right, title and 
int«»re=t that above named* judgment 
debtors had in and to the real estate 
hereinafter described, on the Sth day 
of August, 1912. that being the date 
of the filing and docketing of sai<i 
Judgment at the Office of the CleiK 
of the District Court in and for said 
St Louis County, Minnesota, or any 
irterest therein, which said judgment 
debtors may have since that day ac- 
quired. The description of the prop- 
erty being as follows, to-wit: 

Lot one (1». Section twenty-nine f29), 
Township fifty-one (51). Range eigh- 
teen 118). West of the Fourtii Prin- 
cipal Meridian, situated in St. Louis 
County, Minnesota. 

Dated. Duluth, Minn.. August 9th, 

^^^^' JOHN R. MEINING, 

Sheriff St. Louis County. Minn. 
By F L. MAGIE, 

Deputy. 
WALTER L. CASE 

Attorney for Judgment Creditor. 
D H, Aug. 13, 20. 27, Sept. 3, 10 and 
17, 1912. 



TIME 
FOR 



TO FILE 
HEARING 



CERTIFICATEOFINCORPORATION 

— OF— 

DILUTH-MOCTEZLMA IRON 

COMPANY. 



699.512.20 



15.000.00 
8,000.00 



I Vtv. 



Arrlte. 



• 7.30a« 
t 2.4S»n 



t 9.30*«i 

tia.OOai 



J 



•—Dally. t— Ually except Sunday. |— Mlxad 
traliia W»,^9 and arrlTW Ktfteenth a»«nue caat •ta- 
ttoo, t — Daily exjfvl Monaa*. i— SuuUay only. 



SUFFR.iGE J^PEAKERS 

TO TALK IN MICHIGAN 

Mrs. H. Hill, Mrs. Grace Qabel. Mrs. 
Marion Soderblom and Mrs. Hulda 
Flroved, all of West Duluth. left yes- 
terday for a speaking tour in the in- 
terest of woman's suffrage. The party 
will speak in behalf of the cause to 
the residents of Detroit. Sheboygan. 
Hlllsvilte. St. Ignace. MlUersburg and 
Hlllsvllle. Mich. They will return to 
Duluth early n ext week. 

REV. NYLANDER ON 

TOUR IN CANADA 



DULUTH & NORTHERN MINNESOTA RAILWAY. 

OfHem. 510 Lanttfal* Bid*.. Duluth. 
Traina couii«ct at liuU« H'ver dally i«xe«H Sun- 
ilai) wUU U. *- L IL tralua leavUm DululU at t:3« 
a m. airtvUig at G.3« p. m- dally; eMtxs^ Suuday. 
Ccnnacta at Cramer with Uraud Uaralt ataga wbao 
ruiuilim. 



Duluth, South Shore & Atlantie. 



Leate 



ST.\T10N3 



ArrlT«L 



Redemption fund with U. 

S. treasurer (5 per cent 

of circulation) 

Due from U. S. treasurer.^ 

Total $13,953,774.91 

LIABILITIE.S. 

Capital stock paid in $ 500.000.00 

Surplus fund 1.600.000.00 

Undivided profits, less ex- 
penses and taxes paid.. 

Natiimal bank notes out- 
standing 1; • ■ • ; 

^blnks ..''.'.''.*.'■..." "*^ 830.371 

Due to state and private 

banks and bankers 

'Dividends unpaid .•■.•••• 
! Individual deposits subject 

to check •••■• 8.810.01&.-9 

Demand certificates of de- 
posit V ' 1" 

Time certificates of de- 
posit 

Certified checks •• 

Ca-shler'a checks out- 
standing • ••• 

United States deposits, 

$86,300.59; Pos*^*! „,^Y' 
Ings deposits. $4.».406.41. 

Deposits of U. .S. disburs- 
ing officers 

Premiums received 



LUNDMARK 
& FRANSON 

gOS TORREY BLDG. 



238.951.36 

299,997.50 

31 

451,848.23 
746.00 

015.59 

1,132.00 

991.436.05 
9.098.91 

81,667.67 
131,707.00 



Buy a lot now In Gle-i Avon, 
Seventh Division. Hunter's Faf^; 
then plan your home and build it 
In the spring and get the full bene- 
fit of the summer in that beautiful 
suburb. ^ __. 

Ftf tr-(oo4 Lot, f«50— gas. water and 
sewer. Small cash payment, bal- 
ance to suit. 



BIG BARGAIN 

lEW MODEM HOME 

In the best part of Lakeside. Six 
nice large rooms and big attic. Fin- 
ished in hardwood from top to bot- 
tom Stone foundation. Extra good 
hot water plant: laundry; linen 
closets; large bath room; clothes 
chute; splendid basement. House 
extra well built. Owner will sacri- 
Ice — leaving the city. 



310 and 311 ColnmbUi Bids. 




1? «9aiB •«.IS»«.. . UuluUj ....•!(». 30a« tS.Mpai 
' ' (Suu Line L'alun Stalloo.) 

t« I2»m •t.4itm.... Sutcrlor ....•»0.00«« fJ.IOwi 

' (Suo Lteie UiiloQ Station.) . - ,„_.^o 

*» Mas •• sSrti.r.. .-iupecior .... t.Mam tS.Mp* Reserved for taxes 
TB.«a" . -» ^xiuioa Ue»o4.l 

Arrt»«. ^^^ 

t; 5S#m i.«Om«i... Houghton ••-tll-OOp* 
ta «•• 6 30m«i.... Calumet .. ..TiO. I0»« 

IJIsST •S SU... Mar<iaeti. ...•II. 30pm tS.lOmi. 
''• *' .l0.20sm.8«Mlt Ste. "arte. .5 25pni 

•ftOtea... Uoauaal ••- **->*pm •8.20pai 

•«:za»M.... B«*to« ....••a.i»»« •«.3aMi 

fS aaaB^ ISpai... Montr-al .. .•lO.OOamtlO OOpm 
t'.??*"'^^ li?^--- j;e» Vorlc.... •7.I5PIH TH SUam 



63,699.41 

7.984.24 

25.129.66 



Rev O. Nylander, former pastor of 
the Third Swedish Baptist church. 
Fifty-ninth avenue west and Ramsey 
street who gave up the pastorate last 
July, la now on a speaking tour in 
Canada. He has been traveling in the 
North since his departure from the 
city and expects to continue his tour 
until the latter part of this month. 
Mrs. Nylander. who was with Mr. Ny- 
lander for the last month, returned 
Lome last Saturday evening. She also 



tl0.08pni»l0.20ain. 



f— Daily eiO'Pt Sunday. 



-Dally. 



Total $13.953.774 . 93 

State of Minnesota. County of St. Loula 

——38 

I. John H. Dlght. Cashier of the 
above named baak. do solemnly swear 
that the above statement is true^ to the 
best of my knowU^lge^and beHef^ 

Cashier. 



f 



Lakeside Bargain ! 



Owner moving West, will sell his 
fine seven-room bame. with hot wa- 
ter heat, stone foundation, haru- 
wood fioors, laundry tubs, etc.; lot 
100x150 with fine trees, shrubbery, 
vines, etc., only half a block from 
car line— on small cash payment. 
Price, M^iOO; worth easily fS.OOO. 

This Is a snap for someone. 

DULUTH REALTY CO. 

6O8 rtnt NaH«ksI Bank Bids. 



ARTICLES OF LNCORPORATIOX 

— OF— 

NORTHERN PACIFIC LAND & 

INVESTMENT COMPANY. 

For the purpose of forming a cor- 
poration pursuant to the provisions of 
Chapter 58, Revised Laws of Minnesota, 
1905 and the acts amendatory thereof 
and 'supplementary thereto, the under- 
signed have adopted, subscribed and 
acknowledged the following Certificate 
of Incorporation: 

ARTICLE 1. The name of this cor- 
poration shall be "Northern Pacific 
Land & Investment Company." 

ARTICLE 2. The general nature of 
the business of the corporation shall 
be buying, selling, leasing. Improving, 
mortgaging. holding. platting and 
otherwise dealing In any and all kinds 



The three persons hereinafter named 
being desirous of forming a corpora- 
tion for the purpose of carrying on the 
m^-chanical business of mining and re- 
ducing ores and minerals, do hereby 
subscribe and acknowledge the fol- 
lowing certificate under and pursuant 
to the appropriate provisions of Chap- 
ter Fifty-eight of the Revised Laws of 

Minnesota, 1905: 

FIRST. 
The name of the corporation shall be 
■'Duluth-Moctezuma Iron Company. 
The general nature of the business of 
this corporation shall be that of min- 
ing smelting, reducing, refining and 
working ores and minerals. The prin- 
cipal place of transacting the business 
of this corporation shall be Duluth. 
Minnesota, with such branch offices 
outside of the State as the Board of 
Directors may from time to time pre- 
scribe. 

SECOND. 
The period of duration of this corpo- 
ration shall be thirty (30) years from 
the date that it is organized. 
THIRD. 
The names and place of residence of 
the three incorporators are as follows: 

A L. Agatin. A. J. McLennan and A. 
O. Rabideau. all of whom reside in Du- 
luth. Minnesota. 

FOURTH. 
The management of its business shall 
be vested in a board of three directors, 
who shall be elected at the first re^gu- 
lar annual meeting of the stockholders 
of this corporation, which shall be held 
on the third Monday in January, 1913, 
and until such election the following 
shall compose the board of directors, 
to-wit: 

A. L. Agatin. 
A. J. McLennan. 
A. O. Rabideau. 

The annual meeting of said corpora- 
tion shall be held on the third Monday 
in January in each year at twelve 
o'clock noon. The present board of 
directors may fill any vacancy occur- 
ring therein at any time before the 
first annual meeting by a majority 
vote. The board of directors may at 
any time by a resolution increase the 
number of directors of the Company 
to five, and in such case the board shall 
elect two additional directors, who shall 
hold office until the next succeeding 
annual meeting of the stockholders, 



ORDER LIMITING 

CLAIMS, AND 

THEREON— . ^ ^ . 

State of Minnesota, County of St. Louis 

^— ss. 

In Probate Court. 
In the Matter of the Estate of Peter 

McAliiin, Decedent. 

Letters of administration this day 
having been granted to G. B. Gifford. 

IT IS ORDERED, That the time 
within which all creditors of the above 
named decedent may present claim.'; 
against his estate in this court be, and 
the same hereby is. limited to siv 
months from and after the date hereof, 
and that the 25th day of February, 
1913, at ten o'clock A. M.. in the Pro- 
bate' Court Rooms at the Court House 
at Duluth. In said County, be, and the 
same hereby is, fixed and appointed as 
the time and place for hearing upon 
the examination, adjustment and al- 
lowance of such claims as shall be 
presented within the time aforesaid. 

Let notice hereof be given by the 
publication of this order in The Duluth 
Herald, as provided by law. 

Dated Duluth, Minn., August 21st. 

191'' 

S. W. GILPIN. 
Judge of Probate. 
(Seal. Probate Court, St. Louis Co., 

Minn.) 
D. H., Aug. 27, Sept. 3, 10. 1912. 

ORDER TO EXAMINE FINAL AC- 
COUNT— 
State of Minnesota, County of St. 
Louis. — ss. 

In Probate Court. 
In the Matter of the Estate of James 
McDowell. Decedent. 
THE PETITION OF Marie J. Mc- 
Dowell, as representative of the above 
named decedent, together with her 
final account of the administration of 
said estate, having been filed in this 
court. representing. among other 
things, that she has fully administered 
said estate, and praying that said final 
account of said administration be ex- 
amined, adjusted and allowed by the 
Court, and that the Court make and 
enter its final decree of distribution of 
the residue of the estate of said de- 
cedent to the persons entitled thereto, 
and tor the discharge of the repre- 
sentative and the sureties on her bond. 
IT IS ORDERED. That said petition 
be heard, and said final account ex- 
amined, adjusted, and if correct, al- 
lowed by the Court, at the Probate 
Court Rooms in the Court House, in 
the City of Duluth in said County, on 
Monday, the 7th day of October. 1912. 
at ten o'clock A. M., and all persons 
interested in said hearing and in said 
matter are hereby cited and required 
at said time and place to show cause, 
if any there be, why said petition 
should not be granted. 

ORDERED FURTHER. That this or- 
der be served by publication in. The 
Dnluth Herald, according to law. 

Dated at Duluth, Minn., Sept. 10. 
1912. 

By the Court. 

S. W. GILPIN. 
Judge of Probate. 
(Seal. Probate Court. St. Louis CouB- 

tv. Minn.l 
D. H., Sept. 10. 17, 24. 1912. 



otherwise aeai...B '" -'7_J"'^oi-%" r"g " after which such additional directors 
S'onrincumber.'seir^ndlioSvet' milfe's shaU be elected by the stockholders in 



HOIELS. 

^ St. James Hotel 

213-215 Weat Superior Straet. 

European. Strictly modem. L'nU«r new nanafa- 
ment CoDTenlent to depvu and boau. Pbpular 
prlcca by day. Ualea by wank. %'t.tQ aad u». 



Correct — Attest: 

L. MENDENH.VLL. 
A. M. M.\RriHALL. 
A. L. ORDEAN. 

Directors. 



Subscribed and sworn to before me 
this 9th day of September. 1912. 
in.3 i^ ^^^ Q GEARHART, 

Notary Public, 
St. Louis County, Minn. 
(Notarial Seal. St. Louis Co.. Minn.) 
My commission •xpirss May. 16, 1914. 



WILLIAM a. SARGENT 

208 Exchnnge Bldg. 

I want an offer on a 7-room 
house and I00xl35-foot grounds 
at Woodland, one and a half 
block from street cars. The 
price and terms will surprise 
you. 
WE MAKE LOANS AND 
WRITE INSURANCE. 



and mining property and mining 
rights and privileges of every kind and 
nature; to explore for. mine, remove, 
dispose of and deal In all kinds of ores 
and minerals: to accept and acquire 
franchises, and rights-of-way for rail- 
roads, telephones and street railway^ 
and to own, operate, utilize, sell and 
dispose of the same; to buy, rent, lease, 
construct, utilize, maintain, sell. In- 
cumber and dispose of all kinds of 
railroads and street railway lines, and 
to equip and operate the same with 
steam, electricity or other motive 
power; to manufacture, buy. sell and 
generally deal in all kinds of motor 
cars, motors, engines and all kinds of 
machinery; to buy, hold, pledge, sell 
and transfer personal property; all 
kinds of merchandise, choses In action, 
mortgages; stocks, bonds, notes, bills 
of exchange and other evidences of in- 
debtedness of every kind and descrip- 
tion- to do business on commission 
and 'to act as agent, attorney or broker 
for other persons or corporations. In 
any business which such corporation 



the same manner as the three directors 
hereinabove provided for. 

The first meeting of the incorpora- 
tors and the board of directors shall 
be held without any notice thereof at 
Number 1107 Alworth Building. Duluth, 
Minnesota, on Friday, September 13th. 
1912 at ten o'clock In the morning. 
FIFTH. 

The amount of the capital stock of 
this corporation shall be Fifty thousand 
dollars (tr.O,00O.O«\ which Bhall be 
divided into fifty thousand (50,000) 
shares of the par value of one dollar 
(fl 06) each. Said capital stock shall 
be paid Fn from time to time in the 
manner and as called for by the board 
of directors. The board of directors 
may Issue stock in exchange for prop- 
erty, including options, and may grant 
options to subscribe for and purchase 
stock and other contractural rights to 
stock, and the judgment of the board 
of directors as to the value of such 
property and options shall be conclu- 

sracTH. 

The highest amount of indebtedness 
or liability to which this corporation 
shall at anv time be subject shall be 



might transact for Itself; to loan 
money to other persons or corporations. 

either as P'-»"«»P*i,.*%«"f^[ J^^^^^^^^^ thousand dollars < $50,000.00). 

negotiate >°^"«' «;"';^*''J'!^L^°^Pd |n- ^ W WHEREOF, the parti 

Jl^rce'SecumV Kr\he ^ymenf"o' ^ bave executed this certificate 



es 



ORDER FOR HEARING GUARDIAN'S 

ACCOUNT— 
State of Minnesota, County of St. Louis. 

S8. 

In Probate Court, 

Special Term September nth. 1912. 
In the Matter of the Guardianship of 

Merrill M. Clark. Incompetent. 

UPON FILING THE FINAL AC- 
COUNT OF Guardianship with a petition 
for final settlement and allowance of 
Flora L. Clark as executrix of the es- 
tate of Louis R. Clark, Guardian of the 
above named Incompetent. 

IT IS ORDERED, That said petition 
be heard, and the settlement and al- 
lowance of said account be made at a 
special term of the Probate Court to 
be held in and for said County of St. 
Louis, on the 2nd day of October, A. 
D 1912, at ten o'clock in the fore- 
noon, at the Probate Office In the 
Court Hou.se. in the City of Duluth. In 
said County. 

IT IS F1.:RTHER ordered. That a 
copy of this order be served by pub- 
Mcatlon in The Duluth Herald, accord- 
ing to law. 

Dated at Duluth, Minn., the 5th day 
of September. A. D., 1912. 

By the Court, „ ^ „„ „.r^ 

S. W. GILPIN, 
Judge of Prob.ate. 
(Seal Probate Court, St. Louis County, 

Minn.) ^„^ 

MASON M. FORBES, 
Attorney. 

710-711 Torrey Building. 
D, H. Sept, 10, 17, 1912. . ^ 




I 




rtk«« 



le 



Tuesday, 



THE DULUTH. IHER 



September 10, 



WHEAT BULLS 
MAKERALLY 

Upward Reaction Occurs in 

Spite of Magnificent 

Weather. 

Clear Sunny Skies and Large 

Offers Send Flaxseed 

Down. 



AMERICAN WHEAT MARKETS, SEPTEMBER 



Sept.— 

Pulutli 

Mtnneapolis . . . . 

rhicaKO 

Wlrmtpt'K. Oct.. , 

December — 

I>nliith 

-Mini'.t'.ii'i lis . . . 

ri»i< iii;!' 

\Vinni|i«K 

May — 

Duhitli 

Mlnneapi'lis • ■ • 
Chicago 



Sept. 

(kt. 

Nov. 



Open. 

.85% 



.87V4-% 



\n% 



High. 
.87% 
.86 
.91% 
M\ 

.«7%b 

.88%-% 

.91% 

.85%-%b 

.92 %b 

.93% 

.95% 



Low. 

.86% 
.85% 
.90% 
.88 

.87% 
.87% 
.90 
.85% 

.92 

.92%-% 

.94%-% 



Clofe. 
.87% 
.85% 
.91%a 

.88%b 

.87 %h 
.88 Si a 
.90 %b 
.8b%-%b 

.92%b 
.93 %b 
.9&%-'Aa 



8ept. ». 
.86%b 
.8<%b 
.»0%b 
.87%-%b 



10. 



1912. 



.87b 
.87%- 

.H<J%- 

.84 %b 

.»2%- 
.»4% 



%b 

i>Ua 



r HKO. 

1.01 '/ib 
l.ui %b 

.^■^% 
.9»>*b 

1.02 %b 
l.O.J'n. 

.9ti%- 
.97% 



'-ia 



%l> 



DULUTH LINSEED 



Open. 
.83 %b 
.83 



HiKh. 
.84%b 
.83%b 
.83%b 



Li>w. 

.83% 

.83a 

.83a 



MARKET. 

C'lope. Sept. ». 

.84 %b .»a%h 
.83 %b .hi: -lib 

.83%b .ttUiiin 



Y'r apo. 
l.l>l%b 



«•••••• 



DULUTH DURUM MARKET 



Sept. 

(Kt. 
Nov. 
l>ec. 



Optn. 

. 1.7(ia 

. l.CO% 

. l.eoa 

1 [.7a 



HiKh. 
1.70 
160% 
1.60 
1.57 



lA>W. 

1.66% 
l.r.7a 
1 56% 
1.54%a 



Close. 
1.66% 
1.59 
1.57a 
1.54 %a 



Sept. 

1.70 

1.6Ib 

1.60a 

l.bTb 



9. 



Y'r ago. 

a.bOb 
2.2.i 
2.23 
2.rJb 



92%fi)92%o; clM^ 93%c. 

CloulnK cash^^^Wi). 1 hard, 88 %c; No. 

1 northern. 86%«<87%c; to arrive, 
ti6%c; No. 2 northern, »2%®85%c; No. 

2 hard, Montankt^6'>«'^; No. 3 wheat. 
}*0%«|'«2%c. No. V-yellow corn, 73%c. 
No. 3 white oatft^Oc. No. 2 rye. 61© 
63c. ^~-i 

Uran In 100-lh iackH. |20. 

Flour — The market remained strong 
and active. ShlPiJients. 75.160 bblH. 
First patents, =«»# 4. 65; second pat- 
ents, $4.204|)4.55. first clears, |3.20<* 
8.60, second dears, |2.30©'2.60. 

Flax — Recelutn. -13 cars, year ago, 
12; shipments. ^'J Jpt-mand good. Clos- 
ing price, |1.7(>-%««.71%. 

Barley — Rectljjta. JiO cars; year ago, 
79; shipments, W. ft Barley In good de- 
mand. CloBinrf-rttge. 40 ©65c. 



track: No. 1 hard, 
northern to arrive. 



Ihe " 

in xf 
liarvt 



Puluth Board of Tru.le, Sept. 10.— 
Wheat had an upward reaction on 
'•■■ •« of North America today 
. xcellent thrashing and 
vealher through the great 
It region of the United 
..t,ada. l>uluth September 
tiaLiv closed %c higher. Cash 
rlc.»ed 1 cent over September 
lowed W VI p. oats %c off and 
, il unchanged. Duluth ijeptem- 
• ' . clostd 3% cents 
tnt» off. November 
vu iii-a lu-cember 2% 



S!, 

wh*-at 
whefit 

r- • 

r> - 

ber : 
lower 
S cenis 



cents 



off. 



St. 

r< - 
ti 

\v • 
A- 
al 

ii'". . 
Stilt 
of t? 
r I 

il. ■■ 
bad 
that 
a ' 
t; 
I" 
»j' ■ 

w - 



ti 

i: 



a., 
at 
ti< 



vcrnment rt port was construed 
, vn the wheat crop. 
' the weather was ideal for 
and tiirashlng over sub- 
..f fit. great spring wheav 
riian Northwest and 
wheat this morning 
t- markets of North 
,«; the more remark . 
.- '..v t that the pri- 
V ,,: America were 
.:nl vastly >" excess 
ago. There was a 
ng from the recent 
!it. The bears have 
\vn way for so long 
i:e is liot unnatural. 
. s into consideration 
government crop re- 
.•d yesterday, did 
, of the private 
.1 J. ad been made by 
;horitie», the upward 
morning is not so 
taiul. l-'\irthermore, 
...iipool and most other 
els was bullish, 
f-mber wheat. which 
at 86«4c bid, opened to. 
<1 at noon was ouoted 
.:• were higher quota- 
.igo, Minneapolis and 



Duluth close: New wheat — On 
H»%c; No. 2 northern. 86%c; No. 1 , ., . „^,i..^ 

northern to arrive Sept. 15, 86%c: No. 1 northern to arri\e 
n<.rthern to^arrlve .jp^^ .^^^ S^P^^^fli *'"fe*.- "^r^.^i^r- ^" 
Durum-<.n Uack: No^^l.^,*/^^,.-, N^, -i,3^.;?^bui. 

''WnTeV'^d-Ortrack^"|1.71%;Whern to arrive Sept. 15. 
11.66%; October, $1.59; November. $1.57 asked 
track, 31c; to arrive. 31c. Kye on track, 

bK4.»44 



tana No. 2 

9;:%4C bid. 

84 %c; No. 2. 82%f; 

bid: December. 84c. 

|1 67% : Septeml>er. 

11.54% asked. Oats on 



89%c; No. 1 northern, 

Sept. 1.'., 88% c; No. 2 

Sept. 20. 88%c; Mon- 

asked; MaV, 

To arrive: No. 1, 

; November. 83 %c 



Wew York Grata. 

New York, Sept/ 10.— Wheat close: 
September, $1.08% ©101%; December, 
»!)%c; May, |1.02%. 

•- • 

Liverpool Cirnln. 

Liverpool. Sept. 10. — Closing: Wheat 
— Spot, steady; No. 1 Manitoba, nom- 
inal; No. 2 Manitoba, Ss 5d; No. 3 
Manitoba, 8s 2%d; futures strong: Oc- 
tober. 78 7%d; December, 7b 4% d. 

Corn — Spot, quiet; American mixed 
old. 78 3%d; new American kiln dried, 
7b 2%d. Futures steady; September, 5s 
3 Ad; December, 6b l%d. 



HEAVY AT 
THEaOSE 

Stocks Start Higher But 

Trading Is Again Very 

Light. 

Prices Decline as Money 

Rates Climb and Gains 

Lost 



Southwestern Miami . 
Superior & Globe .... 

Temiskaming 

Tonopah ■ 

Tonopah Belmont .... 
Tonopah Extension . . 
United Verde Exten. 

West End 

Wettlaufer 

Yukon 



• 


' VA 




16c 


37c 


40c 


7% 


7% 


9% 


10 


2% 


3 


48c 


50c 


1% 


1% 


40c 


44c 


3% 


4 



December, 
62c; to ar- 



645,519 bu. last year 



'^'^*'Elevator receipts of domestic grain— Wheat, „, n f.7r. h„. rve 

r..iev»iwr .»- irt^ 167 180 bu; f.ax. none, last year ll,57i» bu, rye, 

35,'902 bu, last year 6,872 bu; corn, none. 



year 
oats, 



bu: barley, 181,329 bu. last 
46,900. last year 15,174 bu; 
year 5.065 bu. 

Shipments of domestic 
1,600 bu, last year 333 bu; 
bu, last year none. 

Elevator receipts of 
none, last year 985 bu 

Shipments of bonded grain 



Oato, 
o>u. 

No. a ryf. 3 
No. 3 rye. 2 

Mollt. wlMHtt. 

Mont, wlitmt. 

«rrl«e 
B«rli->, 
Marl»j. 
Ilarlcy. 
BarWy. 
lUih-y, 
liarlcy, 
B«rU7. 
i;«flcy. 
lUrl«y. 
Barley. 
lUrley, 



last 



grain — WT»eat, 
barley, 146,347 



257,158 bu, last year 52.681 bu; oats, 
bu. last year 197,619 bu; rye, 15.000 

flax. 



Corn and Wheat Bulletin 



FtT 

(lay. 



the twenty -fuur 
Hrpt. 10: 



)UlU(« 



erullug at > &. m.. Tue*- 



ETATIONS. 



bonded grain— Wheat, none, last year 4.485 
Flax, 960 bu, last year none. 



bu; 




Temperature 



Rain- 
fall. 



State o/ 
Weather! 



A heat closed today at an 

to ^d. On that market 

on the Balkan political 

tu-n. i'Uier bullish factors were 

American government crop report, 

failed to confirm extreme esti- 

American and Canadian over- 

- which were light and firm. 

^■ shortage of good, dry 

t market and continued 

the English crop. 

t laxMee*! <i««>* 1-ower. 

\V,.rrn, drv weather caused a 

In the Duiuth tlaxs'eed market 

Offers of Max to arrive 

from tht' • ■ 



«' 

Kit 
t»M 

Which 

luates*: 

Bigl.' 

ly lu 

wheal 
bad ref 



Replies to letters of inquiry sent out 
by The Herald in regard to crop con- 
ditions were received today as lol- 

lowtf * 

Falls. Ottertail county, 

spring wheat crop is good, ^ 

to 25 bu to the acre, with weather 
of 18 bu. The flax crop is 



and 



mand 
luth !- 

at ii' 

< 

t - . 

Ay res 
at II ( 
ber 
at I- 



is'w 



Vl . 



break 

today. 

futures 

try were heavy. The de- 

particularly strong. Du- 

I and November flaxseed 

was 3%c off, October 3c 

i.-r 2%c off. Winnipeg 

t noon was Ic off, at 

.luth October. Buenos 

ia.>st night closed Ic off, 

London Calcutta Septem. 

tr closed ^c off today, 



f aHh »»ie» Tuesday. 



1, W) arrive. 



ru, to arriTe. 



1. 11. U) u.'Tive 

.. to ariiie 

;■ arrhe 

, ■.. lo anive 

., to arrife 

.. 10 It). In more. 



' ar 



^L. 


, 


Wo. 




N« 


»....■.■ 


Kn. 


1 IM 


Ko. 


I 1:< 


tUt. 




1 












N». 


2 !•' 


Ko. 


I r:. 


No. 


1 ;. 


,N.' 


1 I 



to 
to 



arrirr . 
strive. . 



, car. . 
c-ar . 

till, to 



iiTTift Sn>t . . 



arrh e 



No i 

Bar. 

Ni> 



Itlff 

10 arrive 

Kt arri»e 

arrive 

;o arrlte 

arrive ^% 

.82 



.BS 
.M 
.87% 
.»;•, 

.fu»^ 

.87 

.87% 
.87% 
.»7H 
.SGTfc 
.87^4 
.87% 
.86% 
.8T-!i 
.86% 
.87% 
.8Tli 
.88% 
.84% 
.84<>& 
.84% 
.82 
.84 
.84% 
.84^ 
.»■»% 
.84% 
.87H 
.84% 
.87% 
.87% 
.87% 
.8T% 
.49 
.92 
.85% 
.84% 
1.70 
.87% 
.87 
.87% 
.87% 
.84% 
.26 
.87% 
.84 
.80 
.SO 
.47 
. 4<! 
. .84 
. .45 
1.70 
. .8€% 
, .86'* 
. .84 
.87% 



Fergus 
Minn. — The 
running 10 
an average _. _- 

also good and will yield 5 to 12 bu to 
the acre, with an average of about 12. 
Barley runs 25 to 40 bu, averaging 
3'' bu 

'Medicine Lake. Valley county, Mont. 
Help is short and thrashing is con- 
sequently slow. Kaln would do a 
great deal of damage, as the grain Is 
well shocked. The quality is gener- 
ally good. Wheat and flax crops are 
good, spring wheat running 16 to 35 
bu to the acre with an average of 20 
bu and flaxseed 10 to 24 bu to the 
acre with an average of 15 bu Bar- 
ley runs 30 to 40 bu, averaging 35 bu. 
Cando, Towner county. N. D. — Spring 
wheat is bleached and somewhat 
sprouted, and is running 15 to 25 bu 
to the acre. The flaxseed crop is fair, 
but there has not yet been any thrash- 
ing of It. Barley is thrashing 30 to 
40 bu to the acre. 

McClusky. Sheridan county, N. D.-- 
Wheat is good, going from 13 to 27 
bu to the acre; 15 to 20 bu catches the 
most. Flax is not so good. 

Washburn, McLean county. N. D. — 
There is a good grade of wheat here. 
Spring wheat thrashes 20 to 26 bu to 
the acre and durum wheat about the 
same. Flax Is fair. It is not yet 
all harvested. It will run 10 to 16 
bu to the acre. Barley will run 30 
to 40 bu to the acre. 

The following l8*from B. W. Snow: 
"The government conditions on July 1 
indicated a winter wheat yield of 13.9 
bu per acre, but the preliminary 
thrashing returns on Aug. 1 showed 
15 1 or 1.2 bu above the Indication. Next 
month the thrashing returns for spring 
wheat and for oats will show 
result. Spring wheat will gain 
than a bushel and oats nearly 
thrashing returns to date 



000,000 bu. Should the frost hold off 
for two weeks, the crop will be made 
beyond the possibility ot damage, 
though it might be caught In the 
fields by early snows and rains as it 
was last year. It is simply ainazlng 
to discover the amount of seed thai 
has been sown in Saskatchewan, and 
practically all of the big increase is in 

that province." 

• ♦ « 
Clearances— Wheat. 391 000 bu: flour 
22.000 bill; wheat and "our equal lo 
490,000 bu; corn. 3,000 bu; oats. lal.OOO 

^"- • . . 

Minneapolis, indemnities: December 
puts, 87 %c bid; cans. 89 %c bid. 

American primaries: Wheat— -Re. 

ceipts. today. 1,942.000 *>"• >«*»• a^i'i' o^'o 
344T0OO bu! shipments, today 1.21o,ooo 
bu. year ago, 440,000 bu. Corn— Re- 
ceipts, today. 921,000 bu year ago 7 6 
000 bu; shipments, today, 580,000 bu, 
year ago, 1,358,000 bu. 

Broomhall says that in every county 
of both England and Wales the potato 
crop is badly diseased. Warm dry 
is wanted in all the counties 
for corn and the outlook is £e[»«rally 
unfavorable. The oats crop will gen- 
erally be a short one. 

• • * 

Duluth car inspection: Wheat--J^o. 1 
hard. 4; No. 1 northern, 222, No. 2 
northern, 78; No. 3 13; No. <• 
em red, 1; rejected, 2; no grade, 65, 
durum, 63; winter. 20; total whe^at 
last year. 579; oats, 20; last year, 
barley. 46; last year. 218; rye, 
year. 13; flax, none; last year, 
1; last year. 8; total of all 
on track, 657. 



4; west- 

65 

472 

18; 

29; last 

7; corn, 

grains, 568; 



MiiiiieaiKiria Cloudy 

Alnaiidria I'lear 

('auiltbell Clear 

Creokirton Clear 

r>etrolt City Clear 

HatstaO Clear 

.Moiitev ideo Pt. Cloudy 

.New Ulm Cloudy 

Park Kaplda Clear 

KorliCBter Cluudy 

Winnebago City Cluudy 

Wortblnxton Cloudy 

Aberdeen Cloudy 

.Millbank Pt. C^lou«ly 

UJfihell KaUiiiig 

Pollock ., Cloudy 

KeUfltId Cloudy 

Kioux Falls Cluudy 

Walertown Cltudy 

Yaitktcit Raining 

Aineiila Cloudy 

Kotl'ineau Clear 

U0Hl>eIla Clear 

Itlckinsun J..;:. Cloudy 

Grafton Clear 

Jamestown Clear 

l.aiigiktn Clear 

l.arinior« Clear 

Lisbon noudy 

.Mlnot Clear 

.NatMileon Pt. Cloudy 

Pembina Cloudy 

Wahiieton Clear 

BUUiigs Cloudy 

iliuluth Clear 

J-Moorhead Clear 

IHL Paul Clomly 

ILa Ouaae Cloudy 

{Huron Uainlng 

IPlerre Clouily 

IKapId City Haiuliig 

iHLimarck ..Clouily 

iUi-«ila L4ike Clear 

{(iraiid Korha Clear 

{WUIUton Foggy 

(Havre Clear 

Ikniea City Cloudy 

j:.Mlnne<l«8a ,. Clear 

|tWliiiiiiK« Cloudy 

ItUuAppelle Clear 



Cars of 



wheat 



Duluth 

Minneapolis 
Winnipeg • . 
Chicago • • • • 
Kansas City 



received — 

Monday. 

472 

468 

. 67 

420 

172 



St 



Louis, 
Cars of linseed 



Year 
ago. 
679 
170 
212 
609 
109 

23,000 



Year 
ago. 

7 

12 

None. 



88 
93 

80 
80 
80 
80 
90 
80 
82 
82 
76 
74 
68 
68 
68 
78 
74 
70 
78 
8U 
68 
76 
76 
8« 
68 
78 
76 
90 

82 
78 
70 
74 

72 

66 
68 



74 
58 



64 

56 

48 

50 

48 

46 

56 

62 

50 

66 

60 

68 

52 

52 

54 

50 

58 

58 

56 

60 

50 

38 

36 

40 

54 

44 

48 

40 

46 

38 

38 

48 

46 

84 

66 

48 

66 

68 

54 

58 

52 

46 

44 

46 

36 

36 

44 

44 

50 

3i 



il 
.10 





« 





.12 

.38 
.04 


.20 




14 












.02 

.04 


.16 
.12 

.16 












THE PRODK-E MARKETS. 



Mew York. 

Nt-w York. Snrt. 10.— Butter— 8Uady; »««*»»**•'*•" 
S21 tubh; e-reamery txtius. 28%e'29c; nrrta, 27e'28c; 
aUte dairy lube, finest, 27«»27%t; proceea eitrae, 
2.'i%g2«K'; Bmta, 24%fe2r>c; factory, June make, 
flraU, 2:4c; factory, current make, flrata, 22%c. 
Cheese— I':aey ; receluta, 2.676 boxes; state whole milk, 
new, specials, white or cwlored. 16c: do. average, 
fancy, white or colored. 15%c; do, under grade*. 
14^15%c; dalales, new. bent, lC%c; eklms, 4«ol3«. 
Eggs— Firm: receipts, 20.48j cajies; fresh gathered 
extran, 27^2fic; extra ttrsts, 25^<26c: firots, 23@ 
24c; fresh gathered dirties. No. 1, 20^20%c; frcsb 
Kalhiretl cheiks, good to fine. 18%e'10c; refrigerator. 
Bnta, season's storage charges paid, 23@24c; weat- 
eni gaUiered whites. 26ia)29c. 



Com. Keatinir 

Elenita 

Keating ■ 

Mowitza 

North America 
San Anton . . . 

St. Mary 

Sierra 

Summit 

Tuolumne . . .. 
Vermilion . . . . 

Sales — 
Butte Alex 



Shares. 
Scott ..100 



2.00 

i!66 



1.00 

.10 

2.75 

2.25 

High. 

$10.31^ 



8. 



.59 
,1J 
.S& 

1.12 
8.7S 

.10 
1.25 

.12 

2.87 

2.7s 

Low. 



New York, Sept. 10.— Yesterday s 
brilliant crop report and the apparent 
Improvement In the Mexican situation 
imparted a mildly stimulating effect 
to the stock market today, although 
trading was again very light and al- 
most wholly professional. Reading and 
Union Pacific were most active and 
strongest of the speculative favorites, 
with underlying strength in the Hill 
iBsues, St. Paul and Lehigh valley. 
Smelting made the best showing of the 
metal and allied issues. Steel, however, 
held firm pending publication of Au- 
gust tonnage figures. Harvester, the 
Tobaccos, Mexican Petroleum and a 
few more obscure specialties were up 
1 to 3 points. Bonds were steady. 

Aside from one-point gains in 
Harvester and Woolworth, price 
changes In the early dealings on 
the stock exchange today were 
unimportant. Southern Pacific and 
some of the Grangers and trunk lines 
recorded fractional advances, presum- 
ably as a result of yesterday's gov- 
ernment crop report. 

Large fractional gains were shown 
by the leading stocks during the first 
hour. High priced Industrials moved 
in contrary currents, Sears-Roebuck 
falling 3 points, while Leggitt-Myera 
gained nearly as much. 

Profits were taken In Steel on the 
publication of the favorable tonnage 
figures and the price sank under yes- 
terday's closing. The general tone also 
became heavy with effective pressure 
aaglnst the coppers. 

The market closed heavy. The prices 
went down as money rates climbed, 
with some issues ruling a point be- 
low their best prices. Including Union 
Pacific and Amalgamated. 

* ■ 

New York stock quotations furnished by Gay A 
Bturgia, 326 Wert Su perior streeC 

Low. I Clone. |S«pt. 9 



Chicago. 

Chicago, Sept. 10— Butter— Steady; receipt*, 13.- 
995 tubs; creamery extras. 28c; extra firsts. 2C%c; 
firsts, 25 %c; se<-onds, 24c: dairy extras, 24 %c; 
flms. 23 %c; seconds, 22 %c; ladlea. No. 1. 22c: 
packing. 21c. Kgg»— Steady; receipts. 9.700 cases; at 
niaric, caaea included. 17%^'18%c; ordinary firsts. 
19c; firsU. 21c. Cheoe— Steady : daisies. 15%^ 
I6c; twins. 15%@15%c; young Americas, 15%fel6c; 
long horns. lo%@16c. Potatoes — Kteady; receipt?, 
47 cars: Michigan and Minnesota. 4J(S:>0t; Wtocon- 
sin. 40«50c. Poultry— Live, weak; turkeys, 13c; 
uliiekens. heavy, 14c: Ugbt. 12 %c; aprtngs. 15c 
Veal— Steady; 9@14%c. 



WOMAN WITH $500,000 

HAS LEFT NO WILL 

Waukegan, HI., Sept. 10 —Despite the 
fact that Bhe left an estate of l&OO.- 
000. Mrs. Margaret Steele left no will, 
so her only child. Nelson Steele, presi- 
dent of a Waukegan bank. Is the sole 
heir The Inheritance makes him the 
richest man in Waukegan. 



TOO LATE 
TO CLASSIFY 



Each 



■■•ertioa. 
IS C«a«| 



Ooe CcBt • Word 
No Advcrttoemeat 



Hair, Moles, Warts removed forerer. 
Miss Kelly. 131 West Superior street. 



Farm lands at wholesale prices. L. A. 
Larsen Co., 214 Providence building. 



STOCKS— 



High. 



Ui-JklAKKS — Showers fell over Iowa, Minnesota. 
South Dakota. Nebraska, Kansas and Western Wis- 
consin; heavy rain* fell over Nebraska and WcsUm 
Iowa. Omaha reinirlhig 2.54 Inches; hot weather pre- 
\aU«l Monday in the Mlasiaslppl. lower Missouri and 
Otao T»U«ff. H- W. KICHAHIJSON. 

Local Forecaster. 



same 
more 
6. My 
Insure this 
result Just as they forecasted the ad- 
vance In winter wheat yields." 
« « * 
Grain in store at Chicago, Sept. 9— 
Wheat total. 4,015,000 bu^.^^^f urease. 
271,000 bu; last year, 1».'<».^00 bu. 
Corn, 258,000 bu; increase, 119,000 bu, 
last year, 1,644.000 bu. Oats, 2,516,000 



682.000 bu; last year, 10,- 



1,292,000 

year, 12,- 

Increase. 

bu ; oats, 

bu; last 




bu; Increase, 

998.000 bu. , ^„^ ^ 

Contract stocks — Wheat, 
bu decrease, 206,000 bu. ; last 
320,000 bu. Corn, 23,000 Mr, 
22,000 bu. ; last year, 335,000 
140,000 bu; Increase, 24,000 
year, 2,668,000 bu. 

P J Anderson, of Conrad, Teton 
rountv, Mont., representative of the 
Duluth grain firm of McKindley * 
Nicholls, who was on" the floor of the 
Duluth Board of Trade today, stated 
that the grain crops of that port of 
Montana were magrjiflcent. In one 
part of the Conrad district, said 

'wheat has been thrashing 51 bu 
the acge Of course this is exceptional, 
even for that region, but I should not 
be surprised to see our winter wheat 
near Conrad average as high as J5 bu 
to the acre. Spring wheat is also giv- 

ng a fine yield, though perhaps not 

^ so large as the winter wheat, 
is also making an 
In some places near 
as high as 20 bu to 

, think It win^a^;e^rage^^^ ^^^^ ^^^^^ 

Montana Is fast de- 



he, 
to 



quite 
Fla.x 
yield, 
going 



heard 
as a 



The 



GOOD FIRM TO SHIP 
YOUR GRAIN TO 

ATWOOD-URSON 
COMPANY, Inc. 

Special attention given to cash 
grains. We glv© all shlpmcnta our 
personal attention. 



DULUTH. 




.MINNBAPOUS. 



eral. 

wan. 

tracts 

wheat and tla^' . 

the outlook could 

were left to the 

conceive it. 
exceptionally strong 
iVeavy. and the same 
seed In 

icVi 
of the 
province 
at the present 

that It will 

test amount_ 



Saskatche- 
^everal larg'.^ 
cultivation in 



excellent 

Conrad It is 

the acre and 

from 10 to 12 

bu. Barley 

farming state. ' ^ ^ ^ 

The Chicago Paint & Varnish Record 

« vs "Never were there such optimls- 

'it^ ^enorVs f rom Canada concerning 

lli'e It^oyl'lf grains and cereals in gen- 

Returned visitors to 

where they have 

of land --^«/ ,Ke-^Hter that 

not be better if it 

maglnatlon of man 

stand of wheat Is 

to conceive "..t— „ and the growth 

is true of flax- 

time which would »ug- 
ill not produce by lar 
pest tnai n ""* "V of seed that it 
The PJ:«*«^^„^,^o/J^°d Thlre is not the 
ever has P'^.°"^,„ .he minds of those 
slightest *l«"tL»- »"o\er "saSatchewan 
^h^' ^'^'ni ^ve a^least 10.000,000 bu 

ment. the a",^_^^% i 711.000 acres. If 
in the <5^'"'l"if," average of 8 bu be 
the very Bmall a\"^f° Canada will 
adopted as the measi^re ^ ^^ ^^ 

lave I3.6^^:?,»0r^oduce 15,399.000 bu 
surprising to see 



bu 126,000 

received — 

Monday 

Duluth None. 

Minneapolis ^^ 

Winnipeg i"V 

Foreign closing cables: J-iverpofi— 
W^heat, %d to »4d higher; com, Hi«l Jo 
iVd higher. Paris— WTieat. »^c to %c 
higher; flour, hie higher. Berlin— 
W^eat. %c higher. Budapest-'W heat 
%c lower. Antwerp — \\neat, ly^c 
higher. 

CHICAGO MARKET. 

Bullish Cables Cause Wheat Prices 
to Make Some Advance. 

Chicago, Sept. 10. — Bullish cables to- 
day cauged the wheat market to take 
an upturn. Opening prices were %c to 
%c higher. December started at 90»4c 
to 90 %c, an advance of >A@%c to %@ 
He and rose to 90Hc. 

After a little further gain, the mar- 
ket suffered a backset owing to large 
sales of new wheat here from the West. 
The close, however, was strong with 
December Ic to 1^/ic net higher, at 
90 %c. 

December corn opened a shade to % 
@^c lower at 53%c to 53'Ac, but ral- 
lied to 53Tii,Cf54c. , „ ^ 

Subsequently prices fell sharply as 
a result of wheat weakness. The close 
was unsettled with December He un- 
der last night, at b2%it,:>3\^c. 

Oats held steady. December started 
one sixteenth off to a like amount up 
at 32^4c to 32%c and hardened to 32% 
^ 32 He. 

Slowness of demand weakened pro- 
visions. 1- irst sales ranged from 7H 
ft 10c lower to 2 He advance, with Jan- 
uary 118.87 H for pork, J10.65 to 
$10t;7H for lara and JIO. 10 for ribs. 

Cash grain: Wheat— No. 2 red, $1.04 
(&'1.05H; No. 3 red, 95c(&'?1.04H : No 2 
hard, 91Hi&92c; No. 3 hard, 90H&92c; 
No. 1 northern, 92ff93c; No. 2 northern. 
87&90c; No. 3 northern, «3©'87c; No. 2 
spring, 87@90c; No. 3 spring, 83ef87c; 
No. 4 spring, 82® 86c: velvet chaff. 
83V'&90He; durum. 87® 90c. Corn — 
No."2, 76H<&77*4c; No. 2 white, lS(u)iOc; 
No 2 yellow, 77(a'77Hc; No. 3, 76® 
77 He; No. 3 white, 78®79Hc; No. 3 
yellow. 76'm <&''78'/4c: No. 4, 75®77c; No. 
4 white, 77H<&'78Hc; No. 4 yellow, 
76H#"7Hc. Oats — No. 2 white, 34 »A 
e)3Bc; No. 3 white, 32i4@)33c; No. 4 
white, 31%@32»4c; standard, 33@34c 

No. 2 rye, 6"Hc. Barley, 45(&72c. 
Timothy seed. $2.50® 4.00. Clover seed. 



t— Not laelwtea In the dlstrlet areraga, |— Maxi- 
mum ot yesterday, nanlmum I'f last night. •— HlgU- 
«t yesurday. t— Lowest for twenlyftur boura. end- 
ing 8 a. m . severty- fifth meriJlan time. 

NOTE The average highest and lowest temper- 
atures are made up at each center from iha actual 
uumtttt of reportj receited. and the arerage preclpi- 
taUon from the number of staUoos reporting 0.10 
Inch 01 laore. The "itata of weaUier" la that »r«- 
taUlug at time ot «bacrTatlon. 



Cirtton OU 

Telephone Co.. 
Beet Sugar... 

Smelting 

LocomotiTC . . . 



pfd... 
Ore... 



ChlcdKO LIveMtock. 

CWcago, Sept. 10 — (.•aule— UfceUilg. S.500; mar- 
ket steady; beeres, »5.75e'10.70; Texas steers. 14 75 
^« 40: wMtem steers. $5.8566 30; stocken and feed- 
ers $4 25€7.U0; cows and lielftrs, 13.00^8.00; 
calree. $8.»0«} 11.50. Hogs— Hecelpt*. 11.000; market 
slow, shade under yesterday; IWht, $8.45® 15; 
mUe<I. $«.00^-9K.; heavy, $7.80a8.t'0; rough. $7.80 
©8 00 pigs, $5.25^8.21); bulk tf sales, $8.20@8.80. 
Sheep— Receipts. 28,000; market strong, 10c higher; 
naUre $3.50^4.75; western, $3.60«j4.75; ytarUngs. 
$4 70@5.75; lambs. naUve. $4.76fe7.40; western, 
$S.00®7.59. 

Midway HorNe Market. 

Minnesota TraiisftT. St. Paul, Minn., Sept. 10.— 
Barrett A Zimmerman report: Tlie markK la 
somewhat Qulet, with clearance limited to retail or- 
ders from local teaming interesU and farmers frum 
Uinneaota and Wisconsin. Bhii'niiiite were made to 
Bemidjl LitUe falU, and Mora, Minn., and Whed- 
and Balsam Lake, Wis. Mules and cheap- 
of Uonea cooUoue without call. Values as 



er, Vilas, 
cr classes 
follow : 

Prafters, extra 

Drafters, choice 

Drafters, ct mmon to gf)Od 

Farm mares and horsm, exua. . . 
Farm mates and horses, choice. 
Fann liorses, lommou to good... 

U«ll,cry 120<'.210 

l»rlvers and saddlers "*^° ?"5! 

Mulea, according to slie 150e'240 



Amalgamated 

Anaconda 

American 

American 

American 

American 

American 

Atchison 

Balljnore & Ohio 

Brooklyn Rapid Tranilt 

Canadian Pacific 

Car Foundry 

Colorado l-^jel ic Iron. . 
ClieftupeaJie A. Ohio ... 

Consolidated Uas 

Central Leather 

.\merican Can 

Erie 

do 1st 

Great Northern 
t:rcat Northern 

Oenrral Electric 

Bellileliem Steel 

Intertwrough 

do pfd 

Lehigh 

Ix>ui8TlUe * NaahTtll* 

Missouri. Kansas & Taxaa. 

Missouri Pacific 

New York Central .... 

Northern Pat'iflc 

Norfolk A Weatem... 

Nalloual Load 

<!ugi!enhriu»sr 

I'ennsyUanla 

IVessed Steel 

Heading 

Rock Island 

Itepublic Steel A Iron 

Rubber 

Southern Pacific .... 

Sugar 

Southern Railway ... 

St Paul 

I'nlcn Pacific 

Steel common 

do pfd 

Virginia Chemical ... 

Wabash pfd 

Wehtem Union 

Westinghouse 



.$190^250 
. .120^1t'0 
. 00fen5 
. 140(ft'180 
. 115(ft'140 
70®11.T 



88^ 


87% 


87% 


88 


46% 


46% 


46% 


46% 


56 H 


66% 


56% 


66% 


144 


144 


144 


144 


75% 


74% 


74% 


74% 


««H 


85% 


85% 


86% 


!,*\ 


43% 


43% 


42% 


108% 


108%! 


108% 


108% 


107 


106% 


106% 


106% 


90% 


90% 


90% 


90% 


274% 


273% 


274% 


274% 


61)% 


60% 


«0% 


61% 


35% 


84% 


34% 


34% 


80% 


80 


80 


80 


145% 


145 


145 


145 


81 


30% 


30% 


30% 


40% 


39% 


39% 


39% 


36 


36 


36 


3«% 


52.% 


52% 


52% 


52% 


139% 


139 


139% 


139% 


46% 


46 


46 


46 


181% 


181% 


181% 


183 


40% 


89% 


40% 


40% 


19% 


19% 


19% 


19% 


58% 


58% 


58% 


58% 


168 


167% 


167% 


167% 


1«1% 


161% 


161% 


162% 


29% 


28% 


28% 


28% 


41% 


40% 


40% 


40% 


115% 


114% 


114% 


115 


12T% 


127 


127 


126% 


116 


116 


116 


116% 


60% 


60% 


60% 


60% 


50% 


59% 


B9% 


59 


124% 


124 


124 


124 


37% 


37% 


37% 


37 


169% 


168% 


168% 


168% 


26% 


26% 


26% 


25% 


27% 


27% 


27% 


27% 


51% 


51% 


51% 


51% 


110% 


109% 


10»% 


109% 


127% 


126% 


126% 


126% 


30% 


29% 


30 


29% 


107% 


106% 


106% 


107 


169% 


168% 


168% 


160 


7i»% 


72% 


72% 


73 


113 


113 


112% 


112% 


441 


45 


45 


46 


14% 


14% 


14% 


14% 


82 


81% 


81% 


82 


87% 


87% 


87% 


87% 



BEARISH DAY 

FOR COPPERS 



The copper stock market was dull 

and Inclined to ease off today. The 
weakness of the general stock mar- 
ket of New York and the bearishness 
of the copper metal market of London 
pulled down the copper stocks. Chief 
Consolidated closed a little higher, but 
there were declines In Butte & Supe- 
rior, Calumet & Arizona, North Butte 
and Amalgamated. Butte & Superior 
and Calumet & Arizona each lost more 
than $1. The London copper metal 
market today closed with spot end 
futures 8s 9d lower than yesterday. 
• • • 
The News Letter of Thompson, 
Towle & Co. says: 

- "Greene-Cananea at the present time 
Is turning out approximately 55,000,000 
pounds of copper per annum. Produc- 
tion, however, should steadily Increase 
month by month, and It Is not unrea- 
sonable to expect that In 1913 the out- 
put should reach 60,000,000 pounds. 

"Greene has not been able to main- 
tain the low figure of around 9c, 
which It had attained some months 
back. We understand that costs at 
the present time are higher as a result 
of the construction work, which is 
now going on at the property, and Is 
approximately the same as that ob- 
tained during 1911. During that, year 
the total cost, crediting gold and silver 
values and miscellaneous revenues, 
was 9.08c and with construction 9.Sc 
per pound. However, this extraordinary 
construction work, which Is now 
progress, namely, the Installation 
Great Falls converters, additional 
blowing engines, etc.. will soon 
completed and Greene s cost 
again decrease, and reach the 
previously attained, ^,^„„,„ 

"It appears safe to figure Greene 
when working at normal capacity, as 
at least a 9c producer. On 
pounds production, present 
ket and a 9c oost, Gre> 
should show earnings of $2 per share. 
The future for the company in 
bright, and In 1913, with its 
production, Greene 
make an excellent 



WANTED TO RENT. 



WANTED TO RENT — OCT. 1 IN EAST 
end, five to six-room house or flat, 
with some yard; must be modern; 
family of three; state rent and loca- 
tion. O 494, Herald. 

WANTED TO RENI — COTTAGE OR 
lower flat, five or six rooms; thor- 
oughly modern; East end; about one 
block from car line; small garden; 
no children; permanent tenants. A 
382 Herald. 



FOR RENT— TWO LARGE FUR- 
nlshed rooms, suitable for gentlemen; 
East end; references required. Mel- 
rose, 3516. , 

PERSONAL — PORTIERES MADE TO 
order; $1 a yard. Call Grand, 2266-D. 
117 East Eighth street. 

FOR RENT— FIVE ROOMS. WATER, 
gas and light; $12. Call 420 First 
avenue east. 

WANTED TO RENT — SIX-ROOM 
flat with barn to accommodate one 
horse; must be central. Address Z, 
453. care Herald. 



in 
of 
al 
be 
should 
fignres 



60,000,000 

metal mar- 

Greene-Cananea 



»gARRIAGE LICENSES. 

Gust Pappas of Milwaukee and Lil- 
lian Payne of Appleton, Wis. 

Cllffton Butterfield and Alice Preston. 

Gustav Hakanson and Hilda Julia 
Larson. 

SOLID GOLD WEDDING AND EN- 
gagement rings made and mounted 
to order at Henricksen's. 



indeed 
Increased 
Cananea should 
record." 

• * 



ThP following wire was received 
the' government crop report. 



showing 

The har- 

In history 

channels agree 



figures better than expected 
vest will be the greatest 
this year. The best chai- 
that the stock market has not dis 
c5unted^he°outlook. Money ma ters 
only hold speculation Inc^^ck politics 
Mexico and other matters being ig- 
nored Editorial opinion on the Maine 
election as a rule agrees that It af- 
fords no guide. Banker aw Rey- 
nolds at the American Bankei-s con 
ventlon Is quoted as saying that not 
i^ thlrty-tv/o years has prosperity 
little chance of being shaken 
present. Information channels 
I vorable to purchase 



BIRTHS. 

JURKANIC — A daughter was born to 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Jurkanic of Lake 

avenue and Thirteenth street Sept. 8. 
LA PANTA — A daughter was born to 

Mr and Mrs. M- '^ La Panta of 103to 

West First street Sept. 9. 
BOARD — A daughter was born to Mr. 

and Mrs. A. Board of 331 West Third 

street Sept. 6. 
WEBER — A daughter was bom to Mr. 

and Mrs. W. A. Weber at St. Lukes 

hospital Sept. 5. 
BOUCHARD — A son was born to Mr. 

and Mrs. E. Bouchard of 1135 Lake 

avenue south Sept. 7. 
NEALLY — A son was born to Mr. and 

Mrs. G. J. Neally of 313 East Slxtli 

street Sept. 1. 



als\ 



of 



as 
are 
stocks on 



so 
at 
fa- 
all 



TXital aalea, 276.900. 



BOSTON COPPER STOCKS 



received 



been ex- 
who was 



Ihe 



llobton stock quotations tmnUhed bw Ov 
Slurgia, 326 Weat Buperior street^ 



L>fai<ed StockM— 



Bid. 1 Asked. 



$13.00®17.00. 



Wheal 
Sept .... 
Iiec ... 
May ... 

Corn — 
Sept .... 
I >ec ... 
May ... 

Oats — 
Sept . .. 
Pw . . . 
May . . . 

Pork— 
Setit . . . 
Oit . . . 

Jan . . . 

Larrt— 
Sept .. 
Oct 
I>ec 
Jan 

Short 
Sept .. 
Oct .. 
Jan 



t)pcn. 
.90%-% 
.90%-% 
.04%-% 



.72% 

.53%- 
.52%- 

.?1% 

.32%- 

.34% 



% 
% 



High. 

.91% 

.91-% 

.95% 

.78% 

.53%-54 

.53 



Low. 

.90% 
.90 

.04%-% 

.71% 
.52% 
.51% 



.32% 

.34% 



i: 


00-02% 


17 


05 


.17 


25 


17. 


25 


.18.87% 


18 


87% 


11 


07% 


11 


10 


11 


15 


11 


15 


.10 8^ 


10 


70 


IP 


.65-67% 


10 


67% 


.10 


70 


10.72% 


.10 


.80 


10 


.80 


.10 


.10 


10 


.10 



.31% 

.32 

.34% 

16.96 
17.07% 
18. 7j 

11.02% 
11.02% 
10.62% 
10.67% 

10.62% 

10.65 

10.02% 



Ooec. 

.91% 
.90% 
.95%-% 

.71% 

.53%-% 

.5::% 

.32 
.32%-% 

.34%-% 

.17.02% 
17.20 
18.85 

11. n 
11.10 
10 67% 
10.6:i%-6S 

10.70 
10.70 
10.07% 



South St. PanI Llveatoek. 

South St. Paul. Minn., Sept. 10. — Cat- 
tie — Receipts, 2,800; killers, steady and 
strong; steers, $6.00 (& 8.25; cows and 
heifers, $3.i:5(&'6.00; calves, 25c to 50c 
higher, $4.00(8' 10.00; feeders, steady 
and strong, $3.50^7.00 

Hogs— Receipts, 2,000; steady to 
weak; range, $8.00@8.85; bulk, $8.25® 

OCA 

■ gheep — Receipts. 1,600; steady to 25c 
higher; lambs, $3.00 ©6.35; wethers, 
$3.5u(S'4.00; ewes, $1.36<&t3.65. 

New York IMoner. 

New York, Sept. 10. — Money on call, 
firm; 3%® 4% per cent; ruling rate, 
3% per cent; closing bid, 4^; offered 
at 4»^ Time loans, strong; 60 days, 5 
per cent and 90 days S^Ov*; six 
months, 5®5V». ^., ,,, 

Close: Prime mercantile paper, 514 
to 6 per cent. Sterling exchange weak 
at $4,83.15 for 60 days and at $4-86.H) 
with actual business in bankers bills 
for demand Commercial bills blank; 
bar silver. 6'2Hc: Mexican dollars. 48>/ic. 
Government bonds firm; railroad bonds 
easy. 

liOBdOB Stoclu. 

London, Sept. 10. — American securi- 
ties opened steady today. During the 
first hour Canadian Pacific eased off. 
but the rest of the list advanced on 
light buying. At noon prices ranged 
from V4 above to »4 below yesterday's 
New York closing. 

• 

Cotton Market. 

New York, Sept. 10. — The cotton mar- 
ket opened steady at an advance of 
4 points to a decline of 3 points. The 
general list eased off to e net loss 
of about 8 to 11 points after the call 
but after this decline there was more 
active covering. The market toward 
the end of the first hour became a little 
steadier on apprehensions that the gulf 
storm might bring driving rains Into 
the Carollnas and Georgia 

closed (lulet; middling uplands, 
- 11.90; sales, 8 



_ as the 
13,68«.000 bu, 

acre she will 

rve"age""of ^nearer" to 10 

wouTd^make the total 



the 

It 

an 

bu, which 

more than 17,- 



middling gulf, 
closed 



SELL TO ARRIVE ON BULGES 

C. C. WYMAN & CO. 




fiRAIN COMMISSION 



MINNEAPOLIS 



MINNEAPOLIS MARKET. 

Wheat Prices Atlvance on Study of 
Government Report. 

Minneapolis. Minn., Sept. 10.— The 
government report on spring wheat 
was not as bearish as generally ex- 
pected, and prices early today ad- 
vanced sharply. Later there was a re- 
cession but just before the close there 
was another advance. September closed 
\c higher than yesterday; December 
l®.l»,*c higher and May l@l»fcc higher. 
Local elevator stocks of wheat de- 
creased 300.000 bushels for three days. 

Cash wheat In good demand, market 
steady. No. 1 northern sold l®2V4c 
above September. „,-, ^ T^*■ 

Mlllstuffs — Shipments, 2,634 tons. De- 
mand active. a oc»/ .. 

Wheat— Septemb/r. rponed, 85 %c, 
high. 86c; low, 85(&/85^c; clo.sed, SSi^c. 
December, opened, 87'^®87%c; high, 
88»s(&!»8'/4c; low, 87Vic; cloM-d, 88 %c. 
May, opened. 92 He; high. 13 He; low. 



Spot 
11.65; 

Futures closed easy. Closing bids: 
September. 11.04: October, 11.40; No- 
aepieiii ^^ ^^ December, 11.34; Jan- 

11 22; February. 11.28; March, 
Mav, 11.46; July. 11.49. 



vember. 

uary, 

11.36; 



POLICEMAN AND 
NEGRO FIGHT 

■I I '' 

Minneapolis. Minn., Sept. 10.— (Spec- 
ial to The Herald.)— While a crowd of 
excited neighbors stood outside. Patrol- 
man A H. Waldorf, early today Jumped 
into the dark basement of the home of 
J S Bell, prendent of a large flour 
mlllcompanv. and shot a n^sro who he 
^ald was looting the place The Bell 
familv Is at Lake Mlnnetonka. 

A sneclal watchman first saw a light 
m the house and called Waldorf, who 
without hesitation engaged with the 
negro, who Is known to the police as 
William Nelson. According to Wal- 
dorf Nelson drew a knife, and In or- 
der to protect bimsfelf he shot his as- 
sailant through the leg. Nelson Is in a 
local hospital under guaro. 



Adventure 

Ahmeek 

Algomah 

Allouez 

Amalgamated 

Arizona Commercial 
Butte & Ballaklava 
Butte & Superior.. 

Chlno 

Calumet & Arizona 
Calumet & Hecla. . . 

Centennial 

Copper Range 

Daly West 

East Butte 

Franklin 

Giroux 

Granby 

Greene Cananea • . 

Hancock 

Indiana 

Inspiration 

Isle Royale 

Keweenaw 

Lake 

La Salle 

Mayflower 

Mass 

Miami . . • •• 

Michigan 

Mohawk : " ' ' 

Nevada Consolidated 

Nlpissing 

North Butte 

North Lake 

Old Dominion 

Ojibway ■ 

Osceola ■ 

I'ond Creek 

Qulncy ■ 

Ray Consolidated • 

Shannon 

Shattuck ■ 

Shoe Machinery 

Superior & Boston 

Superior Copper 

Swift 

Tamarack 

Tuolumne 

U. S. Mining common . 

Utah Con 

Utah Copper 

Victoria 

Winona 

Wolverine ■ 

Zinc • • • • 

.rnllated Stocks — 

Arizona & Michigan .. 

Bay State Gas 

Begole 

Bohemia 

Boston Ely 

Cactus 

Calaveras •••••., 

Calumet & Corbln . . 

Chemung 

Chief Con. 

Corbln Copper 

Cortez 

Crown Reserve 

Davis Daly 

Doble 

Dome Extension 

First National . ... . • • • 

Goldfleld Consolidated 

Hollinger 

La Rose •••••. \ 

Mines Co. of America. . 

Montana 

New Baltic 

Ohio Copper 

Oneco •^•.•: 

Porcupine Gold 

Raven 

Kerr Lake .... 
South Lake ... 



• ••«•• 



8 

340 

6 

46 
87 V4 

6% 

3% 
47% 
42% 
80 
550 
20 
58V4 

4\4 
13% 
10% 

5% 
56% 

9% 
27 
18 

18% 
35 

1 
36 

6% 
13 

7 
29% 
2% 
67 

22% 
8% 

33% 
5 

60% 
4 
113 

20% 

88 

21% 

15 74 

22 

55 
1% 

46 
107% 

42 
2% 
4 

11% 

65% 
3 
4% 

92% 

31% 

6c 
22c 
1% 
3% 
1 

9c 
2% 

13-16 

90c 

90c 

3% 

2% 
12c 

7c 
2 1-16 

3% 
12c 

2% 

3 

2 

2% 
7 8c 

1% 
18c 
29c 

2% 

8% 



8% 
350 

5% 
46% 
87% 

5%. 

3% 
48 
43 



i In Europe 
close touch 
tant copper 
many years 
department 
als Selling 
ago, Mr. 
to study 
particularly 



555 
21 
59 

4% 
14 
11% 

5% 
57 

15-16 
27% 
18% 
18% 
35% 

1% 
36% 

6% 
13% 

7% 
29% 
2% 
68 

22% 
8% 

34 
6% 

61% 
4% 
114 

20% 

89 

22 

16 



recessions. , » » 

The following telegram was . 
by Gay & Sturgls from Boston: Fears 
of higher copper prices have 
pressed by S. S. Rosenstamm, 
^ - for four months and in 

with some of the impor- 
interests abroad. Through 
association with the sales 
of the United States Met- 
company, until five years 
Rosenstamm has been able 
the situation at close range, 
since he has re-entered 
the market In selling the Product of 
the Miami Copper company. The deal- 
ers handling finished copper products, 
said Mr Rosenstamm. "have for the 
past few years been buying on a hand 
to mouth basis as a result of which 
copper consumers have been buying 
their raw material in much the same 
manner. Now it appears that there 
has been better buying of copper at 
17%c than there was for. years when 
the metal was around the 12-cent 
mark. Consumption in the Un'ted 
States was never so large and in Eu- 
rope it is at top notch with no signs 
on either side of a let-up. One of 
the most striking occurrences in this 
connection that has come to my. notice 
has been the Inability of some of the 
foreign manufacturers. particularly 
those In England, to make deliveries. 
This has resulted in some instances In 
orders being placed In the United 
States by countries that would other- 
wise not enter this market for the 
particular class of goods sought. 

Closing quotations on the 
Stock exchange today were as 



made 

West 

No 

been 



Deaths and Funerals 



STAFFORD — Mrs. Victoria M. Stafford. 
38 years old, died this morning at 
St. Luke's hospital after a long ill- 
ness. She is survived by her hus- 
band and two children. She 
her home with her family at 29 
Quince street, Duluth Heights, 
funeral arrangements have 
made. , __ 

EILER — The funeral of Corwln W^. 
Eiler, 18 years old, son of A. W. Eiler 
of Proctor, who died yesterday morn- 
ing after a short illness, will be held 
at noon tomorrow from the residence 
at Proctor and at 2 oClock from the 
First Norwegian Lutheran church. 
Sixth avenue east and Fifth street. 
Interment will be at Forest Hill 
cemetery. 

KLOGH — The funeral of Andrew 
Klogh. 48 years old, 1726 New street 
who died Saturday at International 
Falls, and whose body was brought 
here yesterday, will be held at 2 
o'clock tomorrow afternoon from the 
Olson & Crawford undertaking 
rooms, 2118 West First street. Inter- 
ment will be at Park HIU cemetery. 



In IHemorlaai. 

ADAMS — In sad but loving remem- 
brance of my dear husband, Mose D. 
Adams, who departed this life three 
years ago today, Sept. 10, 1909. 

As the evening sun Is setting, 

Oftlmes. as I sit alone. 
In mv heart there comes a feeling. 



If my husband 
home. 
BY HIS BELOVED 
ADAMS. 



could only come 
WIFE. EMMA 



you leave us alone, 
uncle to cheer our 



lonely, the hours so 
you In the 



55% 

1% 
46% 
107% 
44 

2% 

4 
12 
65% 

3% 

5 
93 
31% 

15c 

23c 

1% 
3% 
1% 
12c 
3 1-16 
10c 
4 
1 15-16 
1 
1 

3% 
2 7-16 
37c 
16c 
2 6-16 
3% 
13c 
2% 
3% 
2% 
2% 
82c 
1% 
22c 
32c 
2% 
»% 



I.lMted SfookM — _ Bid. 

American Saginaw . . 

Butte-Alex. Scott 

Butte Ballaklava . . . 
Calumet & Arizona. 

Cactus 

Copper Queen 

Denn Arizona 

Duluth Moctezuma .. 

Giroux 

Greene-Cananea 

Keweenaw . . ■• 

North Butte 

Ojibway 

Red Warrior 

Savanna 

Shattuck 

Warren .... 

rnilsted Stocks — 

Butte & Ely -80 

Superior 47.75 



10.25 

3.12 

80.00 

.10 

.10 

5.50 

6". 37 
9.87 
1.00 
33.75 
4.00 
1.00 

22.06 



Duluth 

follows: 

Asked. 

$ 5.25 

10.75 

3.60 

■!i2 

.12 
6.00 
1.75 
5.50 
9.94 
1.12 
34.00 
4.25 
1.12 
2.50 



Father, oh. why did 
With no father or 

home? 
The days are so 

long. 
How we long to greet 

heavenly throng. _ _,_^ 

BY HIS DEVOTED DAUGHTER AND 
NIE CE. 1T)A AND IRENE ADAMS. 

MONUMENTS — W^e have our own quar- 
ries and factory. Let a Duluth concern 
do your work. Hundreds In stock. P. 
N Peterson Granite Co.. 230 E. Sup. St. 



MONUMENTS to order, direct frona 
Quarrv. no agents; you save 25 pet. 
Chas. Benson. 2301 W. 2d St. Lin. 334. 



Butte & 
Butte & 
Calumet 
Calumet 
Calumet 
Carman . • 
Chief Cons 
Cliff 



Superior, old. 
& Montana. 
& Corbln. .. 
& Sonora. . . 



4.77 



.St 

.85 



6.00 
.91* 



,12 

.10 
.12 
.48 
.94 
.87 



CARD OF THANKS. 

WE WISH TO THANK OTTR FRIENDS 
and especially the ladies' aid and 
mission societies, the employes or 
the Clyde Iron Works and Qiiayle- 
Larson Co. and the Eintracht ^ erein 
for the beautiful floral offerings and 
also the kindness and sympathy 
shown us during the illness 
reavement of our wife a ._ 

ALBERT WENDT AND FAMILY. 



and be- 

mother. 



0. A. HOFFMAN 

20s PALLADIO BLDO. 

STOCKS AND BONDS 

UNLIftTKD ftlCURltiKS. 



OorrespondcBce 



lavtted. 



GAY & STURGIS 

BANKBB9 AJWD BROKBRS. 
S20 West Sopertor Street. 

Members New York and Bo«to« 
Stock Exchaasesi. 

sveciAL. ATTENTION TO L.OCAI. 

B. T. GOODEI.U W. J. NORTH, 
RealdcBt Her. 



Asa*t. ataaaser. 



Bostoa. 
New York, 
Chlcaso. 



Frlvate WIrea te 
Honsktoa* 
Calnmett 
Baacock. 



PAINE, WEBBER & COMPANY 



Members 



BANKERS AND BROKERS. 
New York Stodc Ezcbaase, Bostoa Stock 



M. J. 



SPECIAL 
O'BRIEN, Ilealdent 



, „»..». Bxch«»»e, Cklcas* 

Board of Trade. 
ATTENTION TO LOCAL CURB STOCKS. 

PATTERSON, Aaa*t. Realdeat Her. 



Mmr. JOS. R. 




.: i 



i 



»». 



-^< 











lllfflfg* I 




Tuesday, 



THE DULUTIH HERALD 



September 10, 1912. 



n 



/ 4 



• ■■■ 



Your Classified Ad 



Howev^i' Smallf Is Never **Lost 
in This Paper*' Simply Because it 



ClassiRed 1 



SKenabec countiea. in tr u 
acres ami up. as low in 
IK IS per aero. Also some v. 



FARM AND FRUIT LANDS. 

* t 

# FOR SALJL « 

» f 

fjm, I— ■ ■■■■iiMitiiii TV 

S 

# Wo have over 100.000 acres of # 
!^ fln© farmlns land In I^V"** ^l*;^! % 

1 A- 

Improved farm-* at iow l""'. ' * 

it easy terms. Now (, rfel>tonu>tr> is -^ 

# one of Ihe be=»t months for looking if 

# at land 
# 
# 

"mr 

lAw 
iflr 

« 

HOME? 
friie American Immigration Co. offer.1 
unitaralleled opportunity in the grea^ 

land " " *-' 'f the Round Lako 

count acres: fine land, rich 
•ol! : itj.. a i-i »eitlemt?nt In the heart 
of Wisconsin choice hardwood landa; 
•aar terms. S«e their reprt-aentativd, 
F. L. Lli^VY, 
510 Torrey Buiklinff^ 

VoR s-Ar,;K 
Sr - 



C. II. CORDON & CO.. 
607 Torrey Bids. 



1 1 

r- 
a<.' 



^ 

FOR 

fa :i 

a; 

ft- 
f- 

Tt 

c •..„■■ ■ 
I', Liii'son 
Minn 



1i»-ACRE FARM AT 

4t) rods from state 

ed. 4 acres potatoe.^', 

IV. house, barn, well, sur- 

- i.foperty hold at 1150 p^r 

!i no Improvements; $2,600 

2*i to 10 acre tracts on 

:oad3. $100 to $150 per acre; 

t*.rma. William C. Sargent. 20» 

:ulldln«. 



s-O Ft S V L K — S K V EN T Y - AC R E FARM; 
,..;., ' • ■ T. ^ir DuUith; twenty- 

« d; fair buildlniars; 



f. 
f. 
r 
!■ 
\ 
1 




ADDITIOHAL WANTS 
ON PAGE 18. 

FOR RENT-^EOUSES. 



* ' — *-- 1215 * 



*. 10-room modem house at 

if East First street: large yard * 

^ and garage; very 

■^ rental. 



attractive if 



# 6-room house, with water, seyyer if 

# and electric llnjht. 711 West * 

# Third street; $16. * 



BARGAINS 

IN 

USED PIANOS. 



if Very desirable 8-room house, with ie 
if a large, fine yard; premLses are if 
iL in first-class condition: walking if 
*. distance; 713 East Third street; if 
if rental $30. * 

if Sixteenth avenue east and First •^ 
* ' ■ ■' " 



FOR SALE MISCELLANEOUS. 

it * 

Hi 

# 

# One Stelnway & Sons, wal- * 

if nut case $198.00 * 

if One B. Shonlnger, mahog- * 

^ any case HliZ'S^ 

if One Remington, oak case.. 75.00 * 
if One Dyer Bros., oak case.. 12j.00 * 
if One Hunter & Co., ebonized * 

^ case 75.00 '^f- 

# One Everett, ebony case... 85.00 ■^• 
iir One Vose & Sons, walnut *■ 



street, very desirable 10-room * 
modern house; fine neighbor- * 
hood; excellent car service; * 
house is in ttrat-clasa condition; * 
rental $40. * 

* 10-room modern brick house at if 
*■ 1228 East First street; steam tf 
if heat, water and Janitor service if 

* furnished. See us about this. # 
if> Rental very attractive. * 

i^ * 

■if 519 Eighth avenue east, rental ^ 

^ only $16 for a 6-room house. * 

with water, sewer and electric if 



PRIVATE HOSPITAL. 

^KrVATE^^Hr^PITAL^^^^^ROSPBCT^ 
mothers will And a pleasant home 
before and during confinement at 
Ashland Maternity home, Ashland. 
Wis. Infan ts cared for. 

Private home before and during con- 
finement; best of care by professional 
nurse; babies also cared for Mar- 
garet Flnkle. Call Melrose 2454. 214 
Ninth avenue east. . 



WANTED TO BUY. 



MRS. HANSON. GRADUATE MID- 
wife; female complaints. 413 bevenin 
avenue eas t. Zenith 1225. 

PRIVATE HOME FOR LADIES DUR- 
Ing confinement: expert care: infants 
cared for. Ida Pearson, M. D., 284 
Harrison avenue, St. Paul. 



* 



-\ FEW SELECTED 

I.Hanti. Kanabec. Chisago 

lutiiities: running in size 

acres, at from $:1;» to 

:; the Great Northern 

.1 imluth: don't fall to 

• .some of them. The L. 

Land Agency. Braham. 



light 



W. M. PRINDLE & CO., 



* 
o * 

* 

* Main Floor. Lonsdale Bldg. * 

* Melrose 2400. Grand 2j9. # 

* . ■?♦ 



case 155.00 * 

* 



HOWARD. FARWELL & CO., 

OLDEST RELIABLE PIANO 

DEALERS, 

120 East Superior St. 

WILBUR J. ALLEN. 
Manager. 



Private home for ladles during con- 
finement. Mrs. Mary Barrell. nurse, 
3510 Woodland avenue. Grand 370-Y. 



Mrs E. Nlvela. midwife and private 
home for ladles. 328 South Sixty- 
third Ave. W. Telephone Cole 31C-D. 

Mrs. H. Olson, graduate midwife— Pri- 
vate hospital, 329 North Flfty-clghth 
avenue west. Cole 173^ 

LYDIA LEHTONEN. MIDWIFE, 2406 
West Second St. 'Phone Lincoln 475-A. 



WANTED TO BUY— ON EASY PAY- 
ments, modern 5 to 10-room. central 
house; state location, „Pr*ce and 
t erms In first letter. R 395, Herald. 

WANTED TO BUY— SECOND-HAND 
roll top desk, three-foot; in good con- 
dition. Address, stating price, fci. K. 
H.. Herald. 

WANTED TO BUY — SECOND-HAND 
furniture and stoves. Joe Popkin. Z» 
West First str eet: Grand 253-X. 

WANTED TO BUY— A FIRST-CLA.SS 
base-burner; must be in good shape. 
Address Z 506 Herald. ^ 

WANTBD TO BUY* — A LARGE OR 
Bmall tract of land for investment. 
I 69. He rald. ^ 

WANTED TO BUY— HOUSE AND LOT 
at West Duluth on easy, terms. Mc- 
Donald. 201_ExchaTige_^ulldln^^ 

WANTED TO BUY — TRACT OF TIM- 
ber within few miles of railroad. X 
340. Herald. 

H POPKIN BUY.«5 SECOND-HAND 
'stoves and furniture. Lincoln 29o-X. 



^Jg^iW^'Jg^g^^^^^^^^-;^-^^^ 



;.ii-v-la3» soil; good 
m at $2,700; adjoin- 
i* twice thl.s amount. 

,■ .■•..i..iny, an Torrey 
I 



fiii« - 
and : 
me kt! 

over. 



Ed. 



-rHEAP. 160 ACRES GOOD 
^ situated in St. Louis 
f Cook. Minn. This ia a 
^oli; hou.-ie. barn and well 
ea under ctiltlvation. Let 
when you will look this 
Hurlbut. Gilbert. Minn. 



"Say, brother, I'm afraid grub is going up!' 



Foil SALE — HOMESTEAD RELIN- 
ouiahment; forty acres fine land. 5 Vis 
miles from town. Write Box 99, Casa 
Lake. Mrnn. 



FOR f^.M.E- 

a- 

1;: 

bvv^; lii". 

Write A 



-FARM LANDS IN PIERCE 

•' counties between new 

. tnd Great Northern; are 

■•t. in North Dakota. 

.es. Esmond. N. D. 



WE BUY AND SELL FARM AND 

timber lar.d.-s; locate gov. cla-ims. Kjo- 

Btad & Le Sai?-. 401 Palladio building. 



FOR SALE— l::') ACRES; COOK COL N- 
tv river running through land close 
to railroad. Address C 441. Herald. 



BUSINESS CHANCES. 

» A GOOD BUSINESS CH^VNCE * 

# I 

# For first-class ahoe repairer with *■ 

# a few hundred dollars to buy a * 

# complete quick shoe repair outfit; if 
^ good location; doing a fine busl- * 

# neaa. Call or write * 

# 

£ p. E. BLODGETT & CO.. 

H 20 West Superior St. 



SITUATION W.INTED— MALE. 

SITUATION WANTEI>— YOUNG NOR- 
wegian, 24. business college grad- 
uate, speaking and writing perfect 
German and good English, with a 
number of years" experience as book- 
keeper and general office clerk, also 
as reporter for a mercantile agency, 
both In Norway and Germany; six 
months in this country; desires occu- 
pation by reliable concern in this 
city; any capacity; .salary moderate. 
Address Y 444. Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED— FEMALE. 

SlTUATIO>P~\V ANTED— COMPETENT, 
reliable stenographer wi.shes to make 
change; can furnish first-class ref- 
erences; four years' experience. Ad- 
dress L. A- M., care of Herald^ 



SITUATION WANTED — DRAUOHT3- 
man desires position in Duluth or vi- 
cinity; long experience, chiefly me- 
chanical, some structural. C. H. 
Rtchter. 324 Kedzle avenue. Chicago. 
111. ^ 



SITUATION WANTED — YOUNG MAN 
with a stenographic and business 
experience would like a position at 
once, as stenographer or office as- 
Blstant. Address Z 493. Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED BY ENGIN- 
eer holding .second-class papers; am 
total abstainer and reliable; position 
In city preferred. Address U 3(>6, 
Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED— BY SCANDIN- 
avlan woman of middle age. a place 
as housekeeper; has 3-year-old boy 
whom she wishes with her. 1002 
Bay stree t. Superior. Wis. 

SITUATION WANTED — WASHING, 
ironing or cooking by the day by 
competent woman. 1718 West Second 
street. A. Erlckson. 

SITUATION WANTED— COMPETENT 
stenographer wishes extra typewrit- 
ing, copying, etc.. to do at homa 
evenings; neat work guaranteed. 
Add ress W 434. Herald. 

SITUATION WANTEI>— BY EXPERI- 
enced head waitress, out of town. 
Address B. E. Olson, Gen. Del.. Du- 
luth, 



^ HOUSES. Hi 

if it 

if For rent — 8-room detached house, if 

if 29 West Second street; will be if 

if put In good condition; rent $45. if 

if 'dp 

if For rent — 10-room modern house, if 

if 413 Fourth avenue east; good * 

if condition; $*5. * 

if * 

^ 10-room house. 2014 East First * 

if street; modern and in good con- # 

if dition; will rent this partly fur- iif 

if nlshed for $50 or unfurnishea *' 

* for $45. * 

if 7P 

* New. thoroughly modern, 11-room if 



* I 

% FOR SALE. * 

if * 

if During our recent sale we found if 
if It necessary to take In several or- * 
if gans and pianos, and to make *• 
if room for a large shipment of baby # 
if grands we will let these pianos * 
* and organs go at cost of repairing * 



if and drayage. 
* 



STORY & CLARK PIANO CO., 

426 West First Street. 

Opposite Postoffice. 



FOR SALE— REAL ESTATE. 

FOR SALE— 45x100 FOOT LOTS ON 
Twentieth avenue east and Slxtn 
street; prices arvd terms right;, best 
residence location In the East end. 
A. H. Burg & Co.. 300 Alworth Bldg, 



FOR SALE— 2% -ACRE LOT AT WOOD- 
land. $176. Whitney Wall company. 



LITMAN BROS. BUT SECOND-HAND 
stoves and furniture. Both 'phones. 

FOR RENT— COTTAGES. 

FOR RENT— FIVE -ROOM MODERN 
cottage, except heat. 1116 East Fifth 
street. Rent. $22. 

FOR RENT— FOUR-ROOM COTTAGH: 
modern; central. $12.50 per month. 
See janitor. Chatham flats. No. 10 
East Second street 



SITUATION WANTED — PRACTICAL 
nurse wishes position with family 
going south for winter. Address D 
383, Herald. 



semi-detached brick house. 1905 if 
East Third street; hot water if 
heat, two bathrooms; rent $65. if 

* 
— — * 



JOHN A. STEPHENSON & CO., 
Wolvln Building. 



HOUSES. 



ifi^^f^6^^^i6^fi(^i6if^^^ 

^. FOR SALE. ff 

if Garland piano in good condition; * 
•i regular price $275; for quick sale •» 
if $80. Payments as low as $1 «;er * 
■^ week accepted. * 

-it- TERRY & ,GILIUSON, f 

# 405 Central avenue. West Duluth. * 
if Minn. ye 

if 'Phone Cole 100 or Calumet 109-L. # 



miM 





if FOR SALE CHEAP. * 

if * 

if $150 marble base, three-seat shin- if 

if Ing stand, complete; good as new. *■ 

if, ie 

if F. E. BLODGETT & CO., * 

if 20 West Superior St ^ 



* 

Br -•■-:—-.> V ri.iN*;BS— FOR SALE. 
t a bargian; good barn for 
4.; n.ad; also seven-room hous^e: 32 
milk cows, horse, wagon, sleigh and 
outfit- r ' raving milk route. Will 
S.11 €■•■ I'Mit building if de- 
sire-l. iin,. averuie west and Tenth 
street. __^_ 

feri='IN*KrtS CHANCES — F«>R SALE— 
Rooniins? house, central. Third .street; 
big • maker for price; $400. See 
tia , •. as owner must sell. Du- 
luth Realty Co. 608 I^rst National 
Bank building 



SrrUATION W.VNTED — STENOGRA^ 

pher desires position; high school 

.and business college training; good 

writer; excellent references. G 507. 

Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED — A STEADY 
and reliable engineer having first- 
clasa papers would like to have fur- 
naces to look after . N 440. Herald. 

MAN 

after 



SITUATION WANTED — GOOD SEAM- 
stress would like sewing by the day. 
Call 1608 Melrose. 



SITUATION WANTED — STENOGRA- 
pher wishes position; experienced. 
Odgen. 858 -D. 



631 West First St. 6 room* $25.00 

19 South 17th ave. E, 8 rooms... 32.50 

701 West 2nd St. 10 rooms 50.00 

1414 East First «t., » rooms 85.00 

FLATS. 

925 E. Fifth St.. 5 rooms ^^^■^'{ 

1510 London road. ^5 rooms t!i „„ 

519 East Superior St., 5 roonns... 17.00 

For complete list call 165, either j 
'phone. 

STRYKER. MANIvEY & BUCK, 
Torrey Building. 



WHERE TO GET WHAT YOU WANT 

EACH FIRM A LEADER IN ITS LINE 

Consult this list before placing your order, if you want 
the best at a price you like to pay. 



AWNINGS, TENTS, PACKSACKS. 

POIRIER TENT & AWNING CO.. 413 
East Supe rior street. Both phones. 

The awning specialists Duluth Tent 
& Awning company. 1608 W. Sup. St 



ACCOUNTANT. 



SITUATION WANTED — OLD 
would like position to look 
steam boiler. T 451, Herald. 



toR RENT— 38-ROOM ROOMING AND 
boarding house, newly painted and 
papered; completely furnished; will 
Bfll f'lrnlture cleap; 25 steady board- 
ers r .-'US well filled. Call or writs 
M.S. Ral-ston. 122 E. First St, Duluth. 



yor: 



.S.VLK— ESTABLLSHED DRESS- 

■-' business cheap; nets $100 

>nth; four furnished rooms in 

■ • the rent; wilt sell furnl- 

•^ four rooms, two machines 

au,i !:;irror if desired. P 218. Herald. 



MONEY TO LOAN. 

f^ .SPECIAL RATE LOANS. # 

% These payments pay both interest if 

if and principal. # 

* YOU MAKE YOUR OWN TERMS. * 

* $10— Pveturn $0.45 wkly; $1.80 m.ly if 
^ $20— Return $0.90 wkly; $3.60 m'ly * 
^ $30- Return $1.33 wkly; $5.40 m;iy # 

* $50— Return $2.25 wkly; $900 ra ly * 
if other amount.s In proportion. •» 
S DULUTH FINANCE CO., * 

* 301 Palladio Bldg. • # 



rOR RENT— BEST EQUIPPED BUTCH- 
er shop, between two grocery stores: 
tile and marble trimming; swell show 
window with ice tank, will make rent 
very reasonable to right party. Call 
ICCW West First street 



BUSINESS CHANCtLS— FOR SALE IN 
West end. First-class tiiree-chah 
barber shop, two pool tablesj and 
three baths; doing good business: 
< .■ ■, if taken at once. Inquire 420 
N ••; Fifty-seco nd avenue west. 

We Imv and sell rooming houses, hotel-^, 
confectionery and grocery stores and 
every other kind of busines-s. See us, 
DULUTH BUSINESS EXCH.VNGE. 

509 Torrey Bui lding. 

BUSINESS CHANCES — FOR SALE— 
Hotel with thlrty-.slx sleeping rooms, 
all furnished; one block from .lepots. 
Address J. Baur, W'alker Hou.se. 
Ironwood, Mich. 



$11) TO $100. $10 TO $100. $10 TO $100. 

ON FURNITURE. PIANOS OR SALARY. 

At charges honest peoplo can pay. 

No red tape. No delay. _ 

WEEKLY OR MONTHLY PAYMENTS 

Arranged to suit your Income. 

DULUTH LOAN COMPANY. 

307 Columbia Bldg. -503 W. Sup. St 

Open every day and Wed. & Sat, evgs. 



LACE CURTAINS neatly laundrled. 3ao 
to 40c per pair Mrs. Wild, Lincoln 
137-A: 2723 West Michigan street. 

SITUATION WANTED — WASHING. 
ironing and and cleaning by the day. 
2132 Vi West .Second street. 

SITUATION WANTED^BY COLORED 
girl. 18 years, position as waitress or 
maid. Call Melrose 4302. 



SITUATION WANTED— PLACE TO DO 
general housework by young girl. 
Call 3815 We.st Fifth street 



SITUATION WANTED — AS HOUSE- 
keeper. Call 112 First avenue east 



WE LOAN ON ALL KINDS OF PER- 
Bonal security at lowest rates. Call 
on us. 430 Manhattan Bldg., and get 
rates. Duluth Mortgage Loan Co. W. 
Horkan. N ew 150S-D; Melrose 3733. 

MONEY FOR SALARIED PEOPLE AND 
others upon the'r own names; cheap 
rates, easy payments; confidential. 
D. H. Tolman. 510 Palladio building. 



HORSES, VEHICLES, ETC. 

JJ5rses! ^'mul^T'"''"'"^iorsesI 
barrett & zimmerman's 
midway horse market, 
the largest in america. 

500 to 800 head of horses and mules 
constantly on hand; fresh horses arriv- 
ing from the country every day. If you 
need draft hor-ses, general purpose 
hores. delivery horses, or horses and 
mules for railroad construction we can 
fill your order. Private sales dally. Part 
time given if desired. See our horses 
before you buy. We can save you money. 
BARRETT & ZIMMERMAN'S 
MIDWAY HORSE MARKET, 
ST. PAUL. MINN. 



if FOR RENT. * 

?f 310 Fourteenth Ave. E., 5 rooms. * 
if bath; $15. ^ * 

if 1218% East Fourth St.. 6 rooms; * 
a- water and sewer; $15. "» 

# 1303 >^ Lake Ave. S.. 5 rooms; $1L # 
*. 1820 West Second St.. 6 rooms; * 
*. heated, all conveniences; $36. * 
if 1007 East Second St, 9 rooms; all * 
i conveniences; $40. w 

# N. J. UPHAM CO., * 

# 18 Third Avenue West *• 



FOR RENT. 



MONEY TO LOAN ON DIAMONDS, 
watches, furs and all griods of value. 
$1 to $1,500. Keystone Loan & Mer- 
cantile company. 22 West Superior St 



REAL ESTATE LOANS. 



WE HAVE FUNDS 



* 



* 



HORSES! 100 HORSES' 

Drafters, delivery, farm horses and 
mares. Fine drivers and ponies. Our 
prices are the lowest; i)art time 
given. We buy. sell and exchange 
horses, wagons and harness. 

RUNQULST & CO., 
.Sale stable. 209 West First street. 



5 rooms. 26 Seventh Ave. W . . 
5 rooms, 16 Seventh Ave. W. . 

7 rooms, 529 Vi E. Superior St. 

8 rooms, 309 W. Fourth St... 

8 rooms. 412 Sixth Ave. W 

8 rooms, 811 E. First St 



R. B. KNOX & CO., 
Exchange Bldg. 



.$22.50 
. 25.00 
. 20.00 
. 30.00 
30.00 
. 37.50 



FOR SALE — POOL AND BILLIARD 
tables. Large stock of new and sec- 
ond-hand billiard and pool tables; 
also bar fixtures, show cases, tables, 
chairs and refrigerators: time pay- 
ments. Write for catalogue. Merle 
& Heaney Manufacturing company. 
621-623 Third street south. Miune- 
apolls. 

FOR SALE— FURNITURE FROM OUR 
Grand Rapids. Mich., and Rockford. ■ 
IIL. factories, sold and delivered di- 
rect to you from our Duluth show- 
rooms, 2201 West First street Car- 
loads Just received. You don't pay- 
retail prices and your credit O. K. 
Cameron, factory distributor. 



MATTESON & MACGREGOR 

PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS AND 

AUDITORS. 

Business Counselors and Systematlzers. 

702-703 Alworth Bldg.. 

•Pho nes: Melrose, 4700; Grand, 7L 

g M. LESTER. 412 PROVIDENCE 
"building. Both 'phones. 862. 



ACCOUNTANT— F. D. HARLOW 405 
Lonsdale building. Melrose 1208^ 



FLORIST. 

Dul. Floral Co., wholesale, retail cut 
flowers: funeral designs. 121 W. Sup. 

GRADING, SODDING & SEEDING. 

THE BEST BLACK DIRT AND SANDY 
loam for sale. H. B. Keedy, 1711 
London road. Both phones. 



FOR SALE. 
Street car bodies, suitable for camp- 
ers or homecrofters, in perfect condi- 
tion, with or without heating plant 
DULUTH MACHINERY CO.. 
Third Avenue East and M'cblican 
Street 



FOR S.\LE— IF YOU'RE LOOKING 
through this column for bargains, 
place your order now with the East 
End Furniture store, 228 E. Superior 
St for good furniture. Compared with 
other stores we save you 100 per cent 



WAGONS— CUTTERS — SLEIGHS. 
Complete line always on hand; bar- 
gains in grocers' and butcher.s' wag- 
ons. Write for catalogue. L. Hammel 
Co.. 302-308 East Ftr.st street. Duluth. 



FOR SALE— BAY HORSE; W^EIGHT 
1,420 pounds; 10 years old. 20 West 
Third street. Call between 6 and 7:30 
p. m. 



Business Chances — For rent — Brick 
building on Garfield avenue, equipped 
for picture shows or can be used for 
ni eat market or grocery. Grand 2201-Y 

BUSINESS CHANCES — FOR S.XLE- 

*^Small confectionery and groc^^ry 
store. Inquire 103 West Second 
street. , . 

FOR .«ALE— GROCERY .STORE, VERY 
well located. Call at once. ^Clarke- 
Wertln company. 200 Alworth bulld- 
tng. . 

BU.SIXESS CHANCES — FOR SALE-- 
ILirdvvare fixtures and tin shop; good 
l ocation. C 445. Herald. 

FOR RENT— MODERN 32-ROOM HO- 
tel; steam heat. Inquire 1029^4 West 
M ichigan street. 

BUSINESS CHANCES — FOR SALE— 
Grocery stock and fixtures. 106 West 

First .street. 



if On hand that we can loan at 5 per # 
ii- cent on select real estate security. •* 
4 NO DELAY. •» 

$ F. I. SALTER COMPANY. * 

i(t 302-3 Lon.sdale Bldg. «^ 

* * 



RENTAL AGENCIES. 



FLATS. 

4 rooms. 104 S. 39th Ave W $9 00 

4 rooms. 121 19th Ave. W 16.00 



HOUSES. 



WE HAVE ON HAND A LARGE 
amount of money which we are loan- 
ing out on Improved real estate; low 
rate; prompt and efficient service; 
no delay. C. L. Rakowsky & Co.. 201 
Exchange building. 



CITY AND VILLAGE LOANS IN MIN- 
nesota. Buy or build a home on 
monthly payments. C. A. Knippen- 
bcrg. 300 Alworth Bldg. 'Phones 597. 
Grand and Fifty-sixth avenues west 

WE WRITE INSURANCE IN STRONG 
companies, make city and farm loans. 
and solicit some of your business. 
Wm. C. Sargen t. 208 Exchange Bldg. 

MONEY TO LOAN ON REAL ESTATE 
security No delay. S. S. William- 
son. 515 Torrey building. 



FOR S-\LE — BIG B.^Y MULE; SOUND 
as a dollar; cheap. The Radford com- 
pany. 



FOR SALE— $65 TAKES HORSE AND 
buggy. Call at 625 Second avenue 
east. 



FOR SALE — 40 horses; all sizes. 28 
E. 1st St. Weatern Sales Stable Co. 



FOR SALE— 30 HORSES AT ZENITH 
.Sale & Boarding stable. 524 W. 1st. St 



FOR RENT — FOUR.- ROOM HOUSE; 
water, sewer and electric light; ha-^d- 
wood floors. $il per month. 316 Va 
West Fourth atreet Inquire 31b 
West Fourth strget downstairs. 

FOR RENT — THIRTEEN-ROOM 
house, suitable for boarding or lodg- 
ing house, 532 West First street. In- 
quire 501 West Michigan street 

FOR RENT— ELEVEN-ROOM MOD- 
ern house. 1905 East Third street 
Apply 1901 East Third street. Mel- 
rose 2374. 



FOR RENT— HOUSE. 1915 WAVERLY 
avenue. Glen Avon. Inquire Mrs. 
John Macleod. at house or 600 Torrey 
building. 



FOR RENT— IN LAKESIDE OCT. 1. 
thoroughly modern six-room house; 
can be seen any time. 4123 Robinson 
street. 



FOR SALE— SLIGHTLY USED AND 
rebuilt typewriters: prices from $20 
up. Machines rented for $1.50 to $2.50 
a month; rental applied as payment 
Hersey & McArthur. 319 West First 
St. 'Phone, Mel. 3248; Grand 2054-Y. 

FOR SALE— THREE ORGANS AT $15 
each; one Kanich & Bach piano, $70; 
one Hazelton piano, good as new, 
$225. J. F. Weismiller, 203 East Su- 
perior street 

FOR SALE— CHEAP, ONE SET STOD- 
dard lectures, oak sideboard, oak 
dresser and Edison phonograph. Call 
Calumet 80-U 



AUCTIONEER. 

Cash for stocks or will auction It for 
you. Harry Sliver, auctioneer. In- 
quire at St. James Jewelry Co.. Duluth. 



CARPENTER REPAIR W ORK. 

Remodeling or repairing work done 
neatly. Call Aug. Anderson. Mel. 4958. 



Work done neatly. O. Pearson. 207 W. 
1st St Zenith 1274-X. or Park 97. 

CARPET CLEANING WORKS. 

INTERST.A.TE CARPET CLEANING CO. 
L. Slnotte, Prop., compressed air and 
vacuum cleaners and rug weavers. 
1928 West Michigan St Both 'phones. 



FOR SALE — Second hand woodworking 
machinery, portable sawmills, trans- 
mission appliances, pipes for steam, 
water and furnaces. Duluth Mach Co. 



For Sale — Get a typewriter for 17 cents 
a day; all makes at greatly reduced 
prices. Edmont 330 W. Superior St 



FOR SALE — FURNITURE OF FIVE- 
room apartment, bought new in 
July. Melr ose 5187. Grand 1445-A. 

FOR SALE — GAS RANGE; USED 
three months. 1517 East Fourth 
street. 



CLAIRVOYANT-HAIR SPECIALIST 

Mrs. Anna, clairvoyant In Bryant & 
Co.'s hair-growing parlors. who 
grows a head of hair or no pay. Odd 
Fellows' hall. Lake avenue, Mel. 1145 

CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

Duluth Engineering Co., W. B. Patton, 
Mgr., 613 Palladio bldg. Specifications 
prepared and construction superin- 
tended for waterworks, sewerage, etc 



HAT SHOPS. 

Hats cleaned and blocked, equal new. 
Union Hat Shop. 28 Lake ave. north. 

JANITOR & WINDOW-WASHER. 



PUBLIC JANITOR AND WINDOW 
washer. Prudence Robert, the best 
new window-cleaner in tlie city. Mel. 
4196, Grand 2285-Y. 120 Pioneer blk. 



KEY, LOCK AND SAFE WORKS. 

LXwrT'^ioW^Rs'^SHAjLpSNEDr'cEJ^ 
tral repair shop, 115 W. Michigan St. 



MUSICAL LNSTRUMENTS. 



A. Haakonsen. dealer 
and expert repairer, 
at J. W. Nelson' 3. 5 
East Superior street. 



BOSTON MUSIC CO.. MUSICAL MER- 
chandise. 6 and 8 West First street 




MUSIC LESSONS. 



VIOLIN. MANDOLIN. BANJO. GUITAR. 
18 Lake avenue N. Prof. Robinson. 



CHEMIST AND ASSAYER. 



Duluth Testing laboratory. C. A. Graves. 
Mgr. Assays, chemical analyses, ce- 
ment tests, Edison Bldg. 214 W. 1st 



FOR RENT— EIGHT- ROOM HOUSE; 
all modern Improvements. 931 East 
Fifth street Inquire 929 East Fifth 
street. 



FOR RENT — GOOD EIGHT-ROOM 
warm and plea.sant furnished house. 
418 Fifteenth avenue east. 



FOR RENT — SIX-ROOM MODERN 
house. Park Point Edmont 330 West 
Superior street. 



TIMBER LANDS. 



FOR .SALE— WE BUY AND SELL 
mining and timber lands, improved 
farm lands in Minnesota. Montana 
and North Dakota, home.steads, tim- 
ber claim.H, farm loans. Barney Eden, 
407 Manhattan building. 



MONEY TO LOAN— LO.\NS MADE ON 
timber and farm lands. John Q. A. 
Crosby. 305 Palladio building. 



Money to Loan — Low rates, no delay. 
Duluth Realty Co.. 1st National Rldg. 



Ifi.OO 
20.00 
35.00 
45.00 



7 rooms, 161S Piedmont Ave... 

« rooms, 1713 Jefferson St 

6 rooms. 807 Park place 

9 rooms, 107 8th Ave. W..- 

8 rooms. 1610 E. Superior St 45.00 

10 rooms. 1431 E. 2nd St 65.00 

J. D. HOWARD & CO.. 

209-212 Providence Building. 
Melrose 193. Oraad 326. 



Money to Loan— Any amount; low rates. 
Cooley & Underbill. 209 Exchange. 



Loans on farm and city property. North- 
ern Title Co., First Nafl Bank Bldg. 



FOR RENT— BARNS. 



FOR RENT — BARN. 121 WEST 
Fourth street. Apply Martin Bugglo. 
Grand Union Tea Co. 



WANTED TO BUY— .STUMPAGE OR 
timber land within few miles of rail- 
road. J. A. F.. 5202 Ramsey street 
West Dul u til. Minn. 



TIMBER AND CUT-OVER LANDS 
bought; mortgage loans made. John 
Q. A. Crosby. 305 Palladio building. 



Padded vans for moving furniture. 
W'est Duluth & Duluth Transfer Co. 



FARM. TIMBER AND CUT-OVER 
lands bought and sold. F. B. Rossom. 
109 Manhattan building. 



FOR SALE— F:IGHTY ACRES TIMBEK. 
Apply box 244. Central avenue. Su- 
perior. Wis. 



NOTICE— I BUY AND SELL TIMBER 
stumpage. Ralph Banta. Brookston. 
Minn. 



I buy standing timber; also cut-over 
land* Geo. Rupley. 615 Lyceum Bldg. 



AUTOS, MOTORCYCLES, MOTOR- 
BOATS. 



TIRE REPAIRING ABSOLUTELY 
guaranteed; the oldest most reliable 
shop in town, Duluth Auto Supply Co. 
412-14 E. Superior. Zen. 2163-A; Mel- 
rose 4102. F. W^ Neuman. Mgr. 

Old auto tires bought; highest prices 
paid. Northwestern Iron & Metal Co.. 
17 E. 1st St., or Eighteenth avenue 
west and Railroad St. Either 'phone. 

BOATS BOUGHT 
Boat exchange 



For sale or rent very cueap, slightly 
used shot guns and rifles. J. W. 
N elson, S East Superior street 

FOR SALE — YOUR OLD STOVE 
taken in exchange on new heater or 
range at R. R. Forwaru & Co. 



FOR SALE— LADY'S-SEALSKIN JACK- 
et; size 36; very reasonable. Z 447. 
Herald. 



FOR SALE— COAL P^\NGE. $3; BRASS, 
bed and springs cheap. 412 East Fifth 
street 



FOR SALE — HOUSEHOLD FURNI- 
ture; party leaving city. 4405 Regent 
street 



FOR SALE— CHEAP— NEW METHOD 
kitchen gas stove. 1021 East Second 
street. 

FOR SALE— TWO ll-FtX)T FLOOR 
cases. Chamberlain-Taylor company. 



M 



SOLD. MOTOR 
Torrey building. 



FOR SALE — Phonograph parts; repair 
work done. E. T. Schlender, Mel. 2619. 



CIVIL ENGINEER & SURVEYORS. 

mCHOLS^jTlviRR^Lu'IlFMAN^^ 
tan Bldg. Anything in engineering. 



MOVING PICTlRfc SUPPLIES. 



9 



Theaters equipped from 
machine to screen; film 
service; moving picture 
machines. Second hand ma- 
chines sold cheap. Duluth 
Film Exch'ge, 107 2d av. W. 



Motion picture outfits bought and sold. 
•National" Co., 417 W. Michigan St 



CARD ENGRAVING AND STAMPS. 

Consolidated Stamp & Printing Co., 
Barker & Orr, props., 14 4th Ave. W 



DANCING ACADEMY. 

COFFIN — 25 Lake avenue north. Either 
'phone. Open afternoon and evening. 



DRESSMAKING SCHOOL. 

Miss Gray's school of garment cutting 
and making, also patterns cut to 
measure. 3rd floor of Geo. A. Gray Co. 



Standard School of Dressmaking, even- 
ing classes. 20 W. Sup. St Mel. 5019 



PHONOGRAPH